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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 16, 2017 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 2pm: police have arrested an 18—year—old man in dover in connection with yesterday's london tube bombing. the uk terror threat remains at its highest level — meaning another attack could be imminent. 1,000 armed police are patrolling nationwide. the tempo is like at a level we haven't seen for a very long time. nearly 600 live investigations covering over 3,000 people and another group of 20,000 people we're concerned of. i'm robert hall, live at parsons green tube station, as the police investigation now extends from here in south—west london to the south coast. also in the next hour, borisjohnson revives his promise of more funding for the nhs after brexit. the foreign secretary sets out his vision for what he calls britain's glorious future outside the eu. a day after north korea's latest missile launch —
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kim jong un says he wants to match the military power of the united states. hundreds of thousands of ryanair passengers are warned their flights could be cancelled over the next six weeks. and coming up here on bbc news in half an hour, inside out reveals the secret plan that could have stopped the collapse of northern rock. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. police have arrested an 18—year—old man at dover in connection with yesterday's bombing of a london underground train. the arrest is described as significant. armed police and military personnel
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are being deployed at key locations across the uk, following the raising of the terror threat level to critical — the highest possible alert. it means the government believes a further attack may be imminent. an emergency cobra meeting is being held this lunchtime. 0ur correspondent robert hall is at new scotland yard. thank you very much. just news on that cobra meeting first. we're told it broke up a short time ago. it lasted about 45 minutes. we hope to bring you more about what the meeting covered in the next few minutes or so. let's get back to the developments of the morning. we know that this investigating team, this huge investigating team, involving police and intelligence officers we re police and intelligence officers were hopeful that the significant amount of evidence that they had been able to gather through closed circuit television, evidence from
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the public, might move the investigation forward during today. that appears to now have happened. the arrest in dover has been described as "significa nt". the arrest in dover has been described as "significant". but there's a warning of other police operation that's may follow. 0bviously, whoever this person is there will be a keen desire to find out whether there are connections, whether there are other individuals who are part of what may have been a concerted plot to carry out the attack on that tube train yesterday morning. so we'll look at what's been happening during the morning. my been happening during the morning. my colleague daniel sandford has been following events. the port of dover this morning, where an 18—year—old man was arrested by kent police on suspicion of terrorism. an arrest detectives described as "significa nt, " and which is directly linked to the investigation into yesterday's explosion on a west london tube train. the arrest is the first obvious breakthrough. nobody died when the improvised explosive device produced a wall of flame in the carriage.
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that bags on fire... the home—made bomb in a bucket, which detectives believe is linked to islamist terrorism, appears to have failed to detonate fully, but 30 people ended up in casualty. three of them are still being treated at chelsea and westminster hospital, and last night the uk moved to its highest terrorism threat level — critical — and soldiers were deployed to do some of the work of armed police officers. we have authorised 0peration temperer, which is the initial deployment of a number of troops. they will be deployed to key sites in the uk to free up armed police. and so you will see more armed police on the streets, up to between 500 and 1,000 depending on how the police wish to deploy them. at euston this morning the change in threat level was immediately obvious, with more armed officers patrolling the station. there are seven premier league football matches today and there will be higher security at all of them and at all big public events.
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we have our go critical plan. we rehearse these a lot. we make sure we do it well, so the public can see an awful lot more police officers. they can expect to see more on the underground in particular, given recent events, armed officers travelling on trains, and in train stations. the bbc understands detectives have good cctv images of the person suspected of planting yesterday's bomb. officers say they are pleased with the investigation‘s progress. london's mayor siddique khan said that the city will never be intimidated by terrorism, and we will always defeat those who seek to destroy our way of life. daniel sandford, bbc news. just to reiterate, stay with us, we expect to hear from just to reiterate, stay with us, we expect to hearfrom cobra just to reiterate, stay with us, we expect to hear from cobra and that level of alert in a moment or two. because we have a correspondent who's been just outside and hearing about that meeting. but the metropolitan police commissioner has
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also been out and about this morning. she made a statement, dan, what's she been up to? she's trying to give reassurance. she's been patrolling with armed officers, just over the river from where we are here. her message is clear that londoners shouldn't change the way they behave in light of this increased terror threat. in a statement she said, "yesterday we saw a cowardly and indiscriminate attack, which could have resulted in many lives being lost. we saw a quick response from the emergency services and transport staff. since then we've had teams of detectives and specialists working through the night on the investigation. 0fficers throughout london mobilising and providing increased visible police presence especially in crowded places. london has not stopped after other terrible attacks and and it will not stop after this one." a real message of defiance. there are words about what they called operation temperer, moving soldiers in. what have we heard about that?l
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source within the met has told collea g u es source within the met has told colleagues at the bbc that this is light touch in compareson to a similar operation after the manchester bomb attack. about 1,000 officers mobilised. it's largely focussing on the south—east and london area. of course, that would chime with where we're seen the arrest activity happening on the south coast. we understand on this occasion it's a lighter touch than before and those military officers coming into the place to release police so that they can be on the streets to be a visible presence but also a covert presence to intervene should any attacks happen. thank you very much indeed. i promised we would hear from cobra. very much indeed. i promised we would hearfrom cobra. my colleague is there now, just across from where iam. is there now, just across from where i am. what's the latest and what have they had to say? well, we know that the meeting of the cobra emergency committee has now ended. it was taking place here at the
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cabinet office in whitehall. it's the second meeting since the explosion. today it was chaired by the home secretary, amber rudd. theresa may chaired the meeting yesterday. she's now back in her constituency, though she is being kept updated on developments. because of the significant movement in the investigation this morning, there will have been some discussion about that progress in the investigation and of course, consideration of the threat level that was raised to its highest level last night, when the suspected bomber, the person who planted the bomber, the person who planted the bomb on the train, was believed to be at large. of course, we've had this arrest. we don't know if that is the end of the story. there will have been discussions about the threat level and whether that should be reduced again back to the level it was yesterday, one below the critical, which meant an attack could be imminent. we are expecting an update further about what was said in the emergency committee meeting this afternoon from the home
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secretary, amber rudd, later today. thank you very much indeed. let's try and get context and background 110w. try and get context and background now. david, you are a former counterterror detective and lead investigator following the 1977 bombings. i beg your pardon, the 7/7 bombings. i beg your pardon, the 7/7 bombings. the arrest this morning, it's very early days. 0bviously, for obvious reasons, the details are sketchy. what do you take from what little we do know? the police have obviously known who this individual is fairly quickly which is why we haven't seen any cctv footage released by them. i would guess that most of the cameras that they have at stations and on trains these days are high definition quality and very quickly they would have identified who this individual is. they've obviously got an incomplete intelligence picture from the
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security service around who this person has been operating with. that's what the threat level is about. they don't understand who is involved and he operated completely under the radar, which is how he delivered this device tie target com pletely delivered this device tie target completely undetected. if they're describing the arrest as significant, i would suggest it's possibly the person that's planted the bomb though we don't know. we don't know how this device has been triggered. lots of people are talking about a timer. but it could be remote detonation. it could be mobile phone, for example. they may be looking at the wider network connected to the telephone used in that case. there's a lot going on. the police will be looking at the forensic opportunities from the device itself. it's unusualfor the device itself. it's unusualfor the device to be in tact as it is and there'll be lots of opportunities for them to decide — you know, fingerprint, fibres, dna, hair. talking about the device and there's
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been discussion about it this morning. some opinions that perhaps it was being taken somewhere in what appears to be a plastic bucket. and that wasn't the final container. what's your thought on that?” that wasn't the final container. what's your thought on that? i think that's incorrect. ieds like this are very common. when - manufacture very common. when they manufacture them these days, the explosives often will be a powder or sludge. they need to have it inside something. the only difference between what you saw yesterday and the 21/7 bomb, 7/7 bomb is the outer packaging. the fact that we've seen a plastic container that had explosives inside it with lights that have been used to pass an electronic charge into the device is identical to what we've seen before. salman abedi had his bomb in a case
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and the 7/7 bombers had their bombs inside rucksacks. this is an identical sort of design. not knowing what type of explosives is in the bottom of that is difficult to say whether it's identical. but it's certainly very similar. anyone who says this is being transported for the purpose of being put in something else is incorrect. just one final thing. it's interesting that all the press statements here at the yard and in also in off the record briefings, the plural has been used. there's been talk about suspects or possible suspects plural. you add that to the fact that cobra have said we stay at critical for the time being, that cobra have said we stay at criticalfor the time being, maybe for a few days, who knows. that suggests that they — they've got a great deal of work to do as you indicated. indeed. the threat level is set by jtac. they're based at mi5. is set by jtac. they're based at
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m15. they will be looking at who else could be involved. the fact is they don't know. this is the issue. this is why there's a degree of panic. i use that word lightly. they're trying to say to people, you need to keep an eye out for us. you need to keep an eye out for us. you need to keep an eye out for us. you need to be the eyes and ears of us on the ground. because we have an incomplete intelligence picture. that's what the public need to do. they need to be aware of what's round them, other people round them and make challenges and be the eyes and make challenges and be the eyes and ears of the police. you are your own health and safety executive in this respect. thank you very much for talking to me. that's it from us for talking to me. that's it from us for now. i would stress again that in that statement announcing this arrest, senior officers were talking about further police activity. 0bviously, about further police activity. obviously, this could well be a fast moving investigation and as soon as we hear any more here, we'll get back to you. borisjohnson has renewed
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the controversial claim that britain will save £350 million a week by leaving the eu, which could be spend on the nhs. the foreign secretary was setting out his vision of what he called britain's glorious future after brexit in a newspaper article. labour and the liberal democrats said government divisions had been laid bare and accused mrjohnson of plotting a challenge to theresa may's leadership. she is due to make a major speech on brexit on friday. a day after its latest ballistic missile launch, north korea has said its final goal is to match the military power of the the united states. last night, the un security council described the missile test over japan as highly provocative — but no further sanctions were imposed.
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bill hayton reports. north korea is celebrating, another successful test for this ballistic missile and kim jong successful test for this ballistic missile and kimjong un successful test for this ballistic missile and kim jong un was there to congratulate the scientists. he told them his aim is to establish a balance of force with the united states, so it cannot threaten his country with military action. but on a visit to an air base near washington, president trump said the us will never be intimidated. after seeing your capabilities and commitment here today, i am more confident than ever that our options in addressing this threat are both effective and overwhelming. in new york, the un security council discussed the situation for the second time this week. this time, there was no new resolution, only a press statement strongly condemning the missile launch and urging compliance with existing sanctions. russia says the us has to get serious about talks about north
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korea. but as russia and china urge patience the us says it's running out of time. it wants an end to north korea's missile and nuclear programmes. but with those programmes. but with those programmes making rapid progress, the choices facing world leaders are becoming more difficult. the headlines on bbc news: police have arrested an 18—year—old man in the port area of dover over yesterday's bombing on the london underground. the foreign secretary borisjohnson revives the promise of billions of pounds of extra funding for the nhs after brexit. a day after north korea's latest missile launch — kim jong un says he aims to match the military power of the united states. let's return to our top story, the
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arrest of an 18—year—old man in the dover area in connection with yesterday's bombing of a london underground train. the metropolitan police commissioner, cresida dick, has been speaking in the past few minutes. let's listen in to what she said. yesterday's event was absolutely appalling, horrendous. my thoughts and everybody‘s are with those people who were injured. we had an excellent response. i went to the scene last night. i'm really proud of everybody who coordinated that response. but it must have been utterly awful for everybody on that train and especially those who are badly injured. it's a very fast moving investigation. we've got the full weight of counterterrorist police agencies and government helping in every way they possibly can. we're making very considerable progress. you will have seen the announcement of an arrest earlier on in relation to this. we will
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continue to work as hard as we can to make sure that we reduce the threat in this country and that we know exactly who it was who did this, whether anybody else is involved and just try to reduce the risk as fast as we possibly can. the threat level remains at critical. we've seen high visibility today from your officers, sniffer dogs around. this will go on for some time? the threat level is set by the joint terrorism analysis centre. they will constantly review what is going on. at the moment it is at critical. that started last night. that means that we've take an whole series of measures in london, where i've been today and yesterday, we have more police on the streets. we have more police on the streets. we have more police on the streets. we have more unarmed police and we have more armed police. the public should feel utterly reassured by that. i've been out and about today. the public seem been out and about today. the public seem to be very positive about the number of officers that we have
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here. clearly, there's a series of measures that we need to take for the time that we are at critical, which means that a threat may — sorry an attack may be eminent. europe's biggest airline, ryanair, has said it's cancelling up to 50 flights a day for the next six weeks, to try to improve punctuality. the move is expected to affect nearly 300,000 passengers, who will be offered alternative flights or refunds. the airline says it needs to have more planes available on standby. some passengers have already been affected. leo belchetz from hackney in london got in touch to tell us about his experience. we're here on holiday in italy. my fiance and i. yeah, basicallyjust received a text out of the blue from ryanair to check our e—mails about ourflight ryanair to check our e—mails about our flight cancellation. when we checked the e—mail, gave no
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indication why the flight had been cancelled. the information it gave us was cancelled. the information it gave us was that we could rebook through ryanairor us was that we could rebook through ryanair or apply for a refund. we went to look to rebook through ryanair, there were no seats available until the weekend. 0ur flight available until the weekend. 0ur flight was due to depart on tuesday. 0bviously flight was due to depart on tuesday. obviously we need to get back for work on wednesday. so that's unsuitable. the refund is unsuitable because flights with any other airlines cost a lot more than what we would have got back for our refund. we tried contacting ryanair through their web chat, but that's not working on the website. then when you ring them up, you get cut off after saying that the call volumes are too high to take your call. they refer you to the web chat, which isn't working or to
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rebooking options, which as i said are unsuitable ( joining me to discuss this is david learmount, who's the consulting editor for flight global. thank you forjoining us. apart from appalling customer service that we we re appalling customer service that we were just hearing there, what do you make of this story involving ryanair? ryanair runs a very tight ship. it doesn't have any slack. that's why it manages to keep such low fares. that's why it manages to keep such low fa res. i that's why it manages to keep such low fares. i think this time they've overcooked it. what happens if a ryanairflight overcooked it. what happens if a ryanair flight gets overcooked it. what happens if a rya nair flight gets delayed ? overcooked it. what happens if a ryanair flight gets delayed? ryanair has a fantastic reputation for punctuality, until now. the reason why they have to be punctual is because there's no slippage. they have terribly fast turn arounds. they get the most out of their aeroplanes and crews. if anything does slip, it has a domino effect throughout the day. that aircraft can go out of service or even they
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have to cancel the flight at the end of the day. they're being proactive. they're cancelling of the day. they're being proactive. they‘ re cancelling at of the day. they're being proactive. they're cancelling at the beginning. have they overstretched themselves? they have, yes. i mean, it seems to bea they have, yes. i mean, it seems to be a combination of two things. they're talking of needing to have more aircraft on stand by. that indicates what i've just said, basically, they don't have enough slack in the system, but they've also got this problem they've mentioned which is that they've had a build up of annual leave entitlement and therefore they're short of people as well. basically, they're a very tight ship and this time they've overcooked it. long—term, will it impact on them badly? there is a cost element and we're hearing things like "beyond its control" which sounds like a get—out clause. long—term what impact will this have on ryanair? this is not beyond ryanair‘s control. this is completely under their control. they've just got it
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wrong this time. they don't usually. they are a very tight outfit. that's why they have the lowest fares that are out there. normally, they're pretty good. but this time, no, they've just miscalculated. they've been sailing so close to the wind that the weather's caught them out. we heard there an example of terrible customer service, no communication whatsoever. some customers are saying, it would be nice to know which flights are going to be cancelled. there's none of that information available. is something like this unheard of in the industry? more or less, yes. the way in which it's been done, it is pretty typical. ryanair was trying to get its customer service better thanit to get its customer service better than it used to be. which wasn't difficult. but i mean, one thing you've got was you got a flight and got it incredibly cheaply. don't
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expect beautiful, smooth customer service. they were trying time prove that. now they've come unstuck by operating with no slack whatsoever. so if any small thing goes wrong, they have to cancel flights. there is no back up. they've admitted themselves they have to have more aircraft on stand by. we're going to lever it there for you, thank you very much indeed. well, as mentioned, ryanair released a statement on their website which airline says: the american actor harry dean stanton has died at the age of 91. his career spanned six decades, he was best—known for roles in godfather 2 and alien. the actor's last role was in lucky — a new film about an atheist who comes to terms with his own mortality. it's due to be released later this month. one of the biggest names in the indian film industry is in the uk this week. salman khan is one of the top grossing actors in bollywood and has made more than a hundred films.
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his tour in the uk will be the first in 12 years. he's been speaking exclusively to the bbc asian network's haroon rashid, ahead of his first concert tonight: singing. he's an international superstar, with hundreds of millions of fans around the world. and this weekend, salman khan is in the uk. one of bollywood's most famous actors is performing here at the more than a decade. i'm a huge fan, salman. thank you. oh, my god! i just got to take a picture with salman khan, and... our hearts are beating. and my heart is racing right now. he told me what it's like to meet his british fans. it's amazing. it feels just... you know, it's amazing because the grandparents and the parents have, when the kids are growing up, they've kept them in touch with our culture. and our culture is... well, it's mythology, it's religion, it's families together, and it's movies. tell me about how you put
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a tour like this together. the last time you did this was over 12 years ago in the uk. how do you go about constructing what this production is going to look like? earlier, i used to do a tour like every year and a half, two years, and then i got tired of it. and then we just thought that, you know, just rebooting it a bit, just changing it a little bit, with a much better production value to it, we could once again come and do this. see, it's not about the money here, it's not about... it's about the interaction with the star and the fans. me, i like me, you like me. i like you that much and i come here and i perform here. this week, you were honoured at the house of commons as well. you were given a global diversity award. what does that mean to you? what does a global citizen award mean to you? it's an honour. i don't know if i deserve it or not, but they've given me that honour and i, you know,
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gladly accept it. i never thought that i would ever be in a position like this today. you know? i never thought that i deserved even my first big film. i don't know how long this is going to be there, but whenever it goes away, i hope it goes to somebody well deserving. with thousands expected to attend his concerts this weekend, it doesn't look like his fame is going away any time soon. haroon rashid, bbc news. well, let's find out how the weather is looking. chris has got the moves for us this lunch time, have you? hmmm... yes and it's showery as well. i won't do any dance moves mind you. you have to work harder to get me to do that. today is a showery day. the storm clouds on the horizon. there are the showers. some areas getting more than their fair share of showers. coming in across
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the eastern side of england, across east anglia into the east midlands now. widespread showers here. this area of showers thinning out a bit across wales and perhaps across south—west england over the coming hours. still heavy ones. thunder storms have brought flooding to jersey. we will see some sunshine, the best across wales and western england. later this afternoon, northern scotland joining in with sunnier skies. cloudy and wet for northern ireland. 0vernight, there will be some rain for wales and south—west england. generally, the weather becomes drier and it gets chilly. 0vernight lows 7 to 10 degrees in towns and cities. in the countryside all the way down to zero. a touch of frost for some. a chilly start then. fewer showers than today and more in the way of sunshine between any showers that do form. tomorrow should be mainly dry. hello. this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. the headlines atjust gone 2.30pm.
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police have arrested an 18—year—old man in the port area of dover in connection with yesterday's bombing on the london underground. detectives say the arrest is "significa nt". the uk terror threat remains at the highest level, meaning another attack could be imminent. one thousand armed police are patrolling nationwide. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has revived his pledge of billions of pounds in extra funding for the nhs, once britain leaves the eu. and the un security council calls a meeting to discuss the threat from north korea as its leader kim jong—un vows to match the military might of the united states.
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