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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  September 2, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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hello. i'm with bbc world news. joy and horror in iraq. amid claims of ethnic cleansing, one town is liberated and families reunited. our reporter has been there. >> reporter: we're told we shouldn't venture that away because there's the potential for snipers and shootings here. japan fighting its first home grown outbreak in decades.
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34 people are infected. hello there. thanks for joining us. a senior russian official has accused nato of tensions in ukraine by boosting the military presence. russia would have to adapt its own defense strategy accordingly. on the ground in eastern ukraine, government troops are forced to withdraw from the airport. they say russian units were involved. moscow denied sending soldiers into ukraine. >> ukraine is now calling the this conflict a great war launched by moscow that could claim tens of thousands of lives. this is donetsk airport, the
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scene of more fierce fighting. the pro russian separatist rebels have been gaining ground in recent days in luhansk and donetsk regions. ukrainian forces say they were forced to withdraw from the airport. the defense minister says on his facebook page russia is behind the rebel attacks and begun a full scale military intervention. he says a great war has arrived at our doorstep, the likes of which europe has not seen since world war ii. russia denies involvement in the conflict. lavrov said monday's talks should agree on a ceasefire. those talks brought together ukrainian, russian and separatist envoys over a few hours. >> rebels do appear to have
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softened demands. they're seeking a special status region if for ukraine to give amnesty of prosecution. it will allow the deepening of economic with russia. they're set with closer economic ties with eu. talks are adjourned until friday. >> at the next few days, nato is set to agree on a rapid response force of several thousand troops that can be deployed in two days. those countries now extremely nervous about russia peace future intentions. emily thomas, wbs,bbc news. >> let's speak to david stern many kiev that joining us now. this war of words we're talking
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about, what does it reflect greater tensions on the ground? >> reporter: exactly. the war of words reflects very much the war on the ground. we've been seeing the conflict continuing and in fact escalating in the last week. every since the rebels launch what they describe as counter offensive. they've made enormous amount of ground and driven back the ukrainian army in from a number of spaces. they're also threatening the key force city of mariupol. the government forces are digging in there. there hasn't been an attack yet. there's expectations because rebels they say are going to move onto the city. this is obviously reflected as i say in the war of words. especially since ukrainians are insisting along with western officials and western experts, journalists on the ground that the russians are very much involved in this conflict. the fact that the russians said
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fastly deny this is ratcheting up here in kiev. >> we're seeing one report earlier from roiters that said a ukrainian military spokesman had 15 members of the armed services killed in 24 hours. clearly rebels, separatists are gaining an upper hand at the moment. this rhetoric coming out of ukraine calls by the defense minister of saying it's a great war. is that a warning or cry for help? >> i guess you could say a bit of both. ukrainians feel very trapped. they feel they have few options now. they understand they're very much in this fight alone. they're the ones doing the fighting. they're looking for more support possibly, more weapons. it is also a warning to europe. they've said a number of times this is not just a war in
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ukraine. this is a war that ultimately threatens the security structures in europe and in fact the security structures throughout the war. back to the takeover of crimea as well. >> thanks david. now the hue man rights group has accused islamic state fighters of systematic ethnic cleansing in northern iraq. it says the militants are guilty of war crimes and points to an attack of survivors, mass killings and abductions. forces are continuing advance against islamic state fighters after they broke the siege. this is one of the first western journalists to get in. from there he sent this report. >> reporter: fighters from a local shia militia are going home at last, returning after the long siege.
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the road is open but not secure. guides say snipers are hidden in the villages around. we're skirting around to the east and trying to come at it from there. over off to our right there's pockets of islamic state resistance. this is a small shia town surrounded by sunni villages. local fighters held out against the islam mists more than two months. it took an unlikely alliance of shia militias, iraqi military and american air power to finally break the siege. he is looking for his family, but they're not at home. he's had no word from his elderly parents since the siege began. finally he finds his mother at a
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relative's house. then father is reunited with son. >> translator: i haven't seen my son for three months. my son. i'm his mother. they shelled us from all sides day after day. they shelled my home. >> the defense was a collective effort. boys as young as 10 years old have been forced to grow up fast. more than 1,000 rockets and missiles have landed on our town. they used tank as and heavy weapons. all even children were optimizing logistics. >> everyone in this town is still on war footing. amid the euphoria of victory, even the grannies fancy a pop at
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the islamic state. the joy, reunification of families, relief that the siege is broken. there's still anxiety here on the streets. we're told we shouldn't venture too far that way because there's the potential of snipers and shootings here. this is a town only just beginning to come back to life. when the fire ran out, she stoked the bread oven with grain. she began digging holes looking for fresh water. so the appearance today of a truckload of ice felt almost like a miracle. this has been iraq's biggest victory so far against an opponent that's swept through the country with terrifying speed. this is just one small town. the islamic state is still a
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powerful force. so we learned about the conditions people have been living in the past few months. we also learned there will there seems to be a coalition of forces that have come together in the fight against the islamic state. our correspondent in kurdistan sent us more. >> quite bazaar. the militia that seemed to be the backbone have been trained by iran. one of the main ones was in ire ran many years, came back to iraq in 2003. we're told by people on the ground there were iranian office areas with them directing, guiding, advising and so on. that artillery support involved iranian specialists and advisors
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working in the joint operations room. it seems clear iran has been deeply involved on the ground not as fighting forces but directing, advising and so on while americans were carrying out air raids many in support of all the ground forces including militia backed by iran fighting americans when they were on the ground a few years ago even kidnapping and killing them. so that's welded together into a fighting alliance brought together by the threat they all see from isis as a threat to everybody. we're seeing strange followers coming together. there will probably be more to come if they're to tackle as what they regard as a dire minute. >> jim reporting there from irbil. let's take you to japan. that country is battling the the first case of the fever in 14 years. the health ministry says the
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cases were contracted by visitors at the popular park. in case you don't know, let me explain what dengue fever is. it's a tropical virus spread by mosquitos. high fever, measles like rash and severe joint pain are symptoms. 50 to 100 people are infected worldwide each year. of those, up to 2 1/2% die. it's the leading cause of serious illness and death microphone asiin asian and latin american countries. we look at where japan's outbreak is thought to have started. >> the park, probably tokyo's most famous park right next to the shrine. a lot of people visit, tourists go to it on the weekend. one of the nicest parks in
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tokyo. it has been very wet the last six or eight weeks. we've had a very wet summer. there's standing water around helping to breed the mosquito population. it seems some how it has got here from southeast asia. the government i this is probably somebody has brought it back on holiday visiting japan from southeast asia has gotten bitten in the park. that mosquito started to spread through the people in the park. that's the only way this can transmit. >> there have reporting from tokyo. now thebbc learned china accused britain of interfering in internal affairs. beijing recently ruled on the selection of candidates. at the leadership selection for 2017. that decision was met with angry protestors seen here. okay.
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alice is here with the latest business news. what you got? >> a day of business for you and starting with the story we've been covering months it feels. after decades, detroit in the u.s. has finally hit fiscal rock bottom. the trial for the largest bankruptcy in u.s. history is scheduled to start tuesday. the city hopes to cut the current debt $12 billion to a manageable $5 billion. with thousands of creditors, complex union and pension issues to resolve, the bankruptcy will take over a year to sort out. now a radical proposal to build an entirely thank you island airport to the east of london has been rejected by commission looking into the uk airport leads. the proposal came from london conservative who called the decision to reject the plan my oppic. it's seen as a key driver of
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economic growth. london is a hub airport in europe fighting to remain relevant with increased competition from amsterdam, europe and dubbadubai. another story, the greek finance minister and other senior government figures arrive in paris for talks with the aim of restructuring greece's debt burden once and for all. they're meeting with creditors to look at how interest rates on the outstanding debt can be reduced and whether the repayment schedule can be changed. some just question whether greece has really done enough to deserve debt lenient say. more coming on today's world business world. that's it. back to you. >> lovely. thanks very much indeed. stay with us here on bbc.
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hello. this is bbc world news. i have the latest headlines for you. a war of words over ukraine. now russia accuses nato of ratcheting tensions in the crisis. the human rights group amnesty international says it has evidence islamic state jihadist have carried out ethnic cleansing in northern iraq. the fbi says it's looking into allegations that the online accounts of dozens of celebrities have been hacked leading to nude photos of them being posted online anonymously. we told you about this yesterday. you know actress jennifer
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laurence, ri an ma and kim kardashian had photos released. well for more on this, i'm joined by rick ferguson, vice president of security research at internet security firm trend micro. thanks for joining us. what's your best guess as to how this happened? >> there are a number of possibilities. most of them have to do with human security rather than system security. maybe the people infected had weak and easy to get to pass words. there's indications there may have been vulnerability in apple services that allowed the breach. far more likely individuals were directly targeted. may have been a phishing e-mail, pass word reuse, using the same on multiple websites and one of the other websites was compromised. or may have been another service
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connected to their i cloud was compromised and people were able to use that to reset their pass words. the attackers probably went through the reset feature. they would need to know the victim's date of birth and answers to two or three security questio questions. if you're a celebrity, it could probably be looked up online. >> so much of our life is carried around in the clouds. do you think we have reason to be concerned about the cloud safety? >> i don't think it's a question of security of cloud. i think it's a question of security of us as individuals. we're too lax in our security. for example, i cloud has two features but far too many are not enabling this. when you log in you must be doing so from a trusted device
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or otherwise you'll receive a code to use the second device. this is far more about human behavioral security than it is about the cloud. the cloud is giant enterprise level binsz with enterprise level security which is more than most of us could hope for in security. >> thanks for joining us. >> thank you. here in the uk, prosecutors are deciding whether to drop the case against the couple that removed their seriously ill son from the hospital in the south of england. the king's who's 5-year-old son has a brain tumor spent the the night in the prison. >> they say they only want what's best for their critically ill child. bret and mrs. king have spent another night in custody accused of neglect. the couple held at this are prison in madrid haven't been charged with any offense.
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the grand prosecution service in the uk has announced the case is under immediate review. if lawyers decide there isn't enough evidence or that a prosecution wouldn't be this the public interest, the couple will be free to go. the european arrest warrant was put out for the pair at the request of police. they were taken into custody saturday night. after appearing in court yesterday and refusing to be extradited, a spanish judge ordered the king's to be jailed while he considered granting bail. meanwhile, ashya is cared for and a police guard hundreds of miles away in spain at a hospital. his older brother was allowed to visit him the first time last night. the king's travelled to spain to sell their holiday home in order to pay for cancer treatment nhs would not provide. the czech republic says it's
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willing and ready to treat the boy. if cps decides to drop the case against his parents, it's possible he could be about to be moved to yet another foreign country. >> now we've heard a lot about china becoming a growing economic super power. it's spreading influence on the cultural scene. as a result many more museums are springing up. new ones opened up every day last year. some have unusual scenes. our beijing correspondent found out. >> reporter: welcome to beijing's latest cultural offering and museum. that's right. a history of the capital's most famous. it was built by a chinese restaurant chain. most visitors here are customers waiting to be fed.
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>> young people don't know much about history. when we visit museums, we learn about our past. it's like traveling back in time. >> it wouldn't taste good because it's all rubber. you think this museum is bizarre, there's also the salt museum in china. for those dedicated to fruit, go to the watermelon museum. if you're a fan of concrete, there's a museum for that as well. china's cultural scene has flourished in recent years. one of the big success stories is here at the art district 798. across china, a new museum opens in stores almost everyday last year. she tells me the building boom is all part of improving the country's image. >> the government realizes that economic success is not enough.
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soft power and creative industries must now play an important role in improving china's appeal. >> reporter: the design from museums here with more than 100 new ones expected to open doors this year. this censorship is always at play. if there's anything controversial those museums will be forced to shut down. it's fine to look at plastic food. anything politically sensitive is strict. now to show you incredible pictures from the volcano in iceland, the one keeping us on hooks for a few days now. there's been a lava eruption that began sunday continued spouting monday, produced lava fountains more than 50 meters
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high. it caused the country to raise the ash alert level of aviation to highest level. it was downgraded when no ash was detected. in 2009 another volcano closed much of the air space. amazing pictures to leave you with. i'll be back with headlines in a minute. you owned your car for four years.
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our top story. a war of words over ukraine. now russia accuses nato of ratcheting tensions in the crisis. joy and horror in iraq amid claims of ethnic cleansing. one town is liberated and families reunited. our reporter has been there. >> reporter: there's anxiety on the streets of amreli. we're told we shouldn't venture that way because there's the potential of snipers and shootings here. the british human rights activists faces jail in thailand for exposing abuses of migrant
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workers. could this be what an earthquake looks like from space in the program sends back the first images. hello there. thanks for being with us. a senior russian security official has accused nato of ratcheting tensions over ukraine by boosting the military presence along europe's eastern borders. russia will have to change the defense strategy in response to what is called a military threat. on the ground, ukrainian troops are fighting pro russian rebels in the east of ukraine where they've lost 15 soldiers in the last 24 hours. ukraine's defense minister has accused russia of launching a great war against the country. moscow denies actively
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supporting the rebels. with me is bbc's ukraine analyst. we told you about this conflict. now when we hear a russian military official talking about russia reviewing its own military strategy and we get ukraine's defense minister saying there's a great war, this feels it's getting bigger. does that reflect tensions on the ground? >> it is getting bigger on the ground. not maybe necessarily in terms of territory but in terms of human suffering and intensity of fighting. latest figures we're getting is close to a million people displaced. officials figures of the civilians who died as a result of shelling or fighting is closing on 3,000. this is just the official figure. the actual figure may be much bigger and we don't know. this is on top of military casualties which is substantial. what's interesting and important is not just the military
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confrontation inside ukraine that seems to be intensifying but also the political rhetoric. there are accusations of nato, mr. lavrov the russian foreign minister today accused the united states of supporting the party of war in ukraine rather than party of peace. the there are glimmers of hope from where the contact group yesterday for the first time saw ukrainian representatives talking to representative temperatures th temperaturthe rebels. there is dialogue that is assumed under this whole rather aggressive tone that is coming now through the air ways, accusations and counter accusations, denials and more. >> when ukraine's defense minister talks about a great war, is that a warning or cry for help? >> it's difficult to say.
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that was certainly an emotional posting on facebook. doesn't help when defense ministers have emotional postings on facebook. they should be limited to twitter, and damage would be smaller. >> fewer characters. >> this is a sense of desperation. something that looked like a successful operation by ukrainian forces against the rebels in the east within one week was completely turned around. the defense minister believes this is because of presence of russian tanks, russian support and russian troops on the ground. something moscow completely denies and refutes. i think the cry for help is there. it's not clear whether ukraine can actually get this help. there are some attempts by individual nato members to supply non lethal equipment. this all play be be too late. if rebels continue like they're doing now with the backing and support allegedly of russian forces to capture one airport after another and expand the area after their control, plus
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have access to the strategic town of mariupol, the military situation on the ground can change the political set which is substantial. this is a danger to many more we'll observe over the next several months. >> we'll have you back on this set i'm sure. thanks very much. now the human rights group amnesty international has accused fighters of ethnic cleansing in iraq. militants are guilty of war crimes and points to accounts from survivors of massacres, mass killings and abductions. meanwhile, iraqi troops and kurdish forces continue their advance against islamic state fighters after they broke the siege in northern iraq. our correspondent is one of the first western journalists to enter the town. he sent us this report. >> fighters from a local shia militia are going home at last
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returning ing ting to amreli a long siege. our guides say there's snipers all around. >> we're skirting from east trying to come from there. there are pockets of islamic state resistance. >> amreli is a small shia town surrounded by sunni villages. local fighters held out against the islamists more r than two months. it took an unlikely alliance of iranian backed shia militia, iraqi military and american air power to break the siege. he is looking for his family, but they're not home. he's had virtually no news of his elderly parents since the
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siege began. finally he finds his mother at a relative's house. then father is reunited with son. >> translator: i haven't seen my son for three months. my son. i'm his mother. they shelled us from all sides day after day. they shelled my home. >> reporter: the defense of a amreli was a collective effort. boys as young as 10 years old has been forced to grow up fast. more than 1,000 rockets and missiles have landed on our town. they used tanks and heavy weapons. all of these heroes here, even children, were organizing logistics. >> everyone in this town is still on a war footing. amid the euphoria of victory, even the grannies fancy a pop
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the islamic state. the palpable sense of joy and reunification of families and relief the siege is broken, there's still anxiety here on the streets of amreli. we're told we shouldn't venture that way because there's the potential of snipers and shootings here. this is a town that's only just beginning to come back to life. when the firewood ran out, she stoked her bread oven. then the grain dwindled and she began digging holes looking for fresh water. so the appearance today of a truckload of ice felt almost like a miracle. amreli has been iraq's biggest victory so far against the opponent that's swept through the country with terrifying
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speed. this is just one small town and the islamic state is still a powerful force. bbc news in amreli. now let me take you the to japan. that country is battling the first outbreak of dengue fever in 70 years. the health ministry says the case were probably contracted by visitors to tokyo's popular park. if you don't know about dengue fever, it's a fatally tropical i virus spread by mosquitos. some symptoms are fever, rash and severe joint pain. 50 to 100 are estimated infected each year. of those 2.5% can die. w.h.o. says it's the leading cause of serious illness and death among children in asian
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and latin american countries. our correspondent gave me more details about where japan's outbreak is thought to have spread from. >> from the yoyo park, probably the most famous park next to the shrine. it's a place a lot of people visit, tourists go to it on the weekend. it's one of the nicest parks in tokyo. it has been very, very wet here the last six or eight weeks. we've had a lot of very wet summer. there's a lot of standing water around. that's helped to breed the mosquito population. it seems some how it's gotten here from southeast asia. the government thinks probably someone has brought it back from being on holiday and visiting japan from southeast asia. has gotten bitten at the park and that started to spread it through the people in the park. that's the only way this can transmit. >> reporting from tokyo there. now to thailand. british human rights activist has gone on trial accused of
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defaming a leading thai fruit company for allegeding widespread abuse of migrant labor, child labor and low wages. >> the case that started that the courthouse today is getting a great deal of attention because of the spotlight it throws on the troubled issue of labor in thailand. the defendant is one of dozens of activists who's been trying to get companies to improve treatment of migrant workers and end after abuses. it's not just activists. the u.s. government downgraded thailand to the lowest level in the annual report on human trafficking because of the failure of governments to live up to promises of improved conditions. the company that filed the charges, the thai fruit company is taking a different pack. it's the largest producer of
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pineapples in thailand and produce is exported to markets a across the world. the owner says it's not just loss of reputation a pushing him to pursue this case. >> translator: this is if for the future of my company. i ask, is that important? today i'm fighting my case. that's all. who's right and who's wrong? i don't know. maybe i should sell my company. >> reporter: british activists is backed by a number of retail and neighbor organizations which have been urging thai natural fruit to drop this case and investigate the allegations of mistreatment included in the report. the company is invoking the criminal deformation law in thailand. if he's held guilty, he faces the possibility of up to seven years in prison. he believes that the thai
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company and others behind it are simply trying to silence critics. >> this is a political case. they're trying to silence me and get me to leave the country. that's the intention behind the case. i'm someone that thinks the government and industry don't want to reveal. >> reporter: there's a lot riding on this case. thai governments have are promised to address concerns about the rights in this country. the law against activists does have the climate making it difficult to investigate what goes on in the factories. stay with us here on bbc. still to come. the fbi investigates who could have posted nude photos online and how. that's coming up in a moment. for the first time..
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this is bbc world news. these are the latest headlines. a war of words over ukraine. russ russia accuses nato of ratcheting in the crisis. now evidence the jihadist carried out systematic ethnic cleansing in northern iraq. the fbi said it's looking into allegations in the online accounts of dozen of celebrities that have been hacked leading to nude photographs of them being posted online anonymously. jennifer laurence and kim kardashian were among those who's pictures were released. they may have been obtained by hacking celebrity i cloud accounts. we have views of how the pictures may have been obtained. >> there are a number of possibilities. most of them have to do with
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human security rather than system security. maybe the people affected had weak and easy to guess pass words. there are indications there may have been a vulnerability in apple services that allowed those to be resourced. we've got to wait for that one. maybe a phishing e-mail asking them to confirm credentials setting up a bogus wchblts it may have been pass word reuse so using the pass word on multiple websites and one of those other websites was compromised. or could have been a web mail account was compromised and people were able to use at that to receive pass word reset e-mails for the i cloud e-mail. most likely attackers went through the i cloud pass word reset feature. they would simply need to flow the victim's date of birth and answers to two or three security questions. if you're a celebrity, it could be probably looked up online. >> that's rick ferguson from the
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internet security firm talking about that online hacking story. europe's multibillion satellite program returned the first earthquake image. i want to ho you that. ooirt it's hoping mapping before and after an earthquake will lead to understanding and save many lives in the future. with me is jonathan. great to have you here. i want to talk about this incredible image behind us. >> this is the napa valley region of the northern end of san francisco bay. looks kind of like the bubbles in washing bowl. >> what is actual wily showing the amount the ground moved in the quake a week ago. they take the radar image of the earth before the quake and immediately after wards if they can get the satellite overhead.
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the the earliest they could do it was this weekend and compare the difference. >> pink areas is where the earth moved the most? >> they show you contours of movement. they delineate each by 2.8 centimeters. if you count the contours, you add a up 10 centimeters. that's how much the ground moved in the quake over a week ago. it's this type of analysis now the program is going to automate in the years ahead. previously this sort of analysis has taken weeks and months to do. the new system the eu has put up is going to pop these out within a few days within every earthquake. >> much more available to scientist much more quickly. what's it going to help them do? >> if you walk the fault as many scientists have been doing, you can see where exactly it is on the ground because it buckles and snaps.
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in california the skate borders have been out jumping ramps in the middle of the road. california to some extent is a bad example because it's an extensively studied part of the world for earthquakes go. to other places in the world where they don't have that infrastructure, this is the only way you can get insight into where the rupture has taken place. it doesn't always come to the surface. if you go back to the earthquake in iran, 23,000 killed. they did the analysis and found the quake occurred on a fault no one knew existed. >> is it going to help scientists the holy grail of information? >> you look before and after the earth and say is there an event that led up to this? whether we'll ever be able to do that, i don't know. scientists don't know. unless you have information like
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this, you certainly won't get there. >> thanks very much. now a frantic scramble late monday as europe's football club looked to finalize their squad ahead of the closing of transfer window. records were smashed with the five biggest leagues spending $2 billion. let's cross to the bbc sports center and get more from nick marshal. $2 billion is a lot of money nick. >> both are paid great. it was a lot of money on the english premiere league, record summer spending of $1.4 billion them alone. that was double what was spent in spain. obviously one of the biggest signings of the day, the rumor mill headline was resolving around the columbian that moved to manchester united on a one year loan with potential to extend to a further contract. it was interesting at the last minutes of the deal.
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the transfer deadline window last night. a lot of people think he wasn't going to happen. the rumor mill kicked to full gear. they were saying he had failed his medical. that all turned out to be false. they needed to finalize complications. they asked for extension and got it. extension was granted to get danny from manchester united down to arsenal. they needed a striker. the arsenal coach under a huge amount of pressure to replace his player out four months with a severe injury to his leg. >> man united needs new face this is season. is this going to help them get out? >> one of the first things he said via translater last night in the early hours of tuesday morning once the deal was officially done, he said i really think i can turn and residencer recollect manchester united season.
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they've taken two points from possible nine in the league. they had the loss in the capital one league cup in england. things are going bad for louis. you heard if i bring in more players and strikers that will not solve the problem. >> the big name is still heading to spain right? >> absolutely, rodriguez, the big name from the world cup. the top goal scorer in brazil. he's gone to madrid over $105 million and suarez around the same mark. went to barcelona from liverpool. these players are boosting spain's league. they always have the money. rodriguez on your screen now. he will perform dramatically for
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them. navas as well another big player to make a move. huge tv rights are coming through and $60 billion per club a year to spend. they make up the spending of spain's league. they're always going to be in the hunt for the best players from the english premiere league and try to steal them across. >> i'm going to put you on the spot. are players worth it? >> the players will tell you they are. they can go to dinner, have good girlfriends. >> yeah, good point. all right nick. thanks very much. >> no worries. now to a tell of changing fortune. life in the slums is tough for many, not just the children begging for food. kids in the next report were doing that until they took up dancing to make money to pay for school fees. they made a video, uploaded to youtube and made the worldwide
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hit. >> their quick steps, rhythm and swagger are taking uganda by storm. the ghetto kids are performing at the biggest shows. audiences don't want to miss a move or a beat. ghetto kids shot to fame with this homemade video uploaded to youtube in january. it's become an internet sensation with millions of views from around the world. the group's success hasn't come easy. they train practically everyday either rehearsing routines or doing kpexercises. >> they're like our friends. then it will grow out to help them. they get their needs. >> the brain behind it all is
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mathematics teacher. he set up the collective of the way to help poorer children in his neighborhood. himself a former street child, he says he felt he had to do something. >> get money for school. that's how i was inspired to open up. >> many of the group's members come from the slum. this kid showed me where he lives. he says he's proud the little money he makes from dancing and singi -- singing has allowed him to move his mother here and go back to school. >> my life was bad. i would go to street and start to beg. if i don't get someone who give
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me money, i have to chase rubbish. >> those kids are inspiration of how to turn your life around. i'd love to hear from you. stick around. plenty more from the bbc world news. is how delicious it can be.
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hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news. a wave of ethnic cleansing against minorities in iraq. amnesty says islamic state has turned parts of the region into blood soaked killing field. this is one of the first western journalist to enter the key town that was under siege by militants for weeks. >> reporter: we're told we shouldn't venture too far that way because there's still potential for snipers and shootings here. this is a town that's only beginning to come back to

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