Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 13, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, withjohn maguire and sian lloyd. a woman has killed and more than 30 people are injured in violence at a white nationalist rally in the united states. a car is driven into a crowd of anti—fascist protestors, following a day of clashes in charlottesville, virginia. go home. you are not wanted in this great commonwealth. shame on you. good morning, it is sunday 13 august. also ahead: ecstasy and agony at the world athletics championships. great britain's men claim the axioom relay gold, but usain bolt pulls up in his last race on the world stage. it didn't go to plan for sir mo farah, either,
6:01 am
here at the london stadium. in his last major race on the track, he is beaten into second place in the final of the 5,000m. we will be speaking to him later. and it has been clear enough for many to be able to see the perseid meteor shower lighting up the sky overnight. philip can tell us if it is going to stay clear on sunday. hello, very good morning to you. it is quite a cool start to the day, but i think it is going to be a very pleasa nt but i think it is going to be a very pleasant day across many parts of the british isles. one or two showers in the mix. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: white supremacists have been told to go home by the governor of virginia, after one person was killed during violent protests, when a car was driven into a group of people. overnight, a 20—year—old man from ohio was arrested on suspicion of murder. more than 30 people have been injured at the protests, as laura westbrook reports. this is what you represent! hate on
6:02 am
the streets of this southern american city. chaos and violence erupted after a planned protest by white nationalists. the day started ina white nationalists. the day started in a tense stand—off, as the group was surrounded by antiracism activists. it then erupted into taunting, shoving, and outright brawling. this has been declared an unlawful assembly... the rally was cancelled before it even began. the police took back streets. the crowd dispersed. then this. our car ploughs through protesters. one person was killed. a state of emergency has been declared in charlottesville, and a curfew is in place. later, a police helicopter
6:03 am
crash near a golf course, leaving two officers dead. it appeared to have been monitoring the protests. the us president said the violence is not just the us president said the violence is notjust one—sided. the us president said the violence is notjust one-sided. we condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence, on many sides. on many sides. but many, even within his own party, feel those words were not enough. senator cory gartner directly addressed donald trump. the governor of virginia had this to say to those who came to the city. and i have a message to all the white supremacists and the nazis who came into charlottesville today. our message is plain and simple. go home. the day of violence ended with
6:04 am
a vigilfor the victims. home. the day of violence ended with a vigil for the victims. as home. the day of violence ended with a vigilfor the victims. as many reflect on a city and nation divided. al apology is therefore a brief interruption during that report on bbc one, but we will be speaking to a local newspaper reporter and giving much more on that story. we will be speaking to him in around ten minutes' time. it was a night of drama at the world athletics championships in london. britain's men took gold in the axioom relay, while, to the surprise of those watching, usain bolt pulled up with an injury in his final race on the international stage. earlier, sir mo farah was beaten into second place in the final of the 5,000m. our sports news correspondent andy swiss was watching. rally has a single race encapsulated so rally has a single race encapsulated so many emotions. as the british relay team celebrated a dazzling win, usain bolt‘s career ended in
6:05 am
calamity. it is britain out in front. usain bolt's jamaica were the defending champions but it was britain who left the way —— led the way, and as they sprinted to glory, bolt's chase was cut agonisingly short. as britain's stunning gold sunk in, usain bolt was on his back. hardly the fairytale finish his career deserved. eventually he was able to hobble away, but it was the saddest end to his swansong. for the british team, though, up picture of perfection. one of the fastest times ever on one of the biggest stages. we are world champions, it is crazy to think. we are so grateful to be in this team, and especially to run with danny. we have some not so nice memories from 2012 in terms of the relay, and to run at how we ran today, we couldn't have done it without the support of the team. the crowd he has been fantastic. wejust
6:06 am
wa nted crowd he has been fantastic. wejust wanted to say thank you so much to eve ryo ne wanted to say thank you so much to everyone watching, and we did it. and they are in a position to challenge for the metal. quite a run forjamaica so far! and the women's tea m forjamaica so far! and the women's team took silver. on a night when the relay team give them plenty to cheer. great britain and northern ireland and jamaica. silver medal for great britain, gold for the united states. he is going to take the gold medal. it is going to be ethiopia at last. mo farah, thanks for the silver. there was also disappointment, no golden goodbye for sir mo disappointment, no golden goodbye for sirmo farah, disappointment, no golden goodbye for sir mo farah, having to settle for sir mo farah, having to settle for silver in his final race at a world championships. it has been incredible, and a dozen had back until you actually compete here and finally, after crossing the line and having a couple of minutes to myself, realised this is it. so a case of agony for some but ecstasy for others. a night as unpredictable
6:07 am
as it was unforgettable. will jessica is at the london stadium. it sounds like a night of high drama. what a night. exactly, what an evening of absolute drama. i was lucky enough to be in that stadium last night, and the atmosphere was absolutely electric. i think my ears are still ringing, and my voice is a little croa ky from are still ringing, and my voice is a little croaky from cheering on all the athletes last night. it was just incredible. even in the morning session, very, very busy. it will be the busiest session we have had so far at these world championships. all the fans flocked into the stadium to get that glimpse of the legend, usain bolt, as he was running in the four x 100—metre heat. and in the evening this really was the hottest ticket in town. just incredible. around 80,000 fans screaming, shouting, on theirfeet,
6:08 am
waving their flags, all screaming, shouting, on theirfeet, waving theirflags, all for screaming, shouting, on theirfeet, waving their flags, all for the athletes on this track. it was just fantastic and i wonder if anyone has actually measure the sound levels in this stadium when it really begins to get going, because it is just a cacophony of sound. the ghillie on the home straight, as you can see behind me. it wasjust incredible, the crowd really roaring on the athletes to bring them across the finish line. and all of the medallists, all of the british medallists, all of the british medallists last night, sir mo farah and both of the relay teams, mention the crowd, and it seems to have worked. three medals in the bag last night for the great britain team. high drama throughout. lots more from you later on this morning. thank you very much indeed. after 8:00am, we are hoping to speak to sir mo farah, and those medal—winning gb relay teams. two ministers who previously expressed opposing views on brexit have written a joint newspaper article clarifying the government's position. writing in the sunday telegraph, philip hammond and liam fox confirm there will be a transition period
6:09 am
to help businesses adjust, but it will only last for a limited period of time. their comments are being seen as an attempt to show unity between rival sides in theresa may's cabinet. cctv footage has emerged of the moment a house was destroyed by a gas explosion. a woman was inside the semi—detached house in sunderland when the blast took place on friday morning, but survived with minor injuries. it is understood that she was protected from the blast by a fridge which fell on top of her. learner drivers are to be allowed on to motorways in england, scotland and wales for the first time from next year. the department for transport said lessons must be in a dual—control car with an approved driving instructor. more details now from our correspondent tom burridge. learning to drive. something many of
6:10 am
us learning to drive. something many of us remember doing, mainly in quiet suburban areas. but from next year, learners will be allowed onto our motorways. the government says it will make us safer, occurs when people passed their test, they will all already have experienced of our biggest and fastest roads. all already have experienced of our biggest and fastest roadsm all already have experienced of our biggest and fastest roads. it is a good idea, because normally as they are getting towards the end of their driving test, i think it is a good idea. if they are well supervised, obviously. we are looking for people who already know how to drive. mainly new drivers, they still cause problems. but when we talk about people, about learners, that would be chaotic, and i don't think it is the right idea. learners will only be allowed onto a motorway with an approved driving instructor, and only ina approved driving instructor, and only in a car weather front passenger has petals as well. road safety groups and the agency that represents driving instructors have all welcomed the move. driving on a
6:11 am
motorway will not initially become pa rt motorway will not initially become part of the practical driving test. learners will be thatjust during training. one aim is to reduce the disproportionate number of young people killed and seriously injured on our roads. the perseid meteor shower has been seen over parts of the uk, giving stargazers the opportunity to spot scores of shooting stars in the sky. the shower was due to peak in the uk on saturday night, in a display also visible in other parts of the world. stargazers took to social media to say they have seen the display, in which 100 meteors had been expected an hour. we will be talking about that later in the programme. so rad to get clear skies —— so rare. far—right protesters who gathered in charlottesville have been told to go home by the state's governor, after a day of violence. one woman died after a car rammed into a crowd of people trying to stop a white nationalist rally. chris suarez works for the local newspaper, and joins us
6:12 am
on the phone now. it is good to talk to you, chris. tell us what is the mood like barratt moment. can you repeat that? ididn't barratt moment. can you repeat that? ididn‘t hear barratt moment. can you repeat that? i didn't hear you so well. chris, tell us a little bit about what the mood there is like at the moment. the mood, pretty sombre. it is... you know, iwas the mood, pretty sombre. it is... you know, i was driving around town trying to find people for the story this evening, i had heard rumours of a vigil which might be organised by the black lives matter movement, on the black lives matter movement, on the grounds of the university in
6:13 am
charlottesville, the grounds of the university in cha rlottesville, it is the grounds of the university in charlottesville, it is the biggest industry in this city of 50,000 people. people say it is not much of a city without the university. but it was raining, i think a lot of people were really exhausted from the date and mostly decided to just go home. we are seeing some pictures that were taken earlier, during the protests that, and i understand that you were there today, as you are just telling us a bit about it. can you explain what you saw? what i saw. . . you explain what you saw? what i saw... this rally was supposed to ta ke saw... this rally was supposed to take place from 12pm to 5pm in what is called emancipation park, which was renamed, previously named lee park for confederate general robert ely, --
6:14 am
park for confederate general robert ely, —— robert e lee, confederate general in the american civil war. soi general in the american civil war. so i arrived at 9am in downtown charlottesville, and you had these columns of different facets and white nationalist groups coming into this park. you know, police had already been deployed, and it got pretty nasty pretty fast between these anti fascist activists. a while to charge my phone at a cafe nearby, and i watched a live stream for a while while waiting for my phone tojudge for a while while waiting for my phone to judge and there was a lot of violence already. they declared a state of emergency, or an unlawful assembly. so they had to take it to assembly. so they had to take it to a federal court case this week to
6:15 am
allow it in this park, and police came in, riot police came in, and made everyone leave. so by noon, when this rally was supposed to start, it was already being shut down and people were milling about. by down and people were milling about. by 2pm, 3pm, everything kind of return to normal to some degree. there was still an air of tension. there was still an air of tension. there was still an air of tension. there was a police presence, national guard, state police, local police everywhere in the city. so it was kind of frightening. and unreal, in some ways. and very briefly, can you give us any update on those who have died? we know that there was an incident with the car, and also a helicopter as well. but briefly, is there any update? i am not sure how much you have heard at this point, but yes, the woman had died, a car ran intoa but yes, the woman had died, a car ran into a group of protesters on the pedestrian malt near the
6:16 am
downtown area. in 19 were injured. i hadn't heard of any other fatalities —— pedestrian mall. and it is very bizarre, but the state police helicopter had crashed by around 5pm. the helicopter had been monitoring this rally, and the police haven't really said much. thank you very much. here's phillip with a look at this morning's weather. how are you? well rested. our viewers were probably up catching amazing scene like this. this is a slice of the action over the isle of wight. it was quite a chilly start. nowhere more so than northern
6:17 am
ireland. you will notice many of the towns and cities are down into single figures. at least it equates toa single figures. at least it equates to a glorious sunny start of the day the many locations across the british isles. not without the chance of a shower but at least we got rid of that more persistent rain which was a bit of a nuisance across the south—eastern quarter of scotland. a sprinkling of showers to be had. one or two further south and as you move into northern ireland, maybe a passing shower but i suspect many of you will stay driver the greater part of the day and you can see “— greater part of the day and you can see —— you greater part of the day and you can see —— you can greater part of the day and you can see —— you can see the extent of the dry weather. with the sunshine pouring through, not too much on the way of breeze. a great way to what has been a really interesting few days of athletics at the world championships. i don't think the weather is going to get on the way.
6:18 am
it's not too hot for the premier league football is trotting out at st james's park at old trafford later in the day. what about monday? not too many dry days in a row. the northern and western parts of the british isles, the cloud and rain into many western parts as you see. further east, that bit driver that bit longer. a high of around 2a degrees. up towards 25 degrees in the south—east, east anglia, all tied in with this set of front is easing their way. quite a few showers. some of them quite sharp. he might even hear a rumble of thunder. that is how we are going to deal with tuesday. a bit of a lull in proceedings and we move into another rather unsettled spell of weather as that area of low pressure eventually closes into the western side of the british isles as you move on to wednesday. a bit of a
6:19 am
mixed bag over the next few days. some rain at times and in some warm sunshine. when phillips says monday is looking a bit mmm, you know we are in trouble. now it's time for the film review with jane hill and james king. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's interesting cinema releases is james king. welcome. what have you been watching? i've been watching charlize theron in a spy thriller that's 007 meets basic instinct. the name's blonde, atomic blonde. from the academy awards to the afterlife, oscar winner casey affleck returns under a sheet
6:20 am
in a ghost story. and get ready to tap, clap and stomp your way through an uplifting new dance documentary, step. quite an eclectic mix this week, james. let's start with the big blockbuster. it looks like one. yes, atomic blonde, so charlize theron stars in this. it's a spy thriller directed by a guy called david leitch. previously he's worked on a movie called john wick with keanu reeves, that was a big hit a couple of years back. there are similarities, they are both very stylish. style over content, really. very violent, very polished, very cartoonish. but atomic blonde has some basis in real events because it is set in 1989 after the fall of the berlin wall. charlize theron is a spy sent there by the british government to track down a list of missing agents.
6:21 am
let's have a look. 0k. so, is this your first time in berlin? yes. well, it is a remarkable time to be here. wonderful music. superb nightlife, marvellous restaurants. you must try the central cafe for a drink. you'll need it later. you remembeer abramowitz, don't you? of course you do. yeah. we can kind of guess what happens after that. it has been hard to find clips of any duration which are not violent. she's quite adept with her stilettos, is charlize. it is ridiculous. however, i think there is some fun to be had with its ridiculousness. firstly, charlize theron is great and there is a pairing that she has with james mcavoy, we didn't see it in that clip, but he's a fellow british agent
6:22 am
in berlin and he's crazy and over the top and she is ice cool and very measured so they have this great chalk and cheese partnership. that really works. she's such a watchable actress, isn't she? very watchable actress. looks great in this, of course is an oscar winner, she can actually act. i wouldn't say she particularly has to act that much in this, but we know she can. and the style is great, this industrial punk aesthetic to it, this pumping 19805 electro soundtrack. we can see a bit of action, the car chases and the fights are stunning and relentless. it almost beats you into submission. with it being visually striking should it remind us of pulp fiction, is that what he's after, the slick look with the violence that goes with it? what it does not have that pulp fiction had is the witty, clever script. it is easy to be snobbish and say the plot is flimsy and stretched. it means you can get away with quite a lot.
6:23 am
i think it relishes its own silliness and pulpy quality. it acknowledges that and when a film is shameless about it it can get away with much more. is it a missed opportunity because the time period in which it is set, berlin, such a great city, it could be the most fantastic story. are they not bothered about that. a slightly missed opportunity but still worth seeing, a male fantasy of a female spy, i don't think many spies are six foot tall former models wandering around in stockings and suspenders. but there is just enough awareness for it to get away with it and i would happily watch another, that movie hasn't done really well but if there is a sequel i wouldn't complain. we move to something that could not be more different.
6:24 am
i am intrigued that this was shot in secret, is it apocryphal that the director was so concerned about how it might end up that he thought, i just won't tell people i am making it. it is very low budget. this is david lowery, last year he moved into the mainstream because he made a film with disney called pete's dragon, so a remake of the old disney story. but that was out of characterfor him. he's much more of an independent, low budget film maker, this is a return to that. this is a ghost story as the title suggests. not a horrorfilm, a drama. casey affleck plays a recently deceased man who returns in spirit to his home to watch over his grieving partner, rooney mara. he is still wearing the sheet that he had placed over him in the morgue. talking about difficult clips to find, it is hard to show you any clips out of context because pacing
6:25 am
and the rhythm of the film is so key. it is a very slow film. there are many takes were seemingly not much happens, the camera is very static and quiet. there's probably more music than dialogue in it. it's even shot in the old 4x3 ratio, the square tv ratio to make it feel claustrophobic. so it's pretty bold and risk taking. i can understand why david lowery might want to keep it secret in case it did not work. i think it does work. you have to take a bit of a leap of faith to get into its rhythm and slowness but when you do it is rewarding and a film about memory and legacy and slowl change. ok, i am a bit worried the trailer might put people off, it's quite bizarre! it isn't that kind of movie. what is your third choice? a documentary, called step. people use the word ‘feelgood' too much, to the point of redundancy but this is genuinely
6:26 am
a feel good movie. a documentary about a girl's dance troupe, called the lethal ladies working out of a high school in inner—city baltimore. the film focuses on three of the girl dancers in particular, about their hopes and aspirations. trying to break the cycle of poverty they come from and get out of baltimore and into college. very charismatic leads, the people in the film are very charismatic. as we will see in this clip. this is the girls in training. you will watch me step. actually, i'm going to make you watch me step. i'm going to get my step, it's going to get up in your grill. i'm going to take you by your neck and you're gonna watch me do what i do. that's what you're supposed to project, every time you get in front of somebody. that's what you step on. if you're not stepping on it, sit down, go home, good night. stand to attention and give me that face. nothing to stop!
6:27 am
i like that teacher, i am not missing with her. she's brilliant, everyone is brilliant. it's a really uplifting story. it's uplifting because it does not scrimp on the hardships. these people that we focus on have had tough lives. there is a lot of anger and it's set among the backdrop of the black lives matter movement and the female empowerment movement. so there tough issues going on. that makes it all the more feel—good when the highs come along and when it gets more optimistic. it's not really a film about stepping as a dance. if you don't know much about stepping, very popular in american colleges, but it's not about the technique and history of stepping. really it's a film about what dance means to people when they don't have much else. i'm really looking
6:28 am
forward to that one. and for best out this week you have delighted me because it is a reissue and what a pleasure it was to watch this film so many years later. this is prick up your ears. re—released, a movie about playwright joe orton, rereleased for the 50th anniversary of his death, the film actually came out in 1987, so the film itself is 30 years old. stephen frears is the director, alan bennett is the writer, based on the diaries ofjoe orton, which we see in the movie. we see john lahr who was the editor, played by wallace shawn in the movie. and then it flashes back to the life ofjoe orton. gary oldman is amazing as orton. i am always reminded of a couple of things, first that time in the 80s when gary oldman and contemporaries like daniel day lewis and tim roth were the angry young men of british cinema and the future of british cinema. weren't they? now daniel day lewis has announced his retirement! and gary oldman will be playing winston churchill! so you feel very old watching this! secondly, more importantly, what alan bennett did with this
6:29 am
script is capture the whit and boisterousness that made joe orton such a great playwright in the 1960s. gary oldman great, vanessa redgrave, for me, it is alfred molina's movie. he plays kenneth halliwell, orton‘s lover. they had an ultimately tragic and shocking relationship. he steals the show. but what is so striking, as you say, the film is 30 years old and it is a litany of wonderful actors because the mother of orton is played byjulie walters and his sister is played by frances barber, these people are part of britain's acting firmament. alan bennett has become even more part of the furniture. what he does brilliantly is give us movies that feel traditional but they are pretty out there when you look at what is going on. now quick thought about the dvd. raw, belgian/french horror movie
6:30 am
about a student who goes to vetinary college and discovers a cannibalistic tendencies. beautifully unsettling. determined to freak you out with the acting, performing and lighting and editing. it is like carrie directed by salvador dali! it weird, but it is wonderful. james, thanks very much. james king, thanks for being with us and that's just about it for this week. enjoy your cinema going. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, withjohn maguire and sian lloyd. coming up before 7:00am, philip will have the weather. but first, at 6:30am, a summary of this morning's main news: one person has died and more than 30 others have been injured after a day of violence between far—right protesters and anti—fascists
6:31 am
in the us city of charlottesville. a 20—year—old man from ohio has been arrested after a car was driven into a group of people trying to prevent a white nationalist rally from taking place. the bbc‘s joel gunter is there for us. joel, talk us through what happened. soa so a lot of white nationalists, white supremacists, and various other so—called alt—right groups descended on charlottesville, many arriving on friday. early on saturday they gathered at emancipation park, formerly lee park park, home to the statue of robert e lee which is at the heart of this tragedy. they were surrounded by antifascist protesters and there we re
6:32 am
antifascist protesters and there were violent skirmishes around emancipation park, and in the end national guard in and dirt rally was over before it could begin —— the rally. we are hearing news of fatalities as well. in terms of what the police and national guard tried to do, what were their tactics? obviously to keep the sides apart, one assumes? well, early on there was very little police intervention at emancipation park, where most of the violence was taking place on saturday morning. the police that we re saturday morning. the police that were they are largely stood back, until after a few hours a state of emergency was declared by the virginia governor and then the riot police and after that the national guard started to move in. they pushed people out of that area around emancipation park, to the surrounding areas. there were sporadic skirmishes and violence and as you mentioned at the top, two locks away this fatal incident with
6:33 am
a driver ploughing into the crowd. thank you very much indeed for the latest from charlottesville —— two blocks away. two ministers who previously expressed opposing views on brexit have written a joint newspaper article clarifying the government's position. writing in the sunday telegraph, philip hammond and liam fox confirm there will be a transition period to help businesses adjust, but it will only last for a limited period of time. their comments are being seen as an attempt to show unity between rival sides in theresa may's cabinet. a danish inventor who built the world's largest privately made submarine has appeared in court in copenhagen charged with killing a swedish journalist. peter madsen, who is a6, has denied the manslaughter of the woman, who disappeared on thursday after a trip in the vessel. cctv footage has emerged of the moment a house was destroyed by a gas explosion.
6:34 am
a woman was inside the semi—detached house in sunderland when the blast took place on friday morning, but survived with minor injuries. it is understood that she was protected from the blast by a fridge which fell on top of her. learner drivers are to be allowed on to motorways in england, scotland and wales for the first time from next year. the department for transport said lessons must be in a dual—control car with an approved driving instructor. road safety groups, as well as the agency that represents driving instructors, have welcomed the move. shooting stars littered the sky last night, as the perseid meteor shower was at its peak over the uk. 100 meteors were expected every hour. the perseid meteor shower happens everyjuly and august, as the earth passes debris from the swift—tuttle comet. did you see any when you woke up?
6:35 am
know, did you? my eyes only open about two minutes before six a.m.. and the skies a bit cloudy, but you had plenty of high drama there last night. exactly, what a night of drama. and actually, it was this time yesterday that we were hyping up time yesterday that we were hyping up the fact that usain bolt and sir mo farah would be on the track. it was the british men in lane seven who won gold. after all the hype, both usain bolt and sir mo farah missed out on the golden goodbye they were hoping for here at the london stadium. news of sir mo's silver medal in a minute, but there was agony for bolt, and sheer joy for great britain, in the men's ax100m relay. the british team of cj ujah, adam gemili and danny talbot had put nethaneel mitchell—bla ke in a fantastic position
6:36 am
for the final leg. bolt, who was running the anchor leg forjamaica, pulled up injured, while mitchell—blake held off america's christian coleman to win team gb's second gold of the championships. the crowd erupted to celebrate a truly fantastic performance. we're world champions, it's crazy to think. especially — i feel so grateful to be in this team, and especially to run it with danny. we have some not—so—nice memories from 2012, in terms of the relay. and to come here and actually run it how we ran today, we couldn't have done it without the support of the team. the crowd he has been fantastic. we just wanted to say thank you so much to everyone watching, and yeah, we did it. joy for the british team, but it wasn't the end to usain bolt's track career that he wanted. his final—ever race ended with him crumpled in pain on the track. his career ended with eight olympic golds, 11 world championship golds and three world records. we may never see his like again, but it wasn't the way bolt would have wanted to end his glittering career. it wasn't quite the farewell to a major track championships
6:37 am
either that great britain's sir mo farah would have hoped for. the four—time olympic champion will compete in a couple more track races, before switching to running marathons. but this was his last chance to win another gold medal, and he gave it everything in the 5,000m. but ethiopia's muktar edris did what farah usually does to the opposition. the briton just didn't have enough left in his legs after defending his 10,000m title. he signed off with a silver medal, and happy to share the moment with his family. it is very special. at the time they we re it is very special. at the time they were in mum's tummy. and at the same time rhianna has grown up. it doesn't hit until you compete here, and finally after crossing the line and finally after crossing the line and having a couple of minutes to myself, realise this is it. the better man won on the day, but i gaveit
6:38 am
better man won on the day, but i gave it all. i didn't have a single bit left at the end. there was another silver medal for team gb in the women's ax100m relay, a thrilling run by the british quartet of asha philip, desiree henry, dina asher—smith and daryll neita. the 100m world champion, tori bowie, anchored the usa to a gold medal. jamaica were third, their only sprint medal of the championships. no such medal success for britain in the highjump, though. both katarina johnson—thompson and morgan lake cleared 1.95m, but it was only good enough for them to finish in fifth and sixth place, respectively. australia won their first medal of the championships, in the women's100m hurdles — sally pearson, returning to london, where she won gold in the 2012 olympics, becoming a world champion for the second time. so much drama here at the athletics, but plenty going on in the premier league, as well. on the first weekend of the new season, defending champions chelsea were beaten
6:39 am
by burnley, while newly promoted huddersfield town sit at the top of the table. ben croucher has the best of the action. so how many of you expected to be waking up with huddersfield leading the premier league this morning? well, that is what you have got. no flu ke well, that is what you have got. no fluke either. a diamond display at crystal palace in their first top—flight game since 1972. crystal palace in their first top-flight game since 1972. 34 huddersfield, and a dream start to their premier league chapter. for burnley, there was delight, there was disbelief, and a deserved three points as well, stunning the champions in their own backyard. three first half goals condemned nine man chelsea to a brutal defeat. on the south coast, the seagulls had soared into the premier league, but brighton's home game capsized. aguero on target in a 2—0 win.
6:40 am
liverpool fans will have to keep their heads up. they were heading for victory, at an injury time equaliser salvaged a 3—3 draw. and that goodison park there was only one name on everyone's blips. that goodison park there was only one name on everyone's blipsm that goodison park there was only one name on everyone's blips. it is wayne rooney! 13.5 years since his last competitive goal for everton, wayne rooney scored the winner against stoke. we know the name. wayne rooney! so here is a full list of yesterday's results. everton winning1—0, thanks to that wayne rooney goal, while west brom beat bournemouth by the same score. southampton were held to a goalless draw by swansea city. the big result in the scottish premiership was stjohnstone beating motherwell 4—1. that result put them top of the table on goals scored, just ahead of champions celtic. elsewhere, there were wins for hamilton, hearts, hibs and aberdeen. and kevin kisner is leading
6:41 am
the us pga championship going into today's final round. the american is looking to win his first major title, and has a one—shot lead after three rounds at quail hollow. england's paul casey had a poor end to his day, dropping back to level—par, but remains the highest placed british player, seven shots off the lead. and we will be speaking to all of the british medallists. it will be exciting. stay tuned for that. we will be back with you later on. looking forward to all those chats. sir mo farah‘s silver medal from last nightjust adds to his incredible trophy cabinet.
6:42 am
amongst his achievements, he's won four olympic medals and he's broken records all over the world. his running potential was spotted at an early age by his pe teacher, alan watkinson. he joins us from twickenham. it is lovely to have you on brea kfast it is lovely to have you on breakfast this morning. we were willing him to gold and now that the dust has settled, how do you look back at his silva? it was a fabulous performance. if you look back at what he had been through through the week, he is getting on a bit, not as old as me yet. but he was suffering from that 10,000 metres, and like he said, he gave absolutely everything. you couldn't fault his performance, really. and did you watch the race in the stadium? i was in the stadium with my eight—year—old son. with two la ps to with my eight—year—old son. with two laps to go he said i have a bad feeling about this. i said don't worry, it will be all right. and to
6:43 am
be fair, it was all right. he had the silva and had to back off that, but scores like that, there is a lwa ys but scores like that, there is always someone in your career who will do better than you, and u nfortu nately for will do better than you, and unfortunately for sir mo farah, that was last night. the atmosphere must have been electric. i watched it on tv and you got a sense of the atmosphere from that. you must be very proud of his achievements. yes, imean, very proud of his achievements. yes, i mean, incredibly proud. you might be able to hear that my voice is struggling a little bit. i wondered last night if i would be able to talk. what he has done is absolutely remarkable. from being a boy that was going to come over here at eight yea rs of was going to come over here at eight years of age with no endless language at all, and not an awful lot going for him in terms of the likelihood of doing anything academically, oranything likelihood of doing anything academically, or anything at all, it is just academically, or anything at all, it isjust a academically, or anything at all, it is just a remarkable story. and academically, or anything at all, it isjust a remarkable story. and it just shows that you should never give up on anybody. and, you know,
6:44 am
hopefully everybody can reach their potential. and you played a part in helping him reach his potential, didn't you? how did you spot that at that early age, when he came over? how did you see what he was going to become? spotting the running talent wasn't too difficult. it was pretty obvious. he kept winning races. the higher you would put him up in levels, he would win those races as well. the thing was finding ways to make sure that he became motivated by it and it wasn't long before we saw it was a real opportunity for him to do something different. and he really grabbed that opportunity, which was great to see. that is a big part of it, having the talent, but having the drive, and grabbing that opportunity, and being able to achieve and keep going at it. he said that this now is the end of one
6:45 am
chapter, but he is going to be beginning another one with the marathon. how do you see him approaching that in taking that on, really? i don't think mo knows another way to approach things, that is besides giving everything to it. if he can be successful in a marathon, there is no doubt he will be. with his work ethic, you can have as much talent as you like but if you don't work you are never going to be the best. and he knows that. he will give it his absolute or. and if it is possible, then i have no doubt whatsoever he will do it. thank you very much forjoining us it. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. it is great to have you on the programme, and get another cup of the mouth or your voice. i can imagine you were cheering a lot. we are going to go back to the stadium now. look at that, doesn't
6:46 am
it look fantastic. blue skies there morning. so much athletics to reflect on the programme this morning. nerve —— now we will pass over to fill it. we will hand on the baton. oh, no. yes. good morning to you. those clear skies helped if you work out and about looking at the perseids last night. a superb picture here, capturing a slice of the action. we've gone on down to the action. we've gone on down to the sussex coast. a chilly start. a number of locations well down into single figures but let's focus on the positives. that sun will soon warm things up —— warm things up. it is not a wall—to—wall but certainly as we come into the northern half of the british isles, you increase your chances of seeing passing showers across scotland but even here, many areas could stay dry. similar prospects into northern ireland.
6:47 am
that is about as many as you are going to get across england and wales. a dry day. i don't think many of you are going to get caught out. there may just be of you are going to get caught out. there mayjust be enough in the way of cloud across the high ground for a passing shower. away from that, across the south—east, 23, 24. just as we get on towards the evening, this will cool down a bit. at the olympic park, for the world championships. into monday, if you're on holiday, the most of it. there is an active weather front coming in. when that pushes through, things will turn quite showery. ahead of that, a pretty warm affair. somebody could be looking at 24, 25. there is no escaping the fact that the response had to work their way across the british isles. tuesday could turn out to be a showery do.
6:48 am
that little ridge of high pressure. we waste some of that overnight into tuesday. more cloud and rain eventually piling in. that feature is going to be dominant across a good part of britain. and indeed, on into thursday. they could be a hint of the autumn word about it. a bit early for that, philip. we don't wa nt early for that, philip. we don't want that yet. we'll be back with the headlines at seven o'clock. now it's time for click. this month marks the 25th anniversary of the self checkout. the first one was installed
6:49 am
in new york on 5 august, 1992, in price chopper. so what does its inventor, doctor howard schneider, remember of it all? i hadn't gone shopping much, so i went to the supermarket near my house with a stopwatch. and i started looking at people checking out, and my stopwatch went "click, click" — it was a mechanical one. and, you know, isaid wow, what a great environment. this is so messy. good luck with any machine doing it, and i said, this would be a great, great problem to solve. and then i started building a machine in my garage. i actually spent every cent i had on parts, and i got the first machines built. see, i love self—service checkouts, but then i'm a control freak. but i do believe they save you time. until they go wrong, at which point they become a right pain in the bagging area. the technology in the machines now
6:50 am
is less than it was 25 years ago, using 286 computers, using ms—dos 3.3. i had better technology 25 years ago than what you see now, which is the reason for a lot of frustrations. please wait for assistance. please remove item before continuing. so now people are thinking outside of the shopping basket, to try and update the self checkout and reduce the delays further. in japan, reggie robo takes your basket and bags your shopping for you. the system, which was trialled at the beginning of the year, scans the rfid tags on all the items at the same time. since december, the amazon go shop has been undergoing testing in seattle. once it is working, shoppers should be able to pick up their items and simply walk out of the store. swedish cafe company wheelys is working on a similar idea. although this staff—less shop will even come to you. here at canary wharf, in london, something less spectacular,
6:51 am
but which seems to me more workable and more scalable. grab and go has been invented by ba rclayca rd. the app scans bar codes as you grab items off the shelf, and then you just go. payment is taken from the card that is linked to the app, and the receipt is sent to the phone, so you don't have to wait in a checkout queue at all. but, with all that grabbing and going, are you thinking what i'm thinking? in the future, if you're scanning things and then just putting it in your bag, and then just walking out, and all the doors are open, i can see more people stealing more stuff. so you can basically very easily pick up some item and then can walk out, but on the way you have cctv, you have a man on the ground basically monitoring all of that. it works in exactly the same way.
6:52 am
so it's no more secure than a self—scan checkout, but i do wonder how many people would just accidentally miss that barcode, and leave with a lot of unpaid stuff. although, even here, technology might be able to spot them. supermarket giant walmart has filed a patent to incorporate facial recognition, blood pressure and heart rate monitoring into its stores to try and understand customer frustration at checkouts. it might improve customer service, but previous trials of the tech have been used to try to spot shoplifters, raising a few security concerns along the way. in fact, just this week, the supermarket announced it is also trialling a scan—and—go solution, but this one relies on shop assistant approval before you can leave. in china, which is home to several unmanned stores like this one, you need your face to get in the front door in the first place. like barclaycard's grab and go, customers scan items using their phones, and they can even heat up their grub
6:53 am
in the microwave inside. speaking of heating things up, a similar chinese idea, bingo box, ran into problems when one of its glass clad stores began to overheat. now, as it was unmanned, it wasn't until customers began to complain that the sweltering temperatures were ruining the food inside that the shop was shut down. it is now back up and running, and everything is cool. so it's not all plain sailing for these souped—up shops, and it will be a while before we buy our weekly groceries in the store without some form of human interaction or intervention. but, as our patience wears increasingly thin in this age of grabbing and going, it's no surprise that bingo box plans to open 5,000 more stores in the coming year. premier league football starts again this weekend, which i'm reliably informed is important to some people. seriously, though, fans will be excited to see what their clubs
6:54 am
new signings have to offer. but how do you know if a new player is going to be right for your team? well, one company is using virtual reality to identify talent, and also help players to recoverfrom injuries. here is carol hawkins. i'm in manchester, home of great football, to check out a small start—up that isjoining up with premier league clubs for an idea that's only eight months in the making. ifeel like i'm doing pretty good. this vr system helps scouts recruit players by using statistics from virtual gameplay to decide whether or not the player would work fora team. but it separately is also being used to help injured players get back to full fitness, mentally and physically. you have injured players who will often spend anything from six months to ten months, years out of the game.
6:55 am
and the scientists, the physios will work with them, but we do not know what they're going to do in a situation, what decisions they're going to make. now, they can play games, as well as having the treatment, the movement is limited, but they can feel a part of the squad. they are using an htc5 headset, with the usual hand controllers attached to shin pads. and the kit is wireless, crucial for football drills. as well as this version, they are also working on one for goalies, which will require an extra pair of sensors. several premier league clubs are signing up to use the vr system, because it promises to bring players back from the bench faster. and the first question they ask — does it feel like a real ball? you do feel like you're really hitting the ball, it's quite strange. i don't know if‘t is the sound, or the visuals,
6:56 am
but it is very immersive. and i know people always use that word for vr, but it does feel as though you are hitting it. but, of course, you're not. and because you are not, it's important players don't try too hard, and injure themselves even more, especially when they've cost clubs millions of pounds. part of the problem is to make sure that they are not hyper—extending. we had a player last week who is not allowed to kick a physical ball. and the scientists, the physios will work with them, but we do not know what they're going to do in a situation, what decisions they're going to make. now, they can play games, as well as having the treatment, the movement is limited, but they can feel a part of the squad. the player, with his injury, he can't do it. it was basically a
6:57 am
case, psychologically, it is massive. i am now in the rehab drill and there is a man to my left who is tracing a s with his foot. now, i cannot do that, because my balance on these prosthetics just is not there, sorry, physios! but i can see how that would be very useful for injured players, but not just injured players, in hospitals. players will complete a set of exercises and drills which will be scored, and their fitness can then be judged by coaches. elsewhere in the sport world, american football is embracing vr quickly. strivr there is a company out of stanford university, currently working with seven nfl teams to allow players to practice anytime, anywhere, without the same physical tolls. and in the netherlands, another vr company, beyond sports, has a contract with both arsenal and stoke city for match analysis and vr training. but, back in the uk, a man who won premier league titles as a player and coach with manchester united thinks the new technology could really help.
6:58 am
i think it benefits both amateur, professional and grassroots. you can put pressure into the situation. the technology is part of sport now. football, possibly, have had a reluctance to use it, but it's moving in that direction. but the kit they are offering is not cheap, with packages starting at £5,000, and increasing to more than £20,000 a month. but the potential benefits of vr to the football clubs that can afford it are intriguing. coaches want to train and test footballers in the most effective way, by recreating the pressure and intensity of performing in a packed stadium. so what would the manager with the most premier league titles under his belt, sir alex ferguson, think about it? do you think fergie would have been up for it? he would have a look at it, yeah. i think he would.
6:59 am
he was open to all that sort of stuff, as long as it made a bit of a difference. or sometimes it's what people like, you know, players like it. they like something new and fresh. top clubs are big businesses, and the money in football is only going to increase. and, as it does, teams will be looking for any way to improve. as you watch your team this weekend, remember that last—minute winner or fingertip save might be the result of some hard hours spent in a virtual world. and that's it for the short cut of click this week. the full version is waiting for you on iplayer. over the next couple of weeks, we are going to give you the chance to rewatch two of our favourite shows from the year so far — the two india specials. we'll be travelling across the country, to meet the people working hard to change lives, save lives, and maybe one day discover new life. i hope you enjoy watching them as much as we enjoyed making them.
7:00 am
do not forget we are on twitter and on facebook. thank you for watching, and we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, withjohn maguire and sian lloyd. a woman has killed and more than 30 people are injured in violence at a white nationalist rally in the united states. a car is driven into a crowd of anti—fascist protestors, following a day of clashes in charlottesville, virginia. go home. you are not wanted in this great commonwealth. shame on you.

38 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on