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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 9, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may is to outline plans to improve support for people in england with mental illness. she'll say it has been "shrouded in a completely unacceptable stigma". flay will set out her government's vision with a pledge of social reform to end what she calls burning injustices. —— theresa may will set out her government vision. gridlock at stations and misery for millions of commuters as tube staff strike in london, over ticket office closures. 16 people have been arrested by french police investigating the theft of jewellery worth millions of pounds from the reality tv star kim kardashian. also, success for british actors including the stars of the night manager at the golden globe awards last night. but it's the comedy "la la land" a nostalgic tribute to hollywood musicals which sweeps the board winning a record seven prizes at the prestigious ceremony.
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good morning, this is bbc news at 11. the prime minister is set to announce more training and resources for schools and companies in england to deal with what she calls the ‘hidden injustice' of mental illness. in a speech in central london shortly, theresa may will order a review of mental health services and outline her plan to create a ‘shared society'. but her announcement has been called ‘puny‘ by some. norman smith is outside the speech venue in central london. an interesting and obviously very significant choice of subject for this first major speech of the new year?
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it's the first instalment of what is expected to be a series of major domestic policy announcements by mrs may over the next month or so. really to try and give substance to her government's agenda beyond brexit because other than grammar schools, really we've heard nothing from theresa may about what she actually wants to do. today, she wa nts to actually wants to do. today, she wants to give us some sense of what her vision is and she will pledge wholesale social reform across a wholesale social reform across a whole range of issues, starting with mental health and some tentative first steps, so for example, she will talk about improving support in schools, perhaps trying to encourage more good practice in the work place, possibly looking at reform of discrimination. a little bit of extra money. the criticism, of course, is that this is really about resources . course, is that this is really about resources. when it comes to resources , resources. when it comes to resources, there is no significant
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extra cash being put in today, albeit the health secretaryjeremy hunt earlier stressed this was not just about money, it was about ending the stigma of mental health. what no—one is disagreeing about is that extra funding is going into the nhs. it's £3 apology 8 billion this year. theresa may is saying one of her big priorities if we are going to have a country that works for everythingth everyone, is to improve mental health. we are accepting a report today that says we should spend a billion a year more on mental health provision by the end of this parliament. our particular focus is mental health provision for young people. that's the area where i think we do the least well of all in terms of probably the provision of all nhs services. we know that about three children in every classroom have a diagnosable mental health condition. we know it's a huge worry for parents with the pressures of social media, cyber
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bullying, the increase in self— harming that we bullying, the increase in self—harming that we are sadly seeing and so this is really theresa may saying this is a big priority, we want to sort this sought, it's not acceptable that people wait too long, some don't get the heap they need at all and she's making this a big priority of her premiership. joining me now isjohn ashworth, the shadow health secretary. i presume you will welcome the fact that the prime minister is talking about mental health. there is more money and the measures being announced today will probably help? yes, we would welcome the measures being announced today, not least because we have been suggesting over previous months that this happen. this announcement is in the context of severe cuts to the mental health provision. we have lost over 6,000 nurses, 400 doctors and 1500 beds in mental health. children's mental health service budgets are being
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raided in order to plug gaps in the nhs more generally. so where would you find the extra money and how much extra money do you think is actually needed to ensure that mental health is adequately funded? there's been a £6 million cut to mental health across—the—board. we'd say the government is about choices, this government's chosen to cut corporation tax. where would you find the money? we'd reduce the corporation tax. that's £1 billion we wouldn't go ahead with inheritance tax cut or grammar schools. let me put it to you that we spend £11 billion on mental health at the moment, the total burden on the nhs is around 23% of all health cases that have to be dealt with so you are talking about really having to double the amount of cash. is that the sort of money that labour is looking at, or are you looking at £1—£2 billion. that labour is looking at, or are you looking at £1-£2 billion. i've told you examples of where we could find money immediately, big tax
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give—aways, we wouldn't go ahead with that, that should go to the national health service. we need a debate about the future of the national health service. at the moment, it's going through the biggest financial squeeze in history, clearly affecting mental health and it's why we have a crisis. let's debate how we fund the health service for the future and i think at the next general election, whoever that comes, labour will come forward with a fully costed plan. let's talk about the scale of funding that might be required. do you have any sense of how much might be needed to ensure there is an adequate social care system, mental health provision is adequate and the nhs does not face the sort of pressures it's currently facing. what sort of figure do you think might be needed? well, experts said at the time of the autumn statement there was a funding short fall in social care of about £1.9 billion. we think that's broadly correct. there is a 4% increase traditionally. at the moment it's
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getting a flat increase. to provide that sort of funding, you would be prepared to look at putting up taxes? well, it's not for me... you have got to think where the cash would come from? i've referred to one tax. i've talked about corporation tax and the inheritance tax cuts that the government are introducing. we'll consider this properly and cost it properly, but we think we need to debate how we raise money. social care, part of the whole nhs funding pressure and another issue. would you be in favour of some sort of taxation specifically earmarked to provide more cash for social care? these are things we can always look at and debate. let's look at them, what would you like to do? we know there are pressures, but what are you going to do? there is £700 million
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allocated to... they've brought money forward? money brought forward by changing the housing budgets that legal governments get means that 50—odd councils are going to see their budgets cut which will impact social care severely. social care is ina social care severely. social care is in a crisis, we know that. if there is going to be more money in 2019, i wa nt is going to be more money in 2019, i want the chancellor to look at that and spend that money today and i hope that theresa may in her speech 01’ hope that theresa may in her speech orjeremy hunt in the commons later will commit to that. thank you very much. joanna, we may get more on that in the commons this afternoon because jeremy hunt's that in the commons this afternoon becausejeremy hunt's expected to be making a statement where he's going to update the house on some of the stories we have been hearing over the past few weeks from some of the pressures in the health service. we'll get more of that tomorrow and of course, the prime minister is speaking in the next few minutes or so. thank you very much, norman. just picking up on what you were talking about there on the issues around funding of social care, we are just hearing from scotland's first
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minister, nicola sturgeon, that she's going to be putting an extra £107 million into cutting preve nta ble £107 million into cutting preventable hospital admissions. she said the cash will help make sure that more people are cared for in their own homes. she's been on a visit to midlothian community hospital and said nhs spending on social care and investment is increasing to almost half a billion in the coming year. in scotland, that is. that is at the same time services are being cut in england and wales. we are hearing a lot about this today. we are expecting theresa may to stand up and talk about that shortly. not announcing actually more resources, but the thrust of her speech she's going to say is about reducing the stigma around mental health issues but it all feeds into the broader context of lack of funding and in particular a lot of attention at the moment on
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funding for social care. so we'll bring you theresa may's speech as $0011 bring you theresa may's speech as 50011 as bring you theresa may's speech as soon as she begins. millions of london commuters had a struggle to get to work this morning as much of the underground network was hit by disruption. clapham junction at one point had to be evacuated because of overcrowding huge crowds gathered at bus stops as travellers tried to complete their journeys. members of the tssa around i’ journeys. members of the tssa around rand rmt walked out in a row over jobs and ticket office closures. the strike is due to finish at six this evening. john leech has been speaking. they need to put back in a task force response almost to putting this safe. 0f task force response almost to putting this safe. of course we have sympathy with the travelling public and we regret this. it was unavoidable, we were in weeks of talks but we were up against a brick wall. let us show you some of the
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scenes in london this morning because people have been queueing to try to get on buses. lots of buses simply not even able to stop because they'd been so overcrowded with people trying to find alternative ways into work this morning. that's one pretty typical scene at a bus stop. the london mayor, sadiq khan, said he condemns the industrial action and he's called on the unions to return to the negotiating table. he said he inherited the dispute but he's taking action to address the union's' concern. that walkout starting at 6 pm last night, due to end at 6 pm today. police in paris say they've arrested more than a dozen people in connection with last 0ctober‘s robbery of kim kardashian at gunpoint. they say dna left by the robbers at the scene led to their arrests. at the time, french police said more than £7 million worth of cash and jewellery were stolen.
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her spokeswoman said masked men entered the room at the luxury residence where kim kardashian was staying while attending paris fashion week. let's go live now to paris and our correspondent hugh schofield. it's taken time but they have made arrests. what do you know? it's 17 people overall who've been arrested across the country. there were raids this morning at dawn here in paris region, in normandy and in an area down near the riviera. these 17 people it seems are those alleged either to have been involved in the actual hold up or presumably to have been involved in the plans to disperse thejury been involved in the plans to disperse the jury after it had been stolen —— the jewellery after it had been stolen. it was a slow—burning investigation, in the sense they identified the prime suspects and kept him and the associates under surveillance. the clue was dna. the perpetrators left two samples of dna, one on the ligatures, the
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plastic ties which they used to bind kim kardashian and another one a p pa re ntly kim kardashian and another one apparently on a pendant which one of them dropped as they fled from the scene on foot. 0n them dropped as they fled from the scene on foot. on one of those pieces of dna, they were able to make a match with someone on their books, somebody well known in the world of the criminal underworld, and they put him under surveillance and they put him under surveillance and kept him under surveillance for and kept him under surveillance for a good time. there is even reports in some of the media that they were actually in a meeting with an agent between the perpetrators, the people they were trying to recruit to pass they were trying to recruit to pass the jewels on. they were trying to recruit to pass thejewels on. in they were trying to recruit to pass the jewels on. in any case, they bided their time and moofed in today with a series of arrests —— moved in. 17 people who're well—known figures from the underworld generally, they say, who they've had in their sights for other matters in
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the past. 0bviously because kim kardashian was the person at the centre of this, there's been a huge amount of attention on it. any other similar robberies? yes. this was huge, given herfame robberies? yes. this was huge, given her fame and all the rest of it, but there was a resonance here in paris because of the ongoing worries in paris about the image of the city for tourists. last year, there was all the various other issues related to terrorism and crime and so on, but there's also been this ongoing series of high profile hold—ups of wealthy people in the centre of paris, not just wealthy people in the centre of paris, notjust kim kardashian, other incidents with very wealthy people being held up and deprived of large amounts of jewellery people being held up and deprived of large amounts ofjewellery and cash and so on. that's part of the problem that paris faces now in
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rebuilding its image amongst tourists. it's very keen to get this sorted out so the authorities will be extremely happy that there's been this apparent breakthrough. thank you very much. let's go back to the impact of the tube strike. tubes in london are not running today. a lot of them at least. that is because of a 24—hour walkout by tube workers and it's obviously having quite an impact on people trying to get into work in the city. leanne brown is at shepherds bush in west london. what impact is it having there, leanne? good morning. well, four million people on average use the london underground every day, so that's a hell of a lot of people trying to use alternative modes of transport. we are here on one of the main roads in shepherds bush where many people have been turning to the buses here this morning. we have seen queues of people trying to get on fully packed
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buses. we have been hearing that many passengers have been angry and irate at not being able to get on some of the buses. transport for london are urging people to be patient. problem with sound. we are passing the rush hour now though. it's not just we are passing the rush hour now though. it's notjust the buses that are full, extra services have been put in place though. there have been extra cycles at bike hubs across the city. we have seen river services enhanced and there are ambassadors on hand to he believe anybody who is struggling. the roads have been absolutely chock—a—block. there has been miles and miles of traffic. the mayor sadiq khan's called this action completely pointless and says that it's caused undue misery for londoners. the unions say though
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that it's necessary because 800 people have been antarcticsed from theirjobs and the offer on the table is simply not good enough —— 800 people have been axed from their jobs. there is the odd service running, but that is very changeable. sown sun problem with sound. struggling to hear you, leanne but we have the main thrust obviously of the situation in central london. thousands of police officers in london are to be asked if they want to be routinely armed with a gun or electric taser. the metropolitan police federation which represents 32,000 officers in the capital says that with more officers being armed to counterthe threat of terrorism, it was only fair to ask them what they think. a spokesman said more than 90% of officers were currently unarmed and there were no planses to change that. more than 20 people
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have died as a result of freezing temperatures across much of central and eastern europe. it caused disruption to utility and transport networks over the weekend as temperatures plunged to beknow minus 20 in some places. snow has been recorded as far south as rome and greece. never seen snow on a beach before! the headlines now. theresa may will outline plans to improve mental health service. gridlock at stations and misery for millions of commuters as tube staff strike in london over ticket office closures. and 16 people have been arrested by french police investigating the theft of jewellery worth millions from kim kardashian. in sport, the spirit of the fa cup. league two plymouth argyle earn a replay with liverpool after holding the seven—time winners to a goalless
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draw in the third round. wasps say england flankjames draw in the third round. wasps say england flank james haskell draw in the third round. wasps say england flankjames haskell is fine after he lasted just 35 seconds in his first game for seven months. he went off with a head injury but was able to walk off the pitch in their match against leicester. and the syd ney match against leicester. and the sydney international is under way, thatis sydney international is under way, that is the run—up to the australian 0pen. more on all of those stories later. now to theresa may with her speech on mental health policy. thank you very much for inviting me to be here this morning to deliver the prestigious charity commission annual lecture and i'm delighted to have this opportunity to express my appreciation for all those who work in our charity sector and for those who freely give their time, money and expertise in the service of others.
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we area others. we are a country built on the bonds of family, community and citizenship. and there's no greater example of the strength of those bonds than our great movement of charities and social enterprises. but the strength of that civil society which i believe we should treasure deeply, does notjust depend on the ingenuity, generosity and commitment of countless volunteers, social entrepreneurs and thrill an troupe thereonists — thrill an troupe thereonists — thrill an troupe thereonists — thrill an frontists. it depends on the practices that social enterprises adopt and above all on the public trust they command. that is why the work that william and the tea m is why the work that william and the team at the charity commission are doing is so important. because the reforms they are leading are strengthening the sector and, together with the new fund—raising regulator, ensuring public confidence in charities and the contribution they make in helping to
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meet some of the greatest son—in—law challenges of our time. —— social challenges of our time. let's be clear — some of the challenges are significant and long—standing. we riv in a country where, if you are born poor, you will die on average nine years earlier than others. if you are black, you are treated more harshly by the criminal justice than if you are white. if you are a white working class boy, you are a white working class boy, you are a white working class boy, you a re less you are a white working class boy, you are less likely than anybody else in britain to go to university. if you are at a state school, you are if you are at a state school, you a re less if you are at a state school, you are less likely to reach the top professions than if you are educated privately. if you are a woman, you are likely to be paid less than a man. if you suffer from are likely to be paid less than a man. if you sufferfrom mental health problems, there's not enough help to hand. if you are young, you will find it harder than ever before to own your own home. there are not easy answers to these problems but it's vital that we come
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together to address them. for they are all burning injustices that undermine the solidarity of our society and stunt our capacity to build the stronger, fairer country that we want britain to be. but the challenges don't end there. governments have traditionally been good at identifying, if not always addressing such problems. however, the mission i have laid out for the government, to make britain a country that works for everyone and not just the country that works for everyone and notjust the privileged few, goes further. it means more than fighting these obvious injustices, it means acknowledging and addressing the every day injustices that too many people feel too. while the obvious injustices receive a lot of attention with the language of social justice and attention with the language of socialjustice and social mobility, a staple of most politicians today, the every day injustices are too often overlooked. if you are from an
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ordinary working class family, life is much harder than many people in westminster realise. the injustice you feel may be less obvious but it burns inside you just the same. if you have a job that you don't always havejob you have a job that you don't always have job security, if you have a home and can just about manage the mortgage, but worry about the cost—of—living and getting your kids into a good school. you are putting in lots of hours, living to work and working to live. you give work your all but there's still little left over to spend on things that malter to you. your wages have stagnated and you feel you are getting by, not necessarily getting on. at the same time, over recent years, these people have felt locked out of these people have felt locked out of the political and social discourse in britain. if they voice their concerns, their views were shut down. decisions made in far away
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places didn't always seem to be the right decisions for them. they sue their community changes but didn't remember being consulted or agreeing to that change. they looked at the changing world, the on set of globalisation and the advances in technology, and worried about what the future held for their children and grandchildren. it's clear to me, and grandchildren. it's clear to me, andi and grandchildren. it's clear to me, and i believe that last year's vote to leave the european union, partially revealed this to be true, that there are growing numbers of people in every part of our country, in cities, suburbs, towns, countryside and coastal areas for whom this is the reality of livment the consequence is this. when you see others prospering while you are not, when you try to raise your concerns but they fall on deaf ears, when you feel your very identity all that you hold dear, is under threat, resentments grow and the decisions
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we see around us between a more prosperous older generation and struggling younger generation, between the wealth of london and the rest of the country, between the rich, the successful and powerful and their fellow citizens become entrenched. that is why i believe that when we consider the obvious and the every day injustices in unison, we see that the central challenge of our times is to ove rco m e challenge of our times is to overcome division and bring our country together by ensuring eve ryo ne country together by ensuring everyone has the chance to share in the wealth and opportunity on offer in britain today. and that starts by building something that i call "the shared society". the shared society is one that doesn't just value society". the shared society is one that doesn'tjust value our individual needs but focuses rather more on the responsibilities we have to one another. it's a society that respects the bonds that we share as a union of people and nations. the bonds of family, community, citizenship and
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strong institutions. it's a society that recognises the obligations we have as citizens, obligations we have as citizens, obligations that make our society work. a few months ago, at the conservative party conference in birmingham, iupset conservative party conference in birmingham, i upset some by saying that if you think you are a citizen of the world, you are a citizen of nowhere. but my point was simple — it was that very word "citizen" implying that we have responsibilities to the people around us, the people in our community, on our streets, around us, the people in our community, on ourstreets, in around us, the people in our community, on our streets, in our places of work. and too often today, those responsibilities have been forgotten as the cult of individualism's taken hold and globalisation and the democratisation of communications, has encouraged people to look beyond their own communities and immediate networks in the name ofjoining a broader global community. i want to be absolutely clear about what i'm saying here.
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i'm notarguing what i'm saying here. i'm not arguing against globalisation, nor the benefits it brings from modern travel and modern media to new products in our shops and new opportunities for british companies to export their goods to millions of consumers around the world. indeed, i have argued that britain has an historic global opportunity to lead the world in shaping the forces of globalisation so that everyone shares in the benefits of economic growth. but just as we benefits of economic growth. butjust as we need to act to address the economic inequalities that have emerged in recent years, so we also need to recognise the way that a more global and individualistic world can sometimes loosen the ties that bind our society together, leaving some people feeling locked out and left behind. the central tenet of my belief, the thing that shapes my approach, is that there is more to life than individualism and self—interest. we
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form families, communities, towns, cities, counties and nations. we embrace the responsibilities those institutions imply. and government has a clear role to play to support this conception of society. it is to act to encourage and nurture those relationships, networks and institutions where it can. and it is to step up to correct injustices and tackle unfairness at every turn, because injustice and unfairness are the things that drive us unfairness are the things that drive us apart. this means a government rooted, not in the lacey fair liberalism that leaves people to get by on their own, but rather in a new philosophy that means government stepping up, not just that means government stepping up, notjust in the traditional way of providing a welfare state, as vital as that will always be, but actually in going frurt to help those who've been ignore bid government for too
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long because they don't fall into the income bracket that sees them qualify for welfare support. it means making a significant shift in the way it works in britain. government and politicians have for yea rs government and politicians have for years talked the language of social justice where we have the very poorest and social mobility where we help the brightest among the poor, but to deliver the change we need and to build that shared society, we must move beyond this agenda and deliver social reform across every layer of society so that those who feel the system's stacked against them, those just above the threshold who're by no means rich or well off, are also given the help they need. so we will recollaborate how we approach policy development to ensure everything we do as government helps to those who're just getting by a fair chance, while
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still helps the most disadvantage ok advantaged. people who're just managing, just getting by, don't need a government that will get out of the way, they need a government that will help make the system work for them, an active government that will help them share in the growing prosperity of pro—brexit britain. that's why we'll shortly launch a new housing white paper to boost supply, new housing white paper to boost supply, tackle the increasing lack of affordability in housing and help ordinary working people with the costs. it's why we'll shortly publish a green to put forward our approach for a modern industrial strategy, setting out our plans to encourage growth, innovation and investment and ensure that as we aim to increase our overall prosperity, that prosperity is shared by people in every corner of our country. it's why, as part of building a great meritocracy, i've outlined
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plans to increase the number of good school places so that every child, not just those fortunate to have pa rent not just those fortunate to have parent who is can afford to move to a good catchment area or pay to go private, can enjoy a school place that caters to their individual needs. so with all the steps, we will deliver this new agenda of social reform and government will step up to support and where necessary enforce the responsibilities we have to each other as citizens so that we respect the bonds and obligations that make our society work. this means government supporting free markets as the basis of the our prosperity. stepping in to repair then when they are not working. standing upfor then when they are not working. standing up for business as a great driver of prosperity and progress. taking action where the contract is
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torn at. it means creating an environment where social enterprises can thrive. it means not being ambivalent about the efforts of all those who give their time, money and expertise in their time, money and expertise in the service of others, but recognising supporting and championing those who lead the way in shaping a civil society that can bring the talents of so many in our volu nta ry bring the talents of so many in our voluntary sector to bring the social challenges we face together. that is why i continue to work of
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david cameron, using the office of prime minister everyday to recognise an outstanding volunteer in britain who service can be an inspiration to us who service can be an inspiration to us all. why i will make national citizens service a rite of passage for every young person in britain. supporting all those brilliant organisations in the prince of wales i will organisations in the prince of wales iwill campaign, organisations in the prince of wales i will campaign, encouraging organisations in the prince of wales iwill campaign, encouraging people to give time in the service of others. why we will continue to lead the way internationally in the development of social finance, to harness the full potential of charities and social enterprises working with business and government to tackle the biggest social challenges in our country. this is the new approach and philosophy we needin the new approach and philosophy we need in britain today. an approach with fairness and solidarity at its heart. as we reflect on and implement the results of the referendum, we must recognise we have a unique opportunity and responsibility to deliver the change. the change people want and need. an opportunity because britain
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is going through a period of great national chains. as we do say we have a once in a generation chance to step back and ask ourselves, what kind of country we want to be? a responsibility, because a failure to ta ke responsibility, because a failure to take this opportunity to shape the ability of mainstream centigram politics to respond to public concern would further entrench the divisions we seek to overcome. for we know what happens when mainstream centigram politics fails. people embrace the fringe, the politics of division and despair. they turn to those who offer easy answers, who claim to understand people's problems, and always know what and who to blame. we see those fringe voices gaining prominence in some countries across europe today. voices from the hard left and the
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far right stepping forward and sensing that this is their time. they stand on the shoulders of mainstream politicians who have allowed unfairness and division to grow by ignoring the legitimate concerns of ordinary people for too long. politicians who embrace the twin pillars of liberalism and globalisation for the great forces of good that they are, and fail to understand that for too many people, particularly those on modest to low incomes, living in rich countries like our own and those forces are something to be concerned and not thrilled about. politicians who supported an economic system he works well for a privileged few, but failed to ensure the prosperity generated by free markets and free trade is shared by everybody in every corner and community of their land. politicians seem a good deals, signed the agreement step change the nature of their country, but failed
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to listen to the public‘s concerns, dismissing them as somehow baroque real —— somehow parochial and illegitimate. the result of this can sentence has been to bring this to a place where all the old certainties are called into question. people are questioning whether the system of globalisation, free markets and free trade, one that has underpinned to say much of our prosperity is actually working for them. when they losejobs, wages actually working for them. when they lose jobs, wages stagnate, actually working for them. when they losejobs, wages stagnate, dreams such as owning a home seemed out of reach, they feel it is even working against them. serving not then interests or ambitions, but those of a privileged few. they are questioning the legitimacy of all the old institutions and systems we have relied on for decades. they have relied on for decades. they have seen a small minority in the banking business sectors appearing to game the system, playing by their
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own rules. they have watched parliament dragged into the row about political expenses, the media marred about questions of phone hacking. this system which allows lawyers to get rich by handing our brave troops. they have come to conclusion there is one law for the and powerful, and anotherfor everybody else. this is dangerous, it's so is division and despair as the gap between those who are prospering, and those who are not get even larger and resentments grow. it involved and is the voices of protectionism and isolation, who would tear down all we have achieved, and take us back to the past. 0ur achieved, and take us back to the past. our responsibility is great. it is to show that mainstream centigram politics can deliver the change people need, that mainstream centigram politics can respond to public concern. and that mainstream centigram government understands what needs to change, and has a plan
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to set things right. —— centre ground. that is why this government has a plan and not simply to manage our withdrawal from the european union, but to take this opportunity to fundamentally change britain for the better. a comprehensive, wide—ranging plan, for the kind of country we want to be. a plan to build a country where wealth and opportunity is shared, where all of us, no matter what our background, played by the same rules. where future generations enjoy the same opportunities from which their pa rents opportunities from which their parents have benefited throughout their lives. i will say more about this plan in the coming weeks. i will talk more about our plans for economic reform, health plans to build a global britain. 0ur ambition is to build a more united country. at the heart of the plan is a commitment to building a fairer society, tackling the burning injustices that have been allowed to stand for too long. i want to turn
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to one of those burning injustices in particular. the burning justice of mental health, and inadequate treatment, that demands a new approach from government and society asa approach from government and society as a whole. let me be clear, mental health problems affect people of all ages, and all backgrounds. an estimated one in four of us has a common mental disorder at any one time. the economic and social costs of mental illness is £105 billion, roughly the same as we spend on the nhs in its entirety. for children, one in ten of whom has a diagnosable condition, the long—term effects can be crippling. children with behavioural disorders, they are four times likely to be drug dependence, six times more likely to die before the age of 30, 20 times more likely to end up in prison. we all know
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someone, a family member, friend, colleague, directly affected by mental health problems. well people talk about parity of esteem, and it was a conservative led government that legislated for it, there is no escaping the fact that people with mental health problems are still not treated the same, as if they have a physical ailment. all of us can employers, schools, charities, need to do more to support our mental well—being. as home secretary, i was determined to take on the grave injustices concerning mental illness within my remit. i made improving police response to people with mental health needs a top priority. iam mental health needs a top priority. i am delighted we have taken great strides forward in reducing the number of people suffering mental health crises he went up in a police cell, for want of someone else to go. in 2012 there has been an 80%
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reduction in such instances in england. more people detained under section 136 under the mental health act are taken to the health placed face of safety. for children and young people of the reduction is co mforta ble. young people of the reduction is comfortable. through the policing and crime bill this will be abolished by spring 2018. this through the reforms that challenge the established way of doing things can respond to mental illness. i wa nt can respond to mental illness. i want us to employ the power of government as a force for good to transform the way we deal with mental health problems right across society. and at every stage of life. for years, the only people who have stood up our civil society and
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mental health charities. 0rganisations such as mine, leading the way in helping those experiencing mental health problems. the heads together campaign, the leadership shown by the duke and duchess of cambridge, and prince harry, aiming to break the stigma surrounding mental health problems. the tremendous campaigning work by black mental health uk, whom i worked with at the home office, exposing the problems in the way days there were black and had mental health problems are treated in particularly. you are leading the way. today i want us to forge a new approach recognising our responsibility to each other. making mental illness and everyday concern for all of us, and in every one of our institutions. what i am announcing is the first steps in our plan to transfer them the way we deal with mental health problems at
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every stage of the person's life. not in hospitals, classrooms, in work, in our communities. this sta rts work, in our communities. this starts with ensuring children and teenagers get the help and support they need and deserve. we know that mental illness too often starts in childhood. when left untreated, it can blight lives, and become entrenched. there is an example to suggest an increase in self harm amongst young people. the number of 16-24 amongst young people. the number of 16—24 —year—old women reporting self harm increasing threefold to one in five between 20 and 2014. we know the use of social media brings additional challenges. in 2014, one in ten young people said they had experienced cyber bullying by phone or over the internet. first we will introduce a package of measures to transform the way we respond to
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mental health issues in young people in our schools. we will pilot issues such as mental health training for teachers and staff to identify and assist children experiencing mental health problems. we will try approach is to ensure schools and colleges were closer together with nhs services to provide dedicated children and young people's mental health services. these steps will accompany a major thematic approach. looking at what is working and what is not working with children and teenagers across the country. following this pc gc at 0fsted will consider how a joint programme of inspections can ensure child and adolescent mental health services are properly held to account for performance. alongside these reviews, later this year, we will bring forward a new green paper on children and young people's mental health to transform services and education forfamilies.
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health to transform services and education for families. these measures will build on the work we are already doing to put a stop to the unstyled misery that hundreds of children being sent halfway across the country to access mental health services. by 2021, and mo child will be sent away from their local area to be treated for a general mental health condition. —— manchild. treatment is any part of the answer. we must look at what can be done to prevent mental health problems, working with you to capitalise on the crucial role civil society has deep lake in helping young people, andindeed deep lake in helping young people, and indeed people of all ages build resilience. secondly i want us to do more to support mental well—being in the workplace. i have asked lord stevenson, who has campaigned on theseissues stevenson, who has campaigned on these issues for many years, and paul farmer ceo of mine and chair of the nhs mental health task force to work with leading employers in mental health groups to create a new partnership with industry, making
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prevention and breaking the stigma top priorities for employees. mental well—being does not just top priorities for employees. mental well—being does notjust improve the health of employees, it improves the motivation and reduces absence, and drives better productivity. we will also review employment discrimination laws for employees with mental health problems, to ensure they are properly supported. we will do everything we can to get the right support for those of mental health problems out of work. for example, through global leadership on the social impact bonds, driving investment in social outcomes. we are already providing up outcomes. we are already providing up to £50 million to support those mental health issues back into work. helping local areas tackled the link between drug and alcohol dependency. and coexisting mental health problems. third, iwant and coexisting mental health problems. third, i want to ensure more people get the support they need when they need it, index
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immunities. we will make up the £50 million in extra funding available for community clinics, crisis cafes, and alternative places of safety to support a wider range of preventative measures in the community, ensuring charities, churches and community organisations can churches and community organisations ca n a ccess churches and community organisations can access funding to run them. we are already investing £10 million to support the fast track think ahead programme. aiming to increase the number of high calibre mental health social workers by at least 300. fourth, we will rapidly expand the treatment available, by investing £67.7 million in digital mental health services. 0nline therapy has the potential to transform the way mental health services are delivered. allowing people to check their symptoms, beat three arched online and receive clinically assisted therapy over the internet much more quickly and easily, assuming it is clinically appropriate. these treatments have
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been tested in other countries and they work. in the right places, they can offer access to treatment far quicker than traditional services. fifth, we will write the everyday injustices that those with mental health illness encounter. starting by examining gp forms relating to mental health and debt. sometimes those with illnesses that result in debt, means they are struggling to pay their debt, they have to prove their mental hefty debt collectors, paying their gp to fill in the form to so. such a process can worsen both mental illness and financial difficulties. we will work with the money in mental health policy institute to consult with these forms with a view to ending the practice. finally, to day we're publishing a strengthened crosscut and suicide prevention strategy. sitting at a comprehensive plan to reduce the suicide rate in this
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parliament. targeting those most at risk, such as young, and middle—aged men, days in contact with the criminal justice system, men, days in contact with the criminaljustice system, and those in the care mental health services. 0n in the care mental health services. on average, 13 people killed themselves every day in england. we wa nt to themselves every day in england. we want to improve the life chances of current and future generations, we need to addressed the shocking reality. we will ensure the nhs itself takes the steps it's needing to ensure parity and justice. we will hold the nhs to account for the extra £1 billion invested in mental health last year. we will make sure mental illness get the attention it needs,in mental illness get the attention it needs, infunding, research mental illness get the attention it needs, in funding, research and technology assessment. we will be sure that when nhs leaders are redesigning services and developing local solutions, mental health should get its full weighting. as i have said, viz are just the first steps in the plan to transform the
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approach to mental health in this country. meeting this challenge will ta ke yea rs, country. meeting this challenge will take years, and require more than government action alone. it will need a sustained effort on the part of everyone in this room and eve ryo ne a cross of everyone in this room and everyone across society. this is a historic opportunity to right a wrong. giving people deserving of compassion and support detention and treatment they deserve. for all of us, to change the way we view mental health illness, so that striving to improve mental well—being is seen is just as natural and positive as good as striving to improve physical well—being. for too long, as striving to improve physical well—being. fortoo long, mental illness has been something of a hidden injustice in our country. shrouded in a completely unacceptable stigma, dangerously disregarded as a second game is seeking physical health. if left unaddressed, it destroys lives, separates people from each other and deepen the divisions within our society. changing this goes right to
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the heart of our humanity to the heart of the kind of country we are. the attitudes we hold, and the values we share. i remember the reaction back in 2012 when charles walker and kevin jones spoke reaction back in 2012 when charles walker and kevinjones spoke in parliament about their own personal challenges with mental illness. the courage of those two mps, conservative and labour. to speak out in this way, encouraged us all to put aside party differences, and come together in solidarity. that sense of solidarity will be essential in helping us to transform the support we offer taser mental health conditions, and defeat the stigma that makes addressing this issueis stigma that makes addressing this issue is so much harder than it should be. ialso issue is so much harder than it should be. i also believe in a wider sense, that commitment to strengthening the bonds we share as a union of people can be a defining pa rt a union of people can be a defining part of how we meet the great challenge of our time, and bring our
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whole country together. i tackling the injustice and unfairness that drive us apart, nurturing the responsibilities of citizenship we can build a shared society and make it the bedrock of the stronger and fairer britain, that truly does work for everyone. thank you. applause. iam able i am able to take a limited number of questions. first hand was game. thank you, you talked about holding
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nhs bosses to account. clearly talking about your concerns about them raiding bits of the budget allocated to mental health. are you really going to ring fence that. surely you accept they are only doing that because they are desperate to deal with issues of physical health, we have even more to date that the crisis the doctors think the nhs is in, links to that, the shared society, is the state to small, too big, or about the right size? discuss. one quick one you are talking about how trusts can damage the mainstream: six, the values you believe in. a failing economy can also damage a political fabric in the country. after your interview
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yesterday, talking about the sort of brexit you imagine, the pound has gone down 1%. isn't that a worry? on the first issue, obviously we recognise the pressure the nhs has been under over the winter. this is not unusual. always extra pressures for the nhs over the winter period. if you look at what has happened in terms of funding for the nhs. we have put the extra funding into the nhs. we asked the nhs to produce their own five—year plan, which they did. they said it would require money, we put 10 million extra in. i recognise the pressures that exist in the nhs. i thank all those medical professionals working so ha rd over medical professionals working so hard over this period to ensure they are delivering services for patients. i think the figure, something like 150,000 medical professionals working on christmas
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day and new year's day. we should thank them for the work they have done, and the work they continue to do. on the size of the state, i spoke about this a few years ago, the importance of the state. it is important it is strategic and strong. what we want to insure, when the state intervenes, it intervenes effectively, where it is right for the state to intervene. that is why this is about a partnership. the shared society, not just this is about a partnership. the shared society, notjust about saying to other groups within society, all about what you do, it is about coming together, where is it right to d something as estate, and how can we make sure what we're doing is effective as possible? on the question of brexit, i have to say, what i said yesterday is what i have been saying the past few months, in relation to brexit. notably that the boat from the 23rd ofjune was very clear from people
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they wanted us to take control of immigration, people coming to the uk from the eu. we also want the best possible deal in trading with an operating within the european single market for british businesses and european businesses operating in trading with the united kingdom. i am ambitious for the sort of arrangement, the relationship we can have with the eu, when we leave the membership of the eu. we must not think of this is leaving you, trying to keep its membership, what ones will be key? it is a new relationship, outside the eu, a new relationship, outside the eu, a new relationship, that i believe that can be one which has a good trading deal at its heart, as i say the best possible dealfor deal at its heart, as i say the best possible deal for the uk. deal at its heart, as i say the best possible dealfor the uk. also deal at its heart, as i say the best possible deal for the uk. also that dealfor the uk possible deal for the uk. also that deal for the uk would possible deal for the uk. also that dealfor the uk would be good possible deal for the uk. also that deal for the uk would be good for the rest of europe as well. 0ne
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one of the charities that has been lobbying government for a long time, welcoming very much what you have to say today. a latter this will make a big difference. i particularly welcome your investment in community organisations, at the forefront of prevention. some of the communities that have been getting by, rather than getting on. as we often say, surviving, not striving, when they could be striking. —— striving. will you be watching intimating officials to watch that the resources really reach those communities left behind, under a lot of pressure on the bay from debt, relationships, all the problems that families can face. a bit of help early, in good time can make all the difference. thank you for what you say about the approach we are taking. as you will recognise, this is the start of a
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new approach. it will take time in relation to this. two things i would say, we must make sure the resources are addressing the needs, as you say. we also need to make sure they are being used effectively, some of the work will be looking at the pilot approaches. to find out what actually works out there on the ground. certainly the role of other organisations came home to me when i was in the home office looking at this issue, of alternative places of safety. what was interesting was in the areas it works best when not just about nhs places. as theresa may continues to talk about the quality of treatment for people suffering mental health issues we will say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. full coverage on bbc channel. more reaction to what she has been saying, as well. you asked, and talked about the
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divisions between the prosperous old, and the struggling new. you haven't said he planned to that. would you agree with your chancellor, looking at all the ring fenced spending, the triple lock on pensions, lap benefits, it is now a necessity? i would like to go back to the 1% drop in the pound. even the markets are getting your vision of brexit wrong, or you are getting your vision of brexit from that which one is it? i don't accept the terms hard and soft breads. what we are doing is going to get an ambitious, good, best possible deal for the united kingdom in terms of trading and operating within the single european market, but it will be a new relationship because we won't be
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members of the ye any longer, we will be outside the european union, therefore we will be negotiating a new relationship across notjust trading but other areas with the european union. in relation to the division to have spoken about, you're absolutely right. i have spoken about the generational division, but also the regional and income divisions. this is where various steps that we are taking as a government, and you will see more of them in the coming weeks, will be applicable. if you look at the generational division, one of the keyissueis generational division, one of the key issue is to housing. a lot of people are worried that their children will not be able to own to own their own home in a way that they were able to in the past or have always expected the children to be able to. young people
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are concerned about that. what we do in terms of housing will be an important part of this. i know this is an issue that you have written about in the past. that is one of the very important issues that we will be looking at. on the regional and income divisions, this is also pa rt and income divisions, this is also part of supporting people in the younger generation, the industrial strategy, making sure that prosperity can be seen across the whole country and notjust in certain parts of the country, is a key pa rt certain parts of the country, is a key part of an economy that works for everyone. i am afraid i can only ta ke for everyone. i am afraid i can only take one more question. the gentleman with the red tie in the middle there has been putting his hand up. inaudible. inaudible question.
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inaudible question. thank you. whilst i am focusing today on a new approach to mental health we should never forget the linkages between mental health and physical health. that is an important aspect of what we need to do when you're looking back question
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of parity and how are being provided down at local level for people with either physical or mental problems. in relation to the charity sector, i think it is important as tuesday, lots of parts of our charities sector invested huge amounts of money in researching ground—breaking initiatives that take place and we need to look to see... we have been doing quite a bit of work to see how we can harness that, but we will continue doing that. notjust the secretary of state for health is here and has heard we do have said, but also the minister for civil society is here as well and has heard those questions and i am sure we will be speaking to other people about issues you want arrears. thank you very much indeed. theresa may speaking in central london. she repeatedly used the word
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injustice as she talked about hoping for a quality in the way that mental health patients are treated compared with patients suffering from physical illnesses in the health service. she began her speech talking about the shared society, talking about the shared society, talking about the shared society, talking about focusing on the responsibilities we have to one another in society. she described that as a new philosophy, talking about fairness and solidarity in society. that was the initial thrust of the speech, then she focused on mental health issues, and the questioning focused on that. norman smith is outside the speech venue in central london. shared society did sound a lot like big society. give me your overall view of what you have heard. what was interesting, although this was meant to be theresa may's vision
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beyond brexit, this was a vision shared by brent said. her sense that brexit is an opportunity for britain to rethink the sort of country we are, and the chance to recalibrate the approach of government. she suggested the breads of bubbles in pa rt suggested the breads of bubbles in part driven by people who felt that policymakers had ignored them for far too long, hadn't listened to their concerns on issues like immigration and that burning injustices as she described them had been ignored for too long. she said that she hoped that her government would be able to provide wholesale social reform to address challenges around, for example, discrimination that black people face in the criminal justice system, that black people face in the criminaljustice system, the difficulties that young people face getting on the housing ladder. of course, mental health issues, the difficulties that young white working—class boys face getting to
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university. the alternative she said of government did not address those we re of government did not address those were the concerns was the rise of far right parties and parties of the ha rd left. we far right parties and parties of the hard left. we have a once in a generation chants to step back and ask ourselves what kind of country we wa nt ask ourselves what kind of country we want to be. it is a responsibility because the failure to take this opportunity, to shoot the ability of mainstream centre ground politics to respond to public concern would further entrench the very divisions we seek to overcome. for we know what happens when mainstream centre ground politics feels. people improve the fringe, the politics of division and despair. they turn to those who offer easy answers, who claim to understand people's problems aren't always know what and who to blame. we see those fringe voices gaining prominence in some countries across
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europe today. voices from the hard left and far right, stepping forward and sensing that this is the time. but they stand on the shoulders of mainstream politicians who have allowed on the nissan division to grow by ignoring the legitimate concerns of ordinary people for too long. what we didn't really get today is any detail. we got a lot of big vision, a lot of aspiration about this moment of change, this desire to try and help those who did not fall into the income bracket to receive well set —— welfare support, but we didn't get a coherent plan beyond some detail on her approach to mental health issues. there we know that theresa may wants to increase support in schools, she wa nts to increase support in schools, she wants to encourage best practice in the workplace, she is looking at possibly tightening up discrimination laws and looking at a small bit of extra funding for mental health issues, but the big thrust of her speech when it came to
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mental health was trying to end what she regards as the stigma often attached to mental health. let me be clear, mental health problems affect people of all ages and backgrounds and an estimated one in fourof us and backgrounds and an estimated one in four of us has a common mental disorder at any one time. the economic and social cost of mental illness is 105 billion pounds, roughly the same as what we spend in the nhs in its entirety. and for children, one in ten of them has a day" dish and, the long—term effects can be crippling. children with behavioural disorders are four times more likely to be drug dependent, six times more likely to die before the age of 30 and 20 times more likely to end up in prison. we all know someone, a family member, friend or colleague, who is directly affected by mental health problems,
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but while people talk about parity of esteem and it was against —— a conservative lead government that legislative board, there is no escaping the fact that people with mental health problems are still not treated the same as if they had a physical ailment, or the fact that all of us, government, employers, schools and charities, need to do more to support all of our mental well—being. let's speak to the chief executive of the mental health charity mind, paul farmer, who has been asked by the prime minister to carry out a review on support in the workplace. thank you very much forjoining us. the prime minister talking about equality of treatment so people with mental health issues are treated equally with people who have physical issues. what is the impact of that been? i don't think there is
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any doubt that for decades people with mental health problems had experienced second—class citizenship, whether it is in the experience of mental health services within the nhs or if it is young people in school to people in the workplace. the kind of ambition being set out here is to change the way that we all think about mental health is an issue and putting it right at the heart of the policy agenda but also at the heart of the delivery agenda in terms of what public services can deliver by ways of supporting people. high ambitious is a? you talk about putting it at the heart of the agenda, but we haven't heard any talk of any more money. well, i think it has got to be about resources and commitment. it isn't simply one or the other and you heard the prime minister talking about shifting stigma and that is an
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important part of the work that needs to be done and government funding which has already shifted public attitude from other funders like comic relief with the big lottery fu nd. like comic relief with the big lottery fund. this is a collective effort. it involves resources but also putting mental health at the heart of the nhs and the way policies are delivered. the five—year forward view for mental health said the clear ambition for £1 billion every year to be spent improving access to mental health services. we also centred a huge range of other recommendations which are being responded to today, the talk about supporting people with mental health in schools and the workplace. in the end of that amount of investment is not forthcoming and not ring fenced for use for people suffering from mental health issues, does this just become platitudes? suffering from mental health issues, does thisjust become platitudes?”
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think there is an immediate test for this new invention, which is the current contracting round for nhs services. it is really important that that commitment for additional funding for children's mental health services for example, is seen in terms of commissioning by local clinical commissioning groups in the next few weeks so that when the new year starts there are clear commitments to services being improved. i think people with mental health problems want to see those changes, they want to see a better quality of service across the public sector. it is good to hear this really strong commitment from the prime minister today and now it needs to be backed up by clear actions of the people really can't see the difference at the local level. paul farmer, thank you very much indeed. millions of london commuters had a struggle to get to work this morning as much of the underground network was hit by strike action. at one point, one of the capital's busiest stations, clapham junction, had to be evacuated because of overcrowding. huge crowds gathered at bus stops as travellers tried to complete theirjourneys.
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members of the rmt and tssa unions walked out last night in a row aboutjobs and ticket office closures. the 24—hour strike is due to finish at 6.00pm tonight. leanne brown is at shepherd's bush in west london. how are things now? around 4 million people use the london underground everyday, so as to can expect lots of people are trying to use other modes of transport today. here at shepherd's bush tube stationed there isa shepherd's bush tube stationed there is a bus station next door and many people have been using that. we have seen many people on the streets queueing up for buses this morning. those buses have turned up packed full of people and people not being able to get on. it has started to
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subside and this is a little bit quieter than it was. the rush to get to work has now finished. it is not just a bus of the people had been using from extra bicycles have been put out that cycle racks up and down london and the art travel ambassadors about to try to help people with their journeys. ambassadors about to try to help people with theirjourneys. if you have been travelling by the roads you are probably still in the long queue. we have seen miles and miles of traffic heading into central london today and that doesn't seem like it is going to stop any time soon. the mayor has called this action pointless and it has caused unnecessary suffering to commuters, the union said the strike action is needed. 800 members of staff have been cuts and this is all about staff numbers and safety. just to let you know what is currently closed, also one central london stations are closed. there are one
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or two services operating, but that has been changing throughout the morning depending on what staff have turned up for work. as you say, the strike will finish at six o'clock, but it will be sometime before services begin to get back to normal. we expect that will be tomorrow morning. police in paris say they have arrested 17 people in connection with last 0ctober‘s robbery of kim kardashian at gunpoint. they say dna left by the robbers at the scene led to the arrests. at the time, french police said more than £7 million worth of cash and jewellery were stolen. her spokeswoman said masked men entered the room at the luxury residence where kim kardashian was staying while attending paris fashion week. let's go live now to paris and our correspondent hugh schofield. 17 arrests and they have been described as veteran gangsters is between 50 and 72. we know that
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there was a dawn swoop in various locations across the country, not just here in paris, but also down south at nice. the 17 people, men and women, i have heard reports of between 20 and 70, but they have seen ' two from the police and that among them are hard and members of the underworld. some are said to be from the travelling community. what we know is that the police have had some of these people under surveillance for some time. there was an early breakthrough that was not publicised from the dna evidence collected from the scene, they were able to match that somebody already on the books. it seems that the perpetrators left two bits of dna, one on the ligatures with which they
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find kim kardashian before they robbed her. then they dropped a bit of jewellery, a pendant robbed her. then they dropped a bit ofjewellery, a pendant on the pavement outside this luxury hotel. that also had dna traces on it. through those they will be able to make a match with an individual, then they put him in his entourage under surveillance and waited until the picture grew clearer about the conspiracy, about who might be involved and how they were supposing to dispose of this £8 million worth of jewellery. the police to dispose of this £8 million worth ofjewellery. the police moved in today. thank you. donald trump a setback of meryl streep following the speech she gave the golden globes last night in which she appeared to attack the policies and direction the president elect was taking. so, hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners and if we get them light you will have nothing to watch but football and
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mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. this respect invites this respect. violence insights violence. when the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose. president—elect donald trump has been treating his response of those comments. let's catch up with this sport. chris robshaw will miss the six nations after undergoing surgery on his shoulder. he is expected to be out of competitive action for around 12 weeks. saracens have confirmed the signing of wales back liam williams from scarlets. williams has won 38 caps since his international debut in 2012. the move could limit his appearances for his country, with the selection policy allowing only three non—wales based players to be picked. saracens director of rugby, mark mccall, said williams
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was "arguably one of the most talented backs in europe". three british tennis players have been in action overnight in the run—up to the australian 0pen. dan evans won his match in sydney. johanna konta beat arina rodionova in straight sets. konta reached the semi—finals at the australian open last year and she has had a pretty good start to the season. but british number two kyle edmund is out, beaten by australian qualifier matthew barton in two tie—break sets. it was edmund's 22nd birthday too, so a bit of a party spoiler. as well as johanna konta, laura robson has been selected for the fed cup match in estonia next month. robson has been chosen for her experience, even though tara moore is higher in the world rankings. it's anne keothavong's first provisional team announcement
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since she took over as captain. she's selected heather watson and jocelyn rae to make up the team. chelsea manager antonio conte says he may appealjohn terry's red card in their 4—1 fa cup win over peterborough yesterday. terry was sent off for a last—man tackle, but conte said the decision was wrong and terry himself wrote on instagram that if referee kevin friend watched the incident back, he would realise there was no contact. joe root should be available for the start of england's one—day series against india. root stayed behind when the squad flew out on thursday to be with his partnerfor the arrival of theirfirst child, who arrived on saturday morning. he is expected to fly out on wednesday, with the first 0di this sunday. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. the issue of how disabled passengers
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are treated on flights has come under the spotlight after the bbc‘s security correspondent frank gardner who was left stranded on a recent easyjet flight. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner is here. tell us exactly what happened. i am quite flattered that this is even news because quite frankly it happens so bloody often it is tedious. time and time again if a plane lands at a british airport and it is not on an aeroplane, disabled passengers like me have to wait for the highlift, get you off. sometimes it arrives on time, which is great, but often, and last night was one of those times, the minutes ticking away, all the passengers arrive, they will have gone through customs, some will have been in taxis, the cleaner starter, on—board and i'm saying to the flight crew, where is
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the lift to get off the plane? bowl, we have called them several times but the haven't turned up. it did turn up eventually andy said that they were understaffed 0cs, the company that does this day they are not overstaffed, but easyjet, who doesn't like to use our bridges because they are too expensive, give them only three days notice to say we're not going to use the air bridge, but that's instead. it is not an exception. i had an apology letter from years ago from the chairman of the british airports authority saying so sorry that this happened to you we are looking into it. nothing has changed. it happens time and time again. they are the last of the plane. it is perfectly reasonable to say that the civil passengers shouldn't have to get off at the same time as everybody else because it would cause congestion, but once everybody else is off, get them off the plane, don't keep them
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there are so long that the cleaners are already on the plane. we can do better than this. it must be so infuriatingly. it is something that has been going on for a long time. you are putting position out the. that might focus minds a bit.” you are putting position out the. that might focus minds a bit. i hope so. iam that might focus minds a bit. i hope so. i am just the tip of the iceberg on this. the twitter comments i have had, 99% of them are sympathetic... 100% of them are sympathetic, which is nice, but so many of them said this has happened to me, my mum and dad, my disabled son. it is not an exception, it is a generic problem. all three organisations have responded, to be fair, saying thanks for alerting us, that is airport, ocs for alerting us, that is airport, 0cs assist and easyjet. they have all apologised, which is great, but
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what we need is for it to change. i am pretty cynical about this because i have been fine with the wheelchair night for 12 years and i have not seen any market change in that time. write—ups have been done, investigations done, but nothing will change unless there is either financial inducements for penalties. that, i'm afraid, is the only web will change. you can have the drip, drip, drip of bad publicity, and i will keep on that case, but it ain't going to change and afraid unless people are forced to change. it is commercially and knowing for somebody to have to pay extra money to get somebody of the blame at the same time as everybody else. if you can get away with it, then why not? we welcome them to go back and said thatis we welcome them to go back and said that is not the case at all, but that is not the case at all, but that does seem to be the case. that is not the case at all, but that does seem to be the casem anybody from 0cs is watching, it would be great if they could get in touch. to be fair to ocs, they have
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done a big report a few months ago that canvassed 500 people. they said they wanted to be the market leader is on this, but they have a way to go. more than 20 people have died as a result of freezing temperatures across much of central and eastern europe. the cold weather caused major disruption to utility and transport networks over the weekend as temperatures plunged to below minus 20 degrees celsius in some places. snow has been recorded as far south as rome and the greek islands. hungary has seen temperatures as low as —28 celsius and there have been ice floes on the danube. we can speak to our correspondent nick thorpe in budapest. look at that behind you! tell us what it has been like. it has been cold here in hungary. we have had theseice cold here in hungary. we have had these ice flows on the river danube for the last two or three days. in
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neighbouring romania in the peak on the copy of the anna watkins they measured —67 celsius this morning. very cold indeed. most vulnerable people, the homeless, the illegal migrants trying to cross the region, are hardest hit. did you say -67? yes, —67 in north—east romania, in the eastern copy of the. that is a record. 0bviously the eastern copy of the. that is a record. obviously a little bit warmer further down record. obviously a little bit warmerfurther down in record. obviously a little bit warmer further down in the valleys, but -67 warmer further down in the valleys, but —67 celsius in the eastern copy of the anna watkins. what we are seeing behind you is extraordinary with the ice on the river. how unusual is this? well, up untilfive yea rs unusual is this? well, up untilfive years ago there was normally a cold speuin years ago there was normally a cold spell in january. january the 16th,
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the average temperature used to be -16. i the average temperature used to be —16. i suppose it is the effect of climate change in recent years, people aren't used to the cold night. we have had several mild winters in a row and this has caught people off—balance. winters in a row and this has caught people off-balance. thank you very much. 0ur weather is set to get cold at the end of the week but it is coming from the north, the arctic, not from europe. for now, it is mild. there isa europe. for now, it is mild. there is a lot of rain around and that wayne is sinking down towards the capital with plenty of showers piling in the north—west. there will be some drier interludes sandwich between the do and that you go through the rest of the day the rain will continue to sink its way south and east. here we will keep mild, it up and east. here we will keep mild, it up to 10 degrees. colder air behind
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with showers, some of those showers wintry on the higher ground. it will be wintry through the night in scotland, showers along west facing coasts, but in sheltered eastern areas temperatures could drop to two or three degrees. how windy start to tuesday, a cluster of showers the more persistent rain arrives that will weaken as we go through the afternoon. it stays relatively mild with highs of 8 degrees up to 11 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live. theresa may pledges to help schools and companies in england help deal with mental illness, announcing plans to help children and teenagers. we will work closely with nhs services, schools, to provide dedicated young people's mental health services. millions of people
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inconvenienced for no reason — that's mayor of london sadiq khan's take on today's strike on the underground. french police have arrested sixteen people in the investigation into the theft of jewellery worth millions of pounds from reality tv star kim kardashian. hollywood musical la la land has broken the record for the most golden globe awards, winning seven prizes at yesterday's ceremony. the prime minister theresa may has set out a new strategy to address what she called the "hidden injustice" of mental illness. there'll be a package of measures to provide more help for children and young people in schools. and there'll be a new initiative to improve the mental wellbeing of employees in the workplace — to prioritise prevention and reduce stigma. mrs may said that mental illness was costing the country £105 billion a year. but the prime minister also took the opportunity to set out her vision for the direction of the country — what she called the "shared society".
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this is a historic opportunity to right a wrong, and give people deserving of compassion and support the attention and treatment they deserve. for all of us to change the way we view mental illness, so that striving to improve mental well—being is seen just as natural, positive and good as striving to improve our physical well—being. for too long mental illness has been something of a hidden injustice in our country. shrouded in a com pletely u na cce pta ble our country. shrouded in a completely unacceptable stigma, dangerously disregarded as a secondary issue to physical health. if left unaddressed, it destroys lives, separate people from each other, and deepens the divisions within our society. changing this goes right to the heart of our humanity, the heart of the kind of country we are. the attitudes we hold, and the values we share. let's speak to professor sir simon wessely, the president of the royal college
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of psychiatrists. thank you forjoining us. what is your response to what she has been saying, outlining the issues, and focusing on children with mental health issues, in particular? festival, this is obviously good news. this morning it is my 60th birthday, i got my free bus pass, and a speech mental health and the prime minister is like a double present. anybody interested in the mental health of children, the whole of society will welcome much of what is said. of course you will ask about the details, the devil is a lwa ys about the details, the devil is always on the details. when you look at it, a pretty broad brush speech, without any financial resource to back it up. talking about every secondary school being offered mental health first aid training from the trials on strengthening links between schools in nhs
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specialist staff, including a review of children and adolescent services across the country. are things like that the right sort of thing? certainly the right approach. the most important thing here, to remember it is teachers and parents that are best able to help troubled children, we support that. bringing in extra resources for teachers is absolutely right, bringing in child mental health services, so they are much closer to where the problems are in schools is the policy for yea rs. we are in schools is the policy for years. we are pleased to hear all of that. we are pleased to hear we will have the inspectors coming to see how we're doing. we have to be clear, we can only deliver this if we get the funding right. actually the funding is there, promised two budgets ago. it has not yet got to the front line. most of that money has not been transferred to services, nor do we have the
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workforce. we need 350 more child and adolescent psychiatrists to deliver the vision the prime minister has outlined. so far she has not said much about how we will achieve that. those things talking about addressing issues when they arise. what about why it is so prevalent now? why so many kids are having those issues? she did touch on ita having those issues? she did touch on it a little bit, talking about moving resilience in kids? everyone has always been interested in resilience in kids. most children remain resilient, going on to have successful lives as adults. it is a worry, for the first time in 50 yea rs we have worry, for the first time in 50 years we have seen real evidence that the prevalence of mental health disorders, particularly in young girls, between adolescence and 24 has gone up. the first time we have seen a true increase, as opposed as an increase in demand. we don't
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really fully understand why. people blame social media, bullying, different styles of parenting. i do think in the publicity surrounding the prime minister'sspeech, i detected a mature attitude, we need to understand a little more about what is going on, and a little more about what is the right thing to do before we leap in with intervention. very pleased to see this was signalling the start of a longer game, to try and understand, not just to have each of us, our favourite social ill, the favourite one being social media, it does do harm, but can also do good. what we are signalling today, is the long—term commitment to understanding the problems, getting the resources through. the issue is getting them through. i cannot emphasise that. we know the money is
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in nhs england, and we know it is absolutely not on the ground. that is the biggest challenge ever since the so—called nhs reforms, how do you get through from the top, the prime minister, right down to the services on the ground. they are over understaffed, facing even more demands of the moment. thank you for yourtime, demands of the moment. thank you for your time, happy birthday. demands of the moment. thank you for yourtime, happy birthday. if demands of the moment. thank you for your time, happy birthday. if you wa nt to your time, happy birthday. if you want to use the bus pass, i hope you can get on a bus, they are pretty crowded! i actually had to walk in. that is quite good for mental health, and nice long walk. also getting trench foot, sitting out there. we will let you get out of there. we will let you get out of the cold, enjoy your day this donald trump has hit back at the actress meryl streep, following a speech she made at the golden globes last night, in which she attacked the policies and direction the president—elect was taking. while streep did not name mr trump, but used almost the entire speech
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to say his actions legitimised bullying, including when he appeared to mock a disabled reporter. here's some of what she had to say. so hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. and if we kick them all out, you'll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. cheering. disrespect invites this respect, violence incites violence. when the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose. the president—elect has tweeted his response to those comments. with me is the film criticjason solomons.
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let's talk a bit more about the movies, away from the politics. that is quite something, going back to that moment. calling meryl streep one of the most overrated actresses in hollywood. he is a film critic! there are overrated actors, but she's not one of them. the most nominated 0scar she's not one of them. the most nominated oscar winner, nominated for lifetime achievement. nominated for lifetime achievement. nominated for her performance in florence fosterjenkins. when she played mrs thatcher in the iron lady, chic may bea thatcher in the iron lady, chic may be a very good president of the united states one day, she should do that, he'd better watch out. let's talk about la la land, i have not seen it. you should. seven awards, a record in the golden globes. they
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split up their categories, musicals and drama. a great musical like la la land, pretty much a dead cert to clea n la land, pretty much a dead cert to clean up in those categories. cleaning up in every category it was nominated in. when i saw it last september at the venice film festival, 0scar september at the venice film festival, oscar and bafta nominations, i think it will be nominated in every category possible. i will hazard a prediction around 11 nominations in the baftas. it has score, song, craft, cinematography. the golden globes don't even touch that. seven is a modest fall. i love the film, irrepressible, the two leads, ryan gosling, emma stone, they could not be more adorable when the film starts, they are even more so at the end. it is post, post—modern. it gives the reason for the views are exist. i don't really like musicals, we have had ms andrews, —— nolan
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—— with moulin rouge and les mis. but this is different and may give musicals a reason to exist in this world. they'll be walking along, talking, emma stone changes from high heels into tap shoes. like most tired people, then they go into a dance number. it is witty, funny, a lwa ys dance number. it is witty, funny, always aware it is a musical. there isa always aware it is a musical. there is a reason to sing each time. shall we have a look? atv
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a tv show? what? i feel like i said negative stuff, like rebel without a cause. you have never seen it. i have never seen it. it is playing at the rialto. you should go. i can ta ke the rialto. you should go. i can take you. for research. for research, yes? monday night, ten o'clock. great. for research. with that name game has to be my favourite actor. is he related? my husband. he won best actor, whether he would do that at the oscars, i don't know. it is not a drama, casey affleck winning for his performance in manchester by the sea. what he
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does is so natural. quite hard to do this british actors did well. they also bring into focus the tv categories. the bb still qualifies as tv. the night manager. huge cast from the night manager, shoe lottery winning, tom huddlestone, 0livia colman. claire foy winning for her performance as queen elizabeth in the crown. terrible situations
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happening for children, our film the crown. terrible situations happening for children, ourfilm is about arms dealing, there are too many arms going to south sudan.” really, really would not be here if it was not for some extraordinary beaming, iwill it was not for some extraordinary beaming, i will thank them. one it was not for some extraordinary beaming, iwillthank them. one of them is queen elizabeth ii. she has been at the centre of the world for the past 63 years. think the world could do with a few more women at the centre of it, if you ask me. she wa za the centre of it, if you ask me. she waza ari, he brought a bit of politics in civic. the brits seem to be allowed to, they asked like outsiders. —— hq i will be able to say i won this at the last of the golden globes.” don't mean to be gloomy, it has the
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words hollywood, foreign, and press in the title. we're talking a lot about movies a lot of us have not seen, just starting to come out. moonlight, another one of those movies. 0ut moonlight, another one of those movies. out in a couple of weeks' time. la la land out this weekend, moonlight follows on the 27. it has been touted hugely, absolutely love it. the story of a young black boy growing up in miami in the 1980s, told in three chapters, three to the present day. surprising, tender, beautiful. the big fuss last year, the oscars were so white, not enough representation of diversity. the golden globes seem to have represented that. da nzell golden globes seem to have represented that. danzell lee washington, viola davis. moonlight
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did not wear anything until the end of the night, winning best drama. relief for everyone. —— win anything. directed by barryjenkins, also starring naomi harris, known in this country as miss moneypenny. sta rs this country as miss moneypenny. stars as a crack addicted man. it is the dark horse to scoop la la land's likeness —— lightness. it is up against the light—footed nests of la la land. whether it can survive, i don't know. absolutely gorgeous movie, slaying maybe —— slaying me with its performances and choice of music. what happened? why did he not come home like you are supposed to present haywire you?
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nobody. i found are supposed to present haywire you? nobody. ifound him are supposed to present haywire you? nobody. i found him yesterday. phantom in a hole on 15. —— found him. samba boys chased him in the cat. skating, would not tell me where he lived. thanks for seem to him this he usually can take care of himself. he's good that way. little man. what is your take of what happened last year with 0scars so white. movies like that in production longerfor white. movies like that in production longer for that controversy this things feel different. the academy has a new head, changing
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the make—up of the academy, adding 1000 voters. 50% female, black or minorities. it has changed. a film like moonlight has existed, always slipping through the cracks, not getting the mainstream focus. beautiful performances. a film that could have been swept away this and ignored. now getting the focus it deserves. the performances are brilliant, the story is so moving in tender. you don't notice it is a black film. 0nly tender. you don't notice it is a black film. only the extraneous politics when we're talking about it. that is the subtle shift in populating your voting body with people who don't have any difference has made. interesting political move in the current era that meryl streep
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is ushering in. that argument will go one for a few years between the liberal elites of hollywood and the populist centrist than we have in the white house. a fascinating battle particularly if donald trump sets himself up as a film critic. yes, that overrated actress. bafta nominations tomorrow, we will get you back. c —— don't forget to seek moonlight and la la land. theresa may has pledged to help schools and hospitals in england do with the hidden scourge of mental illness. misery for millions as cheap staff go on strike. 17 people have been arrested by french police investigating the theft ofjewellery worth millions of pounds from the reality tv star kim kardashian. the
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markets. the ft—se 100 is up, the dowjones is up. thousands of police officers will be asked what they think about potentially being armed. about 90% of officers are currently unarmed, there are no plans to change that. earlier today victoria derbyshire spoke to — ken marsh, chair of the metropolitan police federation and tony long —a former specialist firearms
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officer at the met police. she began by asking ken why the federation were asking their members this question. we're asking them because they had not been asked before, it is more about tasers than anything else. if we see a change in the situation and there is a clamourfor this we see a change in the situation and there is a clamour for this to happen, we have never asked our collea g u es happen, we have never asked our colleagues whether they will be prepared to carry a taser or a firearm. a lot of them may say no way, i do not want to do thejob. that is why we are asking the question. tony long, as a former firearms officer, you have shot five people, killed three individuals, can you give our audience some kind of insight into the circumstances and the decision—making when it comes to using a weapon? obviously those three situations was involved in was overa those three situations was involved in was over a long period of time, the first was 1985, a domestic
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siege, a man in the process of stabbing a little girl he was holding hostage. the decision was incredibly easy. a choice between the life of a little girl, and the life of a man who had already brutally murdered the child's mother in front of the police. not a difficult decision to make. he actually survive. i did not have two labour on my thoughts about it, had he died. the next situation was two years later, an armed robbery, preplanned operation, we had intelligence, waiting for the robbery to happen. when we were confronted, the robbers turned to face me and not a difficult decision. 0n the last occasion, a very difficult decision, i did not see a gun. the intelligence was he had a gun, the mannerisms and it behaviour led me to believe my colleagues' lives were in danger.
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that was the most difficult decision in my career. when an officer finds themselves in that position, the split second before firing, the decision to fire is not difficult, it is living with it afterwards that is the difficulty. have you found it difficult to live with the decision you made in the latter case? no, because i was right, the man had a gun, and as far as i was concerned he posed a threat to my colleagues. i have not found myself in a situation, like two of my colleagues involved in the shooting ofjohn charles buenos aires, they genuinely thought they were involved in a terrorist incident, they ran to what they thought could be their deaf to confront a suspect. they were given the wrong information, i don't know how i would be a will to cope with that. they have got on with their lives, gone back to firearms duties.
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unless you were there, difficult to know how you are feeling. more than a quarter of young people don't feel in control of their lives, according to a survey by the prince's trust. worries about money and recent political events are some of the issues making them feel anxious about their future, as anisa kadri reports. for 19—year—old milly rawley getting help was crucial to getting her life back on track after her mum died. i faced a series of relationship breakdowns and different forms of abuse until eventually when i was 16 i became homeless for three months, and this was when mental health really declined. after receiving treatment in hospital, milly is living at the ymca while doing her a—levels, and she's now feeling much happier. compared to years ago, i know where i want to go, what i want to do and i know how to get there. according to the prince's trust, which has supported milly, more than a quarter of young people don't feel in control of their lives. the charity says well—being for 16
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to 25—year—olds is at its lowest level in eight years of research. we need to invest in things like cadets, programs in schools that are character building and encourage teamwork. i think we need to invest much more heavily in vocational training and further education sector. concerns over body image, recent political events including the brexit vote and the serious situation, as well as money worries, were all raised by the survey, issues these young people say are a concern. of recent political events and the economic outlook, there isjust a really high level of uncertainty. you have to have a certain income... a lot of employers expect you to have lots of experience just even to find an entry leveljob. while life can be difficult for all young people, milly says it's important to reach out when you know things are really spiralling out of control. plenty whether to talk about, in
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europe. first wet and windy weather from each hours following behind. period of rain, some quite persisted into the south east corner for this afternoon. windy conditions for the far north—west, showers, some toning winter route. showers merging together, turning into fog. sam matton between the two, some brightness. milder air down in the south east corner. through the latter stage of the afternoon, the rain sitting through the kent coast, and east anglia. behind its sunny spells, isolated showers, not a bad afternoon, 7—8d. the rash of showers
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driven on by strong wind into northern ireland and scotland. eventually arriving by the end of the day. that is where we will see the day. that is where we will see the strongest winds, gail is unlikely, elsewhere eastern areas should seek clear spells, most of the showers across west facing coasts. two or three degrees in sheltered eastern areas. starting on a blustery no tomorrow, frequent showers moving in from the west. little more persistent in the latter stages of the date from the weakening as it pushes south and east. another relatively mild day, around 7—11d. the wind direction slowly starting to change, to more than north—westerly going into wednesday. cold air across the north. some showers turning increasingly wintry at lower levels. staying relatively mild and quiet, 7-9d, staying relatively mild and quiet, 7—9d, colder air showing its hand. staying relatively mild and quiet, 7—9d, colderairshowing its hand. a sign of what is to come. hearing
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about the awful weather conditions in europe, bitterly cold. a glimmer of good news through the week. westerly winds driving back that cold air further east. at the same time for the cold air further east. at the same time forthe uk, cold air further east. at the same time for the uk, the westerly wind turning into a northern league, the cold source coming from the arctic, not from europe. —— a northerly. potential later in the week to see some wintry weather, even at lower levels. the prime minister lays out her plans to combat what she calls the hidden injustice of mental illness. it's part of a broader strategy to create what she described as a "shared society" to try to prevent extremists exploiting divisions and discontent. failure to take this opportunity to show the ability of mainstream centre ground of politics to respond to public concern would further entrench the buried divisions we
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seek to overcome. —— very divisions. also on the programme this lunchtime... chaos in london for millions of commuters as a 24—hour tube strike brings most of the underground to a halt. seventeen people arrested in france after reality tv star kim kardashian was robbed of millions of pounds of jewellery last year. donald trump calls meryl streep one of hollywood's most overrated actresses after she criticises him in a speech at the golden globe awards.
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