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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 29, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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it's the holy grail of holiday shopping and they hit the aisles early trying to makeup for a short season. the state department calls for china to exercise restraint after fighter jets go to an area in the center of the dispute with japan. up and smoke workers set fire in bangladesh after rumors that a colleague died at the hands of police. living with hiv and billions spent on research and the hope it's giving to millions of infected patients around the globe. ♪
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good morning and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy, thanksgiving has come and gone and black friday is in full swing. some of the biggest chains have been open for hours. toys "r" us and, walmart and target opened hours ahead of the midnight start on black friday and macy's opening on thanksgiving evening for the first time in the 155 year history. the retailers want to makeup for the shorter span this year between thanksgiving and christmas and, walmart has protests with workers demanding higher pay and better working conditions and patricia is at roosevelt field in new york. sorry we do not have patricia now. we will tell you a little bit about black friday's history. thanksgiving thursday may have given black friday a run for its money this year.
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some of the nation's biggest chains started the holiday shopping season on thursday. kmart welcomed shoppers at 6:00 a.m., toys "r" us, target annual mart opened before the usual start on friday. retailers say they need to time because of the short span between thanksgiving and christmas and less time at the dinner table and more bargain hunting. >> i have never done this before and i think i'd rather let the employees have the night off but given that it's open i'm shopping here. >> reporter: the national retail federation says 89 million people shopped on black friday last year and compares to 35 million on thanksgiving. the pizza hut manager who refused to force staff to work on thanksgiving isn't sure he wants his job back and the stand he took on behalf of employees brought support in social media,
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28-year-old tony rohr refused to open on the holiday and he was hired because he told the owners in a letter that the workers deserved the day off. >> why can't we be the company that stands up and says we care about the employees and you can have the day off and during a year two days they are off to spend with the family. >> reporter: the pizza hut corporate office stepped in and said he should be retired. the statement said quote we feel strongly that the situation could and should have been avoided. the vast majority of pizza huts in america are closed on thanksgiving and say that the local franchise reinstate the manager and they got the holiday off and the restaurant did not open on thursday. worries that the macy's thanksgiving day parade huge inflated characters would be on
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the ground but they did fly and they took a grip as the winds were 26 miles per hour. the low-flying balloons encountered a few obstacles and spider man defeats the villains but met it's match by a park, a tree branch took off the super hero's left arm but was strong the rest of the parade. one volunteer helping with the buzz light year balloon was hospitalized, a golf cart ran over the balloon handers foot and doctors say it may be broken. we will go live to al jazeera's patricia who is covering some of the black friday madness at a mall in new york, good morning patricia. >> not madness but keep in mind that consumers poll found that 56% of americans have no intention of setting foot in the store any time during black friday weekend. now around here we see
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respectful foot traffic and people shopping on black friday is a tradition and some people love the thrill of the hunt but with wages being stag negligent and americans coming out on black friday is really about finding the best deals and for shoppers who are armed with smartphones and apps there are an array out there to help them hunt down the best deals. >> reporter: patricia, do we expect that the best deals are on black friday or do shoppers benefit by waiting a little bit? >> well, of course, shoppers have become very savvy about the mark downs on black friday. a lot of retailers will initially price the product very high so window deals are applied and can protect profit margins but there are apps out there that people can use in stores to check prices online and see if there are lower prices in the stores around them.
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>> reporter: it doesn't seem like you are seeing a ton of foot traffic where you are at that mall. >> no, there is not a ton of foot traffic at all. many of the stores bear in mind were open yesterday so that has really stolen some of the thunder from black friday. >> reporter: it will be interesting to see how that plays out as far as the met triggers and patricia is live at the busy long island mall and getting busy i hope and thanks patricia. the hurricane season is coming to an end and metrologist nicole mitchell is here to explain why the season was so much more quiet than expected. >> i'm never a big fan of the season projections because it's not so much the numbers i want people to focus on it's what hits land and you always need to be prepared for that but projections did come out and expected to kind of be a booming season in the atlantic which of course that season end this weekend and here is what we got instead, looking at the total and i have long-term and ten year averages for tropical systems because we have been in
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an active period recently, the number that we had was 13 and not too far off the averages and predictions for a busy seize and hurricanes only two for the whole season and major hurricanes none for the whole season and when you get numbers like that, the last time we had only two hurricanes in a season you go back 30 years to 1982 and back to 1994 and i like to focus on what hit and we had one in june and it is usually quiet but hit the united states and karen was finalized and this is remnants that came close to the united states. mexico from both directions had an active season and it depends where you are. and one was over the atlantic we had a lot of sinking air and larger areas with wind sheer and conflicting winds in the atmosphere and allows the storms not to be able to build up and
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we had a lot of gusts coming off of africa and what that does is drives air, there is a projection we had from the july/august timeframe and that keeps those storms from being able to grow thus the quiet season we saw in the united states and a lot of people were happy to see that and back to you. >> the crash of a high-speed ferry off of hong kong today injured 85 people, six seriously. the hydro foil was traveling from hang congress to mccale and 107 passengers and 10 crew members were aboard and no one is missing and it's under investigation. last year 38 people were killed when two ferries collided in the harbor. caution and restraint is what the u.s. is asking for from china and the message after the communist nation dispatched fighter jets to patrol the air defense zone and it's claiming over the east china sea and it's
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a measure after they defied the claim by flying planes through the zone. al jazeera's stephanie takes a look at the disputed region. >> reporter: it might take only one tiny miss calculation or one tiny misunderstanding and these islands could become the center of a large international conflict. to the japanese and to the chinese and thanks to chinese introduction of what it calls air defense identification zone or adiz they are the most talked about islands in asia and politics at home have a lot to do with it. >> translator: japan and korea facing issues and divert people's attention to security and diplomatic measures and the countries want to find an issue they can quarrel about. >> reporter: china's decision to impose control over the air space has upset its immediate
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neighbors japan and south korea but they argue it's the u.s. that is most annoyed. >> translator: and it was originally introduced by the united states after japan's defeat in the second world war ii secure japan's safety. this is a u.s. invention and china is trying to introduce a new order and that is why the u.s. is more sensitive to this than japan. >> reporter: and on the streets of tokyo there is concern. >> translator: i can't understand why anyone would do this. if you don't know what your neighbor is thinking that is a reason to be afraid. >> translator: my feelings of miss trust, anxiety and nervousness has increased. >> reporter: the islands were never more than a footnote in politics until a u.n. survey years ago saying there could be oil d deposits under the sea an
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it could have serious consequences for peace in the region. it's that kind of miss calculation that the american vice president joe biden hopes kit be avoided when he visits the region next week. with oil deposits yet to be proven the islands hold little real value. >> reporter: that was stephanie reporting and an editorial in the global times chinese newspaper says it's china's will power to beat japan in any strategic confrontation and said the u.s. was not targeted in the disputed area. thousands of protesters in thailand occupied the country's army headquarters for a few hours today and want the army to help them overthrow the
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government. the demonstrators delivered a letter to the army's secretary general seeking support for their campaign. this is the 6th day of large antigovernment rallies. the protesterss say the prime minister is controlled by her brother, a former leader now in exile and al jazeera's scott hidler is live from bangkok and scott what is the latest there? >> yeah, we saw that unfold and we were there on the compound of the thai army headquarters. when they were in there and today the focus of friday was a letter campaign, two letters delivered to two high-profile places. one the thai army headquarters was peaceful and broke through the gate a bit and they delivered a letter to the head of the military essentially asking them a simple question, are you with us, are you against us, do you support the government or do you support the protesters? another letter was delivered to the u.s. embassy here in central
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bangkok. that letter said asked the ambassador not to support a government that is going outside the country's constitution in the way they govern and they were delivered and a bit of a protest in front of the ruling party's headquarters. that dissipated quickly and a few hunt showed up, made their point and left. we are seeing fewer numbers than earlier in the week in the protester around bangkok and the first time we seen a letter campaign and delivering the letters to some of these places. >> reporter: scott, to be clear, this is a democratically elected government and why do the demonstrators believe the army will support an overthrow of the government? >> yeah, it is a democratically-elected government. a lot of people who support the antigovernment protesters and antigovernment protesters themselves are aligned with the
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yellow shirt and against the regime for years and his sister runs the country and prime minister and have been against each other several years and they say the yellow shirts and those against the current administration say there is so much corruption in the government that they were not democratically elected, i asked a woman who was protesting that exact question and she said they bought the election. when it comes to what they can do, the prime minister said why don't we sit down you the protesters and let's talk about this, they flat out rejected it and want a people's council installed and the prime minister is not willing to do and she pass add no confidence vote earlier this week and she is the democratically-elected head of the government and not going michigan where and protesters want her to change and the army is staying away and not in the streets and first time they have been doing this and out of the situation and if things are violent on the streets it may
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change but right now they are at arm's reach. >> and scott is following developments in bangkok and thank you. a blow for the multi-billion garment industry in bangladesh and they torched a factory after rumors that an employee was killed by police. and people go out on black friday, walmart workers will hit the picket lines to demand more pay and bit coin tops the $1,000 mark, one frantic search to recover millions that may be buried in this landfill and this is a live look at macy's harold square and shoppers have been there since late last night picking up bargains. ♪
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power power of the people until we restore of the people until we restore
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♪ good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy. walmart stores are open across the country but some of the workers are out in the parking lots and we will explain why. but first let's look at what temperatures we will see across the nation and metrologist nicole mitchell is back. >> good morning, let's look at
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some of the colder spots as we head out. through the south after the front went through below average temperatures to start the day and some around freezing, atlanta 28 degrees. so this is the part of the country, not as brutal as yesterday but where we don't for example have insulated pipes in a lot of cases and be careful when it dips below freezing and below freezing in the midwest and part of the area we will have a little temperature change so behind that last system that went through high pressure sat in place on the backside of the high with a clockwise flow and get winds out of the south. so this is not the core of the midwest, this is the northern plains under the influence of the southernly wind and have a temperature contrast and look at this denver and rapid city in the 50s today where we have a flow from the south versus minneapolis and chicago not quite feeling that which will stay in the 30s and we will have a contrast in this region of the country and the warm spot is the southwest with la at 71 and back
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to you. >> nicole thank you, a massive fire destroys one of the largest garment factories in bangladesh and they supplied clothes to gap and, walmart and nearly 18,000 people worked there, no one was injured. police are trying to determine if it's an arson case. there have been several tragedies in factories this year including a building collapse in april that killed more than 1100 workers working in the bangladesh sector. walmart may meet giant retailers workers today outside and employers are going public with a list of grievances against the word's biggest private employer and al jazeera john went to ohio and indiana to find out why. >> as walmart racks up the biggest sales of the year on black friday linda is punching out and protesting. her complaints and those of the protesting workers who call themselves our walmart are simple. >> pay retaliation and getting
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workers fired who are standing up for themselves back to work. >> reporter: and she wears this shirt on 2:00 a.m. lunch hour and joined in a nationwide strike last year who got colleagues working with no union protection fired and asking $25,000 a year, under what she earns after eight years working overnights. >> they are in the position that they can assist and help the workers have a better life and i believe that they are not concerned with that, they are more concerned with how much the company can make within a year. >> they can pay the workers more but they just don't. >> right. >> reporter: walmart, the world's largest employer had sales of $443 billion and the ceo earned over $20 million and they raided hollywood and nashville for surprised guests. ♪ being with walmart today the more i learn about everything you do i'm inspired but what you call create
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everyday. ♪ what doesn't kill you makes you stronger ♪ in canton, ohio this box prompted outrage asking colleagues to collect money for needy employees who cannot afford dinner on thanksgiving holiday. the dispute in canton is the latest between walmart and some of its employees, a dispute that is likely to intensify as the holiday shopping season wears on. in a statement a company spokeswoman told thus is the busiest time of year and black friday is the superbowl of retail annual mart is going to win. delivering for our customers wouldn't be possible without our associates, they are a critical part of our success all year long especially during the holiday season. the company is run agree advertising campaign to sell the public a very different image of walmart. >> when people look at me. >> i hope they see someone building a better life. >> living better, that's the real walmart. >> reporter: the real walmart launched sales earlier than ever this year on thursday night.
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>> their logo is save money and live better and workers should live better. >> reporter: when the sales are tallied walmart hopes to post a record and linda will take home $13.25 an hour, john in canton, ohio. >> wage-related issues for walmart and employees across the nation are fighting for a minimum salary of $25,000. the average hourly wage of walmart workers is $8.81. over 800,000 workers make less than $25,000 a year annual mart employees plan to protest at more than 1500 stores today. here is what is making business news this morning. wall street is back in action after taking thanksgiving off with a shortened session and have a healthy appetite to stocks and dow is 16,097, the 44th high this year, s&p 500
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record high, 1807 and nasdaq above the key 4,000 mark, one market watcher said factors are supporting the market. >> the federal reserve will keep the short-term industry rate low for several years and we have very low inflation and gradual recovery so the question is can we sustain this without some external shock or some policy mistake? those are possible and so far we haven't had one but we came close with the government shut down. >> reporter: overseas european markets are flat but spain is one bright spot, standard and pores lifted the outcome from negative to stable and this is the asian markets which closed mostly higher but nikki fell half percent pulling back from six year high. google privacy policy is under fire in europe, a watchdog said
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the u.s. search engine spins an invisible web of our personal information without her permission and that is out lawed, that is a quote and google said our privacy policy respects european law and creates simple and more effective services end quote and they with one of six nations investigating the practices. and one british man it's painful and forgot he had bit coins, real electronic money stored on a computer hard drive he junked. and al jazeera simon wood has more on the man's search for more than $7 million. >> somewhere under all this rubbish lies $7.5 million of bit coins on a computer hard drive belonging to this man, james howell did it by mistake and we have all done something like it,
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well, not quite. >> i was def -- devastated when i realized what i had done and oh, my god. >> it was this 2009, the process of generating bit coins and he sort of forgot about them and since then their value has gone up. >> what is bit coin? >> reporter: on thursday it hit $1,000 a coin, and james howell had 7.5,000 of them but the private key, that which they are worthless was, that is right, you guessed it on the hard drive. >> from the very first time i come across bit coin i knew it was going to be a good investment and i knew it was going to be the next big thing. i mean, devastating really. >> reporter: the bit coin was long considered the play thing of computer experts and had a slightly shady image but more companies are accepting it. at a u.s. congressional meetty recently said such currencies do
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have a legitimate role and only makes his absent mindedness embarrassing and expensive. >> the value peaked at $1,000, 10 times higher than they were worth earlier this year. halfway around the world the 45,000 serving in afghanistan enjoyed a taste of home and they detailed the menu for the thanksgiving dinners and 70,000 pounds of turkey and beef and 29,000 pounds of sweet potatoe and didn't forget the desert and 20,000 pounds of pie. dozens received holiday phone calls from the commander-in-chief, president obama dialled members and thanks for service and wishing them a happy thanksgiving. >> give thanks for the freedom they defend and think what we want and say what we think and worship according to our own beliefs. >> reporter: the president
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celebrated a low-key thanksgiving with his family at the white house. that is a break for many of his predecessors who spent the holiday at camp david. in pakistan a change of command, a powerful military chief passes the baton to his successor as the country struggles to contain militants and struggling to make a living as kids, children who escaped the war in syria facing new dangers on the streets of lebanon. and the eve of world aids day, looking at the funding and research giving hopes to millions of people live with the disease around the world. >> they are trying to get a w and tactics have come into question recently and will show you why in sports. >> reporter: a live look at the toys "r" us square in time square, look at that line as people wait for bargains.
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determining using some sort of determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or their policy as to whether or not your particular report was not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just and in that case they just recommend that you block that recommend that you block that person. person. >> i don't want to minimise >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that some really horrible things that are on are on line, and it's not - it's line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has not just twitter, what has happened through social media happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, that you see websites, hate-filled websites hate-filled websites targetting targetting
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all sorts of groups, popping up. all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. those that exist as well.
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♪ welcome back, i'm stephanie sy and these are top stories at this hour, black friday got off to an early start this year and millions of people spent thanksgiving filling shopping bags instead of stomachs and big name chained opted not to close for the holiday and offered black friday sales a day early and estimate 33 million shoppers took advantage of the early savings. more than 1,000 antigovernment protesters entered thailand headquarters and said they were allowed to come in and demonstrators wanted to deliver a letter to the army secretary general and military officials say they will not be allowed to stay overnight and china sends war planes to the sea to patrol the newly-declared zone and it's after u.s., japan and south
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korea defied china by flying planes through the zone and the u.s. said it's international air space. the changing of the guard in pakistan, and the chief of staff and he succeeds the person who retired after six years and responsible for pushing the taliban out of the valley. and pakistan has a long history of switching between democratic and military rule and the military has sometimes led the overthrow of political leaders and served while pakistan faced biggest threats and al jazeera reports on his mixed legacy. >> all this in honor of the country's most powerful man, the general oversaw this military parade last month alongside the prime minister. for six years he has been pakistan chief of army staff and institution that controlled the country for more than half of its history.
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he took over from general in 2007 after taking the job he frequently traveled to conflict areas to meet his men who were fighting and dying in alarming numbers but like his predecessor he also struggled to counter the threats of groups in the lawless tribal areas and say this led him to focus on what he saw as the true enemy of the nation. >> translator: today we are faced with interel as well as external challenges, the problems are internal battle front and require special attention because thank you pose a great threat over pakistan. >> in a speech this year he did not name india, a country it fought three wars with as the only threat to pakistan. the country faced the most significant threat in years, in 2009 a faction of the pakistan taliban had taken control of the northern region in response he launched defining military operation of his career. under his supervision the
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taliban was driven and it was sank in 2011 and began with killing of to pakistans by a cia contractor and a strike on a border post that killed 24 soldiers and there was a big failing, the bin laden tirade, not because the army failed to find the world's most wanted man because of the embarrassed when the u.s. military launched the raid on pakistan soil without pakistan's knowledge and he was criticized at the time but helped eased the crisis by making compromise with the u.s. and the army chief never gave the americans what they wanted action against the network based in pakistan's tribal areas and they exit is scene on the back drop of a civilian milestone and in may pakistan had elections and the first democratic
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transition of power. the fact he never tried to lead a coup against the democratically-elected government appears to have helped his reputation to some degree but the taliban still controls important parts of the northern tribal areas and remains an enduring threat and while he is able to retire with some grace, he leaves behind him some unfinished business. al jazeera islamabad. >> reporter: the army chief may have a challenge on the afghan, pakistan border and u.s. considers the military cooperation vital in that region. relations between the u.s. and afghanistan are increasingly strained. afghan president is lashing out at obama administration after reports of resent drone strikes. and karzai said it killed a child and injured two women. in a statement on the government's website the president said this attack shows that american forces do not respect the lives and security of the people of afghanistan and
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the jerga decision, for years our people are being killed and houses destroyed under the pretext on the war on terror. the drone attacks come at a delicate time between the two countries. the u.s. wants karzai to sign a security deal to let troops stay in afghanistan past next year, an assembly of elders agrees to the deal but karzai is making additional demands. later this morning we will be speaking with president -- with retired general mark about the president's resent comments, the former army chandler will break down karzai's comments and what they mean for future role of u.s. troops there, you can see the discussion with the general right here on al jazeera at 8:30 eastern. the egyptian law that limbs demonstrations leads to jailing of protesters and in turn triggers more protests. a student was killed in a clash with police at cairo university and the crowd was angered by the sentencing of 21 women and girls
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to prison terms. a leader from the arab spring revolution is under arrest and charged with insighting protests and defiance of the new law and bans demonstrations of more than 10 people without government permission. meanwhile family and friends are saying good-bye for the women heading to prison and dominick cane reports. >> reporter: she looks through her daughter's bedroom, she is 19, on thursday she should have been attending classes at university. instead she was starting a 11 year prison sentence. and she says she has always been conscience and loved to draw and sketch. so the news of her conviction has been like a body blow. >> translator: when we heard the verdict yesterday this verdict was very shocking, very tough and very unjust. my daughter was telling me today
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from prison mom i'm 19 years old, after 11 years when i get out of prison i'll be 30 years old, you can't imagine how much hurt hearing those words caused me. >> reporter: she was one of 21 women and girls found guilty by courts in alexandria of a series of charges including illegal gathering and damage of property. they had formed a human chain during protests against the military-led government several weeks ago. and he is a lawyer representing the women and girls. he says he believes the case has been policized and shows his clients are innocent. >> translator: there is no evidence at all in the papers of the lawsuit against my clients. from the moment they were arrested through the investigation and until the judge announced a verdict and the sentence there is not one eyewitness saying these women
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committed these crimes. >> reporter: human rites groups condemned both the trial and the sentences and say egypt must do away with laws and punishments more reflective of the old egypt. >> this sentence has been given under a 1923 and not newly-adopted mail and have considered extremely restrictive and this has been seen in the larger framework of a lot of restrictions imposed on the right of people to protest in a country that for the past three years changed a lot of things best to protest. >> reporter: in resent weeks both the government and the courts have clamped down on protests. just over a week ago 12 students from the university were jailed for 17 years each for attempting to storm the headquarters of the
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institution. this week the imposition of a new law to regulate protests which has widespread opposition from political groups but the government says it will strictly implement a new law which it says protects the rights of both protesters and the ordinary citizens. the severity of the sentences given to women and girls in alexandria shocked people here and led them to question the independence of egypt's judiciary, dominick cane in cairo. >> reporter: they were cents to prison when they were protesting the removal of mohamed morsi and they are held in juvenile detention until they turn 18. in syria nearly a quarter million of syria's refugees are children, a new u.n. report painted a grim picture and said when the school-age refugees are driven to bordering countries they are cutoff from education and forced to work to survive and the u.n. says the children
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often face grave dangers and more from dana in beirut who are with some of the children. >> reporter: she is 11 and escaped the war in syria and faces a new danger in lebanon. her school is safe but like her many of these refugees also have to work once classes are over. >> translator: a man in a car with a syrian plate number approached me and looked scary and asked to buy some flowers. as i was handing him the flowers he grabbed my arm, i ran in the super market. he waited and followed us. we ran away. >> reporter: because of that she no longer works on the streets but her nine-year-old brother mohamed has no choice, their mother is a cleaner but her salary just is not enough for them to survive so every afternoon may home sells flowers on the streets of beirut, more and more children are being forced to work. >> as family resources become
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more depleted children are sent out to work, some in very difficult circumstances and unsafe conditions. >> reporter: you can see the problem in almost every street corner in lebanon, these children live a difficult and dangerous life, they are vulnerable to exploitation and abuse and many of them are warn down emotionally. these children are traumatized from what they saw in syria. they are scared to reveal their identities even though it has been almost a year since they fled the violence. >> translator: we were in a check point and saw someone kill everyone right in front of us. i saw the way they all died. >> reporter: those images are still clear in their minds and social workers say there are many other children who are not getting the help they need. they also face risks here at lebanon. >> translator: they are traumatized from the violence in syria and some central abuse in crowded areas where refugees stay. >> reporter: just by talking to
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these children you realize how the war has impacted their lives. >> translator: the war won't stop because people are killing each other and take refending and if he loses a brother he will later kill the one responsible. >> reporter: this boy has an adult understanding of his country's tragedy. >> translator: i am disturbed and frustrated he says. >> reporter: he is among those who the u.n. calls a generation of innocence who are in danger of becoming lasting casualties of an appalling war and al jazeera beirut. >> the u.n. says up to 300,000 of those school-age refugees in lebanon and jordan may go out schooling this year. the trial of two men accused of killing a soldier is underway and 12 your -- jurors will be chosen and facing counts of attempted murder and conspiracy
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to murder a police officer. we are joined live by al jazeera's tim friend from london. tim, good morning to you. what is the latest? >> well, the latest is that the prosecution has begun to put their case in court. they describe this as a colorless and cowardly murder and the circumstances are this: a soldier, lee rigby was returning to his barracks having worked the day in the recruitment wing of his regimand and struck by a car going 30 miles per hour and two men got out, armed with a gun, a knife and a meat cleaver and tried to decapitate and attacked him in the street in southeast london. there were members of the public gathered around and they dragged
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or at least the two accused dragged the body out into the street and waited for the inevitable arrival of the emergency services. this is what the court has been told this morning. incredibly members of the public tried to comfort the lifeless body of the soldier and others spoke to the attackers despite the fact they were still armed and the police arrived, the accused or one of them aimed a gun and it turned out to be unloaded and aimed the gun at the police and they shot and fired at both of the accused. they were injured. they were taken in to custody and the court has heard that throughout this members of the public were close by and a school was close by as well and school children just a few seconds earlier had been on their way to classes. >> all right, al jazeera tim friend reporting from the trial where disturbing details are
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starting to come out and tim thank you so much. devastating tornados left them homeless but many victims of last week's midwest storms are giving thanks nonetheless and more than 50 indiana families gathered thursday at a church in cocomo and served a thanksgiving feast and it was a treat for those whose homes were destroyed or damaged. >> i have a home. they don't. this was a dining hall. we decided we were going to deck it out for them to really have a nice thanksgiving day and they need some good memories. >> reporter: organizers of the feast say they were expecting up to 1200 people and 1200 pounds of turkey was donated for that dinner. jessica is here with sports and thanksgiving of course doesn't just mean turkey it means american football. >> that is right, a couple coaches in the league would be happy it's not christmas and would be on the naughty list and we saw coach no, sir longer thankful for being on the sidelines, they want to
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participate the latest being steelers coach mike tomlin after dropping four games this season he is ahead at 5 and 6 in the playoff but with the task of facing the defending superbowl champion raves he was the 12th man on the field and let's go to baltimore where michael phelps is in the house and back in the pool thinking about an olympic come back and we will see and going to tory smith and how about this, 10-0 lead of big ben and company and emanuel sanders. and then check out this dance. way better than the twerk, i will go there. this is down to the wire and a minute left and steelers down by 8 and roethlisberger and the steelers need to convert 2 point conversion to force an overtime and roethlisberger will lay it out again and here he is and
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sanders there but can't haul it in and baltimore wins a nail biter 22-20 and ravens are 6 and 6 in the season and may think the outcome has karma because baltimore gets the win but jones and the ravens an and clear path for a score or at least had a clear path upon further review we will check out steelers' head coach tomlin was on the field and was tackled and a field goal and ravens were 16-7 and the game was in doubt at that point, no penalty called. even at the request of jones and the ravens. >> i'm running and looking at him the whole time i'm like does he know, i'm running and looking at him and cross lanes is he going to move and i weaved and got away and broke my stride a little bit and still shouldn't have got caught but it is what it is and made the tackle.
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and if i was him i would do the same thing. >> i always watch the returns on a jumbo tron for a better perspective to me and lost placement as he broke free and that is how close i was to the field of play. >> tomlin took it and i got flack for joking around saying you should run on the field and tackle somebody and i took flack for that and that is exactly what he did and looking at the big screen the entire time and knew where he was and where jacoby was and pulled my move and did what i thought, yeah, he did what i thought we should do. >> reporter: we thought he was taking a page from the kid handbook for coaching, the first year the coach was fined thursday $50,000 for trying to pull a similar stunt on the hardwood against the lakers and was mouthing hit me to his players and they were out of time outs and needed a quick one
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for a substitution and kid took the hit and dropped the soda in the process and causing a fourth time out and aside from the lakers players joining the huddle on the last play they failed to make the final shot as well. well now some good news in the coaching ranks and appears the broncos get the head coach john fox and will be back to work on monday. fox had open heart surgery earlier in the month and was recovering at home in charlotte. fox was back in denver for thanksgiving and says the plan is to be in the coaching box up stairs or sidelines against tennessee on december 8. broncos are 2-8 under the interim coach and back to you stephanie. >> i didn't know standing in the way is a sports strategy. >> with the jumbo tron very helpful. >> i can do that and jessica thank you. >> amazing. >> fighting the aids epidemic, a look at life-saving drugs helping to prevent the spread of
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hiv and giving hope to those carrying the virus, what happened to the closely watched comet as it passed close to the sun? a lot of you are out shopping today and can hardly buy a better forecast and i will tell you where a couple trough travel trouble spots are. a live look at the cross roads of the world, time square the day after thanksgiving and they call it black friday.
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>> and now, a techknow minute... >> and now, a techknow minute...
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♪ and now, a techknow minute... welcome back to al jazeera america, just ahead how drugs are helping to slow the spread of hiv in south africa. but first let's get a look at where the snow and rain may fall across the country today and metrologist nicole mitchell is here, good morning nicole. >> i have to look for the couple of areas because it's bright friday for the country and look at the sunshine in the midwest and up and down the east coast and a couple trouble spots and one is in the northwest, next system will come in but that is more late today and saturday and sunday looking at the rain and these chances are late foresee
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attel and saturday and sunday could be one part of the country where we have trouble getting home from the holiday weekend and temperatures in the 50s but otherwise lake effect snow left and you can see it has wound down and syracuse with light snow and through the weekend we will have a couple clippers come through, minor but enough to kick up snow from time to time. the only other place we look at any sort of precipitation this morning a slight disturbance off the coastline means light rain in cities like la and that is minor, it's a pretty cooperative day out there stephanie. >> reporter: 33 million people world why are infected with hivn the 90s contracting the virus that causes aids was considered a death sentence but now medical breakthroughs might reverse that and al jazeera's has more on the drugs that are saving lives. >> andrew is a regular at this hiv clinic outside victoria. he cracked the hiv virus ten
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years ago and then it was considered a death sentence. but now with the right combination of drugs he is able to maintain his health. >> more than another day and people get close and take drugs because of the myth and killing people and now it doesn't. >> reporter: in south africa hiv drugs have new infections among children in the last four years and 1-20 catch the virus from the mother, that is a huge advance on earlier treatments. here it is, the hiv virus and these play an important role in how it works. when it comes into contact with a cell in this case a red blood cell it attaches and invades the cell overwhelming the body's immune system and this is where the drugs come in, they effectively disable the virus and can't attack or invade the
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cell and means it can't reproduce in the may sent's immune system and is able to recover. if you keep taking the drugs the virus is kept at bay but stop taking them and it returns in force. more than 1.2 billion a year is spent on hiv research and now there are almost 30 different drugs to treat the virus. competition along with the production of generics has pushed down the price. this makes the drugs more affordable and accessible especially for those in poor countries. >> it has been miraculous and it was a fatal disease with maybe at best 3-4 drugs for treatment and unclear when it should be used to the points where there is nearly 30 drugs and nearly 8 million people around the world are being treated. >> reporter: the u.n. hopes to be able to give 15 million hiv positive people antiviral drugs
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by 2015. in lieu of any breakthrough in the hunt for a cure new and increasingly effective drugs hold the greatest promise giving those with hiv a better and longer life as well as reducing the spread of the virus. i'm with al jazeera. >> reporter: hiv prevention and treatment helped to save thousands of lives, since 1981 more than 25 million people worldwide have died of aids but hiv treatment in poor countries has increased ten fold since 2002. in the u.s. new infections have fallen by more than 60% since the height of the epidemic. a comet with a close encounter with the sun never stood a chance, they watched as the ball of ice broke apart. the comet was reduced to small rocks after passing 3 quarters of a million miles from the sun and no match for the 5,000 degree temperatures. that ends the 4.5 billion trip through the galaxy and hope to
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learn something by studying the trail. in the next hour the film about nelson mandela's life is talking about racial equality in south africa. >> in sports the holidays are about tradition and thanksgiving for the detroit lions and cowboys. >> as the hurricane season comes to a close and it was a season that wasn't for the united states. >> al jazeera continues, i'll be back with you in just 2.5 minutes and here is a live look at a town shopping center in cobb county, atlanta.
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>> we find the fault lines that >> we find the fault lines that run through communities. run through communities. >> the shooting happened >> the shooting happened about 30 minutes ago. about 30 minutes ago. >> companies... >> companies... >> the remains of the fire >> the remains of the fire are still everywhere here. are still everywhere here. >> the powers that be >> the powers that be at home and around the world... at home and around the world... >> not only do they not get >> not only do they not get compensation but you don't even compensation but you don't even have to explain why? have to explain why? >> well thats exactly >> well thats exactly what i said. what i said. >> we question authority. >> we question authority. >> so you said we could get >> so you said we could get access... >> that's enough! access... >> that's enough! >> ... and those affected. >> ... and those affected. >> investigative journalism >> investigative journalism at it's toughest. at it's toughest.
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>> it's the holy grail of holiday shopping, black friday. this year, bargain hunters hit the aisles early as retailers try to make up for a shortened season. >> the state department calls for china to exercise restated after beijing sends fighter jets to the area at the center of its disputes with japan. >> angry workers set pure to a factory in bangladesh after hearing a colleague died at the hands of police. >> africans give a passing grade to the movie on the life of
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nelson mandela. >> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. black friday is in dull swing. some of the nation's biggest chains have been open for hours, toys are us, wal-mart and target open hours ahead of their usual midnight starts. macy's opened thanksgiving evening for the first time in its 155 year history. the retailers want to make up for the shorter span between thanksgiving and chris mat. wal-mart is praying for protest at 150 stores nationwide with workers demanding higher pay and better working conditions. first, we are at the west field saw the shore mall in new york
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where shoppers are expected. i don't see them behind you yet. good morning. >> good morning. traffic has been very, very modest at this mall this morning. the store opened at 8:00 p.m. and that has stolen black friday's thunder. the shopping parches show that people aren't so much gift shopping as buying things for themselves, items like suits and shoes, things that you would buy for yourself. wages have been stagnating and that has seriously eroding the spending power of many americans. this weekend is about making your dollars stretch further. for bargain hunters armed with tablets, there are an array of apps out there. >> let your smart phone be your
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guide. shoppers are harnessing mobile apps to hunt for the best deal. red laser, no more socks and shop kick help shoppers compares prices, get gift ideas and find money saving coupons. >> there's going to be a surge in the role that apps play. >> retail analysts predict he commerce sales this season will hit $80 billion and a lot of that will be done on smart phones and tablets. >> a lot of the app developers are starting to figure out ways to create shopping experiences that are on par with and in a lot of cases better than what you get in the store. >> surveys show smart phone owners have three to four shopping a.s. nearly half of black friday purchases will be made on mobile devices. >> we've seen great growth in the internet business, double
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digits over the last 10 years. >> and of course, a recent consumer reports poll found 56% of shoppers have no intention of setting foot inside a store black friday weekend. a lot of people are holding off for cyber murders. they prefer to avoid the crowds and just shop in the confident of their own homes. stephanie. >> i'm curious at 7:00 in the morning eastern time who is at the mall. what's the vibe and atmosphere like there this early in the morning? >> there's actually a lot of browsing going on. we've seen quite a few families to come out. for them, it's a tradition of coming out, part of event of the holiday spirit. in terms of baggen hunting, we see browsing, but we don't see too many laden down with a tremendous amount of bags. >> thanks, pat russia. >> the day after thanksgiving
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has been the unofficial start of the holiday shopping season since the 19th century, but the term black friday is only 50 years old. it was coined in philadelphia. the army-navy football game was traditionally played there on this saturday after thanksgiving. the game often drew big crowds that frustrated police. the term cropped up when publicist denny grizwold wrote traffic jams are an. >>some problem with the police. the officers referred to it as black friday. shoppers tried to change the name to big friday, that didn't stick. black friday took on a new meaning, referring to the shifting profits from red to black when sales surged. >> thanksgiving may have given black friday a run for its money this year. the early start of the holiday
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shopping season meant less time at the dinner table and more bargain hunting. >> i haven't ever done this before, and i think i'd rather let the employees have the night off, but given that it's open, i'm shopping here. >> the national retail federation says 89 million people shocked on black friday last year. that compared to the 35 million on thanksgiving. >> the pizza hut manager who refused to force his staff to work on thanksgiving isn't sure he wants his job back. the stand he took for his employees brought an have a large of support. he ran a restaurant in elkhart, indiana. the franchise owner said he would quit after refusing to open on the holiday. he said he was fired because he told the company in a letter that his employees deserved the day off. >> you can stand up for your employees and have the day off.
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there are only two days a year they are guaranteed to have the day off to spend with their family. >> the corporate office said we feel strongly that the situation could and should have been avoided. the vast majority of pizza huts were closed for thanksgiving. the staff did get the holiday off. the restaurant you did not open thursday. >> after worries that the macy's thanksgiving day parade huge inflatable characters would be on the ground, the go ahead was given for the bloops to fly with height limits. winds blew up to 26 miles an hour. the low-flying balloons encountered a few obstacles. a tree branch took off spiderman's left arm. he stayed strong for the rest of the parade.
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one volunteer helping with the buzz light year balloon had to be hospitalized. a golf card ran over the balloon handler's food. it may be broken. >> it's time to look at other national weather forecast now. good morning, mitch he will. >> we're going to take a look today at because the weather's quiet, i'll get to your national forecast in a minute. it's been a fairly quiet year. different lines depicting all the storms through the season in the atlantic. a lot of what we did have either stayed in the ocean or more active in mexico and especially on the eve pack side. only one landfall all year and that was a tropical storm. in terms of numbers of storms, we weren't that off kilter, but numbers of hurricane and major hurricanes being zero and two respectively, you have to go
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back 30 years and 20 years to see numbers that were so low on the hurricane numbers. why was it such a quiet season for us? there's a couple reasons that explain why we had a quiet hurricane season. one is just the dust that was coming off of africa. what happens is that's actually a formation area for some of us for the storms, especially getting june, july and into august. dust coming off, you have dryer air to storms can't foal that in direction. early august, as that dust was coming off, you can see this whole area would be hindered from tropical development. we had over the atlantic areas of sinking air with high pressure in place hindering development as with wind shear. storms trying to build in the atmosphere, if there is reversing winds, it knocks the top off. great news that we only had one
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minor landfall. >> thousands of protestors in thigh land are making their way to several government buildings today, calling for the prime minister to step down. just a few hours ago, they occupied the army's headquarters in bangkok. this is the suction day of anti-government rallies. we report from the army headquarters in bangkok. >> about a thousand protestors entered the royal thai army headquarters here. the gates were open for them. the yellow shirts, the protestors have an alliance with the thai army, and are allowed in. the main purpose they came in here to deliver a letter to the secretary general of the army simply asking one question, are you with us or are you with it
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is prime minute at her's government. they stayed in here for about an hour, being asked to leave, politely by the secretary general of the army. they came here, did what they wanted to. in front of the sufficient embass, they want to hand over a letter, as well, and also party hairs, they are going to be amassing out. they're not going to be spending much time here anymore, not going to be spending time here. the army official has asked them to leave. they are doing so, but staplinging in other parts of the city today. >> reporting from bangkok. the crash of a high speed ferry off hong kong today injured 85. the hydrofoil was traveling from hong kong to macak. 107 passengers and 10 crew members were aboard. no one has been reporting missing and the accident is under investigation. last year, 38 were killed when
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two ferries collided in hong kong harbor. >> the message sent after the communist nation dispatched fighter jets to patrol the air defense zone it is now claiming over the east china sea. china calls it a defensive measure after planes were flied through the zone. >> it might take only one tiny miscalculation or one tiny misunderstanding and these islands could become the center of a large international conflict. to the japanese, this year one name, to the chinese, another. thanks to the unilateral introduction of what china calls an air defense identification zone, they're the most talked about islands in asia, and politics at home have a lot to do with it. >> china, japan and korea are
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all facing domestic issues and want to divert people's attention to security and diplomatic matters, so these countries want to find another issue they can quarrel about. >> china's decision to impose control over the air space has upset japan and south korea. some argue the u.s. is the most annoyed. >> the idea was originally introduced by the united states after japan's defeat in the second world war to secure japan's safety. this is a u.s. invention and china is trying to introduce a new order. that's why the u.s. is more sensitive to this than japan. >> on the streets of tokyo, there is concern. >> i can't understand why anyone would do this. if you don't know what your neighbor is thinking, that's a
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reason to become afraid. >> feelings of disrust, anxiety have increased. >> that suggested there could be large oil deposits beneath the sea bed. that's what got taiwan and then china originally interested. now, with so many countries involved, a small misstep could have serious consequences for peace in the region. >> it's that kind of miscalculation that american vice president joe biden hopes can be avoided when he visits the region next week. with oil deposits yet to be proven, the islands hold little real value. aljazeera, tokyo. >> a chinesen newspaper addressed the dispute saying it is china's will power and ambition to beat japan in any
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strategy icon frontation. >> another blow for the multi-billion dollars garment industry in bangladesh. a fire destroys a factory as a rumor circulates that a worker was killed by police. >> wal-mart workers demanding better pay. >> $64 billion is our big number today. for a country that's routinely been struggling, why this represents a turn for the better.
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>> $64.31 billion is the amount of money that flowed into the cash strapped banks of cypress. the central bank said it's the first increase since austerity measures were imposed in march. that number is backed from
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countried outside the europeanin. it's an encouraging sign indicating renewed confidence in the economy. >> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. up next, why you might meet wal-mart workers in the parking lot, if you shop at one of its stores today. first, let's look at temperatures across the nation p.m. meteorologist nicole mitchell is here. >> i mentioned the sunshine we'll see, not a lot of wet weather, but temperatures on the cool side. sometimes it's nice to have the sunshine that makes it feel warmer even when it isn't. some temperatures below freezing. our cooler spot is in the teens in the midwest. the northern plains, not quite the entire midwest under the influence of after that front went through, high pressure came in place. that's a clockwise flow. you get the winds out of the south. we've started to see a warm up in the air influenced by that.
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today, we are going to see rapid city, denver in the 50's, versus minneapolis chicago staying in the 30's, not quite under the influence of that. we will have a few places with a little warm up. we'll start to warm up somewhat for the south. houston gets back into the signature's at 62 degrees. as i said, a lot of sunshine, so not a bad day to get outside, hit the sales and work off some of that dinner from yesterday. >> a massive fire advise one of the laryngest garment factories in bangladesh. it supplies close to the gap and wal-mart. nearly 18,000 people worked there. no one was injured. police stay workers set fire to the factory after hearing that a colleague had been fatally shot by police. there have been self tragedies in the factories this year, including a building collapse in
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april killing more than 100 workers. >> wal-mart shoppers might meet some of the giant retail workers today outside the stores. they are going public with a list of grievances against the world's alarmest employer. we went to ohio and indiana to find out why. >> linda is punching out and protesting. her complaints and protestings workers who call themselves our wal-mart is simple. >> she dons this protest shirt on her lunch hour and joined in a nationwide strike last year that got some of her colleagues operating with no union protection fired. they are asking for $25,000 a year, just under what she earns working eight years. >> they are in a position where they can assist and help the
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workers have a better life and i believe that they're more concerned with how much the company can make within a year. >> so they can pay the workers more. >> they can. >> they just don't. >> right, right. >> wal-mart, the world's largest private employer add sales of $443 billion last year. the c.e.o. earned over $20 million. the companies annual meeting in june rated hollywood and nashville for surprise guests. >> the more i learn about everything you do, i'm inspired by what you all create every day. ♪ ♪ >> in canton, ohio. this collection box prompted outrage, collecting money for needy employees that can't afford the meal for the holiday. >> the dispute is only likely to intensify as the holiday
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shopping season goes on. >> this is the busiest time of year and black friday is the superbowl of retail and wal-mart is going to win. delivering for our customers wouldn't be possible without our associates. they are a critical part of our success all year long especially the holiday season. the company is trying to sell the public a very different image of wal-mart. >> when people look at me. >> i hope they see someone building a better life. >> living better. that that's the real wal-mart. >> the real wal-mart launched sales earlier than ever this year, thursday night. >> their logo is save money, live better while our workers should live better. >> wal-mart hosts to post a new record. linda will take home $13.25 an hour. aljazeera, canton, ohio. >> this is just one of a series of wage-related issues for wal-mart. employees across the nation have been fighting for a minimum annual sally of $25,000.
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the average hourly wage of wal-mart workers is $8.81. wal-mart employees plan to pro testify at more than 1500 stores today. >> we're getting our first indication from wal-mart, the world's biggest retailer saying it had more than 10 million cash rental at her transactions between 6:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. on thanksgiving. on line, it reports getting 400 million paid views yesterday. rival target says it saw strong in-store and on-line sales. >> wall street is back in action today. with a shortened session, futures are pointing to gains this morning. do you futures are up 38 points. the dow jones truly average opens at 16,097, its 44t 44th record high this year.
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one market watcher said it's important to diversify your portfolio. >> have as much as you can in different as as he is. don't put owl your eggs in one basket. in every case, if you're a long term investor in the united states, it's turned out to be a good thing. >> overseas european markets are hire, spain is leading the way. in asia, markets closed mostly higher, but the nikkei fell, pulling back from a six year high in the previous session. h and m. is expanding its presence, opening its first flagship store. the news comes two months after h&m opened its first store.
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googles privacy policy is under fire in europe. the u.s. search engine spins a web of personal information without permission. google said its privacy policy allows it to create more simple services. it is one of seven nations investigating google's privacy practices. >> >> thousands of homeless come to places like this in lower manhattan to get a hot thanksgiving meal. >> it's a nice feeling, because you have people taking time out away from their families, helping people that don't have anything going on for themselves. >> peter had been living on that the streets for about four
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months when someone from the mission gave him a chance to get back on his feet. >> every day, you can come and find some comfort. >> james spent more than 20 careers with the mission, working at the outreach director for the organization that took him in. >> it's a joy, because i was at one time a taker. i gave nothing. now, i don't have that many nickels and dimes again, but i can certainly give of myself. >> maclin says it's volunteers like jackson, who has come here the last four years, who make this possible. >> when i found out about the mission, that they do this whole thanksgiving day thing, i thought this is something i belong at. >> jasmine brought several others along this year. for one friend ricky, his first volunteering experience emotional. >> i see all these people hungry, that got me.
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>> they had over 600 volunteers to help prepare and serve thanksgiving meals to the homeless. >> during the holidays, the out pouring of support is overwhelming. volunteers had to be turned away for thanksgiving. the mission also sees a huge wave of dough he nations in november and december, but mission officials say the need for organizations like theirs that feed and help the homeless is constant. >> we serve 365 days of the year. thank you for coming thanksgiving, but think about helping us the rest of the year. >> it's a message that many organizations like the bauerry mission want people to hear. aljazeera, new york. >> demand jumped when the great recession started and has not let up since. >> many victims of last week's midwest storms are giving
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thanks. more than 50 indiana families gathered at a church in kokomo. volunteers served a thanksgiving feast. the hot meals were a treat for those whose homes were destroyed or damaged. >> i have a home, they don't. this was a dining haul. we decided we were going to deck it out for them to really have a nice thanksgiving day, and yeah, they need some good memories. >> organizers of the feast say they were he can specking up to 1200 people and 1200 pounds of turkey was donated for the dinner. >> supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi defy the government and go to jail. why egypt is handing down tough you sentences to women and girls for standing up for their right to protest. >> the long walk to freedom, the story of nelson mandela comes to a movie theater near you. >> it is a thanksgiving tradition, the lions and cowboys host games.
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>> here is a live look at the toys are us store in times square here in new york city. look at all those people waying to get in. power power of the people until we restore of the people until we restore our freedoms and rights. our freedoms and rights. on this occasion i would like to on this occasion i would like to honour the memory of those who honour the memory of those who have fallen, and i appreciate have fallen, and i appreciate and pray to those and pray to those who have been who have been injured injur injured, offering condolences to injured, offering condolences to
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their families, assuring them their families, assuring them that that their blood will water the their blood will water the tree of freedom for the tree of freedom for the homeland. homeland. here ends the here ends the message. message. president. president. the president reiterated to us the president reiterated to us that he is holding steadfast and that he is holding steadfast and adhering to his legitimacy as adhering to his legitimacy as the lawful legal president of the lawful legal president of egypt. egypt. this was a message this was a message dig tated dig tated verbally to -- dictated verbally verbally to -- dictated verbally to us by the president mohamed to us by the president mohamed the stream is uniquely the stream is uniquely interactive television. interactive television. in fact, we depend on you, your in fact, we depend on you, your ideas, your concerns. ideas, your concerns. >> all these folks are making a >> all these folks are making a whole lot of money. whole lot of money. >> you are one of the voices of >> you are one of the voices of this show. this show. >> i think you've offended >> i think you've offended everyone with that kathy. everyone with that kathy. >> hold on, there's some room to >> hold on, there's some room to offend people, i'm here. offend people, i'm here. >> we have a right to know >> we have a right to know what's in our food and monsanto
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what's in our food and monsanto do not have the right to hide it do not have the right to hide it from us. from us. >> so join the conversation and >> so join the conversation and make it your own. make it your own. >> watch the stream. >> watch the stream. >> and join the conversation >> and join the conversation online @ajamstream. online @ajamstream. >> welcome back. i'm stephanie sy and these are our top stories at this hour. black friday off to an early start. millions of people spent thanksgiving filling shopping bags instead of their stomachs. some big name chains opted not to clothes for the holiday, offering black friday sales a day early instead. analysts estimate 33 million shoppers took advantage of the early savings. >> more than 1,000 anti government protestors entered thailand army headquarters. an army spokesman said they were allowed to come in.
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they had a letter seeking support for the campaign to depose the prime minister. >> china sends war planes to patrol it's newly declared air zone, calling it a defensive measure after the u.s., japan and south korea defied the measure flying planes through the zones. the u.s. says it is international air space. >> the law that limits demonstrations leads to the jail of protestors and more protestors. women and girls were sentenced to prison terms. one is charged with protesting. family and friends are saying goodbye with the women who are heading to prison.
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>> this woman looks through her daughter's bedroom. she is 19. she should have been attending classes added university. instead, she was starting an 11 year prison sentence. she said her daughter has always been conscientious and loved to draw and sketch. so, for the mother, the news of her daughter's conviction has been like a body blow. >> when we heard the verdicted yesterday, this verdict was very shocking, very tough, very unjust. my daughter was telling me mom, i'm 19 years old. after 11 years, when i get out of prison, i'll be 30 years old. you can't imagine how much hurt hearing those words caused me. >> she was one of 21 women and girls found guilty by courts of a series of charges, including thuggery, illegal gathering and damage of property. they had formed a human chain
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during protests against the military-led government several weeks ago. a lawyer representing the women and girls says he beliefs the case politicized. >> there is no evidence at all in the papers of the lawsuit against my clients. from the moment they were arrested through the investigation until the judge announced the verdict and the sentence, there is not one eyewitness saying these women committed these crimes. >> human rights groups have condemned both the trial and the sentences, and say egypt must do away with laws and punishments more reflective of the old egypt. >> this sentence has been given under an old law, and old law from 1923. it's not the newly adopted law.
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this is being seen in the larger framework of a lot of restrictions imposed on the rights of people to protest in a country that for the past three years has changed a lot of things if that. >> in recent weeks, both the government and courts have clamped down on protests. just over a week ago, 12 students from the university were jailed for 17 years each for teaming to storm the headquarters of the institution. this week has seen the imposition of a new law which has seen widespread opposition from groups. the government said it will strictly implement the new law, which it says protects the rights of both the protestors and ordinary citizen. >> the sentences given to the women and girls and to the students at the university have shocked many people here and led
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them to question the independence of egypt's judiciary. aljazeera, cairo. >> the women and girls sent to prison were protesting the ouster of president mohamed morsi. the seven minors are held in juvenile detention until they turn 18. >> the afghan president is lashing out at the obama administration after reports of drone strikes. hamid karzai said one killed a child and injured two women. in a statement on the government's website, the president said: >> the reported attacks come at a delicate time between the two countries. the u.s. wants karzai to sign a security deal letting u.s. troops stay in afghanistan past next year. the jail jirga agreed to the
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deal, but karzai is making additional demands. his comments will be the focus of our discussion later this morning. you can see that right here at 8:30 eastern time. >> it may have thrilled millions of shoppers, but the opening of major chains on thanksgiving didn't sit well with everyone. we are at the mall of the americas in bloomington, minnesota this morning. that is thanksgiving the new black friday? >> good morning, stephanie. i am the kipping of the shopping universe looking down at my subjects right now. there is some talk about that. look, black friday, and thanksgiving kind of merged together this year. not everybody is buying that right now. >> the dash for deals. the push for presents. the rush for a little retail therapy actually began just after all the turkey was gone.
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>> i live for this day and i take this day off for work every year. dinner is cooked, my belly full and now i'm ready to shop. >> shoppers all searching for savings. >> trying to save some money. it's the holidays and we're trying to get as much as we can for the kids. >> starting early and stretching even past the weekend. >> i actually think black friday is gaining relevance, because it's becoming more of a season than one day in particular. >> not everyone is sold on the idea of shopping thanksgiving day. >> they should all be closed. it's thanksgiving! >> if there's a debate about what to do on thursday. >> football and beer and pretty else and food, right? that's what it's about. >> friday's focus is clear. finding that perfect gift at a great price. >> black friday also a good deal
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for retailers. this year, shoppers expected to spend on average $650 this week, that's up 11% from black friday last year, good news for retailers. there's one less week between that thanksgiving and christmas this year. >> i can already see the shoppers out there early. joining us from the mall of may, in blooming to know, minnesota, thanks, jay. >> presidential campaigns cost big money. non-profit organizations are pumping in the lion's share of campaign funds, spending by p.a.c.'s have soared. now the government is proposing new rules to limit political spending by non-profits. joining us to discuss the plan and how it could affect elections in the future is a professor of campaign management at new york university. thanks for joining us.
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happy thanksgiving to you. >> happy that thanksgiving. >> so what exactly do these new rules restrict? >> well, what they've been designed to do, these are for the 501c.4 groups, these are social welfare groups. if we think back to the summer, the big controversy, it's hard tomorrow, we had so many. the obama administration through the i.r.s. was accused of targeting tea party groups who were applying for this decidingation and getting extra scrutiny. the obama administration apologized and said our problems were the rules were too vague. they've tried to clarify the rules. it basically said if you're a social welfare group, you have to be primarily engaged in your social welfare agenda, not political activity. if i ask you what political activity is, we have different definitions. if i ask you what primarily is, people have different percentages. the i.r.s. has said we're going to clarify these terms. if it was that simple, there
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wouldn't be a controversy, now you have people on the left and right taking exception to what the i.r.s. is trying to do. >> some are saying it's political, some are saying this is meant to counter balance the citizens united decision by the supreme court. is it constitutional to have these rules. >> you think about what amendment matters the most in the united states. any attempt to stop or limit speech is always looked at with heightened scrutiny. you have people on the right saying the i.r.s. is going to come down with rules limiting free speech and expression. the left you have people saying don't colorrify these rules. this comes out of the citizens united case, an team to deal with the flood of money that has come into the political system after the 2010 decision, which changed the election, really. >> one of the examples is crossroads.
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between 2011 and 2012 raised $180 million from anonymous donors. do you think these rules will significantly impact elections? >> absolutely. anonymous donors, that's part of what the i.r.s. is trying to clear up. you want to make sure we know who the people are who are donating. disclosure is part of this. absolutely, it will change that. on the right, people saying wait a minute, what it's going to do is limit our speech, and you can never have that in a democracy. this is a case, they have it out for comment. it won't go into effect until after the 2014 he l, but certainly will impact 2016 if they do put these rules in place. >> an ongoing debate, thank you for coming in this morning. >> the trial of two men accused of murdering a british soldier is underway in london.
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the prosecution is making its case. the pair are charged in the killing of lee rigby last may graphic details coming out of the prosecution's opening statement this morning. >> yes. this was described as cowardly and callous murder by these two defendants. the circumstances according to it is prosecution were there. lee rigby, a soldier dressed in civilian clothing was returning from the recruiting office of his regiment and nearly back at his barracks when he was mowed down deliberately by a car. two men got out, armed with meat
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chiefers and knives. they attempted to decapitate hill. they dragged the body out into the middle of the road. there were members of the public standing around watching all this, and proceeded to stand by the body. despite all this terrible scene, one member of the public went to the lifeless body of lee rigby in an attempt to help. another engaged one of the defendants in conversation despite the fact he was still holding a knife. the police arrived. one saying the police opened that fire, shot and injured both defendants. they were detained. the very officers who had shot them had to administer first aid to save their lives. the latest from the court is that the jury had been shown security camera images of the moment that the car struck.
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one witness said the car appeared to be accelerating as it moved towards lee rigby. >> shocking details. how soon do we expect these jurors to be shred. >> well, the jurors of course have been selected. they are hearing this evidence. we expect this trial to go on until at least the end of the year. there is more detail to come, of course and the prosecution are still outlining their case. both defendants did that the charges against them, deny the charges of murder, attempted murder and conspiracy to murder. >> aljazeera's tim friend reporting from the rigby trial in london, thanks, tim. >> thanksgiving means football. >> everything is a contact sport, shopping, football. we've got an annual tradition,
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the lions and cowboys host the annual game. they both had first place on the line. cowboys looking like they were already in a turkey coma. he takes it 23 yards the other way into the end zone. raiders jumped out to that lead in oakland. meanwhile, we've got football here, contact sport, everybody involved, even the camera person. he was ok. meanwhile, back to the game. they are down by 14 points. tony romo and company. ground and pound, murray doing the damage. one of murray's career my three touchdowns on the day. they come back 31-24. >> when you fumble the opening kickoff and they return it for a
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touchdown, that's not a good thing. i thought our team was trying to respond the right way to that. >> it's important after the win last week to come back and put a couple of them together. i was proud of the guys and their ability to concentrate in a touch situation, being where we were in the football game, and teams can go one of two ways there. i was proud of the way the guys committed. they kept get i can better and better throughout the game. >> the packers haven't won a game since aaron rodgers broke his collarbone. detroit in a festive mood, very giving. they give that one up, burnett ready to accept that. detroit finally getting tired of sitting at the kids' table. stafford to ross for the five-yard score, knotted at 10 and more from stafford and company in the third. this time, stafford finds calvin
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johnson and megatron takes it in. lions 37 straight points to feast on the packers on turkey day and end the drought for the win. fellas, you may now go back to the big kids table. aaron rodgers is expected back next week. the lions stafford finished with three touchdowns and has his team at the top of their division at this point in november for the first time since 1993. >> playing a team in our division, a really talented football team and getting the win is what we needed to do. we knew that, talked about it for the three days leading up to the game and made it happen. >> we made mistakes early in the game and had trial to correct them. when we do things the way we're supposed to, we'll be fine. >> good news for denver as the
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broncos will get their head coach back. he has been recovering at his home, but returned to denver for thanksgiving and said the plan is to be there for the game against tennessee on december 8. the broncos are 2-1 under the interim head coach. that is a look at sports this morning. >> many view his life as the epitome of truth and reconciliation. millions around the world will get to see how nelson mandela transformed a nation. >> black friday is going to be bright friday for much of the country under sunshine today. i'll look at those few travel trouble spots. >> a live look at times square in new york city. shoppers starting to get up and early searching for bar against.
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. just ahead, a new film explores the life of a man who inspired a
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nation and made history. first let's look at where the rain and snow may fall across the country today. nicole mitchell is back. >> that whether system caused so much drama, ice to cold air to the rain and whipped up the east coast and now it's moved out. it's relatively quiet as we finish the weekend under sunny skies. we kind of deserve this after what we've been through. just a couple of travel trouble spots around the great lakes. lake effect is still around. you can see the clouds into the northwest, through the day that might pick up and a little area of rain in the southwest. seattle, the rape chances late in the day and especially saturday and sunday. as people return travel over the holiday weekend, this could be a trouble spot. otherwise, a lot of sunshine, even in the northeast, we're seeing the breaks despite clouds in places like syracuse getting some snow today.
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this is very hit and miss. even the rain in the southwest, light stuff and very isolated, so not too bad out there. back to you. >> nicole, thank you. nelson mandela is receiving intensive medical care at his home. the nobel prize winner is confined to his bed. doctors say he is very vulnerable to potential infection. while he clings to life, a new movie looks at his fight against apartheid. we have reaction to the movie in south africa. >> these school girls were born after apartheid ended. they just watched the movie based on nelson mandela's autobiography. >> there was violence that is still happening today. that's horrible and there's so much conflict and so much horrible things going on. >> i don't think there will ever
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be world peace all around the world. there's too much wars and civil wars and fighting and violence. >> was this depressing in a way, the movie? >> it was very sad. the scenes from fighting are very emotional and you find yourselves crying. >> this is your final warning. >> i'm not breaking any laws. >> the movie is an emotional and sometimes violent journey through the discussionles in whites minority rule. producers say making the movie was a long and in steps journey, for others, the story is an eye opening experience. >> it really shows what it was like for people who weren't white in south africa. it was portrayed in how much nelson lost so that everybody could be free. it was a superb movie.
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>> for some, it's simply inspirational. >> it's very, very difficult to understand that someone who had these -- >> the foamer president is 95 years old and seriously ill. those who lived through apartheid will never forgot his achievements and hope this will remind a troubled world that courage and tolerance can bring a peaceful end to the most bitter divisions. >> nelson mandela has been hailed as one of the greatest gt revolutionaries of the 20t 20th century, directing a campaign of peaceful, non-violent defiance against the south african gough. he served as the president of south africa from 1994-1999.
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>> an ancient comet that had a close encounter with the sun never stood a chance. scientists watched as the ball broke apart. the comet was reduced to small rocks after passing about three quarters of a million miles from the sun. it was no match for the 5,000-degree temperatures. that ends the four and a half billion year trip through the galaxy. they hope to learn something by studying its trail. >> let's check in with del walters. >> black friday deals are here, shoppers getting an early dose with with plenty of stores opening on thanksgiving, retailers trying to make up for that shorter shopping season. >> a garment factory in bangladesh destroyed by fire. police trying to find out if arson was the cause. >> delivering a letter, asking for the military to depose the
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prime minister. >> president karzai's comments will be the focus later this morning. why wal-mart workers will be protesting at thousands of stores today. >> the olympics are right around the corner. the united states defending their gold medal is the four man bobsled team. we'll have an interview coming up in sports. >> i'm meteorologist nicole mitchell. as the hurricane season comes to the a close, i will explain why it ranks as one of our least active seasons. aljazeera continues, del walters will be back to you in two and a half minutes.
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determining using some sort of determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or their policy as to whether or not your particular report was not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just and in that case they just recommend that you block that recommend that you block that person. person. >> i don't want to minimise >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that
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some really horrible things that are on are on line, and it's not - it's line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has not just twitter, what has happened through social media happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, that you see websites, hate-filled websites hate-filled websites targetting targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. those that exist as well. >> we find the fault lines that >> we find the fault lines that run through communities. run through communities. >> the shooting happened >> the shooting happened about 30 minutes ago. about 30 minutes ago. >> companies... >> companies... >> the remains of the fire >> the remains of the fire are still everywhere here. are still everywhere here. >> the powers that be >> the powers that be at home and around the world... at home and around the world... >> not only do they not get >> not only do they not get compensation but you don't even compensation but you don't even have to explain why? have to explain why? >> well thats exactly >> well thats exactly what i said. what i said. >> we question authority. >> we question authority. >> so you said we could get >> so you said we could get access... >> that's enough! access... >> that's enough! >> ... and those affected. >> ... and those affected. >> investigative journalism >> investigative journalism at it's toughest. at it's toughest.
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>> it is the holy grail of holiday shopping, black friday starting early. >> forced entry, thousands of protestors taking over army headquarters in thailand, urging the military to take a stand to topple the government. >> a huge fire at a garment factory in bangladesh. >> living with h.i.v. the billions spent on research and development and the hope given to millions of infected patients around the world.
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>> black friday in full swing, large chains have been opened for hours now. toys are us, target, wal-mart open well ahead of their usual midnight start on black friday. retailers are trying to make up for the shorter span between thanksgiving and christmas. workers are demanding better pay and working conditions at wal-mart. we are standing by live right now at the malin bay shore, new york. did they come? >> they did come, but they came last night.
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gray thursday has stolen a lot of black friday's thunder. a lot of stores opened last night. that's when we saw the hard core bargain hunters coming out for door busting deals. initial shopping patterns showed up people showing up last night were mostly shopping for themselves, not so much gift shopping. stagnant wages have eroded the spending power of the majority of americans. the holiday season is all about stretch i go their dollars further. for shoppers armed with smart phones and tablets, there are an array of apps out there to help them target the best deals. >> let your smart phone be your guide. this year, shoppers may be browsing ignitors, but are hunting for the best deal with apps. popular ones help shoppers compare prices, get gift ideas and find money-saving coupons.
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>> there's going to be a major surge in the way app's play. >> a lot of shopping will be done on smart phones and tablets. >> app definitely ors are starting to figure out shopping experiences that are on par with or better than what you get in the store. there's an opportunity to learn about the product, what it does and how it works. >> survey owners show shoppers have three to four shopping apps. >> we've seen some great growth in the internet business. we've seen double digit growth over the last 10 years. >> a report out by consumers reports found 56% of americans don't intend to set foot inside a shop. a lot of people are going to hold out for sign are monday,
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avoid the crowds altogether and shop from the comfort of their own homes. >> it seems every year, there is one hot item. this year, that doesn't seem to be the case. >> we saw the deals kick in earlier and with so many stores opening thanksgiving day, it's stolen the thunder of black friday. >> the term black friday is only 50 years old. it was contained in philadelphia.
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in 1961, publicist grizwold wrote traffic jams are an. >>some problem to the police and it came customary for officers to refer to it as black friday and black saturday. shop owners tried to change the name to big friday. that didn't work. enter those marketing experts. they made sure that black friday took on a whole new meaning, referring to the shift in profits from red to black when sales on the day surged. >> it seems that thanksgiving gave black friday a run for its money this year. the early start to the holiday shopping season meant less time at the dinner table and more time searching for bar against. >> i haven't done this before. i think i'd rather let the employees have the night off, but given that it's open, i'm shopping here. >> national retail federation saying 89 million people shopping on black friday last
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year compared to 35 million on thanks giving. >> remember that pizza hut manager who refused to force his staff to work thanksgiving, he's not sure that he wants his job back. the stand he took on behalf of his employees brought an avalanche of support in social media. the 28-year-old ran a restaurant in elkhart, indiana. the franchise owner said he quit after he refused to open thanksgiving. he says he was fired. he says he told the owners in a letter that his workers deserved the day off. >> i said why can't we be the company that stands up and says we care about our employees and you can have the day off. in the whole year, there are only two days those employees are guaranteed to have the days. >> the company said in a statement:
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>> his staff did get the holiday off, 15 in all. the restaurant was closed on thursday. >> after worries that giant balloons in the macy's thanksgiving day parade would be grounded, new york city police gave the thumbs up, the go ahead for the balloons to fly, but with height limits. volunteers had to keep a tight grip as winds gusted up to 26 miles an hour. >> the low-flying balloons encount erred obstacles. a tree branch took off spiderman's left arm, but spidey stayed strong and made it through the parade. one volunteer had to be hospitalized. a golf cart ran over the balloon handler's foot. it could be broken. >> the atlantic hurricane season is coming to an end. it is somewhat quieter this year than expected. >> going all the way back to
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1950, and we don't go back much farther than that, because we didn't have satellites and didn't know everything out there. this will be the sixth least active season on record. here are some of the numbers. a tropical storm, those numbers were kind of on average 13, given the average and long material. hurricanes, only two major, no major hurricanes anywhere in the atlantic this season. those numbers, you have to go back years to see that quiet of a season. for the united states, only one landfall, a tropical storm back in june. that's very quiet for us, too. mexico was getting hit on both sides, so it was a dramatic season here. why was it so quiet? there were a couple of elements that we were watching. one is as you see a tomorrow form, they build up into the atmosphere. we had areas of sinking air. that kind of quashes them.
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we have the winds at the pass. if you have winds aloft, that's called wind sheer, blowing the tops off and keeping them from develop. those are a couple elements. look at this image from late july, early august from space, showing the dust come off of africa. this is where the storms are forming. with all that dry air and dust, that helped quash storm development, as well. all of those things lending to this theme are a quieter than average season. i know most people across the united states enjoy it. not the a great chance it will form, but we're always keeping our eyes out. del. >> thank you very much. thousands of protestors in thailand are calling for the prime minister to step down. just a few and you say ago, they occupied the army's headquarters in bangkok.
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>> demonstrators want the army to help them overthrow the government. this is the sixth day of those large anti-government rallies. protestors say the prime minister is controlled by her brother in compile. >> the royal thai army headquarters here in bangkok, they didn't storm the gates. they were open for them. le yellow shirts have an alliance with the thai army. they are allowed in. the main purpose, they came in here to deliver a letter to the secretary general of the army, simply asking are you with us or with the prime minister's government. now, they stayed for an hour. they are being asked to leave politely. they did what they wanted to, now are leaving. armed the city of bangkok today, in front of the u.s. embassy
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with, they want to hand over a letter. the headquarters, they are going to be amassing out there. they are not going to spend the time overnight here. again, the army official asked them to leave. they are doing so, but staplinging in other parts of the city today. >> joining us from bangkok. the crash of a high speed ferry today injured 85 people, six seriously. it hit a submerged object. 100 passengers and 10 crew members onboard, no one has been reported missing. that accident is now under investigation. last year, 38 were killed when two ferries collided in hong kong's harbor. >> caution and restraight is what the u.s. is asking from china today, china dispatching fighter jets over the area it now claims. china calls it defensive after
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the u.s., south korea and japan flew planes over the zone. >> it might take only one tiny miscalculation or one tiny misunderstanding and these islands could become the center of a large international conflict. to the japanese, this year one name, to the chinese, another. thanks to the unilateral introduction of what china calls an air defense identification zone, they're the most talked about islands in asia, and politics at home have a lot to do with it. >> china, japan and korea are all facing domestic issues and want to divert people's attention to security and diplomatic matters, so these countries want to find another issue they can quarrel about. >> china's decision to impose control over the air space has upset japan and south korea.
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some argue the u.s. is the most annoyed. >> the idea was originally introduced by the united states after japan's defeat in the second world war to secure japan's safety. this is a u.s. invention and china is trying to introduce a new order. that's why the u.s. is more sensitive to this than japan. >> on the streets of tokyo, there is concern. >> i can't understand why anyone would do this. if you don't know what your neighbor is thinking, that's a reason to become afraid. >> my feelings of disrust, anxiety have increased. >> a survey suggested there could be large oil deposits
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beneath the sea bed. that's what got taiwan and then china originally interested. now, with so many countries involved, a small misstep could have serious consequences for peace in the region. >> it's that kind of miscalculation that american vice president, joe biden, hopes can be avoided when he visits the region next week. with oil deposits yet to be proven, the islands hold little real value. aljazeera, tokyo. >> a chinese newspaper addressed the dispute saying it is china's will power and ambition to beat japan in any strategy icon frontation. >> another blow for the multi-billion dollars garment industry in bangladesh. >> thousands of wal-mart workers
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will hit the picket line in search of better pay. >> virtual money goes missing, as bit point tops the mark. >> there is as crowd in times square gathering outside of toys are us. it's that time of year.
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>> coming up in just a minute, we'll tell you why some wal-mart workers were outside the stores instead of inside at their cash registers. first lets find out about the temperatures across the nation. >> all the way through the south, that's why yesterday morning especially and a little bit this morning we had freeze warnings. some temperatures did get below freezing. this is where pipes aren't well insulated, so there is concern for some of those things
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freezing. teens in the midwest today. parts of the midwest and northern plains will have a warm up. the high frontal move has high circulation. on the backside of the high, you see wind out of the south helping warm you. places today, such as rapid city and dep very in the 50's, where you're getting that warm flow, where you're not with, chicago stays in the 30's. that warm air does make a difference. as we get to the rest of the country, if you want something warmer, phoenix if you want to escape the cold. >> a huge fire in one of the large evident garment factories in bangladesh, making clothing for major u.s. brands, nearly 18,000 people work there. no one was injured. police say workers set the factory on fire after hearing a colleague had been shot by police. there have been self tragedies this year, including that collapse in and you were that killed more than 1100 workers.
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more than 4 million people are working in the bangladesh clothing sector. >> wal-mart shoppers may meet employees outside the stores with employers have a list of grievances against the employer. what kind of turnout are they expecting today? >> police expect about 400 protestors here in chicago's lake view neighborhood. all these protests have been wrapping up over the last year or so. in particular, last month, there were about 50 arrests the at a wal-mart in los angeles during a protest there. here in chicago, a couple weeks ago, workers at three chicago stores walked off the job in a one day strike. del. >> these workers have a long list of demands. exactly what do they want? >> well, one of their issues is
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the fact that wal-mart opened up their shopping on thanksgiving day. some have complained that when they protested with, they faced retaliation from the company. the main issue is over wages. workers barely make $25,000 a year, working the add hours that they do. it boils down to wages they say is not right for a company that makes $16 billion a year. >> what is wal-mart's response? >> in particular to the protestors, wal-mart says that a lot of these protestors they don't believe were actually wal-mart workers. they think union workers are joining in to stir the pot. in terms of wages and benefits, wal-mart said they are comparable to other big box stores, offering generous health benefits. they are trying to stress that what they offer workers starring in the bottom rung is a chance to move up in the company. they said last year alone, they
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promoted 160,000 people with that the company to better paying jobs. the bottom line here might be the bottom line, which is last year for example, when they opened up on thanksgiving thanksgiving, wal-mart said they had their best season opening weekend ever in their history. that might be what's driving this ultimately for the company, as long as profits are good, things might just stay the same. >> andy, thank you very much. >> last year, wal-mart making $16 billion in profit, the c.e.o. $20 million a year. the workers just want to live off the money they make at wal-mart. do they have a bone to pick with wal-mart? >> i think they do have a point. the problem originates in more than just wal-mart.
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essentially we have a wage-cutting arms race, that's probably the best way to look at it. if wal-mart pays its employees more and things end up more expensive in consequence, other stores might be able to undercut wal-mart by paying less. that might eat into wal-mart's profits. in fact what you ever is a kind of arms race between firms like wal-mart to cut wages. the only real solution to that is a collective solution namely living wage laws. >> i often wonder whether these are p.r. nightmares and wal-mart are running a series of ads telling you how good they are to their employees. wouldn't it make more sense to give that money to the employees saying look, it's not what you want, but we are not going to spend it countering with what you're saying. >> if wal-mart didn't have to compete with other big box providers, it would. what we really have to do is do this at a societal level,
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require that all firms pay living wagers enable workers to live on what they earn. >> this is bigger than wal-mart. >> much bigger, it's a systemic condition nationwide. >> congress looked into it. it was said: >> in sense, are u.s. taxpayers footing the bill no. >> that's exactly right. it's a systemic and societal problem. because each firm has an incentive to underbay laborers, we end up footing a lot of the bill, providing the safety net and living expenses in effect when wages not enough to live on. >> wal-mart says if these people weren't working for us, they wouldn't be working in some instances. you maintain it's a drag on the economy. >> it's a huge drag. we don't have enough consumer purchasing power. it's a systemic problem.
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you can't live at the doorstep of any one company. it's a system as a whole. >> there is a stai story about wal-mart setting up an area for employees to celebrate. >> they are trying to collect on behalf of these troubled employees. it's a startling admission on the part of wal-mart that they are not able to pay a living wage to their own employees. the increasing number of americans work at these big box stores and retail, that shows you a dramatic illustration of the systemic problem we face. most americans are no longer able to be paid living wages. >> let's look at business news this morning. we're getting our first indication now of how the holiday season is going for wal-mart.
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the retailer saying it had more than 10 million cash register transactions between 6:00 and 10:00. rival target saw strong in-store and on-line sales. >> wall street back in action after taking thanksgiving off with a shortened session. futures are pointing to gains this morning, the dow up 48 points. the dow jones up, it is its 44th record-high this year. the s&p and r. at record highs. one market watcher saying they are watching the bull run. >> we have very low inflation, and we have a gradual recovery. the question is can we sustain this without some exterm shock
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or some policy mistake. both are possible. so far, we haven't had one, but we came close with a government shutdown. >> overseas european markets are higher, spain is leading the way. standard and poor is lifting its outlook from negative to stable. however, s&p is cutting the triple-a rating saying its economic growth will be weaker than expected. >> in asia, markets closing mostly higher, the nick kay falling a positive%. >> back in the u.s., details are expected today about fixing the employee pension fund. illinois lawmakers would reduce cost of living increases and limit the salaries the payments are based on. that fund is $100 billion in debt. >> the standoff between the u.s. and president of afghanistan over the future of u.s. troops in that country, we'll talk
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about that confrontation in a moment. >> struggling to make a living as kids. children who escaped the war in syria facing new dangers on that the streets of lebanon. >> on the eve of world aids day, a look at the funding and research that is giving hope to millions of people living with the disease around the world. >> a big north a.f.c. match up. the steelers coach made the headlines after the game. more coming up in sports. one else will ask. one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington agree to anything in washington no matter what. no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your the history of suicide in your family. family. >> there's no status quo, just >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete? in a professional athlete?
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power power of the people until we restore of the people until we restore our freedoms and rights. our freedoms and rights. on this occasion i would like to on this occasion i would like to honour the memory of those who honour the memory of those who have fallen, and i appreciate have fallen, and i appreciate and pray to those and pray to those who have been who have been injured injur injured, offering condolences to injured, offering condolences to their families, assuring them their families, assuring them that that their blood will water the their blood will water the tree of freedom for the tree of freedom for the homeland. homeland. here ends the here ends the message. message. president. president. the president reiterated to us the president reiterated to us that he is holding steadfast and that he is holding steadfast and adhering to his legitimacy as adhering to his legitimacy as the lawful legal president of the lawful legal president of egypt. egypt. this was a message this was a message dig tated dig tated verbally to -- dictated verbally verbally to -- dictated verbally to us by the president mohamed to us by the president mohamed
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>> every sunday night al jazeera >> every sunday night al jazeera america brings you america brings you controversial... controversial... >> both parties are owned by the >> both parties are owned by the corporations. corporations. >> ..entertaining >> ..entertaining >> it's fun to play with ideas. >> it's fun to play with ideas. >> ...thought provoking >> ...thought provoking >> get your damn education. >> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interviews with the most interesting people of our time. interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to want to see what's going to happen. happen. >> i want to know what works >> i want to know what works what do you know works? what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> oh my! >> thanksgiving shopping, stealing some of black friday's thunder. millions of people spent thanksgiving filling shopping bags instead of their stomachs. some big name chains offering
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black friday sales early. >> more than 1,000 anti-government protestors enter thailand's army headquarters today. they were allowed in. the demonstrators had a letter for the secretary general of the army. they want him to help them depose that countries prime minister. >> china sense war planes over the sea to defend it's newly declared defense zone. the u.s. says it is international air space. it is considered one of pakistan's most powerful positions. today, a new army chief of staff is taking over, in charge of 600,000 troops. he'll be responsible for fighting the taliban on the afghanistan border. he must focus on relations with its nuclear armed neighbor,
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india. pakistan faced its most significant threats in years under his predecessor. we look at the legacy of the former army chief. >> all this in honor of the country's most powerful man. the general oversaw this military parade after month along the prime minister. for six years, he has been pakistan said chief of army staff, an institution that has controlled the country for more than half its history. he take over in 2007. after taking the job, he frequently traveled to conflict areas to meet his men who were fighting and dying in alarming numbers. he also struggled to counter the threat of armed groups in the country's largest tribal areas. military analysts say this allowed him to focus on the true problems of the nation. >> we are faced with internal
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and external challenges. the problems on our internal battle front require special attention, because they pose a grave threat. >> he didn't name india as the only threat to pakistan. the country faced its most significant threat in years in 2009. a faction of the taliban had taken control of the northern region. in response, he laurened a defining military operation. the taliban were driven back into the remote tribal areas. his popularity sang in 2011, that year beginning with the killing of two pakistanis by a security contractor. his big evident perceived failing, the osama bin laden raid.
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embarrassment was caused when the u.s. military launched its raid on pakistani soil without pakistan's knowledge. he helped ease the cries by making compromises with the u.s. the army chief neve managed to give the americans what they wanted, decisive action against the network in tribal areas. today, he exits the scene against the backdrop of a historic civil milestone. in may, pakistan held general elections. >> the fact he never tried to lead a coup against the democratically elected government helps his legacy to some degree. while he is able to retire with some grace, he leaves behind him some unfinished business. aljazeera, islamabad. >> pakistan has a long history of shifting between democratic
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and military rule. the military sometimes leads the overthrow of political leaders. afghanistan getting an apology from the u.s. after a drone strike, acknowledging that civilians had been killed and injured. karzai lashing out at the obama administration saying a child was killed and two women injured. he said this: >> the u.s. wants karzai to sign security deal to stay there after the end of the year. karzai is making demands.
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>> troops are being pulled out of afghanistan by 2014 if that deal isn't signed with the karzai government. we are joined from washington this morning. first with, your reaction to that apology by the general. >> two fold. first of all, i think it's appropriate that the general apologizes when there is collateral damage on these drone strikes. i think we all recognize it is necessary to continue to prosecute this war against terrorism, and that unfortunately necessitates these types of actions. >> what about what the white house is calling zero option, pulling all u.s. troops out of afghanistan by the end of the year if karzai does not sign? >> if we don't have sovereignty over the judicial prosecution of
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our soldiers, the u.s. has a responsibility of not letting our troops be under foreign jurisdiction in these types of prosecution. it will be necessary, although significantly dell tarrous to our affects of what we're trying to achieve in the long run. >> should we consider as the united states arizonay being an ally or adversary. was it a slap in the face when he tacked on those preconditions to the deal in the first place? >> it certainly wasn't helpful, but i don't think we can call him either an ally or enemy. we have common interests. he wants to day in power. he wants his country not to be overrun by the taliban. we want the to continue to prosecute this fight against terrorism. i don't think there needs to be an emotional relationship. it is common interests, mutual interests that cause us to work together inside afghanistan. >> the new york sometimes are
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urging calm, saying it would be a mistake to let one man speaking of karzai increasingly detached to. can the u.s. let itself be pushed around by karzai. >> i think "the new york times" is right on this one. it is time for calm and decompressing. it's clear that karzai is looking towards his legacy and past. in 1996, the head of having a at that time, the proxy of the soviets interception was taken inside of united nations compound horribly tortured, drug through the streets until killed and hung from a lamppost. that is certainly not what karzai wants to be his future or quite frankly another taliban take over afghanistan. >> counter to what you're saying and the times is saying, what is the risk if the united states takes a hard-line approach to
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karzai no. >> there are two risks primarily. if the united states and coalition forces have to withdraw, it would lead to generally chaos inside of afghanistan as a stronger ejudgent taliban becomes a threat to the central government. it takes away the base for the fight against terrorism that we have currently ongoing in afghanistan. afghanistan is allowing parts of its country to be a sanctuary and safe haven for al-qaeda and it's easier for us to fight al-qaeda inside of having a rather than remotely as we were having to do in places such as pakistan. >> this proposed agreement adds new meaning to coming home. >> they are looking at 10,000 troops in an assist role to help
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the fledgling afghan security forces. it would per hit a capability to have counter terrorism conducted inside. >> the chief of the european union is condemning russias influence with a deal on ukraine that collapsed. the government delayed signing an agreement meaning closer ties with the e.u. we have more from lithuania. >> the summit ended some two hours earlier than it was supposed to have. the leaders left very quickly.
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it seems that having signed up georgia and moldova fully to partnership agreements, two of the six countries they hoped to get together and realizing that they'd lost the prize of ukraine with the ukraine president showing no signs of a last minute change of heart, they may well have felt there wasn't much to talk about. it would have heard of the justification for his last minute u turn on the deal last week, telling them he couldn't withstand russian pressure, that what the e.u. wasn't enough. don't forget on the tail as well was an e.u. condition that he release opposition leader and former prime minister leader from jail. he showed no signs of wishing to do that. that would have always been a sticking point. what happens next, the e.u. made it clear the offer remains on
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the tail. there's another meeting in march, possibly talks can continue behind closed doors, but no signs of ukrainian willingness to do that as such. it is very much locked in the middle of a tug of war between russia and european union, russia is trying to whip back influence in its back yard, the european union wanting to push trade rules all the way up to russia's border. it is a fight at the moment that russia feels it is winning. >> pro e.u. protests have continued in ukrainian cities against the government's decision to back out of that agreement. >> in syria, more than 2 million children are now refugees and a new report paints a very grim picture. it says when these school aged children grow up, are driven to bordering countries, they are
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cut off from education and forced to work just to survive, children. the children often face grave dangers. we are in beirut with some of those children. >> she is 11 years old, she escaped the war in syria to find herself facing a new danger in lebanon. her school is safe, but many refugees have to work once classes are over. >> a man in a car with a syrian plate number approached me. he looked scary and asked to buy flowers. he grabbed my arm. i ran inside the supermarkets. he waited and then followed us. we ran away. >> because of that, she no longer works on the streets, but her 9-year-old brother has no choice. their mother is a cleaner, but her salary isn't enough for them to survive, so every afternoon, he sells flowers on the streets
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of beirut. more and more children are forced to,. >> as family resources become more depleted, children are september out to work, some in very difficult circumstances and unsafe conditions. >> you can see the problem in almost every street corner in lebanon. these children live a difficult and dangerous life. they are vulnerable to exploitation and abuse and many are worn down emotionally. >> these children are traumatized from what they saw in syria. they are cared to reveal their identities, even though it has been almost a year since they fled. >> there was a checkpoint. we saw someone kill everyone right in front of us. i saw the way they all died. >> those images are till clear in their minds, and social workers say there are many other children that who are not getting the help they need. they also face risks here in lebanon. >> they are traumatized from the violence in syria and in
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lebanon, some face abuse in crowded areas where refugees stay. >> by talking to these children, you realize how the war has impacted their lives. >> the war won't stop, because people are killing each other and one will take revenge. if one kills a brother, he will respond. >> i am disturbed and frustrated, he says. he is among those who the united nations calls a generation of innocents who are in danger of becoming lasting casualties of an appalling war. aljazeera, beirut. >> as many as 300,000 children are refugees in lebanon and jordan. many are forced to go without schooling. >> more than 33 million people worldwide are affected with h.i.v. in the 1990's, contracting the virus was considered a death sentence. now medical breakthroughs could
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reverse that. we have more on drugs that are saving lives. >> andrew is a regular at this h.i.v. clinic. he contracted the virus 10 years ago. then it was considered a death sentence. now, with the right combination of drugs, he's able to maintain his health. >> life has changed dramatically. >> in south africa, h.i.v. drugs have affected, with less than 20 catching the virus from their mothers. >> the h.i.v. virus, and these stalks play a role. that when it comes into contact with a cell, in this case, a red
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blood cell be it uses the stalks to attach. the drugs effectively disable the virus's stalks where it can't attach or in void the cell. >> providing you keep taking the drugs, the virus is kept at bay. stop taking them, it returns in force. more than $2 billion a year is spent on research. there are almost 30 drugs to treat the virus. competition, along with the production of generics has pushed down the price. this makes the drugs more affordable and accessible, especially for those in poor countries. >> it's been pretty miraclous. i think we've moved from a situation where a uniformly fatal disease with maybe at best three or four drugs for its
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treatment to a point where there's 30 drugs where 8 million people around the world are being treated. >> the united nations hopes to give people anti retro viral drugs. new and increasingly effective drugs hold the greatest promise, giving those with h.i.v. a better and longer life, as well as rusing the spread of the virus. that aljazeera. >> h.i.v. prevention and treatment efforts have helped save thousands of lives. more than 25 million people worldwide have tied from aids. h.i.v. treatment in poor countries has increased 10 fold. in the u.s., new infections dropping more than 60% sips the height of the epidemic. >> if you had too much turkey last night and fell asleep, you missed a great game. >> the the ravens, the steelers
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were battling on the final wildcard spot. the ravens won in a nail-buyer 22-20. after the game, all the talk was about an in game.gov provided by steelers head coach. baltimore gets the win, but big story, was, this kickoff return. it looks like ravens have the clear path to take it all to the house. no, that was none the wiser. look at this replay. check out tomlin on the sides for the steelers. he. >> no penalty was called even after the ravens requested it, so coach, why were you in the way? >> i'm looking at him the whole time. i'm running, looking at him.
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i just weaved and got away. it broke my stride a little bit. i shouldn't have been caught. it is what it is. it's till a tackle. >> i always watch the returns on the jumbotron. it provides a better perspective for me. i lost my place as he broke free. i saw at the last second how close i was to the field of play. >> michael tomasky lynn topped this one. i took some flak for joking around in the superbowl saying maybe you should run on the field and tackle somebody. that's exactly what he just did. he was looking at the big screen. he knew where he was and where jacoby was. he pulled my move. he did what i thought we should do. >> i'm just impressed he was able to keep a straight face with that one. the countdown to sochi is down
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to 70 days. the journey back to the winter olympics was not an easy one for holcomb. >> steven holcomb has competed as an american bobsledder since 1988. he struck gold as the driver of the four man team in 2010. it was the first such win for the americans since 1948. the win was particularly sweet for holcomb, who had to overcome a repair eye disease before his gold medal dreams could come into focus. >> i had a degenerative eye disease, a slow thinking of the cornea that causes them to bug out and you slowly go blind. everything was going well. it just caused a lot of isolation. it with drew from everything and fell into a deep depression when i finally hit rock bottom.
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>> as he struggled with his vision and keeping his disability a secret, he tried to take his own life. >> you'd be surprised what the human body can endure. you go through crazy stuff. i actually attempted suicide at bun point. it was pretty devastating, a moment i realized i'm here for a bigger purpose. >> with a new lease on life, he found the courage to address his secret disability with a risky experimental procedure. >> we were lucky to find a procedure called c3r, it's a procedure justify now being introduced, and that saved my vision. after that, we won the first world champion in 50 years and then two years almost to the day, won the first gold medal. >> as the team prepares to defend their gold medal in sochi, holcomb is grateful for another opportunity, but he can
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always see that he has a greater purpose. >> if i can help one person, motivate one person, that's a great feeling that i'm here for something big are and better and hopefully can send a message to someone else. >> that is a look at our sports. >> you have no idea how much crow i'm eating because of that pittsburgh and baltimore game. thank you very much. >> virtual money goes missing big time as bit coin tops the $1,000 mark. we'll tell you about a frantic search to find millions that could be buried in this landfill. >> as troublesome as our holiday travel was tuesday and wednesday, it's going to be almost that pleasant heading into the rest of weekend. i'll have your details.
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>> and now a techknow minute... >> and now a techknow minute...
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. straight ahead, we're going to tell you the story of a british man that's very, very sorry that he tossed a computer hard drive in the trash. we'll tell you why.
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first, let's find out how cold it's going to be. >> we have chilly temperatures, but it teams better with sun shine. that's what we have for most of the country. all the misery we had with the storm system sunday, monday, tuesday and even into wednesday, it has cleared out, replaced by high pressure for the rest of the country. we're pretty dry out there. the northwest will see rain and wind chances increase into saturday and sunday. in the northeast where we started the day with lake affect, that's starting to wind down, so a great day to get out and work off that holiday dinner. >> we all know what it feels like to throw something in the trash by mistake. for one man in great britain, it's especially painful. he had electronic money stored on the hard drive. the real value was about $7 million. we have more. >> somewhere under all this
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rubbish in this huge public landfill site lice $7.5 million worth of bit coins. it's on a computer hard drive belonging to this man. james how we will threw it out by at a. we've all done something like. it well, not quite. >> i'm absolutely devastated, to be honest. when i realized what i'd done, it was an oh my god moment, if you will. >> he generated bit coins and forget about them. >> what is but the coin? >> on thursday, it hit $1,000 a coin. james how we will had 7.5000 of them. the private crypt graphic key without which they are worthless was on the hard drive. >> from the very first time i come across bitcoin, i knew it was going to be a good investment and it was going to be the next big thing.
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devastating really. >> the bit coin was considered the play thing of computer experts and had a slightly shady image. more and more companies are accepting it. a u.s. congressional committee said such currencies do have a legitimate role. it makes his moment of absent minded necessary all the more embarrassing and expensive. >> that's it for this hour of aljazeera america. i'll be headed to london shortly searching for bit coins in landfills. we're back with more in two and a half minutes. you can check us on you 24 hours a day at aljazeera.com. that this is times square where the shopping is in full gear.
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determining using some sort of determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or their policy as to whether or not your particular report was not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just and in that case they just recommend that you block that recommend that you block that person. person. >> i don't want to minimise >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that
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some really horrible things that are on are on line, and it's not - it's line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has not just twitter, what has happened through social media happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, that you see websites, hate-filled websites hate-filled websites targetting targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. those that exist as well. >> evey weeknight on >> evey weeknight on al jazeera america al jazeera america change the way you look at news change the way you look at news tune into live news at 8 and 11 tune into live news at 8 and 11 >> i'm john seigenthaler >> i'm john seigenthaler and here's a look at the headlines.. and here's a look at the headlines.. >> infomation changes by the >> infomation changes by the hour here... hour here... >> our team of award winning >> our team of award winning journalists brings you up to journalists brings you up to the minute coverage of today's the minute coverage of today's events... events... then, at 9 and midnight. then, at 9 and midnight. america tonight goes deeper america tonight goes deeper with groundbreaking with groundbreaking investigative coverage of the investigative coverage of the nation's top stories... nation's top stories... >> a fresh take on the stories >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you... that connect to you... >> live news at 8 and 11 eastern >> live news at 8 and 11 eastern followed by america tonight on al jazeera america followed by america tonight on al jazeera america there's more to it. there's more to it.
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