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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 21, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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sealing the deal the u.s. and afghanistan reach a tentative agreement that will keep thousand of american troops there after 2014. now hamid karzai must sell the idea to tribal leaders. >> trey raydull takes a leave of absence after pleading guilty to drug possession. >> and rising from the ashes, a volcanic eruption in japan creates an island in the pacific ring of fire.
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>> good morning and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. the future of american troops in afghanistan is being decided by a group of afghan tribal leaders. afghan and american leaders said yes to a security deal and today afghan president hamid karzai is pushing a council to accept it. the decision now lies with the loya jirga. >> translation: you are here representing the afghan nation. i was under pressure not to organise the loya jirga. when it comes to issues of national significance it is important to hold the jirgas. >> up to 15,000 troops could remain in the region if the security pact is signed, including 8,000-12,000 american troops. >> it is entirely train, equip and assist - there is no combat role for the united states force, and the bilateral security agreement is an effort
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to clarify for afghans and for united states military forces exactly what the rules are with respect to that ongoing relationship. >> here are the terms of the deal - u.s. forces that remain after next year receive immunity from afghan courts. that was a contentious issues. the proposal says the u.s. will respect afghan's sovereignty and integrity, but forbids american forces targetting afghan civilians, especially in their homes. many afghans oppose the deal, saying they want all foreign troops out. jane ferguson reports. >> his family was murdered by an american soldier. last march this man lost his wife, brother, cousin and niece in kandahar provins, killed, along with 12 other afghans, by
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u.s. army staff sergeant robert bales. now he wants all u.s. forces out of his country. >> they will not give military bases we don't want them. they killed our people, destroyed our villages. they came at three in the morning to our house. the children were sleeping in the room. my own family. the majority of the american forces are due to leave. washington wants certain conditions met. under the proposed security agreement, the u.s. government wants its soldier to remain immune from afghan law. the u.s. puts its own soldiers on trial. in kandahar, which has seen some of the worst fighting, people say it's unacceptable. >> translation: they should be put on trial in afghanistan.
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if they commit a grime in afghanistan, afghanistan should try them. no one should she that in their courts. >> it's a point of contention. it could cripple afghanistan. that's because until now the u.s. government was paying the salaries of the afghanistan forces. if the agreement was not signed, that flow of money could stop. it's a bill of more than $3.5 million. where did you get that money. the national revenue of afghanistan, the most hopeful, optimistic figures that you have, it's $3 billion in 2015. that $3 billion couldn't take care of our ordinary budget, let alone the development budget or the security budget. this is not a matter of choice. it's a matter of legitimacy for afghanistan. >> afghan president hamid karzai
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pushed for guarantees the u.s. will assist his country to fight against foreign aggression, it's a demand for the u.s. to confront pakistani support for armed groups operating in afghanistan. >> afghanistan in the past few decades has experienced proxy wars. so we have been talking to the u.s. hoping to have a kind of definition for foreign aggression, which could include proxy war as well as the traditional aggression we have seen. >> the heated debate over security agreements shows it's not simply a matter of a few u.s. military bases. if the afghan government signs, they want conditions to be specific. over a year of negotiations between washington and kabul brought the two sides closer. there has been no final agreement. now the african president is turning those issues over to a consultative debate in the capital to see if the community
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leaders can give it their support. >> and those community leaders are collectively known as the loya jirga or grand assembly. they'll discuss the proposal for three days before announcing a decision. >> a car bomb exploded at a market in iraq, killing at least 25 people, injuring dozens more. the attack happened in the town of sedia, 40 miles north-east of baghdad. the frequency of the bombing raised fears that iraq do descent into the bloodshed of 2006 when tens of thousands died. >> in pakistan a trike by a suspect u.s. drone killed six people, firing on a school in north-west pakistan. it was an attack that occurred outside a tribal region. most of the previous strikes were in remote regions.
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the leader of the pakistani taliban was killed earlier. the school was controlled by the haqqani group, linked to the taliban. >> secretary of state kerry says current talks offer the best chance in a decade. six world powers will be at the bargaining table. they are offering to heed sanctions. al jazeera's james bays has a wrap on the first day of talks. >> back in geneva two weeks after the talks stalled. iran yn foreign minister and catherine ashton. an interim deal on iran's nuclear program is close, but pressures, constraints on both sides have been growing since they were last here. >> in tehran in a televised address the mon in control in iran, supreme leader ali
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khamenei supports the talks but there are red lines negotiators cannot cross. >> translation: the parts of the deal i insist is that the rights of the nation be observed. including nuclear rights. >> last time around john kerriers and his counterparts were here negotiating until late into the night. this time the talks are being handled at a lower level by senior officials. all are aware of strong opposition of deals from israel. and inside the u.s. congress they must overcome differences in their ranks. we know why a deal failed last time. france was unhappy that they could keep the stockpile enriched to 20%. and the heavy water plant under construction - they want the work halted.
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once active it will be hard to shut down. a military strike will release harmful radiation, that could kill thousands of civilians. >> those who followed the diplomacy surrounding the nuclear program believe the nest few days could be make or break. >> you could make a case that the opportunity will get smaller if a deal is not made at these talks. on the american side we have seen the pressure that the obama administration is under, coming from iran, congress, israel, the pro-israel lobby. that will get more intense. talks will condition over the coming hours. a senior u.s. official said they were making good progress, but added this is a hard road to walk. james bays, al jazeera, geneva. >> the road to agreement is a difficult one. iranian's chief negotiators said tehran would only sign a deal if
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it's guaranteed the right to enrich you rinium from start to finish. where do the negotiations stand right now? >> they have begun in ernst - this being the second day after the arrivals. they are behind closed doors. we understand there are a number of meetings happening. their bilateral multiparty talks, and the variety. the pace seems to be diligent. it is - described as a working session. people are here to get to the nitty-gritty to work something out. the specifics, language of a pension document. we do no certainly today, as i say, behind closed doors, but we know that the pace is pretty
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intense. >> you have heard the foreign minister's message. it mirrors another. they say they will not clamp down on nuclear rights. >> certainly people are aware of it. there's a general consensus amongst the p5+1 group, specifically the u.s. allegations, a lot of what is said with the language is what is meant from domestic. the delegation doesn't want to seem too - that a potential agreement will have been reached too easily. they put out a lot of language meant for the folks back home. hard iners so they know that they are not giving away whatever is demanded of them by the p5+1. taking an awful lot of that with
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a grain of salt. >> we know unless the supreme leader sanctioned the talks. >> a son of a u.s. veteran says his 85-year-old father is held in north korea. merrill newman's son said his father was taken off an airliner. he fought in the korean war and was visiting as a tourist. he was detained after talking about his service with the north korean authorityies. north korea detained at least six other americans since 2009. >> money and supplies from around the world poured into the philippines since typhoon haiyan hit. volunteers are rushing to help storm survivors. >> that country has a history of being battered by natural
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disasters. the damage caused by typhoon haiyan is unprecedented. 4,000 people were killed in the central philippines on november 8th. the number keeps going up. thousands of homes have to wait. millions of people displaced. pictures like these resulted in international support pouring in. typhoon haiyan is a tragedy that is all-too familiar. this is one of japan's biggest aid responses. returning a favour to a country that the government says was there to help them. >> japan was helped by neighbouring countries, including the philippines. >> providing logistics, it learned from a disaster killing over 2,000. the indonesian government is here to help, not only because the philippines is an important
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regional ally, but the destruction of typhoon haiyan reminds the intooern government of what happened during the indonesian soon army in 2004. these are experiences that can be learned of. >> learn to you to execute a response. >> this is the first sign that benigno aquino's had to respond to a crisis. he has been criticised. many say the administration failed to provide relief earlier on. >> transparency is an issue, hundreds of millions of aid has been pouring in. donors are worried some of it may be lost to corruption. the philippine government promised this will not happen, ensuring aid will reach those that need it most. aid groups say the lack of
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leadership on the ground makes it difficult for organizations to coordinate help. >> it's a matter of engaging, communicating with people saying, "this is how we'll help you, this is how you can ask us for help." >> reassurances from a government that survivors are not getting. many are saying all they want is to know when and how they can start. >> the u.n. says it has received $129 million no donations and hopes to raise $300 million. >> areas devastated by tornados - they'll help to determine eligibility for federal help. damage caused by the storms will cost about $1 billion. the service says 55 twisters touchdown, the most in one day
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this year. eight people were kill. the next storm is bringing a cold and miserable rain. it's a system causing problems. let's bring in metrologist nicole mitchell. >> it's a cold front with everything from snow to rain, rain with it, and some brutally cold air in a one/two shot. here is the band of moisture, i can't imagine whether i would less likely want to be outside than a cold rain. you'll probably see it later in the day. but not only are we dealing with the wet weather, i'll have more on the precipitation. we have some cold air moving into the reemon, another arctic blast will be coming in, starting to move across the country saturday and into sunday. a lot of temperatures through the midwest, middle section of the country to texas and into
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the north-east. some dropping 20-30 degrees. this will bring the wind shields for the north-east below zero. we have some of those cold wind chills in places like denver and a subzero wind chill as we start the day. it will be a mess. i mention some of the precipitation i see. this is through the day into tomorrow. we could be starting with freezing rain tomorrow for parts of the southern plains. we know how treasurerous that makes the roads. we have snow in denver. talking about the specific morning temperatures in a couple of minutes. a mess for the next couple of days. >> we'll bring out the snow boots. the freshman congressman convicted of cocaine possession is speaking out. in a news conference, trey raydull said he is taking a leave of absence and will donate
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his salary to charity whilst in rehab. we have more. >> i'm sorry. i have no excuse for what i have done. i'm not going to sit here and try to make an excuse for what i have done. >> with that apology trey raydull became the first member of congress convicted of cocaine possession. he was buffed in washington d.c. as part of an fbi sting. he brought cocaine from an agent at a restaurant. after the money and drugs were exchanged federal agents moved in. >> how did you meet your dealer? >> at a court hearing on wednesday the rely can freshman pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one year's probation. later at a crowded news conference he expressed regret
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for an irresponsible choice. >> i let down the country and constituents. >> it's disappointing any time an elected official is let than honourable. >> if they can't make decisions on their own life, how do we trust decisions made for other people. >> trey raydull's political career started 10 months ago. voters elected him to represent the congressional district. before taking office he was a former radio host, tv anchor and newspaper owner who won his election due to tea party support. >> in his short time in office date day. >> i've only been here a few months. >> he requirement a bill requiring food stamp recipients to be drug tested. >> his office will be vacant as
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he takes time off to address addiction to drugs and alcohol. >> i want to be a better man for south-west florida and a better man for my family. >> if trey raydull makes it through his sentence of one year's probation, this conviction will be wiped from his criminal record. trey raydull is the first member of congress to be convicted of cocaine possession. he is not the only one with a police record. dozens have been found guilty through the years from possessing child porn, drink driving. >> here are a few:
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some of the most popular stores in america are talking action to make sure their clothes are made safely. which retailers are tightening standards at the factories where most of their clothes are made? >> people in the transgender community say they battle discrimination every day and why this makes them more likely to be more and uninsured. and looking at the george washington bridge connecting new jersey and new york this earlier i morning. -- early morning.
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. next leading american retailers improving safety standards for overseas workers that make the clothes we buy. let's look at temperatures first. >> don't shoot the messenger. we have had a drop, dramatic, especially in parts of the midwest. it will be spreading so it's getting colder. look at the core, the northern
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plains - billings at 2 degrees. running 20 below. that is some of that cold air initially moving in. we have an arctic blast. a lot of region will drop. as you continue to denver - 18 degrees. yesterday we were in the 40, we hit 60. today we have dropped from yesterday 26 degrees. wind chill below zero and we'll barely make it to 20. that's 60 degrees. we are really feeling the change. other temperatures - spreading to the midwest, enjoy the last warm day in places like memphis. >> thank you. walmart, macy's and the gapp are joining global retailers to toughen safety standards in bank le derby facties -- bangladeshi factories. more nan 11-00 workers were
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killed last april. the proposal calls for fire prevention at the factories that make goods for those stores. >> business news - stock futures are higher signalling a positive start to trading. it could change as the federal reserve appears to be spooking. stock and bond prices fell an minutes from the fed's latest figures were release the. here is where we stand: >> overseas - worries about the fed spreading to europe, stocks lower. in asia markets closing mixed. tokyo ended a losing strip with a 2% gain. seers is having a tough year, losing money, sals dropped 3% -- sales dropped 3%. it's the second-straight quarter
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it's had a loss. >> we have greater than 7% unemployment. that number could be a little soft given that there's a lot of people who have been unemployed for a long time. who are no longer seeking employment. they are out of the numbers and out of the mix. >> also on the earnings calendar. abercrombie and fitch. young adults in the u.s. are having a tough time dealing with debt. 19 to 29-year-olds have an average credit score of 628 know the national average, worse than the ratings of older generations. younger people are maxing out the credit card even though they are carrying less plastic. >> the international day of remembrance was recognised on wednesday. it was started as a vij ill for transgepder people killed because of their gender identity. few laws have been passed.
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as we report, transgender communities fight the battle every day. >> not a day goes buy that this woman doesn't worry that her transgender identity will cost her her life. >> i have been chased down the street. i've been attacked. i have been considered disposable. it's like it does not matter if we are alive or dead. >> this career path has been battled based on the difficulties every day. >> people in the transgender communities say they are caught in a vicious employment cycle. discrimination means they can't find work. leaving many homeless and without access to home care.
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>> the silvio lavero project, 15% live in poverty, compared to 4% of the population. 19% say they don't have health insurance. act visits are pushing the state of new york. medicare won't cover expenses for gender reassignment. >> it's not right. there are so many barriers. >> this nurse practitioner says lack of care explains why many transgender people attempted or committed used. >> 41% of transgender discrimination reported and that rate amongst the general population is 1.6%. our lives have value, people need to understand that. by sharing perupset tifs it's
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hoped in time people will. >> acts of violents are prevalent against transgender individuals. transgender europe says 1200 have been murdered across the contintent since 2008. 200 have been killed around the world last year. a u.s. security deal needs the approval of afghanistan tribal's leaders. al jazeera looks at the elders and its pivotal roll in keeping north america in afghanistan past 2014. >> and a tough law helping go after cyber offenders. >> and 50 years after john f. kennedy's assassination. >> i'm john henry smith - late wednesday night tigers and rangers fired up the byrners. details coming up in sports.
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details coming up in sports. details coming up in sports. details coming up in sports.
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details coming up in sports. rangers fired up the byrners.
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>> welcome back. i'm stephanie sy. after more than a decade of american troop presence a council of elders is deciding whether to let some u.s. forces stay behind in afghanistan. the u.s. and afghanistan have tentatively agreed on a proposed security deal, it could mean about 15,000 foreign troops would be posted there beyond 2014. the deal must be accepted by the coup of elders known as the loya jirga. jane ferguson joins us from kabul. good morning to you. the afghan president hamid karzai finished his address. we hear there was a surprise. what can you tell us? >> that's right. he made a long speech, over an hour. towards the end, after having
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discussed in detail the negotiations between him and u.s. secretary of state john kerry, announcing what the agreement had been come to between the two of them in terms of the particulars of this deal, just as he was closing his speech - he made a remark that surprised and confused a few people where he said if the bilateral agreement packed between america and afghanistan - approved by the jirga, a large meeting the elders, that's great. if it's approved by parliament it's great too. and the next step, the final step where he would sign it into law, he said he wouldn't sign it until after the elections next april. that is likely to come as a huge surprise to the americans - have needed the deal to be signed earlier than now. 2014 is incredibly close. it was quite a political ploy, a big announcement that is likely
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to have taken washington by surprise, by saying the americans in this bilateral security agreement need to bring security to afghanistan and need to bring security to the elections themselves. it's not until april next year. really, hamid karzai himself is going to keep these negotiations ongoing. the draft has been largely agreed between him and washington d.c. all that needs to happen is for it to be signed. it doesn't seem that will happen soon. >> it's a major development. we'll look to washington today for reaction on that. al jazeera's jane ferguson reporting from kabul afghanistan. here to talk about how this security agreement might affect afghanistan's future is mr richard bullet a columbian university professor specialising in middle eastern history and the history of islamic countries, thank you for joining us. you heard there are developments in the loya jirga, meanwhile, a
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lot of afghans seem divided about the presence of u.s. troops, don't they? >> i think there's a division, but the fundamentally this is an agreement that is likely to be approved by the loya jirga. getting the american presence confined to a training role will satisfy many of the reservations that afghans have about the combat role that american had in the past several years. >> help us to understand the role of the jirga. the tribaledly exercise how influential they are? >> this is a traditional assembly. it's been convened for various reasons over many, many decades. it's a very large assembly. and i think when you have something like this, where you have a carefully negotiated agreement, and then you put it before an assembly that doesn't have a clear-cut organization,
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it's kind of an awkward contrast. i don't have any doubt but that this will pass. >> what do you make of the development that hamid karzai will wait longer to sign it than the u.s. hoped. >> in order to withdraw all troops at the end of 2014. >> which was the original plan. >> that means you have to start way in advance to do that withdrawal. and to postpone the commitment until april, is - it will be very difficult. there will be a lot of pressure on hamid karzai to sign before that time. >> we'll see what washington says. the broader issue is how much troops and the billions in aid - how much can it help afghanistan to stablilize? >> i think we have to
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stablilize. the men's have support for afghanistan bacjafghanistan bac war with the soviets. after the - after the commitment our commitment to the government was week, and led to the rise of the taliban and al qaeda. we have a cheer notion that if we do not have a continuing presence in afghanistan, the possibility of negative developments is very high. so i think there's a pressure on the american part to get the deal down and on the av -- afghan parts. >> professor richard bullet from columbia university, thank you for coming in. >> two suspected al qaeda fighters were killed in yemen in a clash with security forces. the suspects were hiding in three houses. they opened fire as forces were
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searching the area. officials say weapons and documents related to al qaeda were seized. six were killed in pakistan by a suspected u.s. drone. pakistani officials say three missiles struck a school, one of the first attacks outside a tribal reason. we are in islamabad with a report. >> this drone strike is significant for a few reasons, not least because it's the first to occur since the killing of hakimullah mehsud. the leader of the pakistani taliban. he was killed in a u.s. drone strike, controversial in pakistan. the government said they were hours away from starting peace talks with the pakistani taliban. the drone strike was significant because of where it took place.
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this is in a province where the democratically elected provincial government, an area that hasn't seen drone strikes. j since the drone strike began in pakistan, only two happened in the province the the fast majority are in the remote tribal areas, it is significant because of the target. we understand that the islamic school targeted is operated by the haqqani network. it's a group, a banned terrorist organization. it's placed on the u.s. sanctions list. if the drone strike achieved targetting someone from the haqqani group, it would be a success. >> president obama stepped up drone strikes after taking office in 2009. there were more than 100 attacks in 2010. it decreased to two dozen because of pakistani opposition.
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the central african republic is urging the leader josie koni to verandaher. officials say they are in contact with him. he was indicted for wore crimes at the hague. he waged a guerilla war before taking his fighters into the jungles of central africa eight years ago. >> a man suspected of shooting attacks in paris. the unidentified man was arrested in an underground parking lot six miles north of paris. french police received a tip. the man is suspected in the shooting of a photographer at a paris newspaper and a gun incident at a bank. >> illinois is the 16th state to legalize same-sex marriage. governor pat quin signing the law at the university of chicago on a desk abraham lincoln used to wries his inaugural speech.
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>> charges have been dropped against two girls accused of bullying a class mate who later killed herself. charges were dismissed. they were charged after a 12-year-old school mate committed suicide. the attorney for the 12-year-old wants an apology. >> there's a right and wrong which dealing with problems. by arresting a child and accusing her and going on national television and saying she's responsible for the death offer ex-best presented is n conscionable. >> the teens have been charged with aggravated stalking, which is a felony. canada is taking steps to stop cyber bullying. the government is responding to high-profile cases of teen suicides. daniel lak reports. >> canadians were capt vated and appalled when this plaintiff video by 15-year-old amanda todd
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was seen across the country. posted on youtube it went viral after she killed herself in october 2012. a victim of bullying by extortionsists who persuaded her to take obscene webcam pictures and black mailed her. retaya parsons was 17 when raped at a party. she later killed herself, as did todd, a 15-year-old from canada's prairies, bullied by classmates, via the internet. >> people online think they can be anonymous without repercussions. the anonymity contributes, but it's 24/7 so you can police someone any time of day and night and they can't get away from you. >> cyber bullying is sexual in nature. there are growing calls for a
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change in the company. canada's government decided to act. >> in ottoway ministers announced a bill banning the sharing of intimate images on kline without the consent of the person. >> canadians demanded action, we delivered. when bullying reaches criminal behaviour, we need to ensure laws can address it and we need to make sure victims of cyber bullying. "anonymous" took on cyber bullying as a cause. intervening in the amanda todd and parsons case, threatening to search out and expose bullies and extortionists. parents say the goal is clear, making sure that some day there are no more amanda said to. >> the bill would give police new powers to investigate internet crimes, including the capability to track phone cues
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and data without a warrant. john henry smith joins us in sport with word of a trade in major league baseball. when he was a kid prince fielder was a bat boy, dad played for the team. he's on his way out of town, two seasons after signs prince fielder to a nine year, $214 million contract. he's been traded to the texas rangers in exchange for ian kinsler. he had a no-trade clause, but texas was a team he'd go to. the tigers will send $30 million to the rangers. ian kinsler has four years, $62 million on his contract. prince fielder hit 279, 25 home run, 126 rbi, about the not as good in the post seen hitting 225, no home runs or rbis. as for the 31-year-old ian
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kinsler. he hit 237, 72 rbi, and the move frees up money for tigers to responsible resign matt scherzer. >> baseball was reading up, so was alex rodriguez's temper. the new york bankees third baseman stormed out in the middle of an aggrievance hearing saying the proceedings were a farce. the ruling by the arbiter set him off saying that bull sel. >> oo g would not have -- bud selig would not have to test any. he appeared as a d guest on mike francesca's show and throw shade on selig's transactions. >> i slammed a table. kicked a briefcase and slammed out of the room. i knew it was restrictive and was not fair.
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what we saw was just disgusting and the fact that the man from milwaukee that put the suspension on me with not one bit of evidence - something i didn't do - and he doesn't have the courage to come look me in the eye and tell me this is why i did 211. i shouldn't serve an inning. this guy should come to our city - i know he doesn't like new york. i love the city. i love being a yankee. my daughters grew up in new york. the embarrassment he put me and my family through and he doesn't have the courage to see me and tell me this is why i'm going to destroy your career, and i thought right fully so this should end with him thursday, me friday under oath, put your money where your mouth is. into were you guilty of the charges? >> no. >> did you do anything wrong is this. >> no. >> did you do peds. >> no sthoo. did you obstruct
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witness, anything they accused you of doing. >> no. >> bud is bud selig. >> there's tensions in washington where robert griffin is backtracking from controversial comments. he explained his game-intercepting loss by saying no one was open and the eagles knew who was coming. it prompted a response saying if he were in the spot of having the ball in his hand he would take personal responsibility. r g3 has learnt a lesson. >> i have to know for a tough loss i can't give anyone the possibility to read into my words and misinterpret. i was trying to give a compliment to philly, not take shots at anyone. >> i don't have questions about accountability in leadership.
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what robert was saying was thrown it away to the end zones, fourth and one. a tough loss, a lot of emotions and you look back and think, j"maybe i wish i did say it a different way. this is what i meant. >> camping out for black friday. deals not uncommon. 10 days in advance early, not for the self-proclaimed king. this is the 14th time damon henderson slept in store parking lots to scoop up deals. henderson and others set up tents. normally first in line he had competition. >> i had no choice but to come out here because someone told me someone was out here already. i can't claim to be the king of best friday unless i'm out here in line taking charge. >> some walmart stores are turning this friday into black
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friday because the holiday shopping even is shorter than usual. >> president bill clinton and oprah winfrey are among the 16 americans awarded a high civilian honour, why the medal of freedom ceremony was special. >> balancing the idea of camelot against realities of history, john f. kennedy the legend compared to the facts he left behind. a volcanic eruption has an impact. how it created an island in the iraning -- in the ring of fire. >> looking at the nation's capital. a beautiful sunrise.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead - from the bay of pigs invasion to the vietnam war to civil rights, comparing the legend of john f. kennedy to history. first the precipitation, metrologist nicole mitchell is here. any good news? >> i'm trying to find some silver linings. active in the mid section.
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spotting moisture westward. the mid west is where the action is. lots of rain in places like kansas city. by tomorrow we can see freezing rain. temperatures are falling and then the precipitation will fall. we have winter weather advisories. places like kansas. this could be the freezing precipitation and winter storm warnings in colorado. it will be a mix. could be a wet and slippery mix. >> geologist in japan say a volcanic reaction created an island. it was spotted by coast guard helicopters about 620 miles south of tokyo. it's 650 feet in document area, port of the bonnin island chain
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of the the last eruption in that area was in the mid 1970s. the islands are part of the pacif pacific ring of fire. >> bill clinton, loretta lynn, oprah winfrey - among 16 americans who received the presidential medal of freedom. it's the highest civilian honour. president obama call the recipients true champions. early in oprah winfrey's career her bosses told her she should change her name to susie. [ laughs ] . >> i have to pause to say i got the same advice. [ laughs ] >> they didn't say i should be named suzie. they suggested i change my name. >> john f. kennedy created the award 50 years ago but was assassinated before he could present one. 50 years after his death his g
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legacy is up for debate. we talk about the successes and failures of his presidency. >> his youth and charisma suggested a break with the past. his rhetoric embraced a future, but even at his inauguration the image of j.f.k. diverged with reality. old world bribery seen as a factor in his ascension to the president say. >> the kennedys were aggressive and willing to bend the rules. >> the -- historians speculate on what john f. kennedy would have done. would he have made piece with vietnam? . he ramped up weapons and ballistic missiles. he launched a campaign of the
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sab targe in cuba, it distributed to the soviet's decision to ramp up their ars unanimous. kennedy authorised the use of napalm and poisonous herbicides that scar the local population today. some historians insist he would not have escalated the war. >> he said, "we don't have a rats arse chance of winning in vietnam. the people hate us", a lot of his policies were typical cold war hawkish policies. but you can say that he was abandoning that fitting at the end. >> we will never know. at home it was only in the final months that he embraced the civil rights movements. as for creating an economically equitable society, after a
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battle with the steal industry, kennedy was concerned about alienating corporate america. prosperity was skewed in favourite of corporate profits and the rich. >> rather than an equitable outcome of the kennedy years, we saw increasing inequality. not as bad as we have seen in recent decades. despite the gap between the perception of j.f.k. americans have not stopped voting in presidents with a progressive look to the future. >> in our next hour al jazeera's mike viqueira tell us us about the newly restored eattorney flame beside j.f.k.'s grave at arlington. >> and a look at what else we are following. >> the u.s. and afghan come to a tentative agreement for troops
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in afghan after 2014. it needs to be passed by council of elders. >> rutrey raydull takes an leav of duty after pleading guilty. >> psych lifts taking matters into their own hands. >> alex rodriguez exploding into the headlines as his temper exploded on the airwaves. his radio appearan his radio appearance and more in sport. >> a cold system break-ins cold and windy whether. >> al jazeera continues, thomas and i are back with you in 2.5 minutes.
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>> we find the fault lines that run through communities. >> the shooting happened about 30 minutes ago. >> companies... >> the remains of the fire are still everywhere here. >> the powers that be at home and around the world... >> not only do they not get compensation but you don't even have to explain why? >> well thats exactly what i said. >> we question authority. >> so you said we could get access... >> that's enough! >> ... and those affected. >> investigative journalism at it's toughest.
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>> bombshell after the u.s. and ago reach a deal on the future which u.s. troops on the ground, karzai tells a group he doesn't trust america. >> still no deal as world powers sit down for a second day at that tehran takes a tougher stance on its nuclear program. >> heading to rehab, a congressman takes a leave of absence to receive treatment after bleeding guilty to cocaine possession. >> a fitting nesting place for a president. >> this is so lovely, he said, i could stay here forever. >> the impromptu visit by john f. kennedy to a washington site
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that would ultimately determine where he would be laid to rest. >> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america, i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas drayton. good to have you with us. we begin with the future of american troops in afghanistan. a surprise statement from the of a fan president urging a council of elders to accept a bilateral security deal. >> at the end of his address, he said even if the council accepts the deal, he won't sign it until after elections in april. up to this point, karzai was pushing for an immediate decision from tribal leaders. >> american troops have been in afghanistan since 2001, shortly after 9/11. right now, there are 60,000 american troops there. that is down from a peak of just over 100,000. at least 2100 american servicemen have died in afghanistan since 2001.
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1300 afghan civilians were killed in just this half of the year alone. >> jane ferguson has been covering the meeting. i understand the afghan president has been speaking for hours to this council of elders, but it was what he said right before he finished that could change things significantly. good morning. >> >> good morning. when the of a fan president arrived this morning to start the proceedings, he was of course expected to give a speech, as always happens here. the speech lasted for just over an hour and it was surprising. it was surprising at the very end. after going through the negotiations and the discussions with washington, d.c. on this draft and after encouraging people to vote in favor of it, he mentioned that he would not be signing the agreement until after the presidential election. the next presidential elections here are not until april of next
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year, so that's lookly to come as a huge surprise and not to be good news to washington, d.c. what they had planned on happening would be that this meeting taking place just further behind me would give their approval. after that, hopefully parliament would give it approval and then to make it legal, president karzai needs to sign it. nobody expected he would say he won't sign it for several months to come. >> we'll be looking for reaction from washington today. aljazeera reporting from kabul, afghanistan. >> two suspected al-qaeda fighters were killed in yemen in a clash with security forces. they were hiding in three houses. they opened fire as the security forces were searching the area. the fighters were identified as from yemen and saudi arabia. documents related to al-qaeda were seized. >> at least six people were killed today in pakistan by a suspected u.s. drone.
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pakistani officials say three missiles struck a religious school. it's one of the first drone attacks outside of the remote tribal regions and residents are furious about the strike. >> we are against drone attacks and this situation is not good for the people. after form, we are protest against drone attacks and america attitudes. >> aljazeera is in islamabad with more. >> this drone strike is significant for a few reasons, not least because it's the first drone strike to occur since the killing of the leader of the pakistani taliban. only a few weeks ago, he was killed in a u.s. drone strike. this was deeply controversial here. the government said they were only hours away from starting peace talks with the pakistani
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taliban when he was killed. this drone strike is also significant because of where it took place. this is a province with a democratically elected provincial government and area which hasn't seen drone strikes. since the drone program began in pakistan in 2004, of the hundreds of strikes that have taken place, only two have happened in this province. the vast majority have been in the remote tribal areas. this is also significant because of the target. we understand the islamic school targeted is operated by a network that is a banned terrorist organization. it was placed on a u.s. sanctions list only last year, so if this drone strike managed to achieve targeting somebody from the group, it would be a major success for the u.s. >> president obama stepped up drone strikes after he took office. there were more than 100 attacks
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in 2010 and that has decreased to two dozen this year because of pakistani opposition. >> secretary of state john kerry said current talks offer the best chance in a decade for a deal on iran's nuclear program. six world powers are back in the table with iran right now in geneva, offering to ease sanctions if iran will freeze its nuclear enrichment program. the road to agreement remains difficult. iranians chief negotiator said that tehran would only sign a nuclear deal if it's guaranteed the right to continue enriching uranium from start to finish. aljazeera's phil ittner joining us now. can a deal get done and how will they resox the major differences to achieve it? >> obviously that is the question on hand here. now, the delegates who have arrived in geneva and started their first full day of talks today still remain optimistic,
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saying the also mere is positive. they don't know if they'll reach an agreement of course until one is actually signed. it's not a done deal. the u.s. delegation gave a background briefing last night saying they are still hopeful, still working. until there's actually some ink on paper, it's not a done deal. >> statements from iranian officials seem to echo a hard line stance iran bill not back down on its nuclear rights. are these comments affecting talks? well, you know, thomas, obviously, those statements that are being made not only here in geneva by the iranian delegation, but back in iran by the supreme leader which are quite aggressive and very controversial and critical of the west, those statements are obviously on the radar here, but the delegates who have arrived and particularly the u.s. delegation told us that they see
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that as an awful lot aimed at the domestic audience back in iran. they have to be seen taking a very hard line, very strong stance so that they don't simply come out with what looks to be an easy agreement that they sign off on. so, it is not affecting, we are told, being told it is not affecting the talks negatively, because it is being seen as morals aimed at folks back home and those hardliners back in iran. >> we'll examine those comments caming up later in the newscast. phil, thank you. >> the republican congressman who pleaded guilty to a drug charge is taking a leave are absence. speaking out, representative trey radel expressed regret. he bought cocaine from an undercover officer in washington, d.c. last month. a judge sentenced him to one year of probation on the misdemeanor charge. >> i'm sorry.
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i have no excuse for what i've done and i'm not going to sit here and try to make excuses for what i've done. >> he will donate his salary to charity while undergoing team for addiction. >> charges have been dropped against two girls accused of bullying a classmate who later killed herself. the charges were dismissed against them in florida on wednesday. they were charged last month after a 12-year-old school mail committed suicide. the attorney fart 12-year-old wants an apology. >> we have a wrong way of dealing with certain problems and i think by arresting a child and accusing her and going on national television and saying that she's responsible for the death of her exbest friend is unson thennable. >> the teens have been charged with aggravated stalking, which is a felony. >> illinois is the 16th state to legalize same-sex marriage.
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governor pat quinn signed the law wednesday at the university of chicago on the address abraham lincoln used to write his address. >> fema will be at work in tornado devastated areas to determine eligibility for federal help. damage will cost $1 billion. the national weather service says 55 twisters touched down, the most in one day this year. eight people were killed. >> recovery efforts from those tornadoes face a new challenge as a result of a combination of cold temperatures and precipitation. let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. good morning. >> we've had that cold rain in the region. i can't imagine anything more miserable as you're trying to sort through everything in the tornado-damaged areas. that is going through the ohio river valley, as we continue through the day. that moisture is going to be on the move. let's put some of this into motion. you can see especially kansas into oklahoma, the pink, that's
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where we could see some freezing rain switch over. i want to mention, even if you just get rain in portions of the southern plain and not freezing, be very careful on the road the next couple days. with the cold air that's all right come in, those temperatures will go freezing overnight, so water on the roads could actually free freeze and that means the black ice, slick spots, fortunately not large accumulations of freezing rain where we're going to see it, it doesn't look like. i mentioned the cold air. that's round one. we have round two behind this. more cold air, arctic stuff from canada is going to be just funneled into the region and as that's on the move, more places. it's the midwest already seeing a lot of cold air. over the weekend, it will spread through the northeast. this is also a system that with the pressure change around it has a lot of wind associated with it. that means wind chills will be sub zero. they already are in some cases in the midwest this morning, so
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it's really going to be kind of dangerous outside in some cases. back to you guys. >> nicole, thank you. >> the son of a u.s. veteran said his 85-year-old father is bunk held in north carolina. he said authorities took his father off a plane last month just as he was about to leave the country. he was visiting as a tourist. he was day find just a day after he talked his military service with north korean authorities. the state department is not confirming the report. north korea has detained at least six other americans since 2009. >> a man suspected of shooting attacks in paris is in custody. he was arrested in a parking lot north of paris. authorities received a tip after receiving security camera images of the suspect. he is suspected at the shooting of a photographer and at a bank. he has a prior record, involved in several shootings dating back to 1998. >> the troubled health care
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website, reroding support for president obama and his party. >> that loss is krauting opportunity for the tea party. >> how anger over the program could create an advantage for those people. >> also, new data shows that less than half of the parents eligible for child support get the money that they're due. how that's adding up to a mull if i billion dollar bill. >> a volcanic eruption giving birth to a brand new island is all caught on camera. >> you're looking at a beautiful shot of the george washington bridge connecting new york city and new jersey. traffic is in full swing on this thursday morning. we're coming right back.
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> up next, explosive video of a volcanic eruption in the waters off japan. >> first, let's look at how cold temperatures are going to get across the nation today. >> you guys were so excited to hear this forecast.
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as we continue out, it is going tube brutal one. still have warm air in portions of the south, houston at 70, enjoy these temperatures, they are going down across the sufficient. we have started to see the taste of it, billings, negative one before we add in the wind. the feels-like on your skin, 20-30 below zero. it is a brutal morning this morning. the cold air has gone southward. denver at 16 right now. we were at the 40's yesterday morning, had a lovely day with temperatures around 60 degrees. today, we'll be lucky if we get to 20, so that's a huge drop, almost a 40 dedrop. you can see some of these drops, rapid city about 30 degrees cooler than we were yesterday morning. it's all going to be changing for us into northern plains today, spreading down through the midwest as we get tomorrow, southern plains and then eastward over the next couple days. if you still have the mild air,
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enjoy it while you can. >> geologists in japan say a volcanic eruption created an island south of tokyo. it's 6050 feet in diameter, port of an island chain. the last documented eruption in that area was in the mid 1970's, the 30 or so islands along with the rest of japan are part of the pacific. >> billions of dollars in child support go unpaid easterly. it is a big number. $14 billion alone we understand unpaid in 2011. that is according to a new sections report. the report shows fewer than half of eligible parents are paid what they're owed. on average, parents get $500 in support and most ask the government to supplement the money they don't get. others get money through court-mandated payments. only one out of four payments
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have reported unpaid child support. >> polls show the problem-plagued federal health care website is hurting the approval ratings of president obama and his party. we go to rome, georgia where some tea party candidates are trying to use the troubled launch of healthcare.gov to get votes. >> in rome, georgia, political chatter about what's happening in washington is as familiar as the southern charm of its main street. >> 90% of those people up there don't have a clue about what's going on in the united states. >> in the foothills of the appalachians, rome is home to conservative republican congressman tom graves. he's one of the architects of the legislation to repeal obamacare. he's also voted to continue the government shutdown. he can find plenty of supporters in rome who blame the president for the failures of government. >> there are people who would be disposed to opposing him purely
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on partisan grounds and people are opposed to the affordable care act. it helped energize the tea party in its early days. >> here in rome, there's an overall lack of confidence in washington, but specifically with the president of the united states. that is not really surprising. back in 2012, his opponent, mitt romney, won this region by more than 73% of the popular vote. >> now the problem-plagued rollout of the health care website and bickering that led to the partial hut down of the federal government are adding to dissatisfaction, continuing to the sinking approval ratings for president obama. >> i think it has hurt him tremendously. >> charlene abney has been an independent pharmacists in rome for over 30 years. she thinks obama's policies are anti small business, and with the affordable care act, it will just get worse. >> independent pharmacies are not preferred, which is going to
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cost our customers more co pay if they trade with us. >> in the local barber shop, the hope is gone. >> when he was first elected, had an opportunity as a black man, being the first black president of the united states, that he could actually make some changes. >> retired factory worker roy hudson supports the president. for him, the anti obama trend is about something else. >> i think they're really hate from the day he went in office, being he was african-american. >> some see that making it more difficult for sections of the south to continue working through the painful history of race relations, raising issues they say cannot be ignored. >> there are some people drawn to the tea party movement because of racial resentment. tea party sympathizers are more likely to express views that
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harbor racial resentment than those not affiliated with the tea party. >> negotiate gop, it could become a resource to bolster the party for upcoming elections, leading to the 2016 presidential bid. >> rome, georgia. >> the white house said the affordable care act is spurring growth by slowing the rise of medical costs. >> wal-mart are joining other retailers for more safetying bangladesh factories. a garment factory collapsed last april, more than 1100 workers were killed. the proposal calls for fire prevention steps at nearly 2,000 factories that make goods for the stores. >> checking other business news, the year keeps getting worse for sears. the retailer lost more than 500 million dollars last quarter and keels declined 3%. it's the second straight quarter sears reported a loss, saying the results underscores the
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challenges faced as it heads into the crucial holiday season. >> the white house is saying no to a deal for bid of parts of fannie may and freddie mac. the bam la administration says it's committed to revamping the home financing system. the government rescued fanny and freddie from bankruptcy in 2008. >> futures up higher, signaling a positive start to trading this morning. that could change ago the federal reserve appears to be spooking investors. stock and bond prices fell after minutes from the feds latest minutes were released. some officials believe the economy was improving enough to warrant considering a reduction in the fed stimulus program. the dow jones industrial average at 15,900, the s&p at 7,081 and nasdaq at 39,021. overseas, worries about the fed, stocks mostly low i were in early trading. in asia, tokyo with a nearly 2%
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gain. >> the battle for the living room will heat up tonight. microsoft will unveil the x box one. long lines are expected outside stores, probably already lining up. laugh week rival sony unveiled the play station four and sold a million of them in just 24 hours. >> in one province of china, the rate of children born with serious birth defects is six times higher than the national average. it is blamed on poor air quality. we report from the province, considered one of the most polluted places on earth. >> the smell of burning coal is so pervasive here that the additional smoke from lunch being prepared doesn't bother the children of happy house. all 29 of them are now members of the fan family, but as far as many in china are concerned, including their birth parents, these children don't exist.
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>> all these kids more or less have problems physically or mentally. they were abandoned. i couldn't let them die. they need help. >> everyone calls her mother. by doing odd jobs and with the help of donations, she's been taking care of abandoned chirp for 40 years. they live in the province just south of beijing, one of china's largest coal producing areas and one of the most polluted areas in the world. pollution leads to a higher chance of babies being born with neuroor physical problems. >> over 1 million babies with defectses are born in china every year. some 18% of them are from here. despite the central governments plans to cut down on the use of coal to lessen pollution, it's where 40% of the revenue of this province comes from. with the global economic
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slowdown already affects things here, the government is offering incentives to prop up the ailing coal industry. >> the government has done very little to help those who suffer from its effects. there's a proud place in this woman's home for the list of every child she's raised. she believes the shame of what's having seen as a defective child compounded by the loss of health care lead to children being abandoned. >> these kids if receive early and proper treatment can live healthfully or improve the quality of their lives. some parents don't know about this, so the tragedy happens. >> the central government is moving to shut down coal-fired plants, but the current state of pollution is already affecting the physical and mental development of china's next generation. many here feel for all the children's sake, cleaning up the environment should be treated as a national emergency.
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aljazeera, china. >> 16 of the world's 20 most polluted cities all are in china. >> to your health this morning, go ahead and pour yourself another cup of joe. a new study says coffee may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. researchers say the caffeine boosts the function of small blood vessels in healthy people. scientists will try to figure out exactly how the coffee works its magic and try to come up with a new strategy for cardiovascular disease. >> nuts have been known to be heart healthy. eating a handful a day can reduce the risk of death from any cause. men and women who feast on nuts seven days a week had a 20% lower death rate. nut eaters also stayed slimmer, they were more likely to work out, abstain from smoking and lead healthier lifestyles. they are a good source of
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unsaturated fats, protein and vitamins. >> that is the good kind of fat. >> live longer, right? >> still ahead, talks over iran's nuclear program are underway. >> tempers on all sides, the deal could be derailed. >> we're going to talk to a professor of mid eastern politics about whether they can all walk away from the talks satisfied. >> a man arrested for shooting attacks in paris. how officials caught the suspect. >> a rapid ride in deaths among cyclists in one major city. how bikers are taking matters into their own hands. >> late wednesday night, the tigers and rangers, calls of their big trade, coming up in sports. one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington
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no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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>> good morning, welcome back. >> today marks day two of those really important nuclear talks. secretary kerry saying this is the best chance of a deal in this decades-long standoff. in a moment, you'll talk about whether a deal is really possible, especially with the strong language from the supreme leader of islam. >> we'll extra those words. >> riding a bike in any major city can be a challenge, trying to share the roads with the cars. in london, there's a dramatic spike in deadly collisions. every other day for the past two weeks, there has been a fatality. the bikers say enough is enough, more needs to be done. we're going to hear about the problems they face. >> i used to live in london, i completely believe that. tomorrow marks the 50t 50th anniversary of the assassination of president john f. kennedy, a moment in the history of this country, a moment that shook the core of this country.
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if people around the u.s. honor the legacy, we'll hear from one man who met the president and how you a simple conversation that day would have major impact on where he would be buried. >> life-change. we'll have those stories coming up in just a moment. >> iranian's chief negotiator said tehran would only sign a nuclear deal if guaranteed the right to continue enriching uranium. we have a wrap on the first day of talks. >> less than two weeks after the last talks stalled, iranian foreign minister and u.s. official in charge of foreign affairs, an interim deal seems reasonably close, but pressures, possible constraints on both sides have been growing since they were last here. >> in tehran, the man in ultimate control in iran, the
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supreme leader said he supports the talks but there are red lines he will not allow negotiators to cross. >> the other part of the deal is that i insist that the rights toure rain yes, ma'am be preserved, including the nuclear rights. >> u secretary of state john kerry and his counter parts from germany, france, the u.k., france, china and russia negotiated late into the night. this time, the talks are handled by senior officials at a lower level. all are aware to strong opposition from israel, the gulf countries and inside the u.s. congress and must overcome differences in their own ranks, too. >> we know why a deal failed last time. france was unhappy that iran would be able to keep for now its stockpile of uranium jen riched to 20%. they were concerned about the iraq heavy water plant currently under construction. that they want all work halted now. once active, that reactor will
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be very hard to shut down. even a military strike would release harmful radiation that could potentially kill thousands of civilians. >> those who follow the diplomacy surrounding iran's nuclear program for years believe the next few days could be make or break. >> i think you can make a pretty good case that the opportunity is going to get a lot smaller if a deal is not made at this particular set of talks. on the american side, we have seen in the last week and 10 days the incredible pressure that the obama administration is under coming from iran hawks in congress, coming from israeli, from the pro israeli lobby. that will only get more intense. >> talks continue. one senior u.s. official said they were that making progress, but added that is a hard road to walk. >> this is the third round of talks with iran over its nuclear program. >> what does it mean this time around? with us for more on the talks i
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guess irvin, a distinguished professor of middle eastern history and politics. good to have you with us. >> good morning. >> these talks are already complicated. how much will the stream leader's words, his red lines com product talks? >> they are not new and basically, he is not in geneva negotiating. what the negotiators say in geneva is much more important for the united states. the supreme leader is basically talking for his constituency inside the country. >> he said he wounded intervene directly with talks but does have the final say when it comes to policy matters, does he not. >> it does, but i think the red line here is basically saying iran has the right to have some nuclear program. he's not saying they have the right to have a nuclear weaponnization program. he always insisted it is for civilian purposes. that would not be crossing the
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red line. >> iran is saying it will not stop or halt uranium enrichment. >> if iran is being seen as forced on its knees, they will pull out of negotiations. i think that's what the major threat is, that if they can't get a reasonable deal in geneva, they have the right, then, to withdraw from the no one proliferation treaty and then ask the u.n. inspectors to leave, and then they would start a real program of weaponizing. then, of course, israel would have to strike, and that would be of course then down the road a war. >> let's talk about israel here. in his speech, he called them the rob bid dogs of the middle east. what do you make of those words as talks move ahead? >> a number of iranian
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scientists have been assassinated and the usual suspicion is it is israel doing it. from the islamic point of view, israel is out to destroy the islamic re public. you have to put it in the context of they feel israeli is out to get them. >> can the u.s. move forward without the support of israel? >> u.s. has to pursue u.s. interests. when it comes to the bottom line, obama is pursuing what he perceives is the best interests of the united states. it's dangerous for ally to say try to force or persuade united states to follow interests in their own countries. >> would there be any deal that would appease israel no. >> no, because israel's position that iran should have no nuclear scientists, no nuclear program, and that would be unacceptable.
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for the united states, i think it's ok for iran to have some nuclear programs, as long as it's not weaponnized. >> with all the powers, trust certainly needed to be destroyed. we'll leave it there. thank you, distinguished professor of middle eastern history and poll tucks. thank you very much, appreciate it. >> some victims of a suicide attack in lebanon have been laid to rest. the explosions tuesday at the iranian embassy in beirut killed 24 people. as we report, the attack is raising fears that the syrian war is spreading to lebanon. >> one woman alone with her grief, and one of dozens of lebanese civilians bereeved by a bombing that draws this country even closer to the war in syria. her husband rushed to see if he could help after the first bomb detonated, as this security camera was recording. he was a short distance away from a second suicide bomber in
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a car when it blew up. nothing remains of his body. his wife's search only retrieves a wristwatch and what she thinks is part of his clothing. the devastation and the human loss is big. by no means is it as large as so many attacks that have afflicted the lebanese people over so many years of suffering. this attack was different, as well in that it presents a new threat that it could have been a lot worse. if the second suicide bomber had driven through this secure gate, the blast in a more confined space could have been even more devastating. the man in charge of beirut's hospital, taking us inside his intensive care units, is only too aware of the new threat. this man has just come out of a coma. there are three others even more critically ill nearby. he warns that many more lebanese lives are endangered by the escalation of the war in syria. >> we don't have faith in the
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future of this country anymore. i'm sorry to say that. i'm furious, and i don't see anybody who is doing something really serious to save the country. >> a day of if you know release, thises biggest. this man was one of the first to die. in life, he was in charge of security at the main that gates of the iranian embassy. hezbollah remains defiant to the increasing threat here from syrias opposition, including al-qaeda linked groups. iran, a state that supports bashar al assad and his ally to hezbollah also remains resolute. at another funeral, the anger and the grief is clear to see. lebanon has seen decades of conflict, and its times of peace
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have been tenuous. once again, a foreign war threatens it's livelihood. >> the brigades claimed responsibility for the bombings on twitter. it's a sign that militant sunni groups are on the rise in lebanon. >> a visit from the french president is sparking riots in rome. protestors oppose construction of a high speed thin between france and italy. riots erupted wednesday as protestors tried to reach the french embass. on the other side of town, the two leaders confirmed the project will begin. some say it could impose environmental hazards. >> cars and cyclists trying to share the roads in london, and deadly collisions are on the rise. it is asked how safe routes can be provided.
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>> a major road near the center of london, another statistic to add to a major topic of debate here. it's the most common story, a cyclist dragged under the wheels of a vehicle. nearby, journeys disrupted for thousands, but mostly, it's another personality tragedy. >> when these suburbs were built in central london, these houses and roads well over 100 years ago now, of course, planners had no thought for traffic safety, yet london wants to be an environmentally conscious city. one cyclist who rode together with buses and cars and everything else, this one is the sixth death of a cyclist here in less than a fort night in london. clearly for all the aspirations, something's really not working. >> every cyclist in london has a story to tell about a near miss or in this case, knocked clean off. to make things worse, a second car then runs over his bicycle.
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the new trend is for cyclist to wear cycle cameras to record experiences on the roads. this man post the registrations of offending motorists on you tube. >> you've got a camera up there telling me what you can do and not do. you're going on you tube and i'm reporting you to the police. >> he does it to better help educate drivers, though accepts many hood like to ride a bicycle in london don't, because they think it's not much short of russian roulette. >> many put on skis on the side of the mountain, yes you won't see them, they won't go on a bicycle with a full helmet and safety gear. >> that's how dangerous people think it is. >> the authorities put in painted lanes for cyclists, but it led to more deaths. supporters say london needs to follow scandinavian countries separating cyclists from vehicles. the city doesn't spend 2% of its
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budget on safety. >> so often, cyclists are left abandoned with no proper structure at the busiest, most dangerous spots and roundabouts. those need to be designed as a matter of urgency. >> the london mayor has trumpeted cycling, but the risks are still huge. london is a city in transition, trying but failing to cater to a growing number of cyclists, while still allowing the meals of industry to turn. people need to lose aggression and there's not much sign of that. aljazeera, london. >> the london mayor said the best way to save lives is obeying traffic laws, not changing roads. >> sounds familiar. we have a similar problem here in new york city. time for sports. john henry smith is here now with a big trade in major league baseball. >> talk about big, a big bat is headed t to the lone star state. after signing prince fielder to
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a nine year $14 million contract, the tigers traded him to the texas rangers in exchange for second baseman ian kinsler fielder had a no trade cause, but texas is a team he said he would go to willingly. the tigers will send $30 million to the rangers in the deal. kinsler that four years and $52 million remaining on his contract. the 29-year-old fielder hilt .229 with 100 home runs, but was nowhere near as good in the postseason, .225, no home runs and no r.b.i. in 11 games. as for the 31-year-old kinsler, he hit .277, 13 home runs and 72 r.b.i. last season with texas. this frees up money for the tigers to possibly resign matt scherzer. >> while baseball's hot stove was heating up, so was alex rodriguez's temper. the new york yankees third
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baseman stormed out of the a hearing in new york, claiming it was a far as. what set him off was the ruling by the arbiter that commissioner bud selig would not have to testify. the associated press reports that rodriguez slammed a table and cursed at mlb chief operating officer before leaving the meeting. soon thereafter, rodriguez appeared as a guest on mike francesca's radio show to share his version of the events and throw verbal rocks in bud selig's direction. >> i lost my mind. i banged the table and kicked a briefcase and slammed out of the room and just fell that the system, i knew it was restricted, and i knew it wasn't fair, but what we saw today is just disgusting. the fact that the man from milwaukee that put the suspension on me with not one bit of evidence, something i didn't do, and he doesn't have the courage to come look at me
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in the eye and tell me this is why i did 211? i shouldn't serve one inning, and this guy should come to our city. i know he doesn't like new york. i love this city. i love being a yankee. my daughters grew up in new york. this guy, the embarrassment he's put me and my family through and he doesn't have the courage to come see me and tell me this is why i'm going to destroy your career, and i thought rightfully so, this should end with selig on thursday and me on friday you should oath. >> were you guilty of any of these charges? >> no. >> did you do anything wrong? >> no. >> did you do p.e.d.'s? >> no. >> did you obstruct justice, witnesses, did you do anything they accuse you of doing? >> no. >> more controversy to the college football. espn reports a de.a. test administered reveals that d.n.a. from florida state quarterback james win to know has been found in the underwear of a woman who
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has accused him of sexual about the battery. then there's this, in a statement released by the victim's family, she claims a tallahassee officer warned her her life could be made miserable if she pursued charges because tallahassee is a big football town. her roommate was not interviewed, because they said the matter would become public. >> it was a battle of the best two small forwards in the eastern conference. knicks and pacers went to o.t. in the garden. into o.t., there he hit the long three to give the pacers breathing room. carmelo came route back, made his move in the low post to make it a one-point game. carmelo anthony had 18 rebounds
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in this one. too much paul george, scoring 35 to lead indiana to a 103-96 win. knicks fall to 3-8. that's your look and it is sports this morning. >> if only i could play half as good as any of them, i'd be all set. >> it's one of america's highest honors. >> we'll see which high profile names were added to the list of recipients presidential medal of free dam. >> the nation parks 50 years of the death of the man who created the award. how a casual conversation would prey a major role determining the president's final resting place.
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>> evey weeknight on al jazeera america change the way you look at news
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera marrying. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas drayton. friday will mark 50 years since the death of john f. kennedy, one of the most tragic moments in u.s. history. we'll see how a stranger played a major role where j.f.k. would
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be buried. >> let's look at potential precipitation, nicole mitchell is back, nicole. >> we're going to have a little bit of everything today, a mixed bag. here's what we have, really the midsection of the country is under the worst of it as a front comes through. also that initial shot of colder air coming in with that and then the bottom will fall out on the temperatures and some of what you see more as rain will turn to freezing rain and then possibly snow. we have snow already in places like colorado. that's some good news, because a lot of the ski resorts are trying to get open in time for the holiday weekend. you can see however south as winter weather advisories, some of that is for freezing rain as we get later today into tomorrow. be very careful on the roads. back to you. >> americans will look back to a day that changed sum history. fifty years ago on that date, john f. kennedy was assassinated. his memory was invoked wednesday during the presidential medal of freedom as her moneys in
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washington. president kennedy established the award. the medal, the nation's highest civilian honor went to 16 people, among them loretta lynn, ernie banks, oprah winfrey and president bill clinton. >> the obama's and clintons laid a wreath at the gave of president john f. kennedy. >> the grave at arlington is marked by an eternal blame. aljazeera's mike viqueira tell us how that site because j.f.k.'s final resting place. >> the eternal flame now draws visitors from around the world, but it was supposed to burn in boston. as the nation reeled from tragedy, some kennedies want j.f.k. laid to rest at massachusetts, but a stranger played a decisive role. in 1963, paul was a part time
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tour guide at arlington house. it sits atop a lil over looking arlington national cemetery. eight months during dallas, he had an unexpected visitor. >> it was late afternoon, early evening and cars pulled up. a gentleman with ear phones hopped out and said the president was here. >> almost unthinkable now, the president was out on a lark. >> he said that he and his friend were just driving around town looking at the city and looked up here and neither of them had been here, so they thought they'd come up here. >> he led them on the tour of the house. >> then we came out here and the city is incredible. >> the words kennedy spoke next would loom large in november. >> he paused a little longer and the city was just beautiful. he said you know, this is so lovely, i could stay here forever. >> i could stay here forever. >> a friend with the president that day remembered those words, as the family debated the site of the burial, he told them the
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story. soon, there were more representatives there to scout it out. >> robert kennedy asked if that would be a, you know, could be done, could that be a grave site. secretary mcnamara said yes, that was army, and he could just convert it to that use instantly, and so that was it. >> the day came. kings, queens and leaders from around the world joining the grieving widow, jacki kennedy, shrouded in back in a half mile long proceeding. full honors for the commander-in-chief. note. >> but not all the military that day was american. two irishmen found themselves at arlington. >> does it seem like 50 years
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ago? >> straight from dublin, irish da datz, members of a drill team. in june, they impressed j.f.k. during a tour to island, where he saw them perform. >> we were in awe of this man, this young, charismatic irish catholic, leader of the free world. >> the president often spoke of them to jacki. when the time came, she sent for them. >> the stunning message was get your act in order as quickly as possible, get your gear together, because we're going to the kennedy funeral in the morning to do the funeral drill. >> once in position, they were anxious, astonished to find themselves literally at grave side. >> quite a fantastic occasion. what if something goes wrong and your minds wander, and then you would have to get back and tell yourself you're here to do the job, do the job and get on with it. >> 50 years later, we're sitting
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here and it still is something that i would never, ever forget. >> a young tour guide and a team of irish cadets, both leaving a memory with a young president, both playing an unexpected role in laying him to rest. aljazeera, washington. >> coming up in our next half hour, after j.f.k. was assassinated, dallas was called the city of hate. fifty years layer, artists are trying to change that image. powerful words there, and powerful words by the late president. i could stay here forever. >> our parents generation so defined by that moment and your name actually a legacy. >> my parents were so moved, they gave they john f. kennedy's middle name, fitzgerald. a lot of people were moved by that moment and here we are 50 years later tomorrow. >> at the end of our second hour, del walters joins us with what we are following. >> the u.s. and afghanistan have come to a tentative agreement on a security deal past 2014, but
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that deal needs the approval of a council of elders. >> a second day of nuclear talks is underway between iran and those six world powers. >> florida congressman trey radel taking a leave of absence. >> a country shrouded in secrets for the role in played in security during the wars in black water and afghanistan. the founder of black water in forms us what his firm really did overseas. >> a sexual assault case against a florida quarterback took a turn wednesday evening. we'll have that and more coming up in sports next hour. >> the aljazeera morning news continues, del's coming back with you in two and a half minutes. >> have a great morning. time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple
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developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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>> bombshell after the u.s. and afghanistan reach a deal on the few of u.s. troops in that country, the afghan president telling tribal leaders he doesn't trust america. >> the war on terror, the founder of black water security said u.s. counter terrorism efforts have grown too large. now he regrets working with the american government. >> 50 years after the assassination of john f. kennedy, how dallas is trying to change its image from the city of hate to the city of love. >> rising from the ashes of volcanic eruptions in japan, creating an island in the pacific.
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>> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. we are talking this morning about the the future of american troops in afghanistan. afghan and american leaders say yes to a security deal, now though, it is up to a council of elders to decide if they will sign off. a few major points of contention, immunity from afghan troops for u.s. troops and if president obama will apologize for civilians who were killed. the president did not apologize, but did send a carefully worded letter to his afghan counterpart saying:
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>> here are some of the terms of the deal. u.s. forces that remain after next year would receive immunity from afghan courts. that was a very contentious issue in the negotiations. the proposal saying the u.s. will respect afghanistan's sovereignty and territorial integrity. it for about bids american forces from targeting afghan civilians especially in their homes and pledge little to keep funding afghan security forces. that agreement could keep american troops there through 2024. some afghans oppose the deal, saying they want all foreign troops out. we have more from kabul. >> when afghan president hamid karzai took to the stage today to address the meeting where representatives had come to discuss the security pact with the americans, most knew that he would be talking about what
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exactly he had been negotiating with the americans and he did say that in his speech. he discussed how up until this very morning he had been discussing with u.s. secretary of state john kerry the last sticking point in the agreement, which would be whether or not american soldiers are allowed to enter afghan homes. karzai himself was saying that absolutely under no circumstances could that happen. eventually, it was decided that they would say under exceptional circumstances and under the invitation of the afghan government, would they be allowed to enter afghan homes during night raised or any kind of raised or operations around the country. he he presented a letter signed by u.s. president barack obama saying u.s. troops if entered afghan houses would respect the dignity of those living there, and that they would really go to great lengths to increase efforts to respect of a gap sovereignty and dignity of
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civilians here. later in the speech, however, he really surprised everybody with one more comment. he said that if this security pact is approved by this committee here and then approved by the parliament, he will not sign it until after the presidential elections next april, which really is likely to come as a huge surprise to washington, d.c. that's several months away and much later than they had hoped, so of course, there's progress on this draft having been approved between both sides and at least going to the representatives to debate, but it doesn't look like it will be signed anytime soon. >> that is aljazeera's jane ferguson in kabul. >> we will talk to the ceo of black water, providing security for u.s. personnel in afghanistan and iraq. he'll be talking about his new book and why he says he regrets now working with the u.s. government. >> at least six were killed today in pakistan by a suspected
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u.s. drone. officials say three missiles struck a religious school in the northwestern part of the country. it is one of the first drone attacks outside the remote tribal regions and residents there are furious about it. >> we are against drone attacks and this situation is not good for the people in the province. after tomorrow, we are protest against drone attacks and america tuesday. >> we have more. >> this drone strike is significant for a few reasons, not least because it's the first drone strike to occur since the killing of the leader of the pakistani tag ban. only a few weeks ago, he was killed in a u.s. drone strike. this was deeply controversial here in pakistan, the government had said they were only hours away from starting peace talks with the pakistani taliban when
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he was killed. this drone strike is significant for other reasons. it's significant because of where it took place. it is in the province with a democratically elected provincial government, and it's an area which hasn't really seen drone strikes. since the drone program began in pakistan in 2004, of the hundreds of strikes that have taken place, only two have happened in this province. the vast majority have been in the remeet tribal areas. this is also significant because of the target. we understand that the islamic school targeted is operated by a network, a group that that is a banned terrorist organization. if this drone strike managed to achieve targeting somebody from the group, it would be a major success for the u.s. >> president obama stepping those drone strikes after taking
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office in 2009. there were more than 100 attacks in 2010. that is decreased down to just two dozen this year because of opposition from pakistan. >> two suspected al-qaeda fighters were killed wednesday in clashes with security forces from yemen. suspects were hiding in three house us. they opened fire as security forces searched the area. they were identified as from yemen and saudi and documents related to al-qaeda were seized. >> secretary of state john kerry said current talks offering the best chance of a decade on iran's nuclear prom. they are back at the bargaining table in geneva. they are offering to ease sanctions if iran will freeze its nuclear enrichment program. iran saying today that iran would sign a deal only if guaranteed the right to continue enriching uranium from start to finish. there is also political rhetoric stepped up between france and iran. this morning, the foreign minister of france saying the
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west needs to keep a firm stance. >> for the moment, the iranians have not been able to accept the position of the six world powers. i hope they do. >> aljazeera's phil ittner is in geneva. is this a game-changer? hardliners now on both sides are really digging in. >> >> well, dell, that's right, but that has been expected all along. there are also going to be people that are against any kind of closeness or detente. we know they've gone into a lunch break here, but will return shortly. we're also hearing from a member of the e.u. delegation during this break that such things as apparently the e.u. representatives have now consolidated into one single person that's catherine ashton,
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the e.u. representative here. that is taken as a good sign. there's talk that they are now at the point of talking about language. that means that perhaps some of those hurdles that were there have been overcome, and now they're down to actually putting the words on the paper of a proposed agreement. del. >> phil, are we to assume that the stepped up rhetoric is playing to the base of the country, in this case, israeli and france? >> yeah, absolutely. i mean, that is the impression. now on this side of things, when the french talk or the israelis make their statements, they are expressing very grave concerns about what is being proposed here. when it comes to the iranian side of things, it is also thought that many of the kind of language coming out of that side of the equation is also meant
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for domestic consumption. there's a consensus here that the iranians want to walk away from these talks, having shown that they really hashed out a deal, that they didn't just acquiesce to get sanction re11. both sides are playing to the hardliners within their camp, but a lot of people are still staying this is such an important matter that they are working very hard on trying to get a success here in geneva. del. >> phil ittner joining us live from geneva, thank you very much. >> the son of a u.s. veteran said his 85-year-old father is held against his will in north carolina korea. he said authorities took his father off a plane last month just as he was about to leave that country. newman fought in the korean war and visiting as a tourist. he was detained a day after he talked to military authorities in korea about his service there. the state department is not confirming the report. north korea has detained six
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others joins 2009. >> money has been pouring into the philippines since the typhoon hit. doctors without borders providing much needed medical attention. >> this is guiuan's hospital or what's left of it. that building behind me is going to have to be demolished. this whole space has been taken over really by doctors without borders, setting up a tent city here. they've been here since day two. that tent is the in o. patient tent. they've gone from 10 beds to 30 beds now. the plan is to get it up to sitting. one great piece of news is last night at three ok in the morning, the first healthy baby was born here in the camp. mom, what's his name? >> justin james. >> and how is your home, how is your family? >> it's ok. >> yeah? >> but my home is --
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>> a happy beginning here, but maybe it's going to be a little tougher as time goes on. >> this building with the twisted metal roof is the building they say they can rehabilitate. they'll use that as a permanent structure here. doctors without borders say they will be here for four or five months, as long as it takes to get the medical capacity back on its feet. >> doctors without borders is working throughout the philippines. in tacloban, they used inflatable tents. >> fema will be at work in the midwest in areas devastated by tornadoes. they are there to determine which areas are he will go i'll for federal help. damages could top $1 billion, the national weather service saying at least 55 twisters touching down is the most in one day this year, eight people were killed. >> for more on our national forecast, we turn to nicole mitchell. >> well, even in some of those areas that were recently hit by the tornadoes, it's just some
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ugly weather in the midwest. cold rain, indiana and illinois, but cold rain all through the midwest that in some cases as we get colder will switch to freezing rain or snow. we have the snow on the backside of all of this in places like colorado. here's what we're watching putting things in motion today. you can see in the overnight hours, these forecast and freezing rain are tricky. it's on the cusp of enough with a cold layer that it's able to be the freezing rain. without too much of a cold layer, it turns into snow. we'll watch to see, but kansas, oklahoma, north texas, watching that, it could be a slick go. it's not expected to be a large quantity of freezing rain, but enough, then the next couple nights with with the roads and cold temperatures, you could have spots refreeze and become slick. each had the cold air move in and then we have a reinforcing shot of arctic air. when wind chills this morning, 20-30 below zero. if your car dice out in the in e
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middle of nowhere, you need the safety kidded to stay safe. this is going to spread through the weekend, even no the northeast, so a lot of temperatures across the country over the next couple days, dropping 20 or 30 degrees. the system that a lot of wind. when i said those wind chills this morning are 20 to 30 below, the temperatures are around zero in the northwest and winds are gusting. that's going to happen into parts of the northeast, below zero, not so extremely below zero as it gets to the northeast, but a lot of cold air. everyone needs extra layers handy. >> del. >> nicole, thank you very much. >> national security expected to be a big issue on capitol hill today. a senate judiciary committee about to hold hears on the limitations of the countries surveillance tactics. we are live on capitol hill. libby, what do we expect to hear today? >> this is the first time we'll
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hear n.s.a. officials testify since a new bill surfaced. chairman patrick lay, democratic worked across the aisle. a republican in the house one of the creators of the patriot act, saying we need to retool. this will be a chance for chairman leahy to talk to n.s.a. officials and run by them what he wants to do. he's looking to add a member to the foreign intelligence surveillance court who could be more of an objective voice. also, he basically wants to end this data collection, this met at a data, bulk phone record collection, change the the way that's done. last month, patrick leahy was asked by a reporter about some of this n.s.a. information, and equipped that he learns more by reading "the new york times" than he does by going to closed door intelligence briefings. you can expect to hear some
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tension in the room today, as well. >> members of the senate committee walking a fine line between national security and personal privacy. >> that's right. we're seeing some other members like ron wyden, a democratic in oregon, one of the liberal members very outspoken with his concerns getting onboard with what patrick leahy is proposing. we're seeing interesting coalitions built. it's interesting to watch who gets the intelligence information, who gets the closed door briefings in congress. not everybody gets all the information, so in these hearings like the ones today, when it comes out, we get a conversation that's actually out in the open and we can hear what some of the sunshine adds to this conversation. >> libby, thank you very much. >> the republican congressman who pleaded guilty to taking drugs is taking a leave of office now. speaking out for the first time since his arrest, representative
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trey rid ex-l was sentenced to one year of probation on a misdemeanor charge. >> i'm sorry. i have no excuse for what i've done, and i'm not going to sit here and make excuses for what i've done. rad del said he will donate his salary to charity while he undergoes treatment. >> which retailers are looking at conditions overseas in their factories. >> u.s. counter terrorism efforts, the founder of black water security tells us his side of the stair and who he calls the unsung heroes in the war on terror. >> the affordable care act changing the workforce.
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>> good morning within welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. we're going to talk about
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changes in the workforce and how they affect mill len yells, but first let's check what temperatures you'll ever around the nation today. >> definitely they have been going down. we've warned you about this, but already seeing single digits in billings. denver has the biggest chance of temperature whiplash, yesterday morning, right now 15 degrees, newt including the sub zero wind chill. yesterday we were in the 40's at this hour, 60's for the day and this is what we're stuck with this morning. in houston at 71, yes, the warming temperature of 71 going ha ha, by the time we get to the weekend, overnight low temperatures in the 40's, daytime in the 50's, even as far south as texas, temperatures dropping 30 degrees. on the skin, this is what it feels like. this is the time you want that winter car kit, because if you're exposed for any period of time if you have to go for help, this is not the weather you want to be out in without the extra
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layers, the cell phone charger to try to get yourself relief. these temperatures have been dropping. these are changes since yesterday, some changes easily a 20-30 drop already with more cold air coming in. it will spread to the warm places the next few days. >> wal-mart, macy's joining other retailers toughening safety. a plan was drawn up by the groups after a garment factory collapsed where more than 100 workers were killed. it calls for fire prevention steps in nearly 2,000 factories. >> janet yellen set to take the next step to head the fed. the senate banking committee i also set to vote on her nomination to replace better than bernanke. she is expected to be confirmed easily. stock futures are higher, dough up 30, signaling a positive start to trading this morning. stock and bond prices fell
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wednesday after minutes from the latest fed meetings were released. they showed some officials thought it might be time to cut back object the fed stimulus program. >> overseas, worries about the fed spreading to europe, stocks lower at this hour. asia, markets closing mixed. >> the year keeps getting worse for sears, losing more than a half billion dollars in the last quarter. it is the second straight quarter sears lost money. the results underscore the challenges sears faces as it heads into the crucial holiday shopping season. >> more disappointing retail news from target. third quarter losses rose less than expected and the it is cutting its profit outlook. target says it is being hurt we con strained consumer environment. >> you may hi less traffic if you're traveling this
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thanksgiving. it is estimated fewer americans will hit the road over the holiday than last year. air travel also expected to guess down. the economy is keeping more people at home. >> the battle for your living room is heating up for the holidays. microsoft set to unveil the x box at midnight. long lines are expected outside stores. last week, sony unveiled its play station four. they have sold a million of them just in the first 24 hours. >> 2014 could bring changes to the workforce and one big factor is expected to affect jobs is the affordable care act. the founder of millennial branding maintains that these changes are already taking plagues ahead of january. >> companies, large companies, mid sized and small firms are already preparing for 2015, when companies are going to have to pay $2,000 per employee that
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work full time. a lot of especially small companies, 20% of them are allowing off workers right now in preparation, and 40% of doing a hiring freeze. at the large companies, home depot, g.e., they're all not hiring as much as they did and paying more attention. there's going to be more freelancers than full time workers by 2020. you're going to see more people doing part time roles, under 30 hours a week and freelance gigs. >> is that the proverbial loophole for companies that don't want to pony up and pay more? >> exactly. big companies have to please shareholders and lower expenses. it could mean maybe the end of employer sponsored health care in the future. >> the numbers don't work well. 18% of baby boomers retiring over the next five years, how is this going to affect generation x.? >> it's going to abhuge changeover. generation x is going to start
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to become the executives and you'll have the whole fleet of millennials becoming the workforce. >> we look at unemployment numbers and say the job pictures changing, but gone are the days when people are graduating from college and expecting a full time job. correct? >> the promise of getting a degree is gone and getting your dreams from that turning into a job. it's becoming much harder and there's no linear career path. you to have create your own. >> changing the intern policy, what do with they do? >> they won't hire unpaid interns, because one complained and filed legal action. we've seen a few cases of this, but in general in terms of research, unpaid internships are less likely to turn into full time jobs. they're also very important for small companies that can't pay interns because they're just starting off and a lot of them don't have venture capitol
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behind them. >> a lot of americans want to know the bottom line. healthcare.gov, or affordable care act, good or bad. >> i think it depends on your situation. if you can't get health care, this is definitely a way to get it, but if you have a good health care program already lined up for you, you really have no use for it. >> here's the problem. you can afford health care now. the problem is you may not have a job that pace you enough to have good health care. >> that's the big issue now. >> what should consumers do, what should they want, demand of the workforce and can they demand anything? >> it's very hard to demand anything. millennials are happy to have a job, because a lot of their friends are $45,000 in debt, living with their parents. it's very hard to negotiate on those terms. >> did i tell you i'm the father of two millennials? >> i'm a millennial, so i have nothing bad to say about them. >> thank you very much. >> camping out for black friday
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deals is knots unusual. ten days in advance, though, that is a bit early, but not for the self proclaimed king of black friday. this is the 14th time damon henderson has lept in store parking lots to scoop up deals. sets are set up outside best buy in ohio. normally, he's first in line. this year, he had competition. >> i had no choice to come out here, because someone told me someone is already out here. i can't claim to be the king of black friday unless i'm definitely out here in line and taking charge, for sure. >> some wal-mart stores are turning this friday into black friday because of the holiday shopping season that is just a little shorter this year than in years past. >> fighting for the nation in terrorism. by black water regrets going to afghanistan and iraq. >> election controversy in honduras, why a first lady's candidacy is causing a divide.
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>> why a visit from the president of france sparked riots in rome. >> i'm john henry smith, alex rodriguez's temper at his hearing and on the airwaves. we'll show you, coming up in sports. one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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>> welcome back, i'm del walters, these are our top stories at this hour. sixty world powers back at the bargaining tail with iran in geneva, offering to ease sanctions if iran freezes its nuclear enrichment program. secretary of state john kerry said it is the best chance in a decade to strike a deal. >> six were killed in a strike by u.s. suspected drone striken pakistan, the drone firing on a religious school in a northwest region near the afghan border.
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u.s. officials say the school was controlled by a group link said to the taliban. >> afghan president says he won't sign any security deal with the u.s. until after next spring's elections. that could be a deal breaker for the u.s., pushing for an agreement as soon as possible. he made the announcement today during a meeting with tribal leaders in afghanistan. >> a car bomb attack at busy market in iraq culled 25, injuring dozens more. that bomb exploding in a town in the northwestern part of baghdad. it raises fierce that iraq is descending into sectarian violence. >> the complete stories of the wars in iraq and afghanistan have yet to be told, but a new book offers a glimpse into the inner workings of america's war on terrorism. eric prince is here. his book "civilian warriors" he
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writes about black water security, the military company and security firm that he founded. he joins us now in an interview for this book, you were asked, did members of your group kill innocent civilians. >> over the course of tens of thousands of missions, it's possible that innocent civilians were killed. >> how does that make you feel, and i guess the question has to be asked, when we say innocent civilians, there's a difference between innocent civilians, almost it seems like a terminology of the military, overseas and for instance say in the boston marathon bombings. >> we feel terrible anytime there's a loss of live, innocent loss of life. 41 of our men were killed doing the job. when you're doing that job, as your previous story talked about, there were six people killed in a drone strike. some of these people could have been innocents.
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in the case of doing that kind of protective mission in iraq when people are actively trying to kill you, ambush you on a dilly basis, there could abtraffic accident, a shooting, a bullet that ricochets, it's war and terrible things happen in war. >> i hear cops saying right now we fought the war on drugs in this country during the 1970's and 1980s and there was a lot of violence. what would happen if men, say for instance an iraqi security force was operating in north carolina, virginia, and they got caught in the crossfire as was the situation in this war, where 11 people were killed, including a 9-year-old kid, what would they be saying about those iraqi security forces on this side of the soil if those casualties were here? >> in the same way the afghans are upset about collateral damage from u.s. soldiers doing raised or drone strikes in afghanistan. i'll give you a closer example. october 3 in washington, d.c. this year, there was a 34-year-old woman, american
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citizen who got into a traffic altercation outside a federal building. secret service agents opened fire object her. she fled the scene, eventually was gunned down near capitol hill and she was driving with her infant child in the back of her car. the point being people that are under stress to make a difficult decision in a split second, sometimes they make the right decision, hopefully always make the right decision, but people are human and it's dangerous. in the case of a car bomb that blew up, causing iraqi security force to say leave the area, the team wee moved into the traffic circle was there to smooth the egress, provide safe flight for those guys leaving the area. >> why not hold that team accountable? they would be if it happened in this country. you've already admitted that the iraqi people have the right to be upset and to demand justice. >> they have the right to be upset at the on going war. they certainly are people being
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there, we're not responsible for a should not knee, shia conflict constantly going on there. our biggest regret is not having cameras. we asked for cameras from our government customer many months before that incidents. they would have protected civilians, our people, and the company, because it takes away the he-said, she-said scenario to arose. when the company got to choose its own tactics like when we work for n.g.o.'s, we would use a beat up vehicle that is armored. it's difficult for in is your generalities to attack what they cannot see. >> you believe you were betrayed. >> politics raises its ugly head in many areas. we were hired to do a job. we did it well. did we do it perfectly? no. a perfect scenario would have been 100% protection of everyone answered nobody firing a weapon. it's difficult to attain that perfection in a war zone when people are actively trying to
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kill you every day. >> let's talk about the job. did you carry out assassinations on behalf of the u.s. government. >> no. >> torture. >>? >> drone strikes. >> we were never in any kind of operational control of any drone strikes. >> but you have not denied in the past that you were using operational u.s. drones. >> we didn't use any operational drones. look, there's all kind of support functions. if you're saying that the mechanics that work on the united airlines flight, are they operating the air flight? no with you but checking the tire pressure of the aircraft? >> no. >> it sounds like we're hiding behind semantics here. tell me what you did involving drones. >> the last chapter of the book is written by a third party, because there's certain confidentiality agreements still in place. i encourage people to read the book. you'll get a good perspective on what the company did and didn't do, how it performed on
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competitively big contracts. there's a chapter about going above and beyond duty with significant rescues. >> you are angry about the terminology sometimes used to describe your contractors overseas. you've been described at mercenaries and jack booted thugs. >> i highly dispute the jack booted thugs and mercenary doesn't fit. >> why not? you're an exnavy seal, you make money off of war. classic definition of mercenary. >> no, the oxford definition of a mercenary indicates a third party recruited to fight in a war nat in their cause. in our case, we were employeing american veterans as a private company supporting the u.s. government. a mercenary would be a complete third party actively fighting in offensive operations. i want to address the mercenary issue. if americans want to tart
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complaining about mercenaries, you need to bull doze great monuments in washington, d.c. across the streit from the white house is lafayette park, where there are statues. when people drive across the bridge in new york, here's a military officer that bought a continental army and fought side by side with american patriots. >> people who have worked sent to the congo to poison. there was oliver north in iran contra, a long list of people who say i raised my hand quarterback what the country asked me to do. history has not been kind to them. do you want to be grouped in that group? >> i certainly wouldn't consider ourselves in the bin lad that crowd of working for the united states government in afghanistan. that's inaccurate. happy to be grouped in with oliver north. >> gottlieb?
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>> don't know about him. >> they were c.i.a. contractors tasked with doing what was perceived at the time to be the dirty work of the u.s. government. >> look, the intelligence business is difficult. when you have people actively trying to destroy you, when they can organize 19 guys to commit suicide and fly fully loaded aircraft into buildings, that's a very worthy adversary and it takes creativity, innovation to go after them. >> you're familiar with the concept of blow back, that is an action that creates another action. >> yes. >> if i am a small child and i see my father killed by your contractors as collateral damage, and i grow up hating america, am i then i guess enabled to come over here and carry out and act of terrorism as an act of revenge for my father? >> i've talked about the danger of the drone program and to be extremely careful how it's
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applied. the u.s. might be successful in killing a terrorist, but when it kills five or six other people especially in yemen or pakistan, they take blood feuds seriously. you could see that pop up in a few years. >> is that child then justified. >> are they justified? no. look, whether it's there's an in tent to intentionally kill, to go premedicated, go injury someone or if it's an accident, there's a fundamental different there. our people are playing defense. less than one half of 1% of all those runs, all those missions that they performed did they discharge a firearm. >> you're now working for other nations, correct? >> right now, i started a prief equity fund envisitting in -- >> you have worked for other nations. >> done consulting for all sorts of projects around the world. >> if you should hire some of your former colleagues, would you then instruct them to carry
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out actions in the u.s. that you carried out in places like iraq? >> i don't know. i guess that's too much hypothetical. right now, i focus on investing -- >> that's what people would be concerned about. you were given a specific skill set when trained as a navy seal to carry out missions on behalf of the united states government. you're now in the private sector, making money off of that skill set. would you use that in actions against this particular country? >> again, right now, i'm focused on investing, using that skill set, we built the afghan border police, we built afghan police bases under fire by ourselves, no external support and taking that know how to make a farm work, an oil development work in africa, that's the skill set i'm focusing on now. >> thanks for being with us. good luck with the book. >> that is eric prince. >> the central african republic
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is encouraging gentlemen coney to undear. he was indicted for war crimes. he with a waged a war against the government of uganda before taking his fighters into the central jungles of africa eight years ago. >> in rome, a stand off was diffused when a man in a wheelchair was pushed to the front of a shouting crowd. demonstrators were protesting a proposed high speed railing between france and northern italy. place are concerned they might hurt the man. they stopped moving toward the crowd. demonstrators say the railway would damage the environment. >> when voters in honduras head to the polls, a familiar face will be among the choices, the former first lady one of the top two contenders. her candidacy reminds many of
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her husband. >> she is a presidential front runner. in her first run for office, she's faced constant questions about her lack of experience. many wonder if hers would be a company presidency, something she rejects. >> there is only one presidential char and one signature and the people elect one person and that would be me. >> he is playing a major role, whether driving the campaign car or appearing at rallies. >> it was castro who played the supporting role in 2009 when she led the movement calling for zellaya's reinstatement. she failed but became a hero
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among supporters. his opponents say he was exceeding his powers. supporters answered his call for protest. the seeds of the new party were sewn in the wake of that coo. her pitch that she'll finish the work of her husband. it's poor communities like this one where castro gets much of her support and people say they want her to win because they feel her husband's presidency was cut short. >> her opponent can't bare the thought of another dalaya leader. she is going to try and call for a new constitution, put in place venezuela style socialism. that is going to earn the hatred of the rich. >> voters are split about what her victory can mean. >> there will be violence in the country. she won't be governing, it will be her husband. >> capitalists have painted her in this negative light, but the
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people aren't as ignorant as they used to be. they know the alternative is castro. if they win, the former first couple will feel state of indiana indicated, but know that they will be watched or missteps. >> illinois is now the 16t 16th state to legalize same-sex marriage. governor pat quinn signing that law wednesday at the university of chicago on the desk that abraham lincoln wrote his inaugural address in 1861. that law set to take effect june 1. john henry smith here with sports of a big trade in major league baseball. >> prince fielder as a kid was a batboy for the tigers. two seasons after signing him to
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a nine year $214 million contract, he is traded to the the accident rangers for ian kinsler. fielder had a limited no trade clause but he was willing to go to texas. the tigers will send $30 million to the rangers. kinsler has four years and $52 million remaining on hit deal. last year fielder hit 279 with 29 home runs but was nowhere near as good in the 2013 postseason hitting just .225 with no home runs and no r.b.i. in 11 games, kinsler hit .277 with 13 home runs and 72 r.b.i. last season with texas. >> alex rodriguezs blood pressure was heating up, the new york yankees third baseman stormed out in the middle of a grievance hearing in new york, proclaimed, inc. the proceedings were a far as.
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what set him off was the ruling by independent arbiter that bud selig would not have to testify. rodriguez cursed at operating officer before leaving the meeting. soon thereafter, he appeared as a guest on mike tran as he is da's radio show to share his version of wednesdays events. >> i lost my mind, banged the table and kicked a briefcase and slammed out of the room and just felt like the system, i knew it was restrict and i knew it wasn't fair, but what we saw today is just disgusting. the fact that the man from milwaukee that put the suspension on me with not one built of evidence, something i didn't do, and he doesn't have the courage to come look at me in the eye and tell me this is why i did 211?
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i shouldn't serve one inning, and this guy should come to my -- to our city, i know he doesn't like new york. i love this city. i love being a yankee. my daughters grew up in new york, and for this guy, the embarrassment that he's put me and my family through and he doesn't have the courage to come see me and tell me this is why i'm going to destroy your career? i thought rightfully so, this should end with selig on that thursday and me on friday under oat, put your money where your mouth is. >> were you guilty of any of these charges? >> no. >> did you do anything wrong? >> no. >> did you do p.e.d.s? >> no with did you obstruct witnesses, did you do anything they accused you of doing? >> no. >> a d.n.a. test administered by the florida officer revealed winston hob found of the underwear of a woman who accused him of sexual battery. in a statement released by the victim's family, the former
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state student claims a detective warned her that her life could be maderiesable if she pursued charges, because tallahassee is a big football town. the statement says police refused to take samples from winston or interview his roommate, because the matter would alert winston and go public. >> moving to the pro hardwood, the mavs and rockets were doing a texas two step wednesday night. dwight howard is gone from l.a. but looks like kareem. the big fella halt 33 points, 11 boards. monta ellis is still battling hard, hitting the three-pointer. a picture perfect jump shot, behold. mavs down one in the final minute. the jumper is not pretty.
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not nearly as pretty at dirk's, but mighty effective, that's a trim. mavs win 123-120. that's sports this morning. del, back to you. >> john henry smith, thank you very much. nuts have long been known to be heart-healthy and researchers say eating a handful a day can reduce your risk from any disease. a harvard study found those who feasted on nuts had a 20% lower risk of death. nut eaters stayed slimmer, were more likely to work out, abstain from smoking and led healthier lifestyles. >> 50 years after the assassination of john f. kennedy, how dallas is trying to change the perception of its city. >> a volcanic eruption creating an island in the ring of fire. >> we have wind and rain and snow, oh, my. i'll show you the latest on this potent storm system.
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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>> welcome back to aljazeera
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america. just ahead, some big names among the 16 americans receiving the nation's highest civilian honor, but first let's see if it's going to rain where you are with nicole mitchell. >> it might be doing that depending where you are. we have a widespread system, a cold front going through, that's part of the cold air through the midsection of the country. still spotty rain and snow showers heading westward. this is a big player into the midwest, rain today in places like missouri, even where we're trying to do tornado recovery. on the backside, denver, as far north as parts of south dakota, we've had snow. winter weather advisories in those areas, even winter storm warnings, colorado, new mexico, great for the ski resorts trying to open in time for the holiday, but this could become an icy mix, kansas to nor texas. tonight into tomorrow might be slick as you start the day. >> geologists say a volcanic
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eruption in. >> pan has created an island. the last on record in that area was in the mid 1970's. along with the rest of japan, it is known as the pacific ring of fire. >> the list of americans and their accomplishments is impressive. president bill clinton, oprah winfrey, loretta lynn were presented the presidential medal of freedom, the highest civilian award. president obama presented it to 16 americans that he called true champions. >> early in oprah winfrey's career, her bosses told her she should change her name to suzy. i have to pause her to say i got the same advice. they didn't say issued be named
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suzy, but they suggested i should change my name. >> president kennedy created the award when he was assassinated before he could actually present one. >> after president kennedy was killed, dallas became known as the city of hate, a label that stuck and now some artists there are trying to make dallas the city of love. aljazeera has more. >> storefront windows along downtown's main street are covered with 18 by 18 drawings, and famous phrases. president kennedys motorcade came down this street minutes before he was assassinated. that moment defined dallas. the dallas love project aims to redefine it. >> i'm very cheesed that the focus is on love and not on death. i think it's very important that people are going to move on while it remains a real sadness in the hearts of the people who live in dallas. >> there are approximately
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10,000 art pieces and 65 venues across the city, turning dallas into one giantar gallery you. >> if it's spreading, then i think everybody within texas and the country and world cab see that dallas is not the same as it used to be, nor does that one person who killed j.f.k. portray the whole entirety of dallas. >> getting the message out through social media, people were urged to get together in classrooms, libraries object peoples houses or work on their own to create the dallas love project. >> we're just trying to give love of voice. love can be as loud and out there and in the public and in your face as all this noisy messaging that we get about the hateful things going on. >> i know he that art can transform people's lives and when i saw that thousands of people were participating, i got out my colored pens and paper and made a piece myself.
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>> the pieces will all come down next tuesday. they'll go from their public perches to places where people can't get out to see them, like nursing homes, even prisons, so more people can feel the love. aljazeera, dallas. >> those artists aren't the only ones there to begin a new chatter in the j.f.k. story. ceremony set for tomorrow will mark the first time the city has headlight an event there to honor president kennedy and also the x that was on the pavement that since been removed. it marked the spot where president kennedy was killed. we're back with the latest headlines in just two and a half minutes. you can check us out 24 hours a day at aljazeera.com. >> not only do they not get compensation but you don't even have to explain why?
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>> well thats exactly what i said. >> we question authority. >> so you said we could get access... >> that's enough! >> ... and those affected. >> investigative journalism at it's toughest.
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every sunday night, al jazeera america presents... eye opening films from the worlds top documetary directors. next sunday, >> there's probably about a hundred people living in the extreme tiny houses... >> is going small part of a big movement? >> part of the reason for moving into a tiny house is to get rid of all this "stuff"... >> what you gain by having less... >> let's think about giving up mcmasions... >> a tiny american dream, al jazeera america presents... tiny: a story about living small premiers next sunday 9 eastern.
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