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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 9, 2017 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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welcome to outside source. saudi arabia has told its citizens in lebanon to leave the country immediately, meanwhile, many lebanese feel their country is being dragged into a wider cold war between saudi arabia and iran. round six of "brexit" talks happened this week, with little progress having been made so far, we will speak with the bbc europe editor about what is the bbc europe editor about what is the main stumbling block. donald trump is in china, talking trade, definitely changed his tone from the campaign trail, compare this: we cannot continue to allow china to rape out cannot continue to allow china to rape our country, and that is what they are doing. with this, from today. who can blame a country for taking advantage of another country for the benefit of its own citizens, i give china great credit. because of the new saudi blockade, yemen is seeing the worst famine the country has seen for several decades. as
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usual, if you are watching, if you have questions, if you want to pick up have questions, if you want to pick up on have questions, if you want to pick upona have questions, if you want to pick up on a particular piece of news, then the hashtag is #os. yesterday on outside source we talked about the political crisis in lebanon, and the situation has escalated since then, we want to show you this story written by the saudi press agency, a source within the saudi ministry of foreign affairs has said, due to the situations in lebanon, saudi nationals visiting or residing are asked to leave the country as soon residing are asked to leave the country as soon as residing are asked to leave the country as soon as possible. exactly what situations it is referring to is not clear, but the political context is clear. at the weekend, lebanon's prime minister resigned,
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very few people saw that coming. on saturday, he had flown from lebanon to saudi arabia, summoned by the king, now, saudi arabia denies telling him to step down, not eve ryo ne telling him to step down, not everyone buys that. notjust the saudis ordering their citizens out of lebanon, here's the associated press telling us kuwait calls on its citizens to leave too following similar moves notjust by saudi arabia but by bahrain as well. a little earlier i spoke with our arabic affairs analyst, on why the saudis have this much influence over lebanese politics. a lot of sway with the president, going back to his father who was assassinated, he was known as mr lebanon, his business empire was built there, in saudi arabia. the wealth and the political influence to a large extent of the hariris is built in
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saudi arabia, he has not been able to step out from under the shadow of his father, or the sense that he is the tool in lebanon. saudi arabia has huge investments in lebanon, far beyond the hariris and a very strong connection as the leading nation of the sunni part of the muslim faith, that has a strong resonance in lebanon with the sunni littered the leaders, up against hezbollah, that is where the interest comes in. and when he made his speech, he had the strongest words for hezbollah in iran, saying they bring chaos and devastation wherever they can. that is the connection, but in terms of practicality of what is happening, do they have the ability to dictator
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who replaces mr hariri? hezbollah, which the saudis are against because of iranian influence, is probably the strongest force in lebanon, politically and militarily. the idea of moving hezbollah away from that position, essentially what the saudis want, go back to the time of graphic hariri, he challenged them at that time many could not get anywhere, that is 12 years ago and he ended up dead, and since then, hezbollah members have been accused of involvement in his murder. —— rafic hariri. we are talking about deep and dark waters and this is what the lebanese are most concerned about, that the saudis are stirring up about, that the saudis are stirring up something that the lebanese have tried to keep a lid on. they have been next to the syrian conflict, walking a tightrope there, hezbollah deeply involved, they feel grateful they have not been drawn deeply into that, they feel something like this could upset the balance and overturn them and they will lose the
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tightrope and down they plunge. saudi arabia in the news for a number of reasons, crown prince mohammed is at the heart of a number of stories. on saturday he began an anti—corruption purge in saudi arabia, we know that 200 people are being questioned, with the saudi attorney general saying that up to $100 billion may have been misused in various corrupt ways. the bbc understands those caught up in the anti—corruption understands those caught up in the anti—corru ption drive understands those caught up in the anti—corruption drive are being held at the 5—star ritz—carlton in riyadh, none of them have been named, we know that they are princes, ministers, influential businessmen. here is sebastien usher on that story. this is the crown prince, mohammad bin salman, his rise has been vertiginous, since his father took control, took power, and this move on saturday, we had the resident shin —— resignation of
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hariri, and then this round—up. the princes are best known, they ran the country for years, the businessmen who run the tv stations, who run the biggest businesses, they have been humiliated, if nothing else. today we heard from the saudis that more than 200 people have been called in for questioning, talking about at least $100 billion that has been involved in systematic corruption over the decades. most people would think that is an underestimate, even though it is an extraordinary amount of money, this is the way business was done through all these decades. the crown prince is trying to overturn that but in overturning that, it shakes the stability, not just of saudi arabia but of the region. he has the young people, they want this change, they believe it is necessary, the economy has been suffering with falling oil prices, something needed to be done. this may be pushing it too far. starting off in lebanon and saudi
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arabia, next, brussels. round six of the "brexit" talks are up round six of the "brexit" talks are up on us, you could make the case that these matter more than any of the previous five, if you have not read it, excellent article by the europe editor, about the particular pressures coming to bear in this round of talks. the emphasis given is on these core issues, the uk really wa nts is on these core issues, the uk really wants to start talks about a future trading relationship. the so—called divorce bill, frustration among "brexit" supporters. we wanted to know what we made of that particular point, here we are, in brussels. this comes down to the fact the two sides are even argue about whether to call these negotiating rounds or not or whether it is an exchange of a point of view. the uk wants for these
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meetings in brussels to be more flexible. discussing issues such as citizens rights, when they reach and impress, go back to london and say, what can the plan b, can we make improvement, can we change tack. the eu says, no, that is not possible, because for michel barnier, the lead eu negotiator, it is not how one capital city with him he has to refer to, he has 27 plus the european parliament as well, that is why the eu says it remains rigid in its call. the eu says, you guys said he wanted to leave the club, so you have to do that under our rules, and thatis have to do that under our rules, and that is where the apparent eu rigidity comes from. at the moment, it appears to be an impact. if the uk can move somehow, on the money issue, which is not, the eu says, a " b rex it" issue, which is not, the eu says, a "brexit" bill, but rather the uk honouring what has already been made, then there can be more trust.
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at the moment it is nonexistent, the eu says it would be flexible if the eu says it would be flexible if the eu says, we need to honour some of those commitments. we will say yes to that one, no to that one, we want wiggle room on that one, then it can negotiate but first it once written confirmation from the uk that it is willing to look at those financial commitments and that it promises to honour them. you were alluding to this instability within theresa may's government. how is all of this turmoil being perceived in brussels? watched very closely. going to background briefings with sources, they quote bits to me out of uk newspapers. watch closely with open mouths here in brussels but particularly closely because they reckon the upheaval in westminster means that it will have an impact on brexit negotiations and in the end, thatis brexit negotiations and in the end, that is what they care about, the eu wa nt that is what they care about, the eu want a deal, notjust the uk, the
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reason the eu is keen for a deal is because they want the money, because if the uk walks out now, without any deal on the table, that leaves a huge gaping hole on the eu's multinational budget, the eu unity, that it multinational budget, the eu unity, thatitis multinational budget, the eu unity, that it is so proud of, standing together in "brexit" negotiations, that will fall apart, when countries are pitted against each other, i am not paying any more, you promised me a bridge and restructuring projects... so that is why it is so important for the eu that a deal is done. that is the dance both sides are doing between not wanting a bad deal but wanting a deal, when you hear from the uk deal but wanting a deal, when you hearfrom the uk side, "no deal is better than a bad deal", that goes for the eu as well, they do not want a deal so much that they will compromise on the single market or that they will bend the rules they hold so dear, because in the end, it is what keeps them together. some sources quoting uk newspapers to
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her, i wonder if they quoted this article, in the times column the eu is preparing for the fall of theresa may before new year and a change of leadership or elections leading to a labour victory. needless to say, not eve ryo ne labour victory. needless to say, not everyone agrees with that particular analysis, here is what prominent brexiteer iain duncan smith makes of this kind of thing: i think it is a bit rich of them to speak about this... the dutch government, after months, onlyjust this... the dutch government, after months, only just managed this... the dutch government, after months, onlyjust managed to find its own feet, had not form a government. germany does not have an official government. chaos in italy, elections coming up, real problems overtheir elections coming up, real problems over their banks. theresa may is the one person who can actually still unite the cabinet and the party and while we are leaving the european union can make sure that the party stays at ease with her domestic agenda. that is what theresa may is trying to do, in part, by promoting today, penny mordaunt, to the newly vacant international development secretary role, member, priti patel resigned
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yesterday. she supported "brexit" in the referendum, this keeps the delicate balance in cabinet, that is the theory. iain watson, has she done well, keeping this delicate balance? certainly, a very vocal member of the vote leave campaign, in fact, member of the vote leave campaign, infact, claiming member of the vote leave campaign, in fact, claiming that britain could not veto turkey's access into the european union, that is somewhere off, and indeed, britain could indeed have vetoed it, she was in the news during the course of the referendum campaign for her views but he was also liked by those who campaigned strongly for britain to leave the european union, she has many years of campaign experience working for the conservative party in head office and hasjunior ministerial experience as well. i am not sure that we can entirely see her appointment because of a "brexit", theresa may would like to keep a gender balance in the cabinet, she has brought in another
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woman with ministerial experience and kind of knocking on the door of the top team in the first place, because there was speculation when michael fallon was defence secretary, just a week or so ago, penny mordaunt, with experience, as an services minister, coming from unarmed services background, reserve for the royal navy, may get promoted, that did not happen but it seemed perhaps not entirely logical that she would get elevated at some point. certainly people like iain duncan smith who campaigned strongly for leaving the european union will be pleased to see somebody with her robust views sitting around the cabinet table. don't go anywhere, i wa nt to cabinet table. don't go anywhere, i want to talk about pressure on another cabinet minister. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has not yet finished with those comments he made last week about a british iranian woman who is in prison in iranian woman who is in prison in iranfor iranian woman who is in prison in iran for allegedly trying to topple the government. these are the comments in question: look at what
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nazanin zaghari— ratcliffe was comments in question: look at what nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was doing, she was simply teaching people journalism, as i understand it. the foreign secretary saying that she was teaching people journalism, foreign secretary saying that she was teaching peoplejournalism, she has said she was not doing that, she was on holiday. this is a rainy state terror television with a report late last night, it has been reporting the comments of the foreign secretary and saying he unwittingly confirmed that in fact, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was in iran to train journalists. iranians elevation story is a pushback against all the negative publicity that iran has been getting over the incarceration of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the message to the public is basically tom that we
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told you so, that she is a spy, that the british foreign secretary said so, and said that in british parliament. story raises the stakes in terms of the importance of the story for iran and britain's relations. for the visiting the next few weeks to iran. an important problem that has to be resolved. but have this in mind, that the publicity, the gaffe, managed to generate, not only in the british media but also in the international media but also in the international media has helped to raise the profile of the story of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and her predicament in iran, and that might, in the end, actually help her. interesting point, some supporters
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say in the long run, this could help but there are concerns from critics that it may cause iran to increase the five year prison sentence she is already serving. as you may know, mr johnson appeared in parliament to explain himself, and also face some of his critics. kenny now give us an undertaking that in future he will concentrate on the very important matters he has within his brief as foreign secretary, to that end, could he give an undertaking to support the prime minister in her efforts, as in relation to the speech, for instance, and make sure his own ambitions are put secondary to the well—being of all my constituents and indeed everybody else in this country because that is hisjob! else in this country because that is his job! comments in the house of commons, back to you in westminster, in political terms, is borisjohnson out of the woods? i don't think he is out of the woods yet, but the
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reason that perhaps he has not been put out to new pastures is quite simply because theresa may cannot afford another high profile resignation at this stage. as already lost two cabinet ministers, two other ministers investigated, internal investigations, by the civil service, over allegations. two members of parliament, they have been reported to the police. over the sexual harassment scandal. for a government with such a narrow majority, dependent on the democratic unionists to prop it up, she does not want another high—profile departure at the moment, there is speculation she may have a more strategic reshuffle of her cabinet after the important budget towards the end of the month, possibly at that stage, possibly borisjohnson will get moved, if he does not, is planning to visit iran, planning to visit nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is —— himself, and his supporters would say, it is the reigning regime looking for
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propaganda, they are at full. not simply what boris johnson propaganda, they are at full. not simply what borisjohnson said to that committee of mps, whether or not she was training journalists, she was on holiday, but the iranians are looking for excuses to put her in prison, rather than is this being simply resolved, and the boris johnson gaffe. thank you very much. inafew minutes, we will talk about yemen, the un is now saying they could be facing the worst famine the world has seen for decades, echoes of a fresh blockade from saudi arabia. for the second time in a week, theresa may has been forced to replace a cabinet minister. penny mordaunt has replaced priti patel as the new international development secretary. priti patel resigned saying she had not been transparent enough about high—level meetings
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with israelis politicians while on holiday. penny mordaunt spoke with reporters after her appointment. holiday. penny mordaunt spoke with reporters after her appointmentlj am reporters after her appointment.” am delighted to have been appointed by the prime minister to be the new secretary of state at the department for international development, looking forward to working with the tea m looking forward to working with the team to continue building a safer, more secure, more prosperous world for us all. really giving the british public pride in what we do. are you going to protect britain? british public pride in what we do. are you going to protect britain7fi is my first day here, i am delighted to be here, i have already met some of the staff, we are doing terrific job, building a more safe, more secure, more prosperous world for us all. i want to continue doing that, and also give the british public confidence and pride in what we are doing. let's talk about day two of president trump's china visit, all
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getting very friendly, he called president xi a special man, this is the statement, —— state newspaper in china, talking about the cooperative spirit, probably worth reminding us, it is not always been so cordial between donald trump and the chinese. we have a lot of power with china, when china does not want to fix the problem in north korea, we say, sorry, folks, you got to fix the problem, because we cannot continue to allow china to rape our country, and that is what they are doing, it is the greatest test in the history of the world. that was last year, this is today: meeting this morning in front of your representatives and my representatives and my representative is, the was excellent. —— representatives. it was excellent. discussing north korea. i believe there is a solution to that, as you do, discussing trade
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with the united states. numbing that the united states really has to change its policies because they have got so far behind on trade with china. and frankly with many other countries. i have great respect for you for that because you are representing china. but it is too bad that past administrations allowed it to get so far out of kilter. but we will make it fair, and it will be mendis. my feeling towards you is an incredibly warm one, as we said. there is great chemistry. i think we are going to do tremendous things for both china and for the united states and it is and for the united states and it is a very great honour to be with you. you can see the chemistry in the eyes of presidentji jin as you can see the chemistry in the eyes of presidentjijin as he listens to donald trump and we have been watching that burgeoning romance from beijing. —— xi
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extraordinarily effusively with from the leader of the free world to the leader of the world's largest commonest party and authoritarian state. what is behind it? on one hand, donald trump comes here seeking action on north korea, which i suppose, you could say, then wea ke ns i suppose, you could say, then weakens his hand on demanding action simultaneously on trade. some are suggesting that maybe this is donald trump's softening china up, a sucker punch for much more trouble to come down the line. suggestions of trade action on products that china perceived to be dumping on the world markets. once the us administration has had time to do the necessary legwork. but whatever way you look at it, at the moment, despite all this extraordinarily positive language, donald trump has walked
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away with very little, no action on the real issues facing us businesses, trying to operate here in china, rampant copyright theft, enforced technology transfer, that kind of thing, he has come away empty—handed. critics will say donald trump is being played here, that this is the chinese doing what they do very well, using flattery to stroke his ego. and, you know, the results are there for everyone to see. lets look at these deals in more detail, plenty of them have been signed, estimated they could be worth up to $215 billion. lots of people, throwing in caveats, before we look at this figure and get carried away. melissa
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in new york, curious, in the american media, the more positive spin to the way these deals have turned out? certainly getting a lot of criticism, a lot of pushback, a lot of questions, in terms ofjust how much of this is in fact new investment and how much of this is actually etched in stone. a lot of these deals are really, there are no contracts involved, they are memorandas of understanding, it allows the chinese to walk away. what i think is interesting, if you look at the comment by the secretary of state, rex tillerson, even he admitted that these deals are indeed small. nonetheless, some might say, given the rhetoric we heard from donald trump, the first work to do
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is just to improve relations between him and his counterpart, he has definitely succeeded on that front. a language he was using certainly much more positive but i would maybe argue that some of the things he is actually saying has not changed all that much. we did hear him talking about china and how they were able to ta ke about china and how they were able to take advantage of the united states. pointing out the feelings of the united states and past administrations, rather than any full of china. thank you very much. that is it for this half hour of outside source, i will be back with you ina outside source, i will be back with you in a couple of minutes time, with more of the biggest stories from around the world. after what has been an exceptionally warm start to the autumn across the north united states and eastern
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canada, now looking at the first significant arctic chill in this pa rt significant arctic chill in this part of the world. you can see, significant deep blues pushing down into the great lakes and into the north—east as we head to the end of the week. those blue colours penetrating as far south as the mid—atlantic penetrating as far south as the mid—atla ntic states, temperatures five or 6 degrees for new york and dc. sub zero around the great lakes and into the chicago area and across the south—east. heavy rain moved through. looks like it'll be a cold, frosty start into the start of the week and across the north—east, maybe a little less cold, cloudy as we head into sunday and monday. into south asia, northern india, in particular parts of pakistan, smog problems persist because of light winds, area of high pressure, keeping the air trapped in, stagnant, building up here, hot and sunny as well, temperatures 30 to 3a degrees. officials are warning, this
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isa degrees. officials are warning, this is a dangerous smog likely to persist for the next few days. people advised to stay indoors if they can. school closures across delhi for the rest of the week. across southern india and towards sri lanka, monsoon rains, very heavy in the past week, causing flooding in chennai. to the bay of ben gordon, disorganised area, some signs of circulation, turning into a tropical storm as we head on into next week full of we will keep you posted. very heavy rain continues across the south—east of asia, thailand and into indonesia and mel asia, this area is a tropical depression, bringing extremely torrential downpours into parts of the central northern philippines. into the weekend, pushing into the south china sea, very heavy rain will impact north vietnam until next week. over into europe, another area
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of low pressure developing. the thing sirocco wind up from the sahara, perhaps poor air quality and lifted dust but thunderstorms will ra ke lifted dust but thunderstorms will rake out, and a cold air will push and we will keep you updated. close to home, little bit quieter, a run of north—westerly wind, plenty of sunshine around. heavy rain will push into the west. stay tuned for the uk weather forecast. hello, i'm ros atkins, welcome to outside source. saudi arabia is telling its citizens in lebanon on to leave the country immediately. many lebanese and now fearing they are being dragged into a wider cold war between saudi
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arabia and's. yemen is facing the worst famine that the world has seen for decades after a new saudi blockade was introduced. —— iran. another round of talks and there hasn't been much progress at so the pressure is ratcheting up. donald trump has been in china and talking trade. he has been lavishing praise on the chinese president, that he has come away from the chinese capital empty—handed. and we will turn to this in a moment, a well—known british big wave server has broken his back in portugal and he has been talking to the bbc. and you can get in touch on twitter. batted surfer. we have had the starkest of warnings
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from the un today. it says a new saudi blockade of yemen could create the worst famines in decades. this blockade was brought in because rebels in yemen fired a rocket towards the main airport in riyadh. the saudi say this new blockade is to stop weapons reaching rebels in yemen. iran denies sending arms to yemen. iran denies sending arms to yemen. we can be sure that millions of civilians are caught up in a humanitarian disaster. our bbc correspondent is from yemen and talk to us. we have been covering this story for nearly three years since the situation began and it gets worse and worse. already yemen's main port was barely able to be functioning. food, and aid was
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trickling in. we had other reports that in the south of the country held by the government was allowing in food held by the government was allowing infood aid held by the government was allowing in food aid and supplies. yemen replies on imports from 94% of its food, fuel and medicines and now none of that is coming in. in a country where 7 million people rely solely on this aid, it is terrifying what could happen in the next few weeks. the un is already saying that the supplies in the country now will run out in the next six weeks. so, it is getting worse. the blockade has only been in place for a few days, as it orally had an impact?‘ huge impact. overnight, from when it was announced, the price of fuel went up 60%. and when the price of fuel shoots up, the price of everything across the country shoots up. and in yemen, the whole population is already struggling to pay for food, to
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population is already struggling to pay forfood, to pay population is already struggling to pay for food, to pay for fuel and clea n pay for food, to pay for fuel and clean water. it is having a devastating effect already. everyday counts. everyday extra that the blockade is imposed on yemen is having catastrophic consequences on the ground. quite often when we talk to you it is about cholera. presumably, i was just mentioning the difficulty with bringing in certain treatments and that will also be impacted by this blockade? and using cholera as an example, and this is not the only example. the un is talking about measles and polio, but cholera especiallyjust two weeks ago ngos were announcing they can contain cholera at 900,000 cases. but today the un announced that chlorine tablets that chlorinated water to stop cholera from spreading had been blocked. this already is having an impact. there are villages across yemen who are in desperate need of these chlorine tablets to stop cholera spreading but they have in stock and
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are running out. much as we appreciate you being here, i'm sure you would it prefer to be in yemen but you cannot getting? the border is sealed with no aeroplanes able to get in. you cannot go by car or boat and there is no way of me getting in. but really it is the people inside who have no escape from this war. there is much more information on this conflict in yemen from the bbc news website. and on that website most read story in the moment is about one of britain's's best—known big wave surfers. he broke his back in a huge wipe—out. in portugal, it is known for its vast waves. some reach over 100 feet high. unfortunately andrew cotton, kerry is lying on his hospital bed. it did not go to plan this week. this is the video that everyone has been watching, let me play it for
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you. when it starts you get the scale of this wave, you cannot even see the bottom and there is the top. andrew cotton is moving across to his left, the problem starts when the lip of this wave starts crashing down before he has time to get beyond the lip of the wave and get along the barrel. he years and years in serious trouble he gets caught up in stock what you need to watch out for is andrew wright in the middle of the wave picked up and turned over, and as the video goes on you see him land in the water and it is that impact which broke his back. then he disappears from sight. if you know him, he is a cheerful guy evenin you know him, he is a cheerful guy even in difficult circumstances. he has been speaking to the bbc. this afternoon his boat was and described what had happened.
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this afternoon his boat was and described what had happenedm this afternoon his boat was and described what had happened. it was a different wave, it was a lot heavier and ifaded a different wave, it was a lot heavier and i faded a a different wave, it was a lot heavier and ifaded a bit deep a different wave, it was a lot heavier and i faded a bit deep and miss timed it. it is just one of those things, it could have been the best wave of my life or the worst wipe—out. unfortunately was the worst wipe—out. when this latest wipe—out comes three years after andrew was hit by another massive wave of the coast of portugal. he said he has not been put off and wa nts to said he has not been put off and wants to be back in the water as soon as possible. but with his wife and children back in devon letting? they are obviously concerned and that childrenjoke they are obviously concerned and that children joke about they are obviously concerned and that childrenjoke about it, that i have managed to make a career by falling off and they think it is hilarious. andrew might though his wife to a special vest he was wearing over his wet suit to protect him from impact. he hopes he will never get a soaking like this again.
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—— over his life. if you want to see that video you can find it online. this took about twitter, not about its new 280 character rule, but because it is dropping those politics. the ones that verify certain people's identities. this has been announced right in the middle of a controversy about this man. he is jason kessler, about this man. he is jason kessler, a white supremacist who was given a bluetit by twitter. you might remember during clashes in cha rlottesville in the remember during clashes in charlottesville in the summer, this was the guy that try to give a press conference and then was chased away by opposition protesters. let's bring in the technology correspondence of the bbc. these two stories directly connected?” correspondence of the bbc. these two stories directly connected? i think the main concern is that bluetit which has been a key feature of twitter for quite which has been a key feature of twitterfor quite some which has been a key feature of twitter for quite some time to make sure that people who say they are
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who they are. but because this is widened out its validation scheme, anyone can get a ticket if they confirm their identity. it has been seen to be an endorsement from twitter and confirm the views of the people. it twitter says this is not the case and its inter—confirms that this people is real. it is a acknowledge that they can see why people might be confused. until they figure that out they are going to suspend giving new ones out to general users. it is not a huge change but twitter is just taking a bit more time to be careful about who gets that on their platform and who gets that on their platform and who doesn't. i thought the whole idea was that if i wanted to pretend
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i was you and say lots of things that you wouldn't want said in your name, this would clear up whether it was me pretending to be you actually you? and that is still the intention. it is not going away as such, but they are temporarily halting the process of giving out new ones until they work out a manner in which they can show that people are authentic but it does not look like twitter is saying that they agree with what people are saying. it is nice and blue, it sits next to people and says yes this is goodin next to people and says yes this is good ina next to people and says yes this is good in a way. i think people would change the design to say this is authentic but we don't necessarily agree with what is being said. authentic but we don't necessarily agree with what is being saidm you follow him on twitter you will find one by his name! if you want more on the stories we are covering you can get them on our website. to a fascinating story that has come out today about researchers who has found that wins that are sustained
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in the daytime he'll faster than wins sustained at night. the full study has been published online the details how a tiny body clock in every cell helps the healing process. that is far as i am taking it, i will let james process. that is far as i am taking it, i will letjames to pick up the story. it allows... one of the things scientists have discovered that the ability of skin to heal wounds fluctuates in the 24—hour pattern and it is easier to heal wounds ended a time rather than not. our skeleton gives a structure and helped us move around. each back individual skills as a site smacks skeleton. it becomes more mobile during the day, if you have a wounds, and you need cells to flood into it and fill that gap. because
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they are more mobile during the day they are more mobile during the day they are more able to seal the wounds. you do not choose when you need a emergency caesarean section. can you take advantage of this in the middle of the night? there are some steroids that help reset the body clock. if you rub it into your skin it would change the clock inside of those cells. the idea is that maybe you can rub in some steroid before doing the operation. that still needs to be tested but is one way you can take advantage of this. we are finishing early because next on the bbc news channel, the former prime minister gordon brown has been warning that the uk may hit a crisis point by next summer as brexit edges closer. he is also saying that he is now in favour of a second referendum on the issue. he is in and extended escutcheon with the bbc political editor. are writing a book about tax havens and how in 2009 we try to bring all
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these tax havens into line, to name and shame, to say they are noncompliant and amount immediate action. it has been far too slow, there are tax havens around the need to be brought in. you need sanctions, you say he will be outside the international community if you don't act. they could be arrest wa rra nts if you don't act. they could be arrest warrants for people to are the institutions and the government is taking action. you must clamp down on this. we have had revelations of the number and scale of abuse. i think it is $7 trillion thatis of abuse. i think it is $7 trillion that is now outside the scope of tax authorities. that means that if we could take action in britain today, philip hammond in his budget could do two things that need to be done. he can reverse the universal credit cuts and have justice for people on benefits. he could also refinance the nhs which needs 20 billion by 20 22. there is enough money locked away in tax havens to be brought back to this country and it is time we got the international community
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working together to achieve it. we had it in 2009, the unity then dissipated. america has not played ball be honest. it is time that some countries like britain put pressure on other international community members to take action now. this is the moment of opportunity. many people would say that a lot of the scheme is now an operation, a lot of them began in the era when you were one of the most powerful economic ministers in the world. you were the chancellor for many years during a period when the sort of behaviour prospered. i did 11 budgets from 1997, and everyone we had action against tax abuses like this and we we re against tax abuses like this and we were trying to close loopholes. but you have to have cooperation from other countries. you cannot close down a tax haven in some sort of far—away place unless you have cooperation from all the other countries. our first battle was with europe. luxembourg and austria were tax havens and we had to bring them into line. once we had done that
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which i was part of, we had to get america and others on board. now with america demanding tax information from other countries but not giving it itself. that reciprocity has to happen, otherwise there is a dent in the armoury we have to tackle tax. it was the biggest issue at the g20 in 2009. residents were threatening to walk out. the chinese government would never allow account to be named as a tax haven and noncompliant. we got an agreement then and which it is possible to do it now. i would spend a lot of time now if people asked me to try and bring countries together so we could actually enforce the agreements we have made. instead of signing documents and never implementing them we actually got action. the benefit of money for the nhs or public services... any fairness. people in britain are paying taxes and then may find other people who are richer than they are not paying taxes at all and this is
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a problem not of individuals, but a problem of institutions, accountants and governments who felt to take action. are you suggesting yourself as some international tax is our? i'm watching this position today i believe there will be a million signature within hours. i believe the argentinian presidency should ta ke the argentinian presidency should take this up. i don't think that once we have seen this evidence, because right to the top in many countries. i think one third of leaders were named in the panama papers. we did not see this evidence when i was in government. you can't beat this underdressed. i come back to the fact that it is money for the nhs and to deal with universal credit. it is money to deal with the problems of housing in our country. it is being denied to is because a few people are being allowed through institutional devices and a ccou nta nts institutional devices and accou nta nts to institutional devices and accountants to put their money somewhere russ and it is not fair. you talk of international cooperation and when you were
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chancellor you crack down on luxembourg and belgium. you were very vocaljoined luxembourg and belgium. you were very vocal joined the luxembourg and belgium. you were very vocaljoined the referendum campaign. i knew convinced that brexit will actually happen?” campaign. i knew convinced that brexit will actually happen? i think what will happen is that we will come to a crisis point next summer. i can't tell you exactly how it will work itself out but this is what will happen. by next summer, the public will have made up their mind that the four red line is that the government had set in place are not going to be achieved. we will not have proper control the borders. we will not have proper control of our money. we are still paying loads of money. we are still paying loads of money to the eu. we will not have proper control of our courts and law because we will still be governed in many ways by the ecj and we won't have proper control of trade because we won't have individual trade agreements. all the propositions that were made by the leave camp, including remember that 350 million weeks of the nhs, they are not being achieved. next summer, we have to
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assess the position. in my view you cannot go back to the electorate and say you were wrong. you can't do that. people have made the decision and it is right to see that respect. ina and it is right to see that respect. in a democracy, once a decision has been made, and it was made in scotland, you have to respect it in each area it is made. but what you can say, is that is their a—game changer? was there something we didn't get right the last time that would persuade millions of leave voters to think it is worth going for remain? and that game changer must have the support of the rest of europe because we can get it through otherwise. i would like to see a situation at the end of negotiations that says that is what you get when you leave. but is there something else that is a game changer that you get if you are prepared to stay? you cannot do this until next summer and not without a great deal of work. you would have to say selling about migration, about the courts, about money. but i think that is the point that the nation should be given new information about what is possible. i'm not advocating a referendum at
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this stage. i am not advocating a change of position in that respect. what i am saying is, let us look at the facts next summer when we know the facts next summer when we know the promises that were made by the leave campaign will not have been achieved. but you are suggesting there is another opportunity? they can only be done if there is new evidence and new information that we can bring to bear to the public. for example, in switzerland at the moment they have made an agreement with the eu, under freedom of movement. jobs are registered atjob centres with local people. there is an agreement that people who don't get a job an agreement that people who don't getajob in an agreement that people who don't get a job in switzerland, they cannot stay forever as eu citizens. belgium have been engaged in new agreement about freedom of movement. france is talking about as they call, social dumping of workers. there is a lot that is happening the eu that... the problem is that david
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cameron came back with a really negotiation and nobody remembers a thing about it. mrs thatcher, to her credit, went back to brussels and everybody knew she had won a budget addition and she got extra money. even harold wilson in 1975 came back and had someone to say about new zealand butter and everything else. we have nothing to say in the referendum that was of benefit to renegotiation and nobody remembers a word of it. there are things in changing in europe to look at. to be clear, you are suggesting that the labour party should be holding out the possibility of people revisiting the possibility of people revisiting the decision if things change in the eu. i do think at this point you should have another referendum. but that possibility should be on the table? what i think you should be saying is, is then you evidence or a game changer or something that is different from what we have learned about what is happening in europe, all what is happening in britain that we have to look at. and the right time to assess that is when we
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have on the table what we think will be an inadequate achievement that bridges the red lines and does not give the leave campaign the satisfaction that it had of all these games from leaving europe. do you think the labour party should argue that now? -- gains. let me put it the other way. i think you will find the next summer that kier starmer and jeremy corbyn are exactly starmer and jeremy corbyn are exa ctly o n starmer and jeremy corbyn are exactly on the same page with what i am saying. if the agreement is u nsatisfa ctory am saying. if the agreement is unsatisfactory and if there is, this is the challenge of people like me and others, that digitally people in the house of commons. if they can show that there is a game changing moment where you can say to the leave voters this is what you were told then, and it was actually the politics of fear them to be honest. this is the positive thing we could get out of europe now, there may be scope for a reassessment. i would not put it higher than that and say it is in every double of another
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referendum and tell people... that they were wrong and you were right. some sort of false consciousness. people voted for very real reasons. they were dissatisfied with global institutions. i think that has to be respected. but there are things that are changing and changing within europe and could change within britain that could make a reassessment possible. but to many leave voters, does that not still sound that you're sticking your things in yourears? sound that you're sticking your things in your ears? i don't think so. when i look at the evidence, i look at people who were worried about migration. but there were worried about a something for nothing culture. they felt people came to the country, when using the services of this country and not giving enough in return. it was not that they were against people filling jobs that other people didn't want to fill. it felt like they were getting something for nothing. he said the referendum use the politics of fear. you would a prime minister to first used the phrase britishjobs of prime minister to first used the phrase british jobs of british workers. but i used it in the
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context of the training british workers for the challenge of globalisation. if you look at the context in which i spoke, i was talking about how we had to retrain british people for the jobs available. when people complained that others were taking the jobs. i said let's retrain british people. that is a different thing. i went to david cameron before the referendum and said, set up the fund for the impact that the challenges that unions these are facing as a result of high migration. and show we are taking action to help those people who are worried about theirjobs or worried that people are getting something for nothing. we did not do that. there was no initiatives such as an immigration action fund. that should have been done and a lot of people argued later that that was a big mistake. there are things that can be done. let's be realistic. the people had voted. the result has to be accepted. it is only if there is a game changer, something new, that i then think you could go to the
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people and say look, do you want to reassess that? i'm not even saying at this stage it could have a referendum. you say that on the eu kier starmer and jeremy corbyn will come around to your way of thinking. notjust as a former leader, but as a student of labour party history, you look at the labour party now and think they are ready for government? jeremy corbyn is a nominal. we have to a cce pt jeremy corbyn is a nominal. we have to accept that, he disagreed with me on many issues. he probably voted against me 500 times! i respect the fa ct against me 500 times! i respect the fact that he is a phenomenal. he is expressing peoples anger about universal credit about what happened at grenfell tower, about affordable housing, about inequality in our country, about tuition fees. he is articulating that anger. i know from my experience, and tony blair will tell you as well, you go back to first principles in opposition and look at whether you have your principles right. then you have a plan about a programme in government. then you have to go out
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and win public support. jeremy corbyn has got potentially, five yea rs into corbyn has got potentially, five years into the general election. he builds from his principles into a plan and into a popular programme that he then wins public support. that is his challenge. to be honest, i'm thinking myself more about what happens in the long—term future. i have no special insight into what is happening today in westminster. but in the long—term it is clear to me that the old neoliberal consensus, which was basically inequality is good for growth, you never have deficit financing because that is building up unacceptable debt, that is all gone. it is completely discredited. it took ten years from the financial recession for it to be discredited. i could not win the argument for stimulus for the economy in 2010. people were worried about debt and deficits and thought it was the equivalent of incest. i could not win the argument with the people and i regret that because we then had seven years of wasted austerities and this is a lost game.
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people have now come both internationally and in britain to the view that the right form of economic policy is when you combine social justice, economic policy is when you combine socialjustice, economic efficiency and environmental sustainability and there is a new wave of support for collective action in this country. hello. if you have been with me this week we know that we have got through this week with fair amount of certainty, the forecast worked out well. it is the latter part of next week that has caused us a little bit of concern about exactly what will happen. i had two scenarios. we will look at them in a second. in the shorter term, there isa second. in the shorter term, there is a deal of certainty because we have had mild air across many parts, particularly in the south. but by the weekend it and much colder from
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the weekend it and much colder from the north. eventually collects into the north. eventually collects into the south. let's see how we get there. friday start sunny, sunny spells and showers for many parts. some arejust spells and showers for many parts. some are just running out of liverpool into the north midlands. the top temperature is not bad. more cloud and rain getting into the far west to finish of the day. into the weekend, sunshine and showers. it turns much colder. let's see how we get there. i was mentioning that ran across northern ireland which eventually becomes quite a player for the far south of scotland. this is relatively moist and mild air from the tropics. let's hope it kids the template is up in the south, that in the north you are a good deal fresher. the first signed of that air looking within ten north of scotland. let's get ourselves through our saturday. it eventually
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begins for the club to break, in the south—west in court. those temperatures are very diverse. much cooler and fresher and then on to remembrance sunday and we really open the doors. the mild and is not a way into france and we end up with a way into france and we end up with a mixture of sunny spells from many down the spine of the british isles, the showers largely confined to the coast. and the temperatures are not better than ten. it will be a chilly start to monday. high—pressure is trying to dominate. it certainly will do in the south. but these frontal systems knockaert flat across the northern half of britain. some cloud wind and rain from the north of scotland. maybe the far north—west of wales later in the day. once we have put that high—pressure that little bit further south, it really does open the door to relatively mild air to come in from the atlantic. but, the
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price we pay for that increase in temperature is the loss of sunshine and the chance of rain across many parts of the british isles as we get on through tuesday. tuesday into wednesday, we get this daisy chain of weather fronts in the atlantic. the high—pressure is trying to hold on and it is what happens at this point that is the matter of conjecture. two scenarios. neither the high stays away towards the south, allowing the low pressure to get into the northern half. with wet and windy conditions. all the high—pressure becomes much more of a player for high—pressure becomes much more of a playerfor more of high—pressure becomes much more of a player for more of the british isles and forces the low pressure much closer to iceland giving a much more settled and to the forthcoming week. there is a great deal of uncertainty. i suspect there will be more rain in the north and more settled conditions in the south. goodbye. tonight at ten — the second cabinet reshuffle in the space of a week, this time to appoint a new secretary for international development.
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penny mordaunt is promoted to the cabinet. she's a strong supporter of brexit — and has been tipped for promotion for some time. i'm looking forward to working with the team here to continue building a safer, more secure, more prosperous world for us all, and really giving the british public pride in what we do. she replaces priti patel, who resigned last night after admitting a series of unauthorised meetings with senior israelis. and the appointment of another prominent brexit campaigner maintains the balance in cabinet between leavers and remainers. we'll have more details, as the latest brexit negotiations get under way in brussels. also tonight. following the death of the welsh labour politician carl sargeant, the first minister defends his own handling
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