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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 11, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ a huge international relief effort is underway in the philippines after the monster typhoon haiyan devastated the pacific nation and thousands are dead and no food, water or shelter. after talks in geneva john kerry says the u.s. is skeptical about iran willingness to dismantle the nuclear problem and in italy a rise in cancer rates may be related to toxic dumping that has gone on for decades. and this veteran's day americans paused to reflect on the honor and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform. ♪
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emergency aid is being rushed to the philippines bringing desperately needed basic essentials to the victims of typhoon high, the record-breaking super storm destroyed villages and hundreds of thousands have no power, food, water or shelter and hospitals are over run and good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, the philippines red cross said 1200 people were killed in the storm but could top 10,000, slowly relief efforts are going to efforts caught off by bridges and roads and they reached the airport on sunday seeking supplies or a way out. a $2 million relief program from the united nation's food program is underway and the u.s. military sent marines for search and rescue efforts and al jazeera has more detail.
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>> three days after suffering one of the worst typhoons ever the devastation is coming into view. many of the hardest hit are unreachable and hard to say just how bad it really is. with a death toll expected to be in the thousands and impact felt by millions typhoon survivors desperate for help is trying to come to grips with the widespread disaster. >> translator: we almost drown. it's so difficult. we have nothing left. no place to sleep. not even dry clothes to wear. >> reporter: the sign is one of the few things left standing in the city as winds over 190 miles per hour ripped through homes and streets and knocking out all communication and structures. >> translator: we were in the gym which is supposed to be our evacuation center and it collapsed and we were running to save our lives.
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>> reporter: it's a city under a state of emergency and homeless residents are trying to find shelter where they can and widespread looting as people struggle for necessities like food and water. >> translator: i can't think. i don't know what to do. right now all we can do is survive the day but i don't know what will happen tomorrow or the day after that or if we can continue surviving. i really do not know. >> reporter: the extent of the devastation is making rescue and relief operations difficult and the roads on the badly effected islands are completely impassible and in some cases emergency personnel walk for hours bringing supplies to survivors. >> and also for those who have been confirmed so that is a concern but it's the needs of those who are injured. >> and the airport was battered and the runway was spared paving the way for a relief effort to
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get underway and in the city osaboo a cargo plane is loaded with rice, and food and those who survive the typhoon and bond for man la. >> if we are lucky they give us boarding pass we can go. but if not we cannot go. >> reporter: on sunday president obama expressed sadness for them and they landed in the philippines as part of an advanced team to determine what the pentagon may need and u.s. ships who help with search and rescue and the true horror is one item being asked for in large supply, body bags. i'm with al jazeera. >> reporter: as we just reported this is the scene of almost unmanageable destruction. and al jazeera's wayne is on the
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ground there and shows us how the storm has devastated the city. >> this building shows the devastation that the storm caused, a fairly large super market that collapsed in the strong winds and the storm surge when it hit on friday but it's also a good example of the desperation shown by the people and looting going on now and food from the super market has already been taken so people are now focusing on really whatever else they can get their hands on, picking through the remains of the super market trying to get their hands on whatever food or perhaps water that may remain in there and those are essential items that people are telling us they need and not quick enough from the government and military and that is food, water and shelter. if we come around here you can see some of the desperate situations they are in and finding what they can to shelter
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in and people wanting to leave because they are taking advantage of the military flights and getting out and the problem in the days and weeks ahead is health and bodies lying the streets in the city and sitting there uncovered, some have a sheet over them with a name scribbled on them and authorities are geting the bodies and taking them to a central location in the city and trying to identify them and once they have they are taking them to a mass grave for burial. >> reporter: and wayne is reporting from the city. joining us now, sorry, at the vatican pope francis led 10s of thousands in prayer because of the storm and urged them to send help and they have one of the world's largest catholic population and we have burn shell with the international federation of the red cross. mr. shell good morning and thanks for being with us, what is your current assessment of
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how many people and how devastating this storm has been? >> definitely we have more than one million families the effected by the storm, a huge number we have not seen here and never had a big disaster and we need an effort to supply people with food, water and shelter. >> you have staff on the ground and areas that were hit hard and what are they reporting back about conditions and about what people there need the most? >> mr. shell are you able to hear me? >> i hear you again. >> reporter: my question is what is your ground staff telling you about what people are in most need of and what the conditions are like on the ground? >> well, of course, it's needing food and water seems to be a little bit okay and shelter. and we are trying to push out
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really as much as possible on the supplies we have and we have to put and air lift this from the neighboring countries and we have a warehouse and takes time because of logistical contrains to bring it to the people. >> reporter: what will be happening in the next couple of hours and days for these recovery efforts, what is the first phase in other words? >> well, we are trying to reach them with all means we have. last night we had 15 trucks left from here and we have airplanes arriving tomorrow and trying to push out enough relief items in the next days and cover basic needs and probably we can go back to a more organized relief distribution if the first needs are covered. >> all right, burn shell with the international federation of
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the red cross in the philippines and the typhoon fell in vietnam but it was weaked and no major deaths and 600,000 people evacuated by haiyan hit and it was downgrade to a tropical storm as it entered southern china and for the track let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> this is the end of the system but causing a lot of damage before it was said and done and the philippines and moves into vietnam but less of a storm by the time it hit vietnam and not as much storm. and in the philippines we have disturbance in the south to bring rain and the original hit was much higher than this with the typhoon, so as that moved
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through or any rain at this point could cause problems because of people without homes and haiyan moved out for now, stephanie. >> something we have seen before with hurricanes in the u.s. is that the storm surge causes a lot of damage we see and was this a factor with typhoon haiyan as well? >> that is the flooding with the storm is what causes the largest loss of life and the storms are categorized based on wind look at storm surge too and not just a factor of how strong the winds and storms are but how big and how big of a wind field they are. looking at storms we had recently in the united states and right now it looks like it had a storm surge of different reports coming in but easily 16-18 feet or maybe as high as 20 feet or more when the data is collected we will know exactly. three people high a wall of water coming in. anyone near that is going to be
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washed out. looking at hurricane katrina with over 20 feet of storm surge just because it was such a large storm, it was a category five at one point but on landfall it was category three but had been a huge storm and 28 feet of storm surge with that, a couple years ago to hurricane ike, that was 20 feet and that was only a category two on landfall and we remember sandy just from last year. that was a category one most of the time up the coastline and not technically a hurricane when it hit the coastline and talking 14 feet of storm surnl. it's the wind field of the storm that helps well up the water and push it on the cost line, stephanie. >> that is extraordinary, thank you, if the death toll of 10,000 is confirmed haiyan would be the deadliest disaster ever and the trouble would be almost double and the 5100 who died during
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felma and 91 and when a magnitude 7.9 earthquake caused a tsunami in 1996. they have an agreement to cooperate with issues and with the atomic agency they will visit a water reactor and mine and feared iran may be experimenting with nuclear weapons with a freeze in the program. a comment from a french official after those talks upset aroone and foreign minister said one wants a deal but not a sucker's deal. some are praising the french for preventing a deal not to stall the program and others are blaming the french for being rigid. the foreign minister's remark had a fire storm in iran and a twitter account under the
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support leader and said they are hostile over the nation the past few years and this is an i'm prudent and inept move, a wise man should not have the politician to turn an entity into an enemy hash tag france and we will talk about iran later in the program with a former nato ambassador. they have not decided if it will join negotiations in geneva, a speaksman said it's ironing out details about terms they are seeking and a demand, the political transition and u.n., u.s. and russia hope to start the summit by the end of the year. the stockpile spro vehicled international outrage but they said they used incindary weapons and have huge fires and burns and some of the images you will see is disturbing and dana
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reports. >> august 26, 2013, aleppo, syria and the groups human rights watch said a military check dropped a bomb that contained napalm. >> all i saw was people on fire and i was on fire, my friends were on fire and there were unidentifiable bodies on the floor. >> reporter: this was one of 56 attacks with incendiary weapons they have documented in the last year and they accuse the syrian airforce of using weapons in residential areas. these weapons like napal and white phosphorous. >> i saw in august and standalone in terms of the
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cruelty, the extent of the devastation, the severity of the injuries that i saw. >> reporter: human rights watch wants the international community to condemn syria like they did for the government use of chemical weapons. >> the red line, the red bar has been set too high and set only on chemical weapons. implicitly saying that anything below that is not such a big problem. it is a big problem. we have documented abuse after abuse in syria. >> reporter: incendary weapons are classified as conventional and more deaths in syria than chemical weapons which the government was believes to have used on august 21, that was a mayor turning point in the conflict. it led to a deal to get rid of the chemical weapons stockpile and has not stopped the war and they criticize the deal and feel
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removing chemical weapons from the syria battlefield makes little difference and believe the international community, in fact, gave the syrian government the permission to keep killing citizens. and human rights watch says the government has violated international law. al jazeera beirut. >> reporter: more than 100 countries joined the band on the weapons. veteran's day honors the men and women who served american. 21.2 million u.s. veterans, 1.6 million of them, 7 1/2% are women and many honored today are seniors, 9.6 million veterans and more than 45% are over the age of 65 and also many young veterans of course, 1.8 million veterans are 35 or younger and school bans and boy scouts
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marched on sunday in a parade honoring vets in los angeles. but the veteran's parade that is the nation's biggest steps off later today in new york city. cancer diagnoses surnling near one of italy's cities and illegal dumping may be linked to the health crisis. and philippines hopeful as they worry about their loved ones back home and these are images coming from the philippines ravaged by typhoon haiyan. ♪
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♪ good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie si and we will hear from american whose are praying and trying to contact loved ones in the typhoon ravaged home land and the temperatures across the
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nation and nicole mitchell is back. >> you may be glad you have the day off and the fellow veterans out there but continuing this morning cool air descended and minnesota a high of 42 degrees. now we are around 30. the overnight temperature of 39 is probably going to be the high temperature for the day because temperatures will drop few the day with cold air that has come in. by this afternoon we are in the 20s and at midnight we were 39 degrees and staying cool the next couple of days and the cool air will spread across the country and tomorrow morning going to the south temperatures this morning in texas, oklahoma in the 40s and 50s and tomorrow could be a hard freeze across the area. coming up, we will talk about the forecast for some of your veteran day parades. philippine america feel
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hopeless and hit hardest have no power or phone service and concerned relatives and friends have no way to learn the fate of their loved ones. ♪ right now all laura lambert can do is pray, she is a member here at the philippine america united church of christ in the richmond section of new york and her brothers live in the southern philippines, one of the main areas hardest hit by typhoon haiyan. >> i'm anxious because i have not heard from them for two nights and i have been trying to call them for to days, to nights but sometimes the phones would ring but nobody would pick up and say i can't get through or it's unattended or sometimes there is no connection at all, it's dead. >> reporter: widespread power outages from the storm made communication from the u.s. near
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impossible. and lambert says her faith gives her something to hold on to. >> we are hopeful and what can we hold on to, right, hope. >> reporter: the pastor said the church has been raising funds for the victims of the devastating earthquake that rocked the philippines weeks ago and now this. >> a friend said we can't change the path of the typhoon but we can have a good attitude in facing this typhoon so as a pastor i want to speak about the toll, about that resource in our faith to rise from death to life. >> reporter: faith they will need as information of the scope of the disaster unfolds. and people at the united church of christ plan to raise money to help their family and friends who have been devastated by the typhoon but their fear is damaged roads and bridges is the aid won't get there, i'm with al
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jazeera richmond hill, new york. >> reporter: it's hitting close to home in southern california. nearly a 4th of the 4 million philippine people are in the la area and they organized a 5k walk and collecting food, clothing and money and some philippine americans have relatives who lost everything. >> all his rice crops were ruined. the house was under water. >> reporter: many of those who are raising money have not yet heard from their relatives in the philippines. several organizations are coordinating relief efforts of typhoon haiyan victims and here are ways you can help, the united nations world food program will send emergency food and working to restore communications and you can donate $10 text aid 27722 on your cell phone or visit the website at wfpusa.org and unicef
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has 66 tons of emergency supplies to stricken areas and donations can be made at unicef.org/support and the american red cross said to mail checks to the local with philippines typhoons and floods in the memo line or donate to the philippine red cross at red cross.org.ph. catholic services is donating at emergencies.crs.org and world vision has food and hydrogen and emergency shelters and it's world site.org. the jewish distribution committee is collecting donations at jdc.org. three major problems are converging to cause a crisis in southern italy. the mafia toxic waste and cancer and we report on this deadly
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dilemma. >> reporter: this is the land where grass barely grows. in the country side around naples they have been polluting the soil for decades and they say the waste is not only killing the environment, it's also killing them. >> translator: first my husband was diagnosed with cancer, then me. my neighbor and six of my colleagues all got cancer too, that is when i started suspecting it had something to do with the nearby landfill. >> reporter: they are among hundreds of residents who say the mountains of toxic waste dumped for decades led to a dramatic rise in cancer rates in the area. back in 1997 a former mafia boss advertising mitted organized crime buried millions of tons of toxic waste from italy and
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europe, a lucrative dirty business. a statement made public he said about people living near the landfills, all at risk of dying from cancer within 20 years and i don't think they will survive, 16 years later a local oncologist said with cancer rates in the area three times higher than the national average, the prediction is now coming true. >> translator: what really hurts is not only discovering the criminals have been poisoning us for 20 years but discovering the state knew about it and has not warned up. >> reporter: it's not only toxic industrial waste that ruins the local echo system and the health of residents here, all kinds of unsorted generic waste end up in hundreds of illegal landfills like this one and turning this region into italy official dumping site and they are calling for authorities to cleanup their act so the
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toxic dumps will not pollute the area for generations to come. al jazeera. >> reporter: cancer tumors have increased by more than 40% in towns rounds naples. here is what is making business news this morning, stock market is on a roll and holing it will continue and futures higher at the hour and they are busy when the markets open. a strong jobs report on friday gave stocks a lift and fueled speculation about when the federal reserve may slow the stimulus program and this is where we stand, dow jones is all time high and opens 15761. s&p 500 a point below and nasdaq is seen here too and reacting to the jobs report and the stocks are higher at this hour.
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hong kong gaining 1 1/2% and in time for the holidays amazon is delivering to people on sundays and it partnered with the u.s. postal service to deliver online orders seven days a week and started this weekend this la and new york and no charge for the service. a college education is soaring and not stopping overseas students from flocking here and a report shows 800,000 international students were enrolled in u.s. colleges and universities and that is 7% increase and half of the students are china, india and south korea and students abroad on the rise but on a smaller scale. a philippine survivor story, one of our own, an al jazeera journalist covering the typhoon rides out the super storm that flat earned nearly everything around her. they want to reign in the program end with no daeal and w
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will talk about the high stakes involved. >> the man at the center of the dolphins bullying scandal talks about this later in sports. looking at a live picture of the sunrising over new york city this veteran's day. ♪
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>> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country.
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>> only on al jazeera america. welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie si, they are rushing supplies from around the world and the problem is how to reach stranded people in isolated areas and we have more from manila. >> there is no shortage of aid and volunteers want to help out
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a 10th of the america's population that has been effected by the storm and everybody feels impotent and volunteered to work with the government and aid agencies and ngo and setting up groups on their own and what to do helping those in need are doing it and the problem is this and government officials are aware of it and many places cannot receive aid because they are impossible to get to. roads remain damaged, they can't get to them by land and airports are closed and can't fly things into the areas that need them the most and sea ports have also been completely destroyed by the storm surge that was brought by typhoon haiyan and some places as high as 5 meters so aid is coming in, the biggest problem now is how to distribute it in a way that is the most efficient. we spoke to the army spokesperson a few minutes ago and he basically said their main goal right now and are flying
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into batallions and 15,000 troops stationed in the philippine islands and too victims of the storm and need support from other parts of the country. the thing is they cannot get equipment in with the men. they are going to have to use whatever equipment and hardware they can salvage from the debris. >> and margaret is reporting from manila. when super typhoon haiyan hit on friday she found herself in the thick of it, one minute she was doing a live report and the next she was fighting for her life. >> it was a force that paralyzed the providence and haiyan swept through the philippines friday morning and destroyed everything in the path, power lines and coastal villages all wiped out in an instant and it arrived
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three hours earlier than expected and thousands of people were trapped when water rose as high as 5 meters. we were one of them, right at the eye of haiyan rather. >> we are trying to make our way out of the place and this is a little over three hours after the wrath of typhoon haiyan is and this place is a ghost town. a few hours ago we were ourselves caught up in the middle of what is said to be the most powerful typhoon in the world this year. it was hard because at some point we were preparing for live and the water started going up and we were by the ceiling clinging for our lives. it's a miracle we survived and what we really need to do is make our way out of here because there is nothing left, only destruction and death. it was the world's most pawful typhoon on record and the damage
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for a small providence is unprecedented. governor fears at least 20,000 people are dead. and those who survived face far more difficult days ahead, the entire providence is isolated and thousands are homeless and unsure where to go, searching for shelter in the few structures that remain standing and almost everyone here has a family member or a friend who died. reality too hard for many to grasp. >> translator: we almost drown and nothing left and no place to sleep and no dry clothes to wear. >> translator: we were in the gym which is supposed to be our evacuation center but it certainly collapsed. everyone started to run everywhere to save their own lives. >> reporter: this hospital is one of the few establishments still operating after the
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typhoon. but doctors here are working under strained conditions, operating on the injured without electricity and clean water and short supply of medicine is running out. most of the areas remain unreachable. the dead, the wounded and those who survived cut out from the rest of the world and as night falls people here become more desperate. the devastation is staggering but the true extent of the damage remains unknown. al jazeera central philippines. >> reporter: a state of emergency still in effect and we will have more from the philippines at the top of the hour. iran is agreeing today on one nuclear issue and signed a joint statement with the u.n. atomic agency to allow international inspectors to visit the mine and reactor and take three months to implement and separate from the
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six world powers were working on in geneva and we go through the failed talks there. >> reporter: they talked for days but in the end couldn't agree on what is next for iran's nuclear program as the foreign ministers went back to the capitols they went public with positions, iran leaders broadcasting his bottom line. >> translator: national interests are the red line, among the rights are nuclear rights within the framework of international law and the right to enrich this on iranian soil. >> reporter: obama administration said this is not sitting well with israel and said it should be the dismantling of the nuclear program and the prime minister took to the american air waves to warn he is not alone. >> it's not just my concern this is a bad deal, there are many
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leaders saying this is a very bad deal for the region and the world. and when you have the arabs and israelis speaking in one voice, doesn't happen very often, it's worth paying attention to us. >> reporter: he has backers in the u.s. congress who they vote to increase sanctions on iran this week. >> it's an insurance for the united states to make sure iran actually complies with an agreement that we would want to see which is of course desirable. >> reporter: john kerry is warning new sanctions could end discussions, publically allowing for more time. >> we are not going into a full deal and giving away something. we are talking nt a stopping their program where it is with enough guarantees to know it is stopped where it is while we then negotiate the full measure of the deal.
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>> reporter: that may not be enough for the u.s. congress and could find out this week if they listen to the president or israeli lobby and how they determine could see if talks get another chance to succeed, al jazeera in washington. >> reporter: kerry will brief in the talks with iran. they had a program in the 1950s and signed a nonproliferation treaty in 68 agreeing never to develop nuclear weapons and the shaw created the atomic energy association to manage the program including the purchase of nuclear technology from the u.s. and other countries. after the shaw was over thrown in 1979 the program was suspended but the new leader komani started it during the war and in january they announced a $800 million with russia to complete a reactor at the
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nuclear plant shown here. and calling for a nuclear free mid east photographs revealed plants previously unknown to u.n. and during the last decade led to a suspicion of the program but some agreements broke down and nuclear work was restarted and he was elected in 2005 and supported the nuclear program and bringing it more national attention and controversy. the talks with iran will reconvene in geneva on november 20 on a lower level with no foreign ministers taking part. joining us to talk about what is next is kurt and former ambassador to nato and in washington and it's great to have you with us especially with so much news breaking on this. i don't know if you heard but iaea has now reached an agreement with iran that they will be able to inspect iraq,
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this is a reactor to produce plutonium and will it push the deal along? >> it depends on iran and interested in having the arrangement with iaea now and saying we are interested in cooperating and looking for an agreement when the reality of what iran's position is doesn't seem to have changed and they want sanctions and lifted but will not give guarantees and access to the new program and control that would be necessary to persuade the international community there is not an effort to build a nuclear weapon going on. >> kerry said earlier today the major powers including france by the way were unified on an iran deal but that it was iran that rejected it and wouldn't accept the terms. what does that say about the possibility of an agreement at this point? >> well, i think it's always good to talk, it's always good
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to try and will meet again on the 20st of november in geneva and a step to keep the process going but it really depends on iran and we have been at this over a decade and multiple u.n. security council resolutions and clear what iran needs to do to have the sanctions lifted and have a peaceful nuclear program but if iran doesn't want to take the steps i think sanctions will stay in place and no agreement and i think secretary kerry is doing it right. >> reporter: what do they say about a deal with iran and oppose deals almost under any terms. >> i wouldn't say that. i think that both the arabs and israelis want to see iran not have a nuclear weapons program and want to see international guarantees in place to make sure that is not the case. if that is the kind of deal that can be reached i don't think there is a problem with them and
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they were concerned they would have a deal to relax the sanctions without iran taking the steps it needs to take and when this happens it's hard to put them back in place. >> given this particular reactor is and the french and saudis are worried about iraq and the plutonium and not on line for a year and why not an item tarry deal going towards a larger deal? scompl what brought iran to the table to negotiate now is the sanctions being in place. the purpose of the sanctions is getting them to stop it with the existing program and has the potential to produce plutonium and sending them inspectors but not stop the program and not stop the other program we were
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worried yet and more to do. >> reporter: the french foreign minister called it a sucker's deal, do you think it would have been a sucker's deal and not sure what they were talking about in geneva but on friday it seems they were close to a deal. >> i don't know exactly what was discussed or how far they might have gone but it's clear that iran has to move towards the u.n. security council that has been passed and near to community to get it lifted and not the other way around and not lifting the symptoms while iran doesn't take the steps. >> we will see if these inspections and will get them closer to a deal and kirk, a former ambassador to nato. iran foreign minister says violence is the greatest threat to global security. in a bbc interview they accuse some sunni countries of fear
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mongering and flaming the animosity for political interest and syria and pakistan are coping with a large increase in sectarian violence. a book by the young activist who risked her life calling for education reform is banned from the nation's private schools, 16-year-old i am malala is being called disrespectful by school officials and the taliban shot the between anchor in the head last year protesting for wider access for education for the girls and it effects 40,000 schools across pack stone and john is here with sports and hear from a player in the miami dolphin scandal. >> he had an interview over the weekend with jay glazer of fox sports because of the message he sent to martin and he referred to martin as a half n word and
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ritchie tried to put it in perspective and said the situation is not a bullying issue. he also said he regrets using that racial slur. >> when the words are put in the context i understand why a lot of eyebrows get raised but people don't know how john and i communicate to one another. for instance the week before this went down jonathan martin text me on my phone, i will murder your whole f'ing family. did i think jonathan was going to murder my family? no i didn't and puts in context of how we communist with one another. i'm not a racist and to judge me by that word it's wrong and no way shape or form is it acceptable to use that friend to friend on a voicemail and i cannot tell you who over reacted
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or did what and i can sit here and be accountable for my actions and my actions were coming from a place of love and how bad or how vulgar it sounds that is how we communicate and that is how our friendship was and those are the facts and that is what i'm accountable. and as the best friend on the team i miffed it and missed it and never saw it coming. >> reporter: in response to this assertion that jonathan martin sent him an off color text they sent glazer a copy of the text which the words i will murder your whole fing family with a smiling person and a smiling dog. and they are playing without john fox who is recovering from heart surgery and jack delrio and manning doesn't mind who is on the sidelines as long as he
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is running the bronco attack and he snuck the ball over the pylon and could not stop them in the second and payton and that is two touchdowns and scored that and payton to thomas and nobody deems it necessary to touch him, broncos win and manning a shot to the legs and will get an mri to see how bad the injury is. the cowboys led the nfc east for the season but are slipping and they went to thomas for one of the two scores. by the time the final guns sounded the crew of thomas, mark ingraham will have five touchdowns and 392 and 49-17 and 7-2 with the second best record in the nfc. after 1-3 start the carolina panthers have five straight wins
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and the ten-9 win in san francisco. the jacksonville jaguars beat the tightens 29-27, that is sports this morning and back to you. >> john henry thank you. coming up, biggy small is a legend in hip-hop and they don't want to honor his memory. this is a live picture of the uss new york docked on the west side of man hat has 7 tons of steel with rubble of the twin towers which fell on september 11 and has an image of the towers and the slogan never for get.
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on august 20th, al jazeera america introduced
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♪ jazeera america introduced welcome back to al jazeera america, ahead new controversy about two stars ever in rock and rap and let's see what
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precipitation we are looking across the u.s. and nicole mitchell is back. >> good morning and especially good morning to our veterans and a good forecast for ceremonies because not a lot of moisture and snow like rochester but that is light and not the precipitation to hinder a lot of parades. let's look at the forecast for the temperatures are based on parade start time and not the start for day and the biggest is new york and after the ceremonies they say it will start at 11:30 and the nicer day of the week before it drops off the rest of the week in new york and arlington t 57 and sunshine and great for that and birmingham which used to have the largest parade before new york replaced it sunshine and temperatures in the 70s and
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levenworth, i have a cousin there and not sure why that is in kansas but it is. ♪ sometimes your words 16 years since the death of rap legend big and remembered in the brooklyn neighborhood he rapped about and as they go through a transformation fans want him to be a permanent fixture but not everyone is on board and kaelin has details. >> he rapped about his home here. he was murdered in 1997. since then the streets he called home have undergone a profound transformation and robert price owned this barber shop for 20 years. >> this was a solid black neighborhood so you have people who have come from other places and different types of people. >> it changed but changed for
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the better. >> reporter: he used to rap in front of the barber shop and wants the community to remember him. >> i started a petition to call the intersection christopher wallace way in honor of biggy small and hoping it is an honor and tribute for him because he lived here as a child. >> reporter: when he went to the community board some board members said he wasn't a good roll model because of his involvement with drugs and guns. >> his music is what we are honoring and in his lyrics it went from a negative to positive. >> reporter: two decades later the debate is not just about the big legacy, it's about the soul of the neighborhood and families who called it home. >> how are you? how are you feeling? all right. >> reporter: they opened their super market in 1967. >> everybody that came up in the
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neighborhood packed bags and food. that was a part of growing up out here, if you wanted to get new sneakers and didn't want to sell drugs you packed drugs and made money. >> reporter: not all of the changes have been good. >> we lost close-knit families where your uncle on the top and aunt in the middle and grandma on the first one and know you don't know your neighbor and you say hi and that is it. >> what happens in brooklyn is a wider trend. >> trendy in the eyes of hipsters or yuppies or up ward mobile professionals and moving to neighborhoods like clinton hill will that predominately are american and working class and prices are rising. individuals living there may no longer feel like this is their
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home. >> reporter: some lived here their lives it's about embracing a new home. >> a cool, diverse, you know vibe that is going on and safe for people, more blacks than whites collaborating together which is cool. and it's a big difference. and this is going to shine now. >> reporter: a sunshine new and old neighbors are eager to be a part of, kay lynn ford, new york. >> reporter: the streets have been renamed and honor police and firefighters and military who died on november 11 and jennings and the group run d mchl c made the -- run d mc made the cut. it tore through the chain and 10,000 people may have been killed and iran signed an agreement with the united nations agency to cooperate on
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nuclear issues and iran will let inspectors visit a water reactor and a mine. an opposition group says it's working on plans for talks aimed at ending the country war and the coalition has not decided if it will be part of the talks in geneva. >> i'm john henry smith and who is class c, the seattle seahawks and we will break it down. >> i'll have the forecast and analysis on the typhoon. >> and i'm al jazeera and i'll will back with you in 2 1/2 minutes.
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consider this... antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. consider this unconventional wisdom weeknights - 10 eastern on al jazeera america determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's
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some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax cuts... the economy... iran... healthcare... it goes on and on... ad guests on all sides of the debate. and a host willing to ask the tough questions and you'll get... the inside story theses are strait forward conversations, no agenda, just hard hitting debate on the issues that matter to you ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america
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>> u.s. marines on the ground in the philippines, delivering did he say rhettly-needed humanitarian aid for the victims of typhoon high dan. it's expected to be a long and difficult recovery. >> grown house gas levels are higher than ever, 190 countries gather in poland for a major u.n. summit on climate change. >> after marathon talks on iran's nuclear plan failed, washington is skeptical about the nation's willingness to make a deal. >> part of our interest is preserving. >> keeping history alive at a small printing company that has had a big impact on the music
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world. ♪ theme >> welcome to aljazeera america on this veterans day. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas drayton. the victims of typhoon haiyan are without power, food, water and shelter. hospitals are overrun. >> the philippines red cross says at least 1200 people were killed in the storm, but local officials fear the death toll could be as worse, topping 10,000. slowly relief is trickling into areas cut off. >> desperate survivors arrived sunday looking for supplies for a way out. a $2 million relief program from
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the united nations food program is underway and u.s. marines are on the ground to help with search and rescue efforts. >> as aid is rushed to the philippines from around the world, rescuers face another problem, how to reach stranded victims in isolated areas. we have more from manila. >> there is no shortage of aid that's coming in, even locally, there are so many volunteers wanting to basically help out. this is a 10th of the countries population affected by the storm, and everybody else who saw it happen just feels i am potent and now volunteered to work with the government, aid agencies, n.g.o.'s, even setting up groups to help those in need. the problem is this and government officials are very aware of i have the, many of these places cannot receive the aid just yet, because they are impossible to get too. roads are damaged. airports are closed. they can't fly things in to the
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most needed areas, and sea ports have been completely destroyed by the storm surge that was brought by the typhoon, in some places as high as five meters. the aid is coming in. the biggest problem is distributing it. we spoke to the army spokesperson. he said their main goal now is clearing operations. they are flying in two battalions to the city to begin helping. there were 15,000 troops stationed there, they, too are victims of the storm and need support from other parts of the country. they cannot get equipment in with the men. they are going to have to use whatever equipment and hardware they can salvage from the debris. >> once again, aljazeera reporting from manila. >> there is a state of emergency
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in tacloban. >> this building shows the devastation the storm caused, the supermarket completely collapsed in the strong winds and storm surge. it is a very good example of the desperation shown by the people who live here in tacloban. people are picking through whatever may remain in there. people still need essential items and they're not getting quick enough from the government, the military, that is food, water and shelter. if you come around here, you can see some of the desperate situation that is people are in,
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people finding whatever they can to shelter in. many people wanting to leave tacloban are taking advantage of the military flights and getting out. another big problem will become health. there are so many bodies lying in the streets around this city, some of them just sitting there uncovered, some have a sheet over them with a name scribbled on them. the authorities are going around getting those bodies, taking them to a central location and the city trying to identify them. they are taking them to a mass grave for burial. >> aljazeera reporting from the city of tacloban. >> more condolences are being sent. president obama said the countries spirit of unit and cooperation will prevail. >> several organizations are coordinating relief efforts for typhoon haiyan's victims. you can help out. united nations world food program will send emergency
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food. it's also work to go restore communications. you can dough anyway $10 by texting aid to 27722 right on your cell phone. you can visit their website at wfpusa.org. >> unicef is there. donations can be made at their website. >> the american red cross asked those who want to help out to mail checks to local red cross chapters. write philippines typhoon and flood in the momentum mow line or donate directly to the philippine red cross. >> catholic relief services are sending slies and staff. you can send donations on line. >> world vision is providing food, hygiene kits and emergency shelters. the site is world vision.org. >> the american jewish joint distribution committee is collecting donations as well. you can give on line at
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jdc.org. >> the typhoon made landfall in northern vietnam but had weakened considerably. no deaths were reported, but 11 people died during storm preparations. 6,000 people evacuated mr. haiyan hit. the storm was downgraded to a tropical storm as it entered southern china. >> for more on the storm's track, let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> this storm has downgraded, the final advisory has been written on it. you can see what happened as it made that hit into seat mom, china, now areas of rain, leaving devastation in its track especially for the philippines where we are still seeing showers in the southern part of the island. so many people are now homeless, you don't want any new weather adding to those concerns. now is the time when all the assessors will go back in to see how strong that storm actually was. >> this was obviously a very
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powerful storm, left a path of destruction. where does it rank among other storms? >> we are still getting all that data in. in the united states, we always here about my reserve job, my colleagues with the hurricane hunters that actually fly and collect the data. that doesn't go on in the western pacific. the united states is the only country that does that. something like a hurricane camille tops the list, wind speeds of 190 miles per hour. the labor day hurricane is after that. then in 2010, there was reconnaissance data on that storm, as well. in the philippines, they'll have to go in and look at what devastation happened, look at weather data that was collected to see if this was the strongest typhoon at landfall.
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there are discrepancies as far as how strong this storm was. why is there so much confusion over that? >> because that have data, when we don't have aircraft going inside looking at it, you're looking at satellites and seeing how god the presentation is. this had a phenomenal presentation indicating high winds, but estimating based on a satellite versus actual data are two different things. >> you can't compare it to other data, in other words. >> and some of the kim in philippines could have been wiped out in the storm. we'll see what data survived. >> we'll have more on the typhoon coming up in a moment. even know nuclear talks with iran ended without an agreement, the french foreign minister said world leaders are not far from a deal to slow it's atomic program. negotiations will resume november 20. as aljazeera reports, those extra 10 days could have consequences. >> they talked for days, but in
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the end, couldn't agree on what's next for iran's nuclear program. as the foreign ministers headed home, they went. with their positions. for iran's leader broadcasting his bottom line. >> among the rights are nuclear rights within the framework within international law. >> the obama administration said iran has the right to nuclear power. that does not sit well with israel, who says the goal should be the dismantling of the program. the prime minister took to the airwaves to warn he's not alone. >> it's not only my concern this is a bad deal, from are many arab leaders in the region saying this is a very bad deal for the region and world. you know, when you have the arabs and israelis speaking in
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one voice, doesn't happen very often, i think it's worth paying attention to it. >> he has his backers in the u.s. congress who say they might vote to increase sanction honest iran this week. >> it's an insurance for the united states to make sure that iran actually complies with an agreement that we would want to see, which is of course, desired. >> secretary of state john kerry is warning new sanctions could end discussions, publicly lobbying congress to trust the administration and give them more time. >> we're not going into a full deal and giving away something. we're talking about stopping their program where it is with enough guarantees to know that it is in fact stopped where it is while we then negotiate the full measure of the deal. >> that may not be enough for the u.s. congress. we could find out this week if they'll listen to their president or the israeli lobby. how they decide could determine if the talks get another chance
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to as you can seat. aljazeera, washington. >> the next round of talks will be at a lower level. senior officials will attend, but not foreign ministers. >> the u.n. says iran is willing to be more up front about its nuclear program. the international atomic energy agency says it now that a deal with iran to get information about its reactors and nuclear sites. in washington, the senate is considering more economic sanction honest iran but that won't happen until secretary of state john kerry briefs the banking committee. vice president joe biden and treasury secretary jack lew have asked senate leaders not to impose new restrictions on iran while kerry is still negotiate i can. >> iran's former minister said fighting between sunni and shia muslims is probably the greatest threat toe world security. he accuses some sunni countries of fear mongering, saying they are fanning the flames for short sighted political interests.
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syria, iraq and pakistan are among the nations now coping with a large increase in sectarian violence. >> syria's largest opposition group has not decided if it will join negotiations in geneva. a spokesman for the coalition says it is still ironing out details about terms being south. one demand is the guarantee of a political transition. the u.n., u.s. and russia hope to start the summit by the end of the year. >> a book by the young activist who risked her life calling for education in pakistan is banned from the nation's private schools there. the 16-year-old's memoir is being called disrespectful to islam by pakistani schools. the officials there, the taliban, shot the teenager in the head while she was protesting for wider access to education for girls. the book ban affects 40,000 schools across pakistan. >> sheriff's deputies say a deadly shooting at a party near houston was triggered by
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celebratory gunfire. two high school students were killed and two dozen wounded at a teen's birthday celebration. investigators are looking for two suspects, 117, the other thought to be about 22. first responders in the scene described mass chaos. party goers jumped from the second floor to escape. >> his death sparked a national debate about gays and bullying. loved ones are retracing the steps to the tragic spot where he took his life three years ago. the rutgers university student committed suicide after his roommate secretly videotaped him kissing another man. no new york to new jersey bridge was the final destination in a 37 day walk spanning nearly a thousand miles to promote friendship and stop bullying. >> world leaders coming together talking climate change. >> they are gathered in poland, trying to reach a deal to cut greenhouse gases. >> there is controversy about players involved in the talks. >> another food recall to tell
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you about over concerns about e-coli. a new report criticizing the treatment of migrant workers in a middle eastern country. the u.n. is raising a red flag. >> as we honor our veterans, we honor those we lost. we'll show you the too many of the unknown soldier. >> this is a look at the u.s. s intrepid, as we honor our veterans on this day.
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and to contact the centers and
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. >> the beyond the nations climate change summit is underway in poland. world leaders are looking to cut greenhouse gas emissions. some argue companies involved in the process may not have the best intentions. >> first, let's look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation today. meteorologist nicole mitchell is
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here. good morning. >> good morning. all i have to say this morning is don't shoot the messenger. it has gotten colder in a few places. in some places, the temperatures will drew that as the front and cold air go through. minneapolis and omaha that could happen. yesterday afternoon in the 40's, this afternoon in the 20's. our high temperature today was probably the 39 degrees we had at midnight. it's been downhill since then. minneapolis 27,oma 28. these are going down. tomorrow, that sinks well south ward. temperatures this morning, 40s in oklahoma and texas. tomorrow, this could be froze in. this could be it for any eventualation outside. the hard freeze is on and tomorrow morning it will spread into the northeast, including chilly highs. back to you guys. >> the super typhoon, the melting of polar ice caps and new warning about greenhouse gases adding new urgency to talk
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about climate change. we report on the united nations summit in poland. >> it's the world's 10t 10th largest consumer of coal and relies on it for almost all its electricity. poland is playing host to the u.n.'s annual climate thank talks. no surprise then which companies the organizers have chosen to sponsor the event. they include the world's largest steel and mining company. its activities produce over 190 million tons of carbon dioxide each year. that's more than the entire co2 output for oil producing venezuela. also a partner, poland's largest electric company. it runs this power station, one of the largest fossil fuel power plants in the world. >> it's very concerning, very
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dangerous and we've got to insure that this conference is for the interest of people on the planet and these companies and their bottom like that is to insure that they continue to maximize their profits. in my mind, this is akin to having cigarette companies comps sponsoring a conference on hundred cancer and being surprised when the conference says smoking is acceptable and should be encouraged. >> others say the involvement of business and some of the dirtiest is welcome and necessary. >> business, you know, is really worried about climate change, it's a big issue for many companies and business has to be part of the solutions to climate change, as well. we can't do it without the active engagement of business. >> how to help the world's vulnerable climate change will be on the agenda, as well as a new plan to change the protocol and map out future cuts in carbon emissions. there's a growing awareness that any agreement must include
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developing nations, in particular india and china. >> since 1990, carbon dioxide emissions from the united states have remained more or less constant. add to this the emissions of our industrialized countries, and you see a decline, mirroring the recent economic downturn. in china, you see where the real increases lie, more than 10% between 2010 and 2011. add to this all the other developing countries, you get a sense of where the greatest challenges lie in reducing emissions. >> the meeting i guess not expected to it are in any break through agreement. for those taking part, they hope it will lay future groundwork for a pact. there are many competing voices and interest. common ground will be hard to find. aljazeera. >> the u.n. hopes to reach a climate deal by 2015. >> a die he did pill is being recalled because it is linked to
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liver damage. oxy elite pro will be pulled from the market. it's caused dozens of cases of hepatitis and liver failure. one death is reported and three other users are awaying liver transplants. >> another recall to tell but involving organic baby food. plum organics is recalling pouches. they include baby stage two, to the mishmash. a manufacturing defect may cause them to spoil. they have dates of august 5-december 18. >> ready to eat salads and sandwich wraps are being recalled. the u.s. department of agriculture said glass onion catering have called back salads that have fully cooked meets. they have p34221 in the u.s.da
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inspection mark. >> the headlines this morning, the stock market is on a roll and it is hold to continue. strong jumps happened friday. it added to the speculation of when the federal program will be reduced. the dow jones is at 15,761, the s&p is at 17,070. the nasdaq 39,019. the bond market is closed for the veterans day holiday. overseas reacting to the jobs report, european stocks are mostly higher at this hour. asian stocks, tokyo gaining 1%, hong kong 1.5%.
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>> the gas prices have fallen about 15 cents a gallon in the past three weeks. the average price of regular is now $3.22. the peak driving season has ended, helping holiday travelers. >> saying goodbye to black friday. target is the latest retailer to open earlier on thanksgiving this year. its stores will open at 8:00 p.m. on the holiday and remain open for 27 hours. closing at 11:00 p.m. the next day to get a jump on holiday shopping. >> die hard shoppers. amazon is teaming up with the post office to deliver packages to some shoppers on sunday. the service started this week in los angeles and new york. amazon hopes to roll out sunday delivery to large parts of the u.s. by next year. the service is free to amazon
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prime customers. >> venezuelas socialist government says it is at war with uncroup husband businesses after reports of price gouging. soldiers seized a chain of electronic stores and arrested managers. >> i have been trying to buy a refrigerator for one month now and can't because goods are too expensive. what's happening seems like an exaggeration. >> the annual inflation rate is above 50% and there are shortages of cooking oil and toilet paper. the government wants to revive the economy before next month's election. >> hundreds of foreign workers in saudi arabia are heading back to their home countries after clashes left one ethiopian and one saudi dead.
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last week, saudi police rounded up thousands of mik migrant wor. nearly a million foreign workers have left saudi arabia in the last three months. >> the united nations has issued a damning account of conditions migrant workers endure in qatar. a special envoy for human rights has been on a week long visit to the state as the country prepares for the world cup. >> they build the future of qatar. these migrants have come to the gulf state on the prospect of a better life. after a 12 hour workday, this is the sort of home they return to, overcrowded compounds, often 12 men to a room and minimal bathroom facilities, conditions a u.n. envoy described as not acceptable. >> i've seen dwellings by mike grant workers and these are
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slums. i think this is a stain in the reputation of qatar, which is the richest country per capita. >> highlighted was the lack of a minimum wage and current sponsor ship system binding foreign workers to a single employer. the labor add ministry did not respond for comment but said reforce are taking place. >> there is a concern for companies confiscating passports, but this is illegal.
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>> they will host football's cup in 2022. >> the challenges increase, because the number of workers will increase again quite dramatically in the coming years. it provides an opportunity, because of the visibility, that the scrutiny under which qatar finds itself. >> nearly 90% of people living in qatar are foreigners, the highest rate of mike grant workforce in the world. although there are labor laws in place, the problem lies in the lack of enforcement. the u.n. says that needs to change. aljazeera. >> a note, aljazeera was founded and is owned by qatar interests. >> relief efforts move ahead in the philippines. >> millions are affected by the walt of typhoon haiyan. >> including one of aljazeera's own while covering the destruction. >> the message the pope sent and
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how it could change the focus of the church. >> a growing crisis in afghanistan, making it one of the world's most addictive societies. how some people are stepping in to help drug abusers. >> i'm john henry smith. if you have been wondering what richy incognito could possibly say, wonder no more. incognito talks, ahead in sports. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? consider this... antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >> what do you think? >> stories that matter to you consider this unconventional wisdom. weeknights 10 eastern on al jazeera america them to go but the
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us delegation that came in here, they told us that -- that quite the opposite could happen, that that could actually poison the well and make things worse, make the stress so unbearable that the iranians will see those sanctions as pure belligerence and then walk away. if that is to happen, it will be a dangerous situation because it means that the diplomatic path will have closed and what happens after that, well, you know, there have obviously been talks of a military option but the u.s.a. says that that should be the absolute last option on the table. they much prefer the idea of trying to talk to the iranians. they do not -- there has been no discussion of a complete lifting of sanctions. they say that possibly by easing some things, perhaps as the iranians would like to see an easing on the oil exports al jazeera america - a new voice
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in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. america tonight weeknights - 9 eastern on al jazeera america >> good morning, on this veterans day. we honor ourans and remember those lost. you are looking at the tomb of the unknown soldier. >> this is a look at arlington national cemetery. >> it is good to have you with us. i'm thomas drayton. >> i'm stephanie sy approximate we're going to have the story of our own reporter actually in
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tacloban, the hard-hit area, about to do a live shot when the storm came bearing down. you'll have her reaction. >> we'll have her account coming up. >> roman catholic bishops are gathering in baltimore as they elect new leadership. the pope called for a refocusing of the church's top priorities. he sent out a survey last year, wanting to know the top priorities of the church. we're going to talk with the chairman of the theology democratic at fordham university. >> a lot of people talking about a sea change in the catholic church. >> the center of the miami dolphins scandal spoke over the weekend. john henry smith will have what incognito who is accused of bullying a fellow player had to say. for now, emergency aid is being rushed to towns and village ravaged by typhoon haiyan.
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people still have no food, water and shelter. the death toll could rise well above 10,000. >> when the storm hit, aljazeera's reporter found herself in the thick of it, one minute preparing to do a live report, the next, she was fighting for her life. >> it was a vicious force that paralyzed the entire province. typhoon haiyan swept through early friday morning. it destroyed everything in its path, power lines, roads, village wiped out. the typhoon arrived three hours earlier than expected. thousands were trapped when water rose as high as five meters. we have one of them, right at the eye of haiyan's wrath. >> we're trying to make our way out of this place. this is what a little over three hours of the wrath of typhoon haiyan has brought into this town of tacloban. this place has become a ghost
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town, just a few hours ago we were ourselves caught up in the middle of what is the most powerful typhoon in the world this year. it was hard, because at some point, we were preparing, and all of a sudden the water started going up. before we knew it, we were by the ceiling, clinging for our lives. it's a miracle that we survived and what we really need to do now is make our way out of here, because there's nothing left, only destruction and death. it was the world's most powerful typhoon on record and the damage is unprecedented. the governor fierce that at least 20,000 people are dead. those who survived face far more difficult days ahead. the province is isolated. thousands have been left homeless, unsure where to go, searching for shelter in the
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structures that remain standing. almost everyone here has a family member or friend who died, the reality too hard for many to grasp. >> we almost drowned. it's so difficult. we have nothing left, no place to clean, not even dry clothes to wear. >> we were in the gymnasium, which is our evacuation center, but it suddenly collapsed. everyone started to run everywhere to save their own lives. >> this hospital is one of the few establishments still operating after the typhoon. doctors here are working under strained conditions, operating on the injured without electricity and clean water. the short supply of medicine is running out. most of the areas remain unreachable, the dead, the wounded, and those who survived cut out from the rest of the
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word. as night falls, people here become more desperate. the devastation is staggering, but the true extend of the damage remains none known. aljazeera, central philippines. >> government officials estimate that super typhoon devastated 80% of structures in its path. catholic bishops across the country are meeting in baltimore to choose new leaders. the tron presence is being watched for a new direction in the american church. the bishops will prepare for a meeting in rome next year on family related church teachings. the vatican is asking bishops and priests worldwide for views
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on same-sex marriage, divorce and birth control. >> joins us for what is expected at the meeting is the chairman of the theology democratic at fordham university. they choose a new leader at the conference. archbishop timothy dolan, the current head bishop has touched a lot of hot buttons, political issues. do you think the next leader will continue that legacy? >> it's a three year term. we don't know what the bishops will do in terms of choosing their next leader. three years ago, they broke precedent. this year, the front runner is from louisville, kentucky, described as a smiling conservative. he takes traditional lines, in fact all of the same lines but
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presents them in a more appealing way, i think you might say. that combination of sort of traditional positions, but a more open way of presenting them seems to be something that's along the lines of pope francis, but we're not sure yet. >> one hot button issue that archbishop dolan was at the forefront of was the affordable care act and the fact that it had a provision that catholic institutions would have to provide coverage for contraceptives. is that a fight that will continue? >> the bishops are split. some folks say this is a battle at the heart of what it means to be catholic and others who may be following in the lines of what pope francis is suggesting, saying maybe there are other issues, too. maybe we should talk about immigration, economic inquality. i think in the choice of new leaders, we're going to get indication of which of those two
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sides they're going to go down. >> what about the issue of immigration, will the bishops continue for a law to be passed? most catholics believe undocumented immigrants should be given citizenship. >> the catholic church has been stand in behind immigrants for many, many years. so often, the catholic presence in the public square gets boiled down to one or two issue or one political party. i don't think that's true. the range of the catholic tradition can speak to folks on a variety of points. >> it's a huge population of people! it's a huge church. given that the current pope has basically said the church should focus less on these hot button issues, when it comes to gay marriage and contraception, do you think the bishops will take heed and do something different? >> it's the pope saying this, that is significant. most of these bishops weren't
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appointed by pope francis, they were appointed under john paul ii. >> who is more conservative. >> this is the first test in the u.s. catholic church of the new priorities and tone set by the pope are going to look like on the ground in terms of what catholics will experience from their own bishops. >> all right. thanks for you your insight. >> at a memorial service for the death of arafat, they promised to get to the bottom of his death. he had at least 18 times the normal levels of radioactive polonium in his remains, renewing the debate over whether he was poisoned. >> it is a country struggling
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with years of war and corruption. iran is dealing with another crisis -- afghanistan is dealing with another crisis, drug users. help is hard to come by. >> they are the forgotten ones, addicts who live in equal lower under a kabul bridge, adequating in garbage and drug paraphernalia. one woman brings hope. this woman is called mother by the addicts. >> the government takes all the aid money poured into this country, so there's nothing, no place for these people. >> she tries to find them a place. she runs a private shelter where she helps the addicts get clean. >> there aren't enough government facilities to treat them and she has only 25 beds. most of these men will never make it into treatment.
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>> on this day, there are four lucky ones. she takes two sick addicts to a government hospital and pleads for them to be admitted. the doctors know her, but it's the first time she's brought patients here. >> the cultvasion of poppied and smuggling of drugs increases every day in afghanistan. naturally the number of drug users increases, too. >> she has brought two addicts to her modest shelter, where they try to stop using drugs in counseling and a 12 step program. addicts stay for a month, then return for follow up meetings. she has an estimated 50% success rate. >> i find that we're all the same here. there is no prejudice or language problem. we try to support each other. the first days of quitting is very difficult. it's only been four days since i've stopped using drugs. >> he used drugs for most of his adult life. now he's just happy cleaning at
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her restaurant. she employs former addicts to give them confidence. she has enlarged the restaurant and isn't attracting enough customers to pay the bills yet, but she's hopeful. it's a revolutionary model in a country where women and addicts face discrimination. her husband divorced her when she started helping the addicts. she hasn't seen her children since. she said she will not stop helping the addicts. >> afghanistan has one of the world's highest rates of drug addiction. >> a symbol is back on earth, the olympic torch returns after a trip more than 260 miles in orbit for its first-ever handover in space. >> john henry smith is here with this morning's sports and the
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player at the center of the miami dolphins hazing scandal speaking out. >> you know the story's big when the first thing my wife wants to know on sunday is what time is the incognito interview. she is not a sports fan. in rewards to the now in famous text message he sent to jonathan martin referring to him as the half n. word. he tried to put that into perspective, saying that this situation is not a bullying issue. he also says he regrets using those racial slurs. >> when i see that voice mail, those words come up across the screen, i'm embarrassed by it, by my actions. what i want people to know is the way jonathan and the rest of the offensive line and how our teammates communicate, it's vulgar. it's not right. when the words are put in the context, i understand why a lot of eyebrows get raised, but
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people don't know how john and i communicate to one another. i'm not a racist, and to judge me by that one word is wrong. in no way, shape or form is it ever acceptable for me to use that word, even if it's friend to friend on a voice mail. if i was a raciest and bullying john martin, when the pros asked questions, that locker room would have said we saw this, that. i'm proud of my guys for having my back and telling the truth, but the fact of the matter is when john left the team on monday, we played a game thursday. i spoke with john friday. >> you spoke with him? >> i texted with him, text messaged. i spoke with him through text message. he said i don't blame you guys, i blame some stuff in the locker room. i blame the culture, i blame what was going on around me. >> in response to incognitos assertion that jonathan sent him an off color text, martin's attorney sent a copy of a text in which the words "i will
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murder your whole [bleep] family." that text came from jonathan martin. >> the seahawks sunday were getting tricky in their effort to start 9-1 for the first time in team history. 43-yard touchdown, seahawks led just before half. russell wilson lays it out, snares it one-handed, both feet inbounds. the seahawks win 33-10. >> calvin johnson squeezes tight for a touchdown, lions up. josh mccown finds marshall for
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the touchdown. bears need a two-point conversion to tie. a lion's penalty gave the bears two tries, they swallowed matt forte to end it. they're all alone in first place. >> the cincinnati bengals needed a miracle against the baltimore ravens with two seconds left. throws it up, knock it down, ravens, a.j. green hauls it in, game is tied at 17. that almost never works, but it worked that time. in o.t., in from 46 yards out. ravens win 20-17, snapping a three-game losing skid. that's your look at morning sports. >> it's between that and the eagles. >> a lot of great football yesterday, john henry smith, thank you. >> he's one of rock and roll's best known names. >> before he was a beatle, he was a bad boy in school. so cute, too. >> turning back the clocks in a
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digital world. one company in nashville foregoes computer for letter presses. >> how the nation is recognizing its veterans. >> you're looking at a live shot. uss intrepid, anchored right here in new york.
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm receive sigh. >> good to have you with us. i'm thomas drayton. nashville is steeped in history with some of the industries biggest music legends starting there. one shot giving them a chance to use a piece of machinery that's rolled out prints for some of the greats. >> let's look at what potential precipitation we're looking at today. nicole mitchell is here. >> happy veterans day to my fellow veterans out there. fortunately this front coming through the country and look, a little snow along through that, is moving in after most of our
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veterans day celebrations. some of these places, the temperatures and weather will change as the day goes on. there's a closer look at that. temperature 52, tomorrow in the 30's. another big parade in phoenix, 87 degrees and another in fresno, 77 and sunshine, so good weather today. back to you guys. >> veterans day honors the men and women who served in america in the military and we are grateful. aljazeera is on the streets in new york city where the parade is set to start in a couple of hours here. good morning, erika. >> good morning. there is a hustle and bustle down here at the starting point of the parade. you can see folks getting things
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together here. 27,000 people wilman up fifth avenue outside of the park here. one of the main things they're doing this year is featuring the u.s. army, as well as honoring women and service. joining me now is naval petty officer martinez. why do you think it's important for folks to come out and show their support? >> it just reminds the people who can't be here that are overseas and the veterans that have to stay at home that we're supported, especially being on ship, that's really hard, because we're away from family. it just helps them stay chipper, i guess and that everyone here is rooting for them. we'll have more coming up. >> the naughty side of rock and roll, legend john lennon is about to hit the auction block
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with a pair of detention sheets detailing the antics of the beatle, fighting in class, shoving and showing just no interest whatsoever are reasons for his punishment. they are on line up for auction. >> the king of rock and roll elvis presley got his start here, now a huge printing shop is enjoying a renaissance. jonathan martin explains. >> when you walk into the hat show print store in nashville, you're walking into one of the oldest letter press shops in the country. >> it is an iconic place. it's been around for 130 years. >> we saw led zeppelin in here earlier, 1971, playing the municipal auditorium. >> it is a living museum of
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letter presses, still rolling out iconic posters. no digital printers here. >> the layman's definition of a letter press is letters are pressed in the paper with ink. >> hatch that created letter press posters from elvis to johnny cash to b.b. king. this kind of genuine technology is retro and cutting edge in our digitally dominated culture. >> we're proud when the new band comes in and asks us to help define their presentation into the public. >> with their unique style, that's not always perfect, these hat show prints is a rite of passage for bands around the world. >> it could be mumford and sons, our largest client through the summer. they are traveling all over, i'm proud to say. >> their business is a museum within a museum, but nothing
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sits on the shelves and gets dusty. the presses always up and running. >> we're an accredited museum. part of our somebody is obviously preserving. this is an important part of the city's culture. we have an opportunity to save it, and we think we've been good stewards. >> our mantra is preservation through production. >> history dates back to the late 1800s, and still used today. >> it ain't sleeping here. we want hank williams guitar to rest. we don't want these presses to rest. we don't want this type to rest. >> 50 years ago, posters were designed to sell you something. despite being a digitally advanced world, hand printed images continue to define moments of our lives. jonathan martin, aljazeera, nashville.
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>> did you know letter presses were originally used in the mid-15th century. good to see them still around. >> i actually think they look better and richer. letter press it is. at the end of our second hour, here's what we're following this morning. >> one of the hardest hit cities in the philippines, tacloban, has declared a state of emergency. 10,000 people may have been killed in the storm. >> iran signed an agreement with the united nations atomic agency to cooperate with nuclear issues. >> in syria, the largest opposition group is ironing out the details to end the war. it has not decided if it will be part of the talks in geneva. >> the broncos won sunday, but was it a costly victory? next hour in sports.
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>> dramatic temperature changes taking place across the country this week. i'll have your national forecast and more analysis object the typhoon. >> what's behind a violent clash in saudi arabia between foreign workers and the police? >> we'll show you how communities across the country are honoring our nation's military. >> thanks for spending part of your morning with us. >> aljazeera america continues in just a few minutes with del walters. >> we leave you with a live look at new york city on this veterans day morning.
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>> every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? consider this... antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >> what do you think? >> stories that matter to you consider this unconventional wisdom. weeknights 10 eastern on al jazeera america
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>> a massive international relief effort is underway in the philippines. thousands are feared dead and millions have no food, water or shelter after the super typhoon. >> the u.s. is skeptical about iran dismantling it's nuclear program. >> riots in reidea. what led workers to demonstrate.
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>> emergency aid is being rushed to the philippines, bringing desperately needed essentials to the victims of typhoon haiyan. it destroyed village and hundreds of thousands of people have no water, food, and hospitals are overrun. good morning, welcome to aljazeera america, i'm del walters approximate the philippine red cross saying at least 1200 people were killed in the storm. the death toll could top 10,000. aid is beginning to trickle in to areas cut off. survivors reaching the airport seeking supplies or just a way out. the united nations world food program set aside $2 million for relief efforts and u.s. marines are in the area to help with
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search and rescue. we have details. >> three days after suffering one of the worst typhoons ever, the full scale of the devastation in the philippines is slowly coming into view. many of the hardest hit areas are totally unreachable, so it is hard to say how bad it really is. with the death toll expected to be in the thousands, typhoon survivors desperate for help are still trying to come to grills with the widespread impact of the disaster. >> with we almost drowned. it's so difficult. we have nothing left, no place to sleep, not even dry clothes to wear. >> the welcome sign in the town of tacloban is one of the few things left standing as winds of 190 miles an hour ripped through, knocking out nearly owl communication and structures. >> we were in the gymnasium, it
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collapsed. everyone started running everywhere. >> tacloban is in a state of emergency. people struggle for behaving necessities, like food and water. >> i can't think. i don't know what to do. all we can do is survive the day, but i don't know what will happen tomorrow or the day after that or if we can continue surviving. i really do not know. >> the extend of the devastation was making relief operations difficult. almost all the roads are completely impassable. in some cases, emergency personnel walk for hours, trying to bring supplies to survivors. >> for the missing and those confirmed. that is a concern. >> while the airport was
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battered, its runway was spared, paving the way for a massive international relief effort to get underway. a c130 cargo plane is loaded with rice, canned food and water for those who survived the typhoon. >> if we are lucky, they give us boarding pass so we can go. if no boarding pass, we cannot go. >> on sunday, president obama expressed sadness and a pledge of aid. ninety american marines and sailors landed as an advance team to determine the need. expected to aid are u.s. ships and aircrafts that help search and rescue. one indicator of the horror of the typhoon, a need for body bags. aljazeera. >> there is a state of emergency in effect right now in tacloban,
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occur fuse in place because of looting there. we have more. having problems with that package, we will bring it to you in a moment. aljazeera's wayne hayes there. the pope urged the faithful to send help to the philippines. you can see a gathering to pray. >> earlier this morning, we talked to burn shell. his organization is exhausting all resource to say provide immediate help. >> we are trying to reach them with all means we have. last night, 15 trucks left from here. we have airplanes arriving
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tomorrow with staff. we try really to push out as much relief items as possible in the next days and at least cover some basic needs. then we can go back to a more organized relief distribution. >> efforts of frustrated by severely damaged roads. it's forced emergency teams to reach survivors by foot. now we turn back to the story of looting in tacloban. >> this building behind me shows you the devastation that this storm caused. a fairly large supermarket has completely collapsed in those strange winds and the storm surge when it hit on friday, it is also a very good example of the desperation now shown by the people who live here in tacloban. a lot of looting going on right now, a lot of food from the supermarket has been taken, so people are now focused on whatever else they can get their hands on, picking through the
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remains, trying to get their hands on whatever food, perhaps some water, that may remain in there. those are the essential items that people are telling us they still really need, and they're not getting quick enough from the government, from the military, that is food, water and shelter. if you come around here, you can see some of the desperate situations that people are in, people finding whatever they can to shelter in. many people wanting to leave tacloban, so are taking advantage of the military flights and getting out. another big problem in the days and weeks ahead will become health. there are so many bodies still liningle the streets around this city, some just sitting there uncovered, some have a sheet over them with a name scribbled on them. authorities are getting those bodies, taking them to a central location in the city, trying to identify them. once they have, they are taking them to a mass grave for burial. >> that is wayne hayes in
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tacloban. 11 people died during the storm preparations in vietnam. it was downgraded to a tropical storm when it entered south china. for more, we turn to nicole mitchell. >> fortunately, not much of a factor anymore. once it moved into china, the final advisory has been written on this. good news we are seeing the end of what was once a devastating typhoon. you can see how it made the landfall, now moving into china and losing organization and just a little bit of moisture left along with it. there's been enough of a disturbance moving south of the island that was causing concern. right now, not showing signs of development and most of the moisture staying southward. that would be a concern. many now are homeless because of the storm. it's nice to see that the tropics have gotten a little quieter out there.
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>> we've seen how problematic the storm surge can be, more damage coming from the storm and flood in than the wind itself. was that a big factor with haiyan? >> absolutely. storm surge and some of the flooding that goes on far more of a deadly loss of life from that than we have from the winds, even though the storms are categorized by the winds. with storm surge, you look at how direct of a hit. if it's perpendicular to the shoreline, how much moisture is churned up and what the coastline does as it goes underwater. right now, the estimates are some of the storm surge could have been as high as 20 feet from this storm. that's significant. that's three people tall of a wall of water coming along. that can wash anyone away. you mentioned katrina. here's how others stack up. katrina is known for the biggest storm surge we have on record,
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going up as high as 28 feet. that was because not only a strong storm, but it had a huge wind field to well up all that water. other storms, hurricane ike number two on this list, with about a 20-foot surge. that was only a category two at landfall. it doesn't matter the category, it's how big the wind field is. sandy was a category one moving up the coastline. that had 14 feet. we know how much devastation that caused. they're still going back in and recovering the data, piecing it altogether, del, so we'll see the final numbers. storm surge is a big cause of loss of life in this case. >> if the death toll of 10,000 is confirmed. it would be the deadliest disaster ever, almost double the 51 people killed by tropical storm thelma in november of 1991. it would nearly double the 5,700 people who died when that magnitude 7.9 earthquake caused a tsunami in 1976.
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>> secretary of state john kerry saying the major powers are united on a nuclear deal with iran, but said iran wouldn't accept it. u.n. nuclear wash dog agency said iran is willing to let inspectors check a ratingor and nuclear sites, but kerry saying getting a far-reaching deal couldn't be done at this time. >> there is a gap still between what language may be appropriate that they're prepared to accept, but the concept that we are all working on, we have absolute unity on. >> in washington, the senate is looking at more economic sanctions against iran, but that won't happen until kerry briefs the senate banking committee. vice president joe biden and jack lew have asked for new restrictions, while secretary of
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state john kerry is negotiating. >> it is not yet decided if syria will join negotiations. details are still being ironed out about the terms. the u.n., u.s. and russia hope to start that by the end of this year. >> iran's foreign minister saying sectarian violence is probably the biggest threat to global security. he accuses some sunni countries of fear mongering, fanning the flames of animosity for short-sighted political gains. syria, pakistan are also countries dealing with the sectarian violence. >> a crockdown on undocumented workers. illegal workers being forced out of you riyadh.
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>> from coast-to-coast, the nation taking time out to honor the sacrifices of its servicemen and women. ♪ ♪ >> filipino americans trying to keep the faith and they worry about their loved ones back at home. >> we want to take another look at some of the damage of the philippines ravaged by typhoon haiyan. sometimes a picture is worth more than a thousand words.
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>> you're looking live at arlington national cemetery in washington, d.c. this day. the burial ground honors those who have served in the military. funerals are held there each and every day. >> straight ahead, you're going to hear from filipino americans operating, trying to contact
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their loved ones in that typhoon-ravaged homeland. first, lets check the weather with meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> temperatures are going to drop. some of these veterans day events getting in just in time before the bottom falls out, so to speak. temperatures this morning, if you've been watching with us. we started at midnight at 39 degrees. even though the sun is up, the temperatures are still dropping. omaha is another place these temperatures will be falling. minneapolis stuck in the 20's with that old air coming in. that's going to sink southward. oklahoma city in the 50's, tomorrow morning around freezing. it might not get past 40 for our high tomorrow. then it spreads to the east coast. enjoy these first today before that drops out, as well. >> nicole, thank you very much. filipino americans say they feel helpless. most areas hit by the typhoon
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have no power or phone service. concerned relatives and friends have no way to reach out to loved ones. ♪ >> right now, all laura lambert can do is pray. she's a member at the filipino united church of christ in the richmond hills section of new york. her brother and relatives live on the island in the southern philippines, one of the main areas hardest hit by typhoon haiyan. >> i'm anxious, because i haven't heard from them for two nights. i've been trying to call them for two days, two nights, but sometimes the phones would ring, but nobody would pick up. it didn't say that i can't get through or unattended. sometimes there is no connection, it's dead. >> widespread outages have made communication near impossible. lambert said her faith gives her
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something to hold on to. >> we're just hopeful. what can we hold on to, right? hope. >> the pastor said the church has been raising funds for the victims of a devastating earthquake that rocked the philippines just weeks ago, now this. >> as one friend said, we cannot change the path of the typhoon, but we can have a good attitude in facing this typhoon, so as a pastor, i want to speak about the hope, to rise up from death to life. >> faith he says they'll need as the information of the scope of the disaster unfolds. >> parishioners here at the united church of christ plan to raise money to help their families a understand friends who have been devastated by the typhoon, but their biggest fear was damaged roads and bridges, is that the aid won't get there. aljazeera, richmond hills, new
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york. >> the disaster is hitting close to home in southern california. there are 4 million filipino americans living in the sufficient. one quarter live in the l.a. area. the community has organized a 5k charity walk and dozens of filipino churches are collecting food, clothing and money. some raise in funds have relatives who have lost everything. >> all the rice crops were ruin'd, the house was underwater. >> many filipino americans have not yet heard from their loved ones overseas and several organizations are coordinating relief efforts for typhoon victims. the u.n. world food program is sending supplies, also working to restore communications. you can donate $10 by texts aid on your cell phone or visit their website at wfpusa.org. unicef is moving supplies.
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you can donate to them. the american red cross said anyone who wants to mail a check to local red cross chapters should do so, said you should ride pill teens typhoon and flood in the memo line, or you can give on line to the red cross. >> just a short time ago, this emotional scene in warsaw poland where a major conference on climate change is underway. the philippine delegation receiving a standing ovation. some members of that delegation visibly moved to tears by that show of support. >> hundreds of foreign workers in saudi arabia are heading back to their home countries after a night of protests and clashes that left one ethiopian and one saudi dead. men and women bringing their belongings to police buses, taken to a center before being deported. thousands of migrant workers were lined up after amnesty linked to employer rules
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expired. we have more. >> in riyadh, men of rounded up by police after hundreds protested against a visa crackdown in the kingdom. many are from ethiopia. those who overstayed their visas are urged to turn themselves in. >> they can surrender individually or with families. >> in april, the government announced an amnesty for workers to get their immigration situation worked out or face prison. hundreds of thousands of workers simply decided to return home. last week, the amnesty ended and the crackdown began. >> we launched the campaign. this comes with correcting the current situation of violations of residents and employment to eradicate this. >> many workers complained that
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they haven't been given enough time to get their paperwork in order. >> we need way to say make it easier. we need a period of time. i think that this time frame that passed wasn't enough. we need at least two years for people to get organized and for this trade in visas to end. >> it had a sponsor ship immigration, tying them to employers. this means they can't change jobs or leave the country without their boss' permission. >> this has been festering for years. a large number of people, different ethnicities, language barriers. >> the saudi government argues its a plan to create jobs for its own people. many who traveled to the kingdom
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to find work may instead find themselves in prison, unable to get the papers they need to keep earning money. >> nearly a million foreign workers have left saudi arabia over the last three months. here's what's making news in the financial markets this morning. the stock market on a roll pointing to a positive start this morning, the futures are higher right now. expectedly strong jobs gave stocks a lift friday. it added to the speculation about when the fed would cut back on stimulus funds pumped into the monetary programs. trading gibbs this morning with the dow at an all time high. the s&p 500 at 17,070. the nasdaq at 39,019. the bond market closed today for veterans day. overseas, trades reacting to the u.s. jobs report, european stocks mostly higher at this hour. strong start to the week for
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asian stocks, tokyo picking up, be and hang congress picking up 1.5%. >> overseas students are flocking here. more than 800,000 international students enrolled in u.s. colleges and universities last year. that is a 7% increase over the previous year. nearly half of those students are from china, india and south korea. the number of students studying abroad on the rice, but on a slightly smaller scale. >> target is now the latest retailer to say it will open earlier on thanksgiving this year, opening at 8:00 p.m. they will remain open for 27 hours, closing at 11:00 p.m. the next day. it is the latest effort by retailers to get a jump on the holiday shopping season. that jeopardized black friday shopping. >> the average price of a gallon
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of regular gas is now $3.22. gas prices usually ease toward the end of the year, because the peek driving season is over, and that helps with holiday travelers. >> three major problems converging to cause a cries in southern italy. the mafia and cancer. we report on this deadly dilemma. >> this is a land where grass barely grows. in the countryside around naples, it has been polluted for decades by waste. it is not only killing the environment, it's also killing them. >> first, my husband was diagnosed with cancer, than me, my neighbor and six of my colleagues all got cancer, too. that's when i started suspecting it had something to do with the nearby landfill.
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>> they are among hundreds who say the mountains of toxic waste illegally dumped by the local mafia for decades has led to a dramatic rise in cancer rates in the area. back in 1997, a former mafia boss admitted that organized crime buried millions of tons of toxic wave coming from italy and europe, a lucrative, dirty business. in a statement made recently public, he said about the people living near the landfills, they are all at risk of dying from cancer within 20 years. i don't think they will survive. 16 years later, a local oncologist said with cancer rates in the area three times higher than the national average, the prediction is now coming true. >> what really hurts is not only discovering the criminals have been poisoning us for 20 years, but discovering that the state knew about it and hasn't warned us.
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>> it's not only toxics industrial waste that ruins the local ecosystem and health of residents around here. all kind of unsorted generic waste ends up in hundreds of illegal landfills like this one, turning this region into italys unofficial dumping site. >> now residents call for the authorities to clean up their act, so that this toxic dump won't pollute the area for generations to come. aljazeera. >> the cancer tumors have increased by more than 40% in towns around naples. >> still ahead, rushing to help filipino typhoons. >> hear from richie incognito ahead in sports. >> fighting for compensation for
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their help in liberating france during world war ii. >> live at the starting point of what is expected to be the largest veterans day parade in the country. coming up, this year honors a specific part of the military population, and we'll tell you who. >> you're looking live right now on this veterans day at the uss intrepid. the carrier was launched in world war ii. 3,000 americans onboard.
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>> every weeknight on al jazeera america change the way you look at news at 9 pm with an encore at midnight, go deeper on the nations top stories with america tonight >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you... >> investigative journalism that's engaging, powerful, thought provoking... >> there's nothing but hopelessness... >> it's either kill or be killed... >> america tonight, right after live news at 8 and 11 eastern. >> welcome to al jazeera america i'm john seigenthaler, and here's a look at the headlines... >> al jazeera america, there's more to it. >> welcome back to aljazeera america, i'm del walters. at this hour, supplies are being rushed to the philippines from around the world, but there's one big problem, reaching the
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stranded victims who live in isolated areas. we have more from manila. >> there is no shortage of aid that's coming in. even locally, there are so many volunteers want i can to help out, this is a 10th of the countries population affected by this storm, and everybody else who saw i happen just feels i am potent and volunteered to work with the government, aid agencies, n.g.o.'s, even groups set up on their own to help those in need. the problem is this and government officials are very aware of it, many of these places cannot receive the aid, because they are impossible to get to. roads remain damaged. they cannot get to them by land. airports are closed. they can't begin flying things in to the areas that need them the most and sea ports have been almost completely destroyed by the storm surge, in some places as high as five meters.
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the aid is coming in. the biggest problem is how to distribute it in a way that is the most efficient. the army spokesperson said their maybe goal are clearing operations. they are flying in two battalions to the city to begin clearing operations there. there were already 15,000 troops stationed in the central philippine islands, however, they, too are victims of the storm now and needing support from other parts of the country. they cannot get equipment in with the men, they are going to have to use whatever equipment and hardware they can salvage from the debris. >> that is aljazeera from manila. >> veterans day honor the men and women who served in the military. the 22 million veterans, 1.6 of them are women. many being honored today are seen years, 9.6 million
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veterans, more than 45% are over the age of 65. young veterans, 1.8 million veterans are 35 or younger. >> the nation's largest veterans day parade is going to kick off in new york city. erika joins us live from the start of the parade at madison square park. good morning. >> good morning. they are calling this america's parade, because it is expected to be the largest in the country, celebrating veterans day. 27,000 people are expected to march up fifth avenue. we were at madison square garden, the starting point of all the celebration. this year's entire celebration is featuring the u.s. early. they are honoring specifically women in service and female veterans, in fact, the grand marshal of the parade is retired general who served 37 years in the army.
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she is the first woman to become a four star general. joining me now is a veteran himself, good morning to you, first of all, thank you so much for your service. this man fought in the tet offensive in the vietnam war 1967-1968. how often do you think about that time? >> every day. every day. in truth, it's the thought of the good, the bad and the ugly and on a day like today, it's such a recognition and so much honor that we're receiving, so it wells us with pride. >> excellent. you are the executive director of the group which puts this on here, united war veterans council of new york. first remind folks why it's so important to have the parade again at 11:11 in the morning on 11/11. >> that's when the guns stopped. they ceased at 11:00 this morning.
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that meant world peace at that time. we're always regaining that thought, that maybe again, it will be world peace. >> featured service is the u.s. army. what can we expect? will we see more of a tribute to them along the parade route? >> without a doubt. the actual chief of staff of the entire army is here. when the general steps out, he's the top, top army. all his troops following behind, men and women both, yeah. >> excellent. honoring specifically women, obviously, you've got retired general an dunwoody. i talked to many who feel inspired by her. >> she had 70,000 juniors, men and women both. she made it in a world that was exclusively men, you know, all men were generals, so to become the very first general means a lot. it really does. >> especially in a fitting year, obviously earlier this year, the military lifting the ban on
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women in combat. >> exactly. when i was in vietnam, they were nurses, god bless them. now, you have a person next to you with a rifle or gun or driving the trucks and so forth. >> thank you again for your service and for joining us this morning. everybody, 11:11, you can see the hustle and bustle, you can be along the parade route. that's the very latest here in new york. back to you guys. >> >> john burn served in the army and coast guard for two decades. he received a valor award for behaviorry serving in afghanistan. we want to thank you for being with us this morning. you received the award for 36 hours of continuous combat? >> >> there was an ambush and
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firefight which i took part in with a lot of other servicemen. >> veterans day used to be celebrated for the veterans. now a lot of people say it's a day off, it's a time to go to the mall. how does that make you feel? >> i feel good about veterans day. i think it acknowledges the men and women who served. it's not approximate about them, it's about what we bring to the table and how we've accommodated our country to live the way that they do. >> is it a shared sacrifice, though, up to vietnam, there was a draft. as a result, the pain and agony, really of war was spread out across the entire populace. now, we have an all volunteer army. is it fair? >> i think it's fair. i think men and women of the armed services know what they're getting into and the day and age that we're in, and they're volunteering, knowing what could or could not happen.
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>> would you feel better, though, if there were people from more privileged backgrounds that fought or did you see that there were a lot of people from more privileged backgrounds fighting beside you? >> a lot of my cam rads, men and women are from various backgrounds. i think it's a widespread of different economic backgrounds of the individuals that join the service. >> you not only fought, you went back to afghanistan for humanitarian reasons. why? >> well, i didn't go back to afghanistan for humanitarian reasons. we saw and witnessed the good the afghan military is doing for the men and women and children and livestock. >> i want to show you the field right now. describe what you're seeing. that's you, much different now. does that take you back to being there and can you ever forget
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what happened there? >> i don't think i'd ever want to forget. i think it was a humbling experience. i think i brought a lot of positive things to the table for the afghan people. the group of gentleman that i fought with, marines and army, with did a lot of good in the area in which we served over there. >> i do want to show this other picture. this is you and children in afghanistan. you were talking about the humanitarian side of what you did there. a lot of people focus oh so much on the battle, they forget it is a battle not only to win the war but also the hearts and minds of the afghan people. describe the picture. >> there were boxes upon boxes sent to us by the public, my parents, families, to hand out, and to give to the children of afghanistan that aren't as fortunate as most of us. it felt good. it was rewarding to see that, along with the good fight that we were fighting, that we were also really making a difference
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in someone's life. >> we hear so much talk about the war its. you hear the politicians in washington describe whether we should be there, shouldn't be there, but the people from afghanistan, when you talk to them, did they appreciate what you did? >> a lot of them did, you know, there were smiles and hugs, and there were the same children coming and visiting us at our catch every day. we were winning the minds and that hearts of them. >> john burn, thanks for being with us. army and coast guard, right? >> yes, sir. army commendation medal. >> 36 hours of combat is a lot, john. >> boy scouts marching in a parade in los angeles. take a look. >> the parade in l.a. followed by a celebration at an american legion post, honorling 238t 238th birthday of the u.s. marine corps.
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a showdown between six states and secretary chuck hagel. states are texas, georgia, louisiana, mississippi, oklahoma, and west virginia. secretary hagel said the states are violating federal law. >> in the second world war, 200,000 soldiers from the french colonies and africa fought to liberate france from the in his decease. while fighting the war was ward, the veterans say what happened afterward was a lot tougher. aljazeera reports from the outskirts of the capitol. >> proud to have liberated france from nazi germany. still shocked by what the army did to them in return.
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it's been 70 years since french officers turned their guns on their own soldiers. those shooting were white, those killed, black. the french admit that 35 died, but war veterans say 300 black african soldiers were killed that day. they were all former prisoners of war, freed from german camps and brought here to a holding facility on the outskirts. this is where they died. some were demanding equal pay with white soldiers, others just wanted their unpaid wages. for the french, it was a mutiny, for these war veterans a call for justice. >> it breaks our hearts, fighting under one uniform for france were massacred. france hasn't responded to our demands. >> there's no mention of this massacre in french history books and it certainly isn't taught in schools. only last year did the french
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president acknowledge what he described as a bloody repression. >> this is a page of history we tried to erase from collective memory. there is part racism and colonial mentality in this, for the african is still considered like a naive child with no role to play in history. >> france cribs to have strong military and political ties with its former colony. >> this is a chapter of world war ii history france wants closed. here, there are no commemoration plaques, no statues, just the memory of a few war veterans still alive. >> these are masked graves where the body was dumped. the cemetery is unkept and no one comes to visit. the caretaker believes it to be haunted. he said the soldiers' spirits
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won't rest until the peace is told. aljazeera, senegal. >> his death sparked a national debate about gays and bullying. loved once are now retracing the footsteps to where he took his life. the university student committed suicide after his roommate secretly videotaped him kissing another man. this was the final destination in a 37-mile walk. >> john henry smith is here with sports. we finally hear from one of the players in that miami dolphins scandal. >> the accused harasser in the bullies scandal sat down for a lengthy interview over the weekend. in rewards to the now infamous text message he sent to jonathan martin in we have he referred to
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martin at a half n word, richie in cognito tried to put that text in perspective, saying this situation i guess not a bullying issue. he said he regrets using those racial slurs. >> when the words are put in the context, i understand why eyebrows get raised, but people don't know how john and i communicate to one another. for instance, a week before this went down, jonathan martin the accidented me on my phone "i will murder your whole fing family." do i think jonathan martin was going to murder my family? not one bit. i knew it was coming from a brother, a friend, a tome mate. that just puts in context how we communicate with one another. i'm not a racist, and to judge me by that one word is wrong. in no way, shape or form is it ever acceptable for me to use that word even friend to friend on a voice mail. i can't tell you who overreacted, who did what.
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i can just be accountable poor my actions. my actions were coming from a place of love. that no matter how bad and vulgar it sounds, that's how we communicate, that's how our friendship was, and those are the fact and what i'm accountable for. as the leader, as his best friend on the team, that's what has me miffed. i never saw it coming. >> in response to incognitos assertion that jonathan martin sent him an off-colored text, martin's attorney sent a copy of a text in which the words "i will murder your whole explea active family" was on a picture of a smiling woman and smiling dog, that text allegedly coming from jonathan martin. >> peyton manning and the denver
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broncos, manning doesn't mind who's on the sidelines, he comes to play. chargers could not stop them. peyton connects again, two touchdowns for the duo. could they score the hat trick. broncos win 28-20. later, manning took a shot to the legs. he'll need an mri today to see how bad the injury is. >> the saints drew brees flipped off to thomas for one of two scores. the saints go on to spank the cowboys. they notch an nfl record, 40 first downs in the process. >> after a 1-3 start, the
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carolina panthers have rolled to a win. in tennessee, the jaguars are winless no more. they beat tennessee 29-27. >> a little too much celebration. >> i'm happy for jacksonville. >> we all are. >> a senior leader of a group linked to al-qaeda is dead. he was killed late sunday. we are joined live from islamabad, pakistan. what do we know about the senior leader who was killed? >> the son of the famous
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commander, also the senior leader is said to have been shot on the outskirts of islamabad buying bread sunday evening. two assailants on a motorcycle are said to have approached him and fired a volley of automatic fire on him, killing him on the spot. his body was then taken close to the afghan border. so far, no one has claimed responsibility for this attack happening on the outskirts of islamabad. >> how much of an influence does the network have on those tribal regions in pakistan? >> the network is an integral part of the taliban. they have been able to regroup on the afghan side of the border, as i mentioned to you. his brother, a leading taliban commander who has considerable
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influence in afghanistan. even though they have some influence in the pakistani tribal regions, their main base of operation is said to have moved on the afghan side of the border. >> reporting from islamabad, pakistan, thank you very much. >> still ahead, a philippine survivor story, one of our own, an aljazeera journalist riding out the storm that flattened nearly everything around her. >> a cold front bringing the colder air and areas of snow. i'll have the complete veterans day forecast. >> on this veterans day, you are looking live right now at the uss intrepid, docked in new york. we'll be right back.
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on august 20th, al jazeera america introduced
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>> welcome back to aljazeerad america. just ahead, one of our colleagues shares a harrowing experience. she went from covering the typhoon in the philippines to struggling to survive it. first we want to get a look at weather that's going to rain on
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your veterans day parade. >> in the most part, this is going to be real cooperative weather, because the front isn't bring ago lot of moisture with it and even the cold air is dipping in a lot of places into tomorrow. we have light precipitation, rochester, minnesota getting it this morning. some of our biggest events, not moving in quite yet. as with we move to clouds, temperatures will stop dropping. new york, that is going t to be sunshine. the temperature bottom out tomorrow. that's good. washington, d.c., there will be a ceremony here, lots of sunshine for that. birmingham, lots of sunshine, here, as well. once again, happy veterans day to all my fellow veterans, back to you. >> thank you very much. >> when super typhoon haiyan hit the philippines, our journalist
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found herself in the thick of things. she was getting ready to do a live shot, the next thing, she first fighting for her life. >> it was a vicious force that paralyzed the entire province. typhoon haiyan swept through central fill teens early friday morning. it destroyed everything in its path, power lines, roads, also villages, all wiped out in an instant. the typhoon arrived three hours earlier that that expected. thousands of people were trapped when rather rose as high as five meters. we were one of them, right at the eye of haiyan's wrath. >> now we're trying to make our way out of this place. this is what a little over three hours of the wrath of typhoon haiyan has broth into tacloban. this place has become a ghost town. just a few hours, abwe were, ourselves, caught up in the middle of what is said to be the most powerful typhoon in the
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world this year. it is hard, because at some point, we were preparing for a live and all of a sudden, the water started going up. before we knew it, we were by the ceiling, clinging for our lives. it's a miracle that we survived. what we really need to do now is make our way out of here, because there's nothing left, only destruction and death. >> it was the world's most powerful typhoon on record and the damage for a small province is unprecedented. the governor fears that at least 20,000 people are dead. those who survived face far more difficult days ahead. the province is isolated. thousands have been left homeless, unsure exactly where to go, searching for shelter in the few structures that remain standing. almost everyone here has a family member or a friend who has died. the reality, too hard for many to grasp. >> we almost drowned.
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it's so difficult. we have nothing left, no place to sleep, not even dry clothes to wear. >> we were in the gymnasium, our evacuation center. it suddenly collapsed. everyone started to run everywhere to save their own lives. >> this hospital is one of the few establishments still operating after the typhoon. doctors here are working under strained conditions, operating on the injured without electricity and clean water. the short supply of medicine is running out. most of the areas remain unreachable, the dead, the wounded, and those who survived cut off from the rest of the world. at nightfalls, people become even more desperate. the devastation is stallerring, but the true extent of the damage remainsun known.
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aljazeera, central philippines. >> as you can see, she is doing fine, back doing what she loves to do. a state of emergency still in effect in tacloban. other continues in two minutes. we have a picture we want to leave you with, the tomb of the unknown on this veterans day. also a look at some of the thousands of gray stones that line the burial site. 624-acres honor those who have served our country.
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determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's
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some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well.
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