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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  November 10, 2017 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello, it's friday, it's 9am. welcome to the programme. march 29th at "pm, 2019 — that's the date that will fixed in law for britain to leave the eu as theresa may warns potential conservative rebels not to try and block the process. forced out of his dream job as a police officerfor being asian — we talk to mark dias about his pursuit ofjustice at the hands of cleveland police, where he says he was systematically bullied and spied on. he has now been awarded half—a—million pounds in compensation. asian officers would be subjected to fabricated internal investigations, conduct investigations and criminal investigation by the professional standards department. we will get the full story later in the programme. women may only need to have three smear tests in their lifetime if they have had a vaccine against a virus called hpv, which can cause the disease. at the moment women are offered 12 tests — we will talk to a mum who has had
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cervical cancer about how it was discovered. hello, welcome to the programme — we're live until ”am this morning. lots to talk about today. you can get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... theresa may has warned pro—eu conservatives that she will not tolerate any attempts to block the brexit process. in a sign of her intent, she's outlined plans to enshrine in law the exact moment that britain will leave the european union — 11pm on 29th march, 2019. but the man responsible for writing the article 50 withdrawal process — cross—bench peer lord john kerr — says brexit could still be reversed. our political correspondent
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emma vardy is in westminster. what has prompted the pledge from the prime minister? call it theatrics, called it symbolic, this is theresa may publicly underlining her commitment to brexit. her message is, we won't go against the democratic will of the british people. listen to what she says in her article in the telegraph today. she says, let no one doubt our determination or question our resolve. brexit is happening. she says, we will not tolerate attempts from any quarter to use the process of amendments to the eu withdrawal bill as a mechanism to try to block the democratic process. the eu withdrawal bill comes back to the commons to be debated by mps next week so it is no coincidence fi.,,, lord coe, the man who knows the nuts and of this
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and bolts of this clause. lord coe, the author of article 50, is expected to say more today. we could change our minds at any stage according to an article that lord kerr has made for some time. later on today he will say the country still has a free choice about whether to proceed. people are still entitled to take a different view. will his intervention make any difference? he knows the score is better than anyone so he will add weight to arguments from remainers
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who say we should leave the door open to a second referendum to see if we want to go ahead with brexit at all. on the other hand, for those people that voted to leave, this has provoked outrage for some today. when you make interventions like this, you run the risk that people will say, you are just trying to go against the referendum result and backslide on the democratic result of the referendum as originally delivered by voters. emma, thank you very much indeed. rachel is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. donald trump has told asia and pacific leaders he will no longer tolerate what he has called chronic trade abuses. co—operation summit. during a hard—hitting speech, he said america was prepared to work with countries in the region, provided they abide by what he called "fair
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and reciprocal trade". from this day forward, we will compete on a fair and equal basis. we are not going to let the united states be taken advantage of any more. i am always going to put america first, the same way i expect all of you in this room to put your country first. a new study is recommending a major change in the way women are screened for cervical cancer. it suggests those who've been vaccinated against the hpv virus need only have three smear tests during their life, rather than the 12 currently offered. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. cervical cancer is a dangerous disease. it's also one of the most preventable cancers, but there's been concern about a steady drop in the number of women going for screening in the past few years. currently, women aged 25 to 49
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are offered smear tests every four —— every three years and then every five years from the age of 50 to 64, but for almost a decade girls aged ii to 13 have been given a vaccine against the cancer—causing virus hpv. today's study published in the internationaljournal of cancer says the vaccine reduces the chance of cancer by 70% and women who have had it only need to undergo three smear tests during their lives, instead of the normal 12, at the age of 30, a0 and 55. all cervical cancers are linked to hpv infection and having the vaccination dramatically reduces the chances of having the infection and also having cervical cancer. screening looks for early changes that could suggest cancer is developing and quite simply having the vaccine means you are less likely to have those changes and less likely to develop cancer, so you don't need screening quite so often. the study comes ahead of changes being planned to the screening programme
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in england for 2019 and similar adjustment in scotland and wales. new, more advanced lab testing is expected to be introduced, which could mean fewer smear tests for all women, whether vaccinated or not. facebook‘s founding president has said he's worried about the effect the site is having on society. sean parker, who says he no longer uses social media, said the network was built on "exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology", and he was concerned about what it was "doing to children's brains". the actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actor portia de rossi, who is married to the us talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her "how important it was to have chemistry off—screen" before unzipping his trousers. mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc that the actor had no comment. universities are to be warned not
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to use misleading language or claims as they try to attract students. with hundreds of thousands of young people in the process of applying for courses, the bbc understands the advertising watchdog is to tell universities next week that they need to prove the accuracy of wording used in their marketing material. the french president emmanuel macron is making an unscheduled visit to saudi arabia to discuss the crisis in lebanon after the prime minister, saad hariri, resigned on saturday. lebanon risks being the battleground in the fight between the saudis and iran for regional supremacy. saudi arabia has told its citizens to leave lebanon immediately and not to travel there from any country. uber is due to find out the outcome of its appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of its drivers. two drivers won a landmark case against the cab—hiring app last year after arguing they were employees and entitled to the minimum wage, sick pay and paid holiday. uber challenged the ruling,
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saying it could deprive drivers of the "personal flexibility they value". more than half of schools in england fail to offer computer science gcse, according to a new report by the uk's leading science academy. the royal society is calling for a ten—fold increase in funding for computing education, which it says is patchy and fragile. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. what effect does a binary shift left and a binary shift right have? in a classroom in saint albans, some budding young computer scientists are deep in their gcse course.
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this school is in a minority. today's report says computer education is fragile and patchy, with too few pupils given the chance to enter the exam. what's more, the subject is being largely avoided by girls. so what has made these students take it up? our future is very much based around computers and technology is becoming a big part of society. i knew that it would be useful to have, and i could get a job easily. maybe in other schools it might be viewed as slightly nerdy to do computer science, but i think it is quite respected at this school. the royal society's report says too many young people are missing out on vital digital skills. 54% of english schools do not offer computer science as a gcse. schools need 3500 more computing teachers. only one in five computer science entrants are female. both the teachers in this class have degrees in computer science, which makes them unusual. the royal society wants a big increase in spending on training new teachers. the computing industry says digital skills are vital for the uk's future. if we want to remain
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a developed nation, a nation that is innovative, that provides products and services to drive us forward in the 21st century, we need people with advanced digital skills, in all industries and all sectors. the department for education says it wants to ensure the future workforce has the skills the uk needs. this report says that, without more computing teachers, that won't happen. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text us, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now with damian johnson. controversy in belfast last night, northern ireland lost that all—important night, northern ireland lost that all—importa nt world night, northern ireland lost that all—important world cup play—off match? that is right, controversial and disappointing for northern ireland, looking to reach the world cup for the first time since 1986, playing against switzerland, the favourites to go through after a 1—0 victories
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because the referee awarded a penalty for handball by northern ireland's coria them. most people we re ireland's coria them. most people were convinced it struck him on the back or at best the shoulder but the referee believed otherwise. ricardo rodriguez scored from the spot cue angry protests from the northern ireland players and supporters. there's been outrage on social media. bbc 5live presenter colin murray said the penalty decision was like refereeing from the dark ages. the northern ireland manager was left furious. it is staggering in this day and age when the stakes are so high at this level of the game that something like that, it's obviously a gamechanger, but dwelling on it isn't going to help us. whether it is the worst, whatever it is, whatever label you want to put on it is irrelevant. the most important thing is that we use it in the right way and overcome it, we channel it into the game on sunday night. they will play their second leg on sunday. not only england will be wearing poppies when they take on germany at wembley tonight? both sets of players
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will wear black armbands with poppies in remembrance of fallen servicemen and women. fifa had previoiusly banned sporting them and the home nations were fined for doing so in november last year. fifa's argument had been that it was a political gesture but have now changed the rules and allowed the wearing of poppies if both teams are in agreement. they will also be using video assistant referee technology. this is technology to help the referee review incidents like goals, red cards, penalties. it could have helped northern ireland last night. just finally from me, the women's ashes test is finely balanced in sydney. the australians are batting in theirfirst innings. andy swiss is in sydney for us. what's the latest, andy? after a frustrating first day, england are fighting back, australia 108-4 in england are fighting back, australia 108—4 in reply to england's first innings, they resumed the day on 235seven, hoping to put on towards 300, they did not quite get there despite an entertaining camier from anya shrubsole. despite an entertaining camier from
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anya shru bsole. australia's despite an entertaining camier from anya shrubsole. australia's batters looked comfortable, 48 without loss but finally an england breakthrough, laura marsh taking the wicket of nicole bolton 428 but no doubting the star of the show for england, 18 year soviet kljestan making her test debut, two wickets for her, beth mooney caught by nats giver, then alex blackwell trapped lbw, said two wickets for sophie ecclestone, just 18 years old, on her test debut. her pa rents a re 18 years old, on her test debut. her parents are here watching her, how proud must they be? a fourth wicket for england in the last few wickets, a brilliant catch by wicketkeeper sarah taylor. the floodlights are on, england struggled under them last night. how will australia fair in the next hour and a half or so? it could be pivotal. andy swiss, how sports correspondent in sydney, thank you. that is all the sport for 110w. thank you. that is all the sport for now. damian, thank you. it's been another fractious week in politics,
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with a second resignation at the top of theresa may's government, and questions about her future looming large. as brexit talks in brussels resume today, the prime minister has said she will not stand for any attempt by pro—remain mps to try and block the brexit process and has announced that the date that britain will leave the eu — march 29th, 2019, at 11pm — will be written into law. with me in the studio is conservative party activist binita mehta—parmar, and down the line from wakefield, samantha harvey. alsojoining us down the line from his home in banbury is the former deputy prime minister lord heseltine. lord heseltine first, from a strong and stable leadership to a cabinet in chaos, how much authority does theresa may have at this moment in time? she has the authority that rests on the fact the party can't agree about her successor. it's
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widely assumed will not fight the next election as leader of the tory party. there is a current vacuum and people are hoping somebody will emerge. it's a very fragile situation, extremely damaging to our ability to negotiate with the europeans. and it does not do us any good on the international stage, but the consequence of two things. first of all the election result, and second the cloud of brexit. some eu leaders think she might not last until christmas. do you agree? no, i don't think her departure is imminent. but you can see in your introduction the scale of the anxiety. there is a panic around the
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legislation, enshrining in law the precise time we will leave the european union. it injects uncertainty at exactly the wrong moment. what is of growing concern is that to give time for brexit to work, and fixing in law the date, will merely accelerate people's decision to take investment elsewhere and not to make investment here. frankly, it's a panic measure reflecting the growing anxiety that hostility to brexit is growing, and in order to make sure that public opinion doesn't get the chance to exert itself, they have now shoved in this time amendment. it wasn't in the original bill. so it isn't essential, . .. isn't it
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the original bill. so it isn't essential,... isn't it essential when their voices like yourself, do you still think brexit should be avoided? 0h, you still think brexit should be avoided? oh, yes, it's the biggest disaster in peace time in my lifetime. it is reducing the status of this country in a way which... how helpful is that for theresa may and the conservative party and the government? if you are already talking about a government and leadership in chaos, and a sense of panic, surely that's unhelpful. well, it is unhelpful, but that's the situation we are in. there is a problem, and i will accept your point that we could all be very quiet and pretend all is well. but we will not fool anybody. europeans are very sophisticated people and know exactly what's going on here. they read our newspapers and have ambassadors. for the british people to not know the scale of the debate that's going on and the anxieties that's going on and the anxieties that are now rife through industry,
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would be a disservice. this is a democracy and people are entitled to hear the arguments on both sides. one of the noxious features of this date being inserted into the legislation is that it is being done so legislation is that it is being done so there is a fixed a moment before people fully understand the nature of the deal that's on offer, and before people see the consequences. in other words, it's trying to choke off the democratic process. this is not exactly the sort of sovereignty we we re not exactly the sort of sovereignty we were told we would regain. or upholding a decision that was made democratically. bringing in samantha at this point. what's your response to what you have heard so far?|j have to say that i totally disagree with lord heseltine's comments earlier on. first of all, theresa may's position is strong at the moment. we at the grassroots of the
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conservative party do support her andl conservative party do support her and i think she's doing a good job to negotiate the best deal for the british people. lord heseltine has mentioned about democracy and the democratic process. we have gone through that last year. we are leaving the eu and we are going to be able to leave the eu on the 29th of march, 2019, at 11am. going back over the same debate will not help us. over the same debate will not help us. are you happy with that, no matter what the terms are, deal or no deal, we don't know what the divorce bill will be, trade deals, how it will affect our lives. it's not going to help us if lord heseltine pontificates the party in the sense that he is not helping the cause, and we should rally behind the prime minister at this stage to
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make sure we have the upper hand over eu counterparts. why don't we have that unanimous support for the prime minister? the cabinet reshuffle is not something she has planned. it has nothing to do with the prime minister's leadership. her leadership can only be judged when the time comes, when the brexit deal is on the table for the british people. do you agree with that point? we need to back theresa may and she is in a strong position? we are only five months into this government, so are only five months into this government, so we are only five months into this government, so we need to give the government, so we need to give the government time to get on with the job. it has been a busy week in politics this week. it's been an exceptional week in politics, two cabinet ministers quitting. exceptional week in politics, two cabinet ministers quittingm exceptional week in politics, two cabinet ministers quitting. it is an exceptional week, it's not a normal one. but we need to give the government space to get on with their work and do theirjob. brexit isa their work and do theirjob. brexit is a decision not made long ago. we have had a general election since.
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although it was a hung parliament, the conservative party did win the most seats. we know there have been two elections, i don't think anybody wants any more and we need to get on with the job. you talk about getting on with thejob with the job. you talk about getting on with the job but the perception outside the uk, to people in europe and the and european leaders, is that there is chaos at the moment. and the and european leaders, is that there is chaos at the momentlj think that there is chaos at the moment.” think that's unfair. there isn't a crisis. they were two different issues that cause the resignations of those cabinet ministers. in this day and age we hold cabinet ministers and politicians in general toa ministers and politicians in general to a very high standards, which is right, and we should do that, as we do with many people in the public sphere. it's right we took those steps. it wasn't under anybody's control as such. theresa may has made changes today. there was a piece in the telegraph this morning to make progress on the biggest issue of our generation, brexit, and
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we need to get on with it. you say it's unfair that eu leaders speculate theresa may might not be in power by christmas.” speculate theresa may might not be in power by christmas. i think speculation is not necessary and is not helpful. people were speculating remain would win. people were speculating jeremy corbyn would be annihilated. i suspect those people are the same who are predicting the demise of theresa may and it's not helpful. you are saying that despite voting to remain but you back the brexit process. i was part of the 48%, but equally there was a 52%. it was a big referendum, it was not quite. we have had a general election since. i was on the losing side of the eu referendum, but let's get on with it. we need to make sure britain, our amazing country, get on with it. we need to make sure britain, ouramazing country, has the best chance of success possible, and the way to do that is to stop distractions and get on with the job at hand. the government isn'tjust the government of brexit, it's a
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government of britain, and their domestic issues we need to tackle as well and i want the government to have space to do that. lord heseltine, what should theresa may do next? she has already made it clear what she's going to do. what do you think she should do to improve the position of the conservative party at the moment? the dilemma is the tory party is split from top to bottom. as are all the other parties. as long as that remains, this indecision and indecisiveness and uncertainty will hang as a cloud over the body politics. i have to be frank, i don't see an easy solution to this. i will tell you what i think will happen, which is not something theresa may would like, but i think public opinion is shifting. looking at the latest polling, there is already a bigger majority against brexit than the one they achieved in
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the referendum. that's going to get worse. the labour party will shift as public opinion shifts, and the tory party will be left holding the baby. where i disagree with your two very articulate ladies, is that they seem very articulate ladies, is that they seem to be prepared to accept any deal, any deal, no matter how bad, under the name of brexit. i personally am totally opposed to that. i think the whole status of this country will be diminished. i think investment will decline. i think investment will decline. i think young people will feel deceived, they feel betrayed by the older generation of brexiteers. they know that the way the world is today, britain has to use its influence in big combinations. and europe is the inevitable and only serious option for us. samantha, how does the conservative party go about engaging with younger voters,
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especially, many of whom voted to remain? we actually think in the north we have a lot of different issues. this election injune just gone, that didn't do as much favour as we would like as a conservative, because we have not engaged younger voters. that's the reason why we need to work very hard from a different level of education and to make sure we engage younger voters from the very beginning. we gave them a strong conservative conviction, conservative values from a young age. i also really feel that lord heseltine is wrong to say we don't have an understanding, we split across the party over brexit. that isn't the case at all. in the grass roots in the north, people like and still respect theresa may because she's the prime minister on the country. she can only be judged
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at any point on the deal is put on the table. locally, in the north, we have a lot of issues. conservative parties have scrapped the house letting fees and we are doing as much as we can for the energy bill to be capped. we care for the people in the north, and their likelihood, as well as the brexit deal. in my city of wakefield we are not allowed to have a stadium of our own for the super league rugby club, which is what the council has promised us over and over. these are the issues, together with brexit, brexit isn't the only issue we are facing in the north. another important word, other than brexit, budget. we have a situation where philip hammond will make the case on wednesday. hopefully we will see more budget towards house—building. sajid javid has called for that recently forced up has called for that recently forced up as has called for that recently forced upasa has called for that recently forced
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up as a young person myself, i am 27, andl up as a young person myself, i am 27, and i am acutely aware we did not win the young vote in june's election. i think we need to have a mass recalibration of conservative values. we need to make the case for oui’ values. we need to make the case for our party. the broadchurch that it is, which has activists like us, and historical figures and amazing politicians within it, from the backbenches to ministerial ranks, heidi alan, lord heseltine, lots of diverse voices within the conservative party. i would like to see a conservative party. i would like to see a good vision for our country beyond brexit put forward with the budget in place. when it comes to house—building, it's such an important point for young people like myself. we want to see a calling and support for businesses, especially beyond brexit. there are a lot of different issues the government is grappling with and we need to give them the space to get on with it. we will leave it there.
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still to come... is this the end of regular cervical screens? according to a new study women may only need three in a lifetime if they have been given the hpv vaccine. we'll be discussing this research. and two more high profile men have been accused of sexual abuse. we'll get the latest from hollywood. time for the latest news — here's rachel. the headlines from bbc news... theresa may has warned pro—eu conservatives that she will not tolerate any attempts to block the brexit process. in a sign of her intent, she's outlined plans to enshrine in law the exact moment that britain will leave the european union — 11pm on 29th march, 2019. but the man responsible for writing the article 50 withdrawal process, cross—bench peer lord john kerr, says brexit could still be reversed. a new study is recommending that women who have had the hpv vaccine only need to have three smear tests during their life, rather than the 12 they're currently offered.
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the vaccine, which helps prevent against cervical cancer, has been given to girls aged 11 to 13 since 2008. the study, funded by cancer research uk, comes ahead of proposed changed to the nhs cervical cancer screening programme due to come in 2019. donald trump has told asia and pacific leaders america will no longer tolerate what he calls chronic trade abuses. the us president is in vietnam at the asia pacific economic co—operation summit. during a hard—hitting speech, he said america was prepared to work with countries in the region, provided they abide by what he called "fair and reciprocal trade". from this day forward, we will compete on a fair and equal basis. we are not going to let the united states be taken advantage of any more. i am always going to put america
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first, the same way i expect all of you in this room to put your countries first. the actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actor portia de rossi, who is married to the us talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her "how important it was to have chemistry off—screen" before unzipping his trousers. mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc that the actor had no comment. the french president emmanuel macron is making an unscheduled visit to saudi arabia to discuss the crisis in lebanon after the prime minister, saad hariri, resigned on saturday. lebanon risks being the battleground in the fight between the saudis and iran for regional supremacy. saudi arabia has told its citizens to leave lebanon immediately and not to travel there from any country.
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universities are to be warned not to use misleading language or claims as they try to attract students. with hundreds of thousands of young people in the process of applying for courses, the bbc understands the advertising watchdog is to tell universities next week that they need to prove the accuracy of wording used in their marketing material. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. let's get some sport now with damien. northern ireland face a huge task to qualify for the world cup after a controversial 1—0 defeat to switzerland in their play—off in belfast. cory evans was the victim of what looked a cruel injustice when he was adjudged to have handled in the area and ricardo rodriguez gave the swiss a lead to take into sunday's second leg. the players of both england and germany will wear black armbands with poppies for tonight's friendly
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at wembley in remembrance of fallen servicemen and women, after fifa agreed to change to its rules. england's women are trying to bowl out the australians on day two of the one—off ashes test in sydney. it isa it is a must win game for england. england are currently going well. the aussies are four wickets down in the final session of the day. and former gb olympian jess varnish is suing uk sport and british cycling. a source close to the sprinter has told bbc sport her legal action is based on claims she suffered sex discrimination, detriment for whistleblowing, victimisation and unfair dismissal. that is all the sport for now. women vaccinated against human papilloma virus, or hpv, which is thought to cause about 99% of cervical cancers, may only need three smear tests in their lifetime, a new study has suggested. since 2008, the hpv vaccine has been offered to girls aged 11 to 13 and reported cases have fallen sharply since then. a team from queen mary university of london found that screenings at age 30, 40 and 55 would offer the same
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benefit to these young women as the current 12 screenings. the study comes ahead of changes being planned to the screening programme in england for 2019, and similar adjustments in scotland and wales. at the moment, labs test for abnormalities in cells taken in a smear test, but the new tests will check for the presence of hpv first, and only check for abnormal cells if the virus is found. joining us now, mandy parker was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2015 after a routine smear test, and she had to have a hysterectomy. she also has two daughters, aged 17 and 14, who both had the hpv vaccine. nicola smith is cancer research uk's health expert. and professor anne mackie is the director of screening at public health england. welcome to the programme. nicola, tell us more about why this study is
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so tell us more about why this study is so significant? this was a study funded by cancer research uk, modelling study looking at, for those girls who had the hbv vaccine who are approaching screening age now, what their screening programme might need to look like to get the same amount of benefit as women currently get through the programme, because they have this huge added protection against cervical cancer through the hpv vaccination they have had. this modelling study took into account different factors the fact that the hpv primary test that you mentioned will be being introduced, and it suggested that to get the same amount of benefit as the current programme, the girls who have had the hpv vaccination will only need three smears instead of the current 12. why does that matter, why three rather than 12? we are keen to make sure women are getting the same benefits but if they can do so with fewer procedures, if they need to go less often, that is a great thing
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for these women. so people are being vaccinated but hpv, is human papillomavirus, what is it? it is a virus linked to all cases of cervical cancer. for most people you will get infected with the virus and clear it and be fine, but in some cases the virus does persist and for those people who don't clear it, it can cause cervical cancer, so it is important that we vaccinate against it in girls now that we have the opportunity to do that, but the hpv vaccine only protect about 70% of infections with hpv so that is why it is important that these girls still have some smears because there is still a chance that they will still get the other hpv types we are not protecting against. mandy, you we re not protecting against. mandy, you were diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2015, can you tell us what happened? how did you find out? in 2015, can you tell us what happened? how did you find ounm was through my regular screening, i had never missed one, i went injune 2015, no symptoms, went along as normal and had the screening and
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unfortunately they called me back because there were abnormal cells and in september 20151 because there were abnormal cells and in september 2015| had a radical hysterectomy due to early—stage cervical cancer. but it was an aggressive grade sol cervical cancer. but it was an aggressive grade so i was told that ifi aggressive grade so i was told that if i had not gone for screening it would be a totally different story, i would not still be here to tell the tale now. it is so important and it isa the tale now. it is so important and it is a great thing about the new hpv screening because that is what caused my cervical cancer. in the way it is down to look for you because you were approaching a screening but otherwise it would have been another three years? yes, another three years, and women lead busy lives, it is important to put it off but it is important that people attend on time because they can detect early changes so it was not as bad as it could have been. how like other cases were jewels in that there were no symptoms?” how like other cases were jewels in that there were no symptoms? i had no symptoms, i just that there were no symptoms? i had no symptoms, ijust went along, i have never had an abnormal screening so have never had an abnormal screening sol have never had an abnormal screening so i didn't think there would be anything different in this one, i
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didn't have any symptoms, but that is not the case for other people, other people can have symptoms, but ididn't, but other people can have symptoms, but i didn't, but if i had missed the screening it would have been worse. how do you feel about the news today... i think it is brilliant. you have two teenage daughters?” do, they have both been vaccinated, i would encourage everyone to have the hpv vaccine, that is what caused my cervical cancer. why is it so important for girls to have the hpv vaccine? to stop them getting cervical cancer, in the end, and thatis cervical cancer, in the end, and that is what we want. it is really exciting times for cervical cancer, we now know what causes it, we can look for it and, as you say, we are turning the programme over so we will look for that rather than abnormal cells, which is a better, simpler test and we have a real prospect of stopping it happening in the first place and how fantastic is that? when will it come in? this is
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what the study has found, when could this new screening programme kick in? i think the important thing to say is this is a model, so what the researchers have done is say, if this happens and happened in this way, then the chances are it would be safe for women to have many, many fewer screenings. what the programme is doing at the moment is concentrating on changing from the y concentrating on changing from the cytology test, looking at the cells under the microscope, to looking at the emergence of the virus, and we will get that into place by the end of 2019. the other thing to say is that the girls who have been vaccinated are coming up to 21,22, and we start screening at 25, and we know that screening is being taken up know that screening is being taken up by know that screening is being taken up by fewerwomen, know that screening is being taken up by fewer women, the rate of people taking up screening are declining. why do you think that is? all sorts of reasons but before i go there, but i want to do is say that i will probably be dead by the time
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the current 25—year—old as i will probably be dead by the time the current 25—year—old a5 are right the current 25—year—old a5 are right the way through the programme because it does not finish until 65 so we because it does not finish until 65 so we really need to be clear that for women who have not been vaccinated it is incredibly important they go and get a screening test, which we are making better. instead of people saying, i only need to be screened three times, the key thing is having had that hpv vaccine at a young age. how long, once you have had that, schoolgirls have the hpv vaccine, how long does it last? that is a good question and part of the reason that what has been done is a model because across the world we have been vaccinating since 2008 or so. the evidence is very strong that it lasts a long time, but we are continuing to gather the data to see whether people remain protected. nicola, do you want to come in before we come back to the reasons why? yes, the main aim of the cervical screening programme is
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actually prevention rather than diagnosis, although it does pick up some cases of cervical cancer actually for a lot of women who get abnormal results those cell changes are actually precancerous, things that can be dealt with, they can be removed or dealt with before it even has a chance to develop into cancer, so has a chance to develop into cancer, so although mandy's experience is u nfortu nate, so although mandy's experience is unfortunate, for a lot of women when they go through the smear process it will be fine and if those abnormal cells are picked up hopefully it can be dealt with before they turn into cancer. can we then, in theory, get toa cancer. can we then, in theory, get to a stage where we really do minimise cases of serious cervical cancer? i don't want to use the word eliminate, but get to that stage... another piece of work that peter has doneis another piece of work that peter has done is suggest that if people took up done is suggest that if people took up the screening offer as the programme is up the screening offer as the programme is now, we up the screening offer as the programme is now, we would stop more than 80% of cases of cervical cancer. it is incredibly effective set of things to do. but having said
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that, you say there are declining numbers of women going for screening? why? it is interesting, i think there is a mix of reasons. apart from the obvious that it is not necessarily, the procedure itself, although it does not take long, it might not be the most co mforta ble long, it might not be the most comfortable thing to do for people? some people find it uncomfortable and some people are worried they will find it uncomfortable. people lead busy lives, if you have three jobs and four children, you have got other things to worry about, it can be difficult sometimes to get access toagp be difficult sometimes to get access toa gp or be difficult sometimes to get access to a gp or clinic to do these things, and some really interesting work suggests that about five to 8% of people who have not had it have never heard of it, so we have got a huge amount of work to promote it, and programmes like this are very helpful. just spinach, your final pitch to people washing the programme who have perhaps ignored
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the doctors' letter and have not been for a screening, what would you say to them? i would say it is essential, just go, it does not matter if you have missed a letter, go and book your screening and the cervical cancer trust is there to help anyone who is frightened about going for a smear test and to help along the procedure so i would urge people to take up the invitation. this cancer research uk modelling study isjust a this cancer research uk modelling study is just a modelling this cancer research uk modelling study isjust a modelling study. for now, we are not going to see these changes implemented, so people, take note of the invitation when it comes through the post, and watch this space. get your daughters vaccinated and take up the offer when it comes. i know i said that was a final thing but our boys affected by this? boys certainly have hpv but my colleague said that the rates of protection we are giving, 80% of girls are not going to get it, so the whole population benefits. hpv is in a bad way and there should be much less of it right the way across the population. thank you very much indeed. coming up...
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a last minute goal at anfield to win the title — that's a cherished memory for many arsenal fans, and it's now been made into a film. we're speaking to lee dixon, who was part of that winning team. another day, yet more allegations about inappropriate sexual behaviour in hollywood. the actor steven seagal is the latest star to be accused of sexual harrassment, after this tweet from the actress portia de rossi. the arrested development actress, who is married to us talk show host ellen degeneres, claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her "how important it was to have chemistry off—screen" before unzipping his trousers. his manager told bbc news that the actor had no comment. meanwhile emmy award—winning us comedian louis ck's movie premiere has been cancelled hours before the screening, as five women accused him of sexual misconduct. the bbc has contacted his manager for a comment. let's speak to the hollywood reporter gayl murphy, who's in los angeles.
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good morning. can you tell us what the latest allegations are? you can add steven seagal, and american comedian louis ck to the list of alleged sexual allegations that include the likes of kevin spacey, dustin hoffman, brett ratner, jeremy piven. everyday people are waking up in hollywood and trying to find out and figure out who is next. it's surprising, when you look at the list, people like dustin hoffman and jeremy piven, these are just allegations and we have to be clear about that, but we get glimpses into these peoples lives we did not necessarily want to see. i was talking to producer earlier about
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how this is almost like a tsunami. you know how you see those documentaries about, how clean is your house, and they take the ultraviolet, and you think your bedding is clean and they take the ultraviolet light and all of a sudden you think, where did all this dirt come from? it's like that, hiding in plain sight. it'sjust a very unsettling time. it's a good time in the fact that women now feel co mforta ble, time in the fact that women now feel comfortable, more comfortable, speaking out about what happened to them and their experience. the screen actors guild is stepping up. the tv academy is stepping up and saying they will make themselves safe places for you. if something happens to you under the umbrella of a castlin, you can come to us, and we will make it safe for you. one of the misnomers about hollywood is
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that there is somewhere to go and someone that there is somewhere to go and someone who will support you, but that isn't true, there is no hr department. so every day it's something else and something more against what we are hearing about a lot of these claims and allegations through social media channels. can you give us a through social media channels. can you give us a sense through social media channels. can you give us a sense of the mood and reaction in hollywood. the reaction in hollywood is everybody‘s holding their breath. they don't know who is next. you think you know someone. i had an experience with somebody that's terrific, and you have experienced the same person and it's dreadful. you never really know. and when you are dealing with power and money and dealing in a business, these are all wild cards and you
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don't really know what's going to happen. it's not even a matter of, why don't you just tell your agent. your agent can't make that decision. they have to push it upstairs. the same thing with your manager. you say that, but portia de rossi said in her tweet, her complaints about steven seagal‘s behaviour were dismissed at the time by her agent. isn't the onus on hollywood agents to do more to protect their clients? it's like a supply chain. every single step along the way has to be revisited. typically come in a corporate environment, you have an hr department that has an entire mechanism. it has a road map and has the rules that you follow to actually investigate anything to do with sexual harassment on a job. you don't have that where everybody is a freelancer. even if you have an
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agent or manager, there is no guarantee because he or she could lose theirjob. they reallyjust wa nt lose theirjob. they reallyjust want you to shut up and not rock the boat. thank you for speaking to us. you have been getting in touch on the stories we have been talking about this morning. theresa may's week and the brexit date and time will be enshrined in law. sarah on facebook says brexit should not be politicised to gain brownie points for the conservative party. it should be for the good of the country as a whole. it should be a consortium from across the country from businesses to education planning the brexit strategy. take it away from politicians who are only self—interested. matt on facebook says brexit day can't come soon facebook says brexit day can't come soon enough. let it also be enshrined as a public holiday. you have also been talking about hpv, a tweet from mike, it's fantastic
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girls get free vaccinations from hpv, but boys need it as well. speaking as a man who has had hpv related oral cancer. and an e—mail from helen, my mother and sister both had cervical cancer and i had banal cancer, the vaccine would have helped us all. coming up on the programme, we are expecting the ruling... we're expecting the ruling in a court case about whether uber drivers should be considered employees and all the entitlements that brings. we'll speak to the driver who brought the case. it was one of the most sensational ends to a football season in history. let me take you back to anfield, the 26th of may 1989. liverpool are three points ahead of their title rivals arsenal — crucially, their goal difference is one better. and by a twist of fate, the fixture list has them playing each other on the final day of the season. to win the league, arsenal would have to not only do what so many teams in the 1980s thought was virtually unthinkable — beat liverpool at anfield — but they'd have to do it
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by two clear goals. so, leading 1—0, into the last minute of the game, it looked like arsenal had just fallen short. if you are a liverpool fan you might wa nt to if you are a liverpool fan you might want to turn away for a couple of minutes. then a couple of long balls up the pitch, and arsenal's michael thomas found himself with just liverpool's keeper to beat. he did. and the gunners won the title. hairs on the back of your neck stuff. well, they‘ve made a film about it— called arsenal 89 — and one of the heroes of that day is here now. but first let's take a look— and a warning, this trailer contains flashing images. it's easily the best finish i have ever seen it's easily the best finish i have ever seen in a football match. ever. its 100 years since... liverpool were the team to beat. we
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didn't want to fail. we have to win by two clear goals. seriously! you think liverpool are going to win? yeah, who's going to beat them? laughter smith! it was desire as well as technical ability. success, you will do anything to get it. i can't emphasise enough how the crowds... one more goal and arsenal will win it. one minute to go. there must be
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seconds left. then it goes into slow motion. arsenal come streaming forward in what will surely be the la st forward in what will surely be the last attack. i'm looking straight down the pitch and i'm thinking, this must be my time. what are you doing? kick it, i'm shouting. isn't it lovely to have moments in your life where you think, nothing can beat that. let's talk now to former arsenal and england defender lee dixon. you were just saying that watching the trailer, you still get goose bumps. it gets me every time. i have seen bumps. it gets me every time. i have seen the finished version of the film probably five or six times, but even watching the trailer, i always think he's going to miss, he's going to hit the post and it's going to come out and something bad is going to happen, but it goes in every
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time. take this back to that day in 1989. the anticipation of what it was like to play at anfield. it was an incredible season right throughout, not only with what happened at hillsborough right in the middle, which was hugely emotional, but going to the end of the season, we were top of the league. liverpool were this shadow coming up behind us and winning every game they played. we had a wobble before the end of the season, lost a game and drew at home. going to anfield, i think because we needed to win 2—0, strangely enough it played in our favour. we were quite relaxed. underdogs? yeah, it isa quite relaxed. underdogs? yeah, it is a david and goliath thing. deep down we knew we could win, but in our heads, certainly my head, i thought if we get beat 4—0, nobody will be surprised because liverpool we re will be surprised because liverpool were a juggernaut of a team who could win every game they played. it was an intimidating game but
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strangely relaxing when we went onto the pitch. the biggest moment was handing over flowers before the game. it was almost like handing over. . . game. it was almost like handing over... hillsborough was in our thoughts not only leading up to the game but on the night as well. handing over the flowers was symbolic for me. i was then allowed to go back to playing football. it was a big night in all ways.” to go back to playing football. it was a big night in all ways. i have seen was a big night in all ways. i have seen it, and you get a sense in watching it, because of hillsborough happening, and you say yourself in it, you didn't think the league would continue that here.” it, you didn't think the league would continue that here. i didn't, andi would continue that here. i didn't, and i didn't want it to. we had two weeks where we didn't play. george try to get us to come in to training, but none of the lads were interested. it was all going on in the media as well. why would football matter, and why should it matter? it didn't stop what you can see how devastated you all were and
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how devastated everyone was. —— it didn't stop whites you can see how devastated you all were... didn't stop whites you can see how devastated you all were. .. stop .it . it soured it's ourjob to go out and play football. you can go back to this now. that's how your mind has to work. you have a game every two or three days with a match coming round. the end of the season was looming. the team ethic carried us through a lot of dark times. we knew we had the league, we threw it away and it was our turn to try to win it backin and it was our turn to try to win it back in that game stop . was that the biggest game in our store's history? it was for me. even kids now ask what the biggest memory was. i say anfield in 1989,
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kids now ask what the biggest memory was. isay anfield in 1989, and kids now ask what the biggest memory was. i say anfield in 1989, and a lot of them were not even born.” would like to say i wasn't, but i was. it pushes it into people's memories again. not only arsenal fa ns memories again. not only arsenal fans but football fans in general. we were originally going to call the film, the goal that changed everything. not only did it change the arsenal history, but it dented liverpool as well. also the face of football. because it was after hillsborough, everything changed. we changed it back to 89 because it was shorter and symbolic. it's a film about football and about the story and as well as arsenal.” about football and about the story and as well as arsenal. i look forward to seeing it in its entirety. we can get the weather next with nick miller. a lot of sunny weather around this weekend, especially by sunday, but temperatures are coming down with cold weather on the way. looking at
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your pictures from friday's weather, plenty of showers in highland scotla nd plenty of showers in highland scotland but sunshine in between. a glorious start day in norfolk. there are glorious start day in norfolk. there a re parts of glorious start day in norfolk. there are parts of england and wales that have started with rain but it has cleared away south with increasing sunshine across south wales and southern england. it still wet on the ground but the sun has come out and it will be a pleasant day. on this north—westerly wind we will have showers running into north—west england, they'd some drifting into the midlands, maybe clip in northern ireland and the north and west of scotland. a blustery start to the day. staying quite windy. the showers might have hail and thunder. wintry in the hills above 300 metres, but lots of sunshine in south—east scotland. it's a fine friday on the way for many of us, if you dodge the showers that are out there. the chilly wind will be important, especially across scotland, northern england and northern ireland. into tonight,
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temperatures dropping quite quickly in scotland as the wind uses. further clear spells and showers in the north with a touch of frost in places. we could see a spell of rain moving through this evening into northern ireland, england and wales overnight. temperatures holding up. they could be some icy patches in northern scotland especially on untreated higher routes after some of those showers after temperatures have dipped. sunshine in northern england, sunshine developing in northern ireland and perhaps the midlands and east anglia later in the day. large parts staying cloudy in central and south england. rain in the south—west of england and south wales. maybe as far east as sussex. it is chilly in the sunshine. some rain pepping up south wales and south england, but we think that's gone by sunday morning. a cold bush of arctic air from the
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north on sunday with temperatures dipping for all of us. there will be a lot of dry and sunny weather on sunday. the difference being that on the north sea coast, northern scotland, the irish sea coast, you might see showers, but many of us will have a sunny day. but temperatures will dip and it will be chilly. hello, it's friday, it's 10am. i'm tina daheley. theresa may says she wants to put the date and time when the uk will leave the eu into law. it'll be 11pm on 29th march, 2019. but former conservative deputy prime minister lord heseltine told this programme she's introducing uncertainty at exactly the wrong time. fixing in law the date will merely accelerate people's decision to take investment elsewhere, not to make investment here. frankly, it's a panic measure, reflecting the growing anxiety that hostility to brexit is growing.
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uber drivers will find out today the outcome of the company's appeal against a ruling saying drivers should be classed as workers, rather than self—employed. we'll talk to one of the drivers who brought the original case. we're up against it, we're up against an army of lawyers an army of pr consultants, an army of lobbyists. but i think we'll prevail. we will bring you the ruling when it happens. potential victims of revenge porn are being asked to send facebook their nude photos so the company can use technology to block former partners from posting them online. it's a pilot project in australia. we'll find out more. here's rachel in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. the headlines from bbc news... theresa may has warned pro—eu conservatives that she will not tolerate any attempts to block the brexit process.
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in a sign of her intent, she's outlined plans to enshrine in law the exact moment that britain will leave the european union — 11pm on 29th march, 2019. but the man responsible for writing the article 50 withdrawal process, cross—bench peer lord john kerr, says brexit could still be reversed. while we're in, we're in. while the divorce talks proceeds, the parties are still married. reconciliation is still possible. the article requires the parties to negotiate the arrangements for our withdrawal, but we are not required to withdrawjust because mrs may sent her letter. we can change our minds at any stage during the process. a new study is recommending that women who have had the hpv vaccine only need to have three smear tests during their life, rather than
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the 12 they're currently offered. the vaccine, which helps prevent against cervical cancer, has been given to girls aged 11 to 13 since 2008. the study, funded by cancer research uk, comes ahead of proposed changed —— changes to the nhs cervical cancer screening programme due to come in 2019. donald trump has told asia and pacific leaders america will no longer tolerate what he calls chronic trade abuses. the us president is in vietnam at the asia—pacific economic co—operation summit. during a hard—hitting speech, he said america was prepared to work with countries in the region, provided they abide by what he called "fair and reciprocal trade". the french president emmanuel macron is making an unscheduled visit to saudi arabia to discuss the crisis in lebanon after the prime minister, saad hariri, resigned on saturday. lebanon risks being the battleground
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in the fight between the saudis and iran for regional supremacy. saudi arabia has told its citizens to leave lebanon immediately and not to travel there from any country. a police force is facing a high court challenge today over its refusal to delete the details of a teenaged boy who sent a naked picture of himself on social media to a girl at his school. the boy's mother is concerned that greater manchester police may release the information to potential employers when he's older. facebook‘s founding president has said he's worried about the effect the site is having on society. sean parker, who says he no longer uses social media, said the network was built on "exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology", and he was concerned about what it was "doing to children's brains". the actor and producer steven seagal is the latest hollywood figure to be accused of sexual harassment. the actor portia de rossi,
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who is married to the us talk show host ellen degeneres, made the allegation in a tweet. she claims that during a film audition mr seagal told her "how important it was to have chemistry off—screen" before unzipping his trousers. mr seagal‘s manager told the bbc that the actor had no comment. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get the sport now with damian. northern ireland face an uphill test to qualify for their first world cup since 1986 after a controversial first leg play—off defeat to switzerland in belfast. northern ireland's cory evans was harshly adjudged to have handled in the air, the ball appeared to have struck him on the bag or solder, but the
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referee awarded a penalty and the only goal of the game was scored from the spot. the decision outraged the northern ireland manager. i thought he had given possibly an offside or something, initially i wasn't sure because, having hit cory i wasn't sure because, having hit cory , the ball did not go out for a corner, you expect a corner, a penalty in that situation, and to book the player as well... i spent three hours in a conference the other week with fifa on assisted video refereeing and certainly when you see what happened in io would be an advocate of it. both england and germany players will wear black armbands with poppies in remembrance of fallen servicemen and women. fifa had previoiusly banned sporting them and the home nations were fined for doing so in november last year. fifa's argument had been that it was a political gesture but have now changed the rules and allowed the wearing of poppies if both teams are in agreement. they will also be using video assistant referee technology. this is technology to help the referee review incidents like goals, red cards, penalties.
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it's day two of the one—off women's ashes test match between england and australia in sydney. it's a must—win match for england, because victory for australia will see them go 8—2 up in the multi—format series, and that will be enough to see them regain the urn. england's first innings came to a close this morning for 280. and the bowlers have made inroads, with sophie ecclestone doing the damage — she took the wicket of beth mooney first. and then claimed the wicket of alex blackwell to put england in a good position. they're currently 159—4. olympianjess varnish is suing uk sport and british cycling. a source close to the sprinter has told bbc sport her legal action is based on claims she suffered sex discrimination, detriment for whistleblowing, victimisation and unfair dismissal. varnish was dropped from british cycling's elite programme last year, after which former technical director shane sutton was found to have used sexist language towards her. sutton resigned but was later cleared of eight
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out of nine allegations. that is all the sport for now. a decision in the appeal of a landmark case is due this morning which could have implications for more than a million workers. the cab—hailing company uber appealed against a ruling that says its drivers are workers entitled to a range of benefits, including paid holidays and the national minimum wage, rather than self—employed. the case was originally brought to an employment tribunal by two of its drivers last year. it has implications for more than a million people employed in the so—called ‘gig economy'. uber maintains its drivers are independent contractors, and that the overwhelming majority want to keep the freedom of being their own boss. we first broke the news of a group of uber drivers intention to take the company to court back in 2015. here's a clip from jim reed's original report, where he spoke to james farrar, one of the drivers who brought the case,
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and to one of uber‘s bosses. my average net injuly was three or five per hour, well below minimum wage. if you want to cover your costs and keep the family afloat, you have to work a lot of hours. but at the end of the day it is your choice? you can work for someone else, get another job? yes, it's true, but uber has come so aggressively into the marketplace, i think those opportunities to work for other operators are rapidly evaporating. james and the other drivers involved in the legal action say that the way that uber operates means they are not really self—employed entrepreneurs at all, but working for the company so they should get the rights that go with that. flexibility.
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being able to log on and log off as i please. you can choose the hours. it is only a small number taking legal action and there are many happy uber drivers, as the company points out in its marketing. you can work whenever you want. money is going directly into my account. at uber‘s new headquarters in a skyscraper in london, the boss says the new way of working is all about choice. many of our drivers have moved from traditionaljobs where they are required to work prescribed shifts and a certain number of hours per week. it was difficult to take time off. they have chosen to work with uber because of that flexibility. the fact that you can work literally whenever you want, that is the flexibility that the majority of uber drivers are looking for. can't you have flexibility and have rights like holiday pay and minimum wage? looking at what drivers take home is something we look at very carefully. what we find is that most of the drivers using the app take home round about £15 or £16 per hour. their costs range considerably if they rent or if they own, as well as other factors.
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the majority of them are actually making around £10—£12 per hour. even after those costs. is there a danger here that uber as a company wants to have its cake and eat it? you want to treat these drivers as self—employed entrepreneurs but on the other hand you want to tell them exactly what to do? uber drivers are completely free to work whenever and wherever they want, so long as they live up to the quality standards on the platform. earlier i spoke to james farrar, the uber driver who brought the drivers‘ rights case against the firm. olivia dobbie, a barrister and employment law specialist. and emma, who drives for uber and thinks the drivers should not be receiving employee benefits. james, you won the tribunal last year, how worried are you about the outcome of this appeal? well, i am naturally concerned and anxious to hear what happens today. but in general, i am optimistic. i think the law is on our side and thatjustice is on our side. you have to be a little bit mad to take on a $70 billion corporation and we're very lucky
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to have the backing of our union, the iwgp, to do that. i think we're going to win, but we are against it. we're up against an army of lawyers and pr consultants, an army of lobbyists, but i think we will prevail because the law is on our side. you're one of two drivers who decided to take this action in the first place, taking on a company worth more than $60 billion — how confident were you at the time? the decision to take them on was over more direct matters at hand. two things, really. earnings — if you do the numbers for a second, uber say that the top drivers, the top drivers, and they published this, earn £18 per hour. if you break that down after commission, it is 13.50 per hour. every hour i work, uber earns 4.50, no matter what. but, for me, that level of earnings comes out to £650 per week. i always have £400 a week to cover — 200—250 per week for the vehicle
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and insurance, and 200—250 forfuel. that leaves you earning about £5 per hour. what difference would it make if you were considered an employee instead of self—employed ? i am self—employed. the case is not becoming an employee. it's about being a self—employed worker with special protections. to earn at least the minimum wage and to have holiday pay. that's the key distinction, isn't it? if you're an employee you get workers' rights like sick pay, holiday pay and the minimum wage. emma, i want to bring you in. you're an uber driver — do you not want to be paid minimum wage? get sick pay and holiday pay? i earn more than minimum wage. i do earn about £18 per hour after they take commission. it is a pot luck thing, whatjobs you get, but i kind of quite like that.
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sometimes you get loads of little jobs and sometimes biggerjobs. i'm not really sure. i agree with so much of whatjames says, however i am quite happy to be self—employed. i pay £2 per week to have sickness benefits with a partner of uber‘s, ipse. i don't know what the advantage is with minimum wage. i don't really understand, to be honest. olivia, what could this appeal be relevant to the gig economy, not just for uber? some confusion has come across in this panel even if i may say so. it is the distinction in law between a self—employed contractor, and employee, at one end of the spectrum, and this intermediate category of what we call a worker.
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the uber decision that came out last year did not find that uber drivers are employees. it was quite a striking finding. it simply found that the workers which is an intermediate category which means they are entitled to basic minimum floor of employee protection rights. those rights include the right to paid holiday, minimum rest breaks and national minimum wage. how is that different to an employee? an employee has a higher level of protection. unfair dismissal, protection against redundancy and other rights as well. if i can describe it as a spectrum, you have got a self—employed contracter at one end, entirely running their own business. you have got the employees at the other end who benefit from the full protection of rights, and workers in the middle who have a sort of minimum bundle of rights which includes minimum wage and paid time off for holiday. the decision last year did not mean that uber drivers were entitled to protection for unfair dismissal or redundancy pay. it equally does not mean that uber can control them day—to—day. as workers, they still retain a high degree of flexibility to reject work, not log on to the app if they don't want to, but, when they do, the time that they spent at work, they will be accruing pay for holiday, which they can
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take at a later date. i think confusion has arisen about the implication of the decisions last year and what they actually are. the appeal was held at the back end of september and the decision is coming out this morning. that was uber challenging the findings that drivers are workers. why? there is a cost for uber. if they have to pay holiday pay, that is going to increase the costs of what they have to pay drivers. there will be a physical cost in monetary terms but also an administrative cost trying to work out what holiday to pay each worker and then to pay that holiday. there is a clear business reason why they would not want to do that. i can only think that is the prime reason. i understand that uber has suggested that a majority if not all of their drivers get minimum wage anyway. i don't know how accurate that is because i have not looked at the data. but i understand that some people challenge that. if that is the case then additional cost is required to guarantee minimum wage.
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which way do you think the appeal will go? i would be surprised if uber were successful. i say that because there seems to be a trend of cases coming through at the moment with similar scenarios where workers in the gig economy, couriers, drivers and delivery people, for example, are being recognised as having a basic minimum floor of employment rights. being workers in law. i would be quite surprised if uber succeed. if they failed, what will the implications be for other workers working in the gig economy? any legal decision is about the people that brought the decision. it is going to be exclusive to the claimants in that case. it will have a wider political impact, perhaps, we might get other companies recognising that the way that they run the platform is similar to what we have in uber so they might start to choose to give their workers, identifying them as workers
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and giving them employment protection rights. it is ultimately only about those that brought the case and the decision is only binding on those. emma, we have some context from olivia. if, as olivia says, you can still choose when you work and which jobs to accept but you also get the benefits of things like sick pay and a guarantee for your wages, what is the harm in that? i think i would be tied in more. there are other platforms out there, other companies that you can work for where you can get some regular routine, know what you are getting. that is not what i signed up to uberfor. i understood what i was signing for. it was attractive to me because i did not know where i was going when i picked up a passenger. it was quite an adventure. i like people, i like driving.
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i am not sure of the advantages. i am not really understanding what those are. even with this whole wonderful explanation, ijust feel that i would be tied in more and the impact of greater administration costs is going to, i feel, come back on us, or the passengers at some point, somehow. james, can you understand how emma feels? ican. but let me tell you a different story. one of the co—claimants, a good friend of mine, involved in this case, has a child who is very sick and is in great ormond street hospital. the family is almost residential there. this is during the child's illness. he has to make the payments on his vehicle every week whether he is working or not. for him to have paid holidays, for him to be guaranteed the minimum wage when he does work, would mean so much for that family in terms of social security and security for that family. i can understand that emma might not want these rights but other people desperately need them.
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what about the impact on prices? when you talk about the business model, if uber is going to have to pay more to cover those extra things, it probably would have the knock—on effect of driving up the costs and prices for customers? i think that is likely. i do not know how they will manage to subsume the cost in the business model. it may be that they take slightly less profit in order to cover the costs themselves. i anticipate there will have to be an increase in price for the customer. in reality, some analysis has been done. at present fares the customer is only paying about 60% of the true cost. the reality is that there has been a lot of venture capital money put into this for companies like uber to literally acquire the market, through referral bonuses and so on. the fares are unrealistically low at the moment. if you are used to paying a fiver
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to get from a to b they are not going to want to pay more. that is true. the problem is that the bus ridership is at the lowest it has been in london for ten years. we are pulling people off the public transportation system. congestion is up. air quality is the worst it has been in london. we can't run a public transportation system... do you think the public would be willing to pay more if they knew it meant better rights for workers? i am certain they would. where to begin. there is a reason why the buses are empty. woman, contrary to the aggressive attacks by london cabs at the moment against uber, women feel safer in ubers. not on public transport. there is no protection for some public transport. you can get assaulted on buses and trains. tfl are not addressing that. that is in your opinion because we cannot speak for all women. listening to a lot of women, talking to a lot of women, i have lots of passengers talking to me about it.
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i feel very strongly about it. i have been supported through all my work at grenfell over the last five and a half months. i look to self—employment and being supported by uber which they have done amazingly as well as you telling the story, i am sorry to hear about that driver with the children in great ormond street hospital. we are all working against something. i haven't found fault with uber in the support they have given me. and the car company that i rent from. thank you very much indeed. still to come... would you send facebook your naked photographs if it meant they could be blocked from being uploaded as revenge pawn? we're looking at a pilot in australia. he thought he was being fast—tracked to a career as a chief constable, but instead, mark dias, an asian officer working
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for cleveland police was systematically bullied by the force. this week, he was awarded half—a—million pounds in compensation, after his own colleagues spied on him and eventually tried to bring criminal charges against him. why? because he blew the whistle on what he believed we elements of institutionalized racism within the force. earlier i spoke to mark and asked him what happened when he was in the force. we started to see certain sets of conduct around asian officers, specifically it was emanating from the professional standards department. what was happening was if officers complained about racial discrimination, all of a sudden fabricated investigations were being made against them. and we complained about that. in 2010 i became the enemy, i became the target of their venom and became part of their investigation track, and i was put under criminal investigation for whistle—blowing about institutional racism. you talk about conduct, you talk about institutional racism,
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without using any offensive terms, can you give me some concrete examples of the type of behaviour you witnessed ? asian officers would be subject to fabricated internal investigations, conduct investigations and criminal investigations by the professional standards department, which was known by the legal department as well. asian officers would be watched, they would be put under internal surveillance. asian officers would be given jobs which were impossible to complete. asian officers would be placed on one shift so that they could be watched en masse, rather than being distributed across the district. those are just some examples that come to mind of the kind of conduct that we were experiencing. you talk about, mark, "they".
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what about you ? i pretty much suffered as well. i was given work that was impossible to do, and impossible notjust because of my own reference but because other people were telling me it was impossible to do. i was placed on a shift in middlesbrough with every other asian officer within the response units. what does that mean? what did that mean? why was that significant? so you had around about five asian officers in the middlesbrough district at one time. and all of those asian officers were put on one shift in middlesbrough so that they could be watched. so you had a situation where a particular shift had 25% constitution of asian officers, and no other asian officer was on any other shift in the middlesbrough district at that time. so you're talking about and giving us examples of how you were treated by your superiors, people in positions of power over you. how were you treated by people on your same level or a level below you?
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oh, with the greatest level of support, in the main. people who worked with me, people who supported me actually were victimised themselves because of their support, not only for me but for other asian officers. in particular the police federation, who supported us in cleveland, were all targeted for unlawful investigations because of their support for asian officers. given what you've talked about, the experiences you went through, how you say asian officers were treated, why did you then decide to go public? in february 2012 the then—chief constable jacqui cheer admitted there was institutional racism in cleveland police. but in april of that year another chief constable actually stated that no racism existed in cleveland police. my challenge publicly, i did this at that time anonymously, was to say that that statement was incorrect. you were illegally monitored.
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how did you find out — what happened ? we heard that there had been surveillance, but we had no proof. so i conducted an investigation into cleveland police from outside the police service. hang on, you say you'd heard there'd been surveillance. that is shocking to hear. so you'd heard that, what, your phone was being tapped? we'd heard that there was a lot more surveillance than just the phone. we'd heard that asian officers had been put under intrusive surveillance. their homes, their cars and also their telephones. it turns out for me it was just my telephone. and we'd heard that information, so we'd used that and started an investigation against cleveland police. you... i know you can't talk about the settlement, but this has been settled, nine years after you left. how has this affected you in that time? so it's five years since i left...
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five years since you left. it's been consuming, working and also trying to manage an investigation against a police force, developing litigation that you had to be sure was going to be successful and being able to navigate all that process whilst being excluded from the police service. but as well it's been very difficult, it's been very hard, but i think now we're in a position where it was worth it and we've actually got to a point of resolution. do you think the police force has changed in that time, including cleveland police? i don't think cleveland police is an example of the police service, and everywhere that i worked within the police service would say that cleveland police is very unique. and it has a legacy of which it has not been able to evolve from. from my view in cleveland police, there is a lot of talk about change, but fundamentally the wrongdoers, those people identified
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of wrongdoing in cleveland police, have not been dealt with. and that's still the same today. chief constable iain spittal says what happened to you up to 2013 doesn't reflect the positive and professional organisational behaviours of 2017. he's also said that cleveland police has moved forward significantly. so you're saying you disagree with that? i can only talk... i'm not in cleveland police today, so i can talk about what i can see, and i can see that those people who have done wrong, those people who should be investigated, have not been investigated or dealt with. what would your message be to them now? i think those people need to be aware that this process are dealing aware that this process of dealing with those wrongdoers is not over with, and we will continue until we getjustice. chief constable iain spittal sent us a statement. he said... "the matters settled with mr dias relate to things
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which occurred up to january 2013. they are not reflective of the positive and professional organisational behaviours present in the force today. cleveland police has moved forwards significantly.along with the pcc, i have led a programme of work called everyone matters. people tell me from within and outside the organisation that this is having a strong and long—lasting impact. over the years that i have worked with cleveland police, i have seen more officers achieve promotion and advancement from under—represented groups. still to come... a 14—year—old boy who sent a naked picture of himself to a girl at school has been put on a police database for the crime of making and distributing indecent images of a child. we'll look at the legal challenge to get this record deleted. saturn and spanghero's memoir, the top, is about to hit our screens, we will speak to the actor playing the
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lead role. time for the latest news — here's rachel schofield. the headlines from bbc news... theresa may has warned pro—eu conservatives that she will not tolerate any attempts to block the brexit process. in a sign of her intent, she's outlined plans to enshrine in law the exact moment that britain will leave the european union — 11pm on 29th march, 2019. but the man responsible for writing the article 50 withdrawal process, cross—bench peer lord kerr, says brexit could still be reversed. a new study is recommending that women who have had the hpv vaccine only need to have three smear tests during their life, rather than the 12 they're currently offered. the vaccine, which helps prevent against cervical cancer, has been given to girls aged 11 to 13 since 2008. the study, funded by cancer research uk, comes ahead of proposed changed
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to the nhs cervical cancer screening programme due to come in 2019. cancer research uk's nicola smith told this programme why some screening is still important. the hpv vaccine only protects about 70% of infections with hbv says that is why it is important that these girls still have some smears, because there is still a chance that they will get the other hpv types we are not protecting against. donald trump has told asia and pacific leaders america will no longer tolerate what he calls chronic trade abuses. the us president is in vietnam at the asia—pacific economic co—operation summit. during a hard—hitting speech, he said america was prepared to work with countries in the region, provided they abide by what he called "fair and reciprocal trade". facebook‘s founding president has said he's worried about the effect the site is having on society. sean parker, who says he no longer uses social media,
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said the network was built on "exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology", and he was concerned about what it was "doing to children's brains". that's a summary of the latest bbc news. let's get the sport now with damian. northern ireland's cory evans says it was a disgrace to award a handball against which led to northern ireland's defeat in their world cup play—off to switzerland. he was adjudged to have handled in the area and ricardo rodriguez gave the area and ricardo rodriguez gave the swiss a precious lead to take into sunday's second leg. the players of both england and germany will wear black armbands with poppies for tonight's friendly at wembley in remebrance of fallen servicemen and women, after fifa agreed to change to its rules. england's women have taken a fifth wicket as they try to bowl out the australians on day two of the one—off ashes test in sydney.
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it's a must—win game for england and they're currently going well in the final session of the day. and olympianjess varnish is suing uk sport and british cycling. a source close to the sprinter has told bbc sport her legal action is based on claims she suffered sex discrimination, detriment for whistleblowing, victimisation and unfair dismissal. that is all gosport borough now. —— all the sport for now. when a 14—year—old boy sent a naked picture of himself to a girl at school, he wasn't charged by greater manchester police, but they put his name on the police intelligence database alongside the crime of making and distributing indecent images of a child. it will stay on file for 10 years unless the high court rules, in a case being heard today, that it should be deleted. let's get more from our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. good morning to you, what more can you tell us? this is an important case that will resonate with a lot of people who haveissues resonate with a lot of people who have issues perhaps about their teenagers so—called sexting people. this 14—year—old boy sent this image
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on snapchat thinking it would be automatically deleted, it wasn't, it was saved by the girl he sent it to, she then shared it with other people. the police got involved, they didn't charge or prosecute him but they did put it on their intelligence database but they did put it on their intelligence data base and but they did put it on their intelligence database and it is recorded under a section called obscene publications and it has his name on there, and the concern of the boy's mother is that, should he go for a job for example working with children as a teacher or working with vulnerable adults, the police may have to disclose that to a future employer which could in effect bar him from getting work. she wants these details about him removed from the database. greater manchester police has refused to do so, our understanding is it could be kept until he is 100 years old, not just ten years but effectively in perpetuity so she is extremely concerned and is taking the case this morning to the high court at manchester to try and argue that greater manchester police's decision needs to be reversed. their argument
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is, as faras needs to be reversed. their argument is, as far as i understand it, that they are entitled to keep it on the database they are entitled to keep it on the data base and any they are entitled to keep it on the database and any decision they make about disclosing it in the future will be very carefully balanced looking at the risks the individual post as against the risks to him of disclosure. 0k, disclosure. ok, thank you very much indeed. we have some breaking news to bring you. the taxi firm uber has lost its appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of drivers. we we re employment rights of drivers. we were speaking earlier to one of the drivers who was involved in the case, james farra, who won his tribunal, uber appealed the decision and we have heard that they have lost the appeal against the ruling to do with the rights of drivers. we should be able to speak to simon gompers at the high court later who will be able to tell us more about
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what has happened and what it could mean not only for bluebird drivers but for the gig economy in general. —— not only for uber drivers. a new scheme to try an combat so called revenge porn is being trialled in australia. it would mean humans, rather than computer algorithms, viewing naked images that are voluntarily sent to facebook. the photograph would then have its "fingerprint" taken so it couldn't be uploaded again by disgruntled ex—lovers. facebook said in a statement one of the hopes for this pilot is to test an emergency option for people to provide a photo proactively to facebook, so it never gets shared in the first place. "it's a protective measure that can help prevent a much worse scenario where an image is shared more widely. we don't want facebook to be a place where people fear their intimate images will be shared without their consent." let's talk to laura higgins who runs a helpline for victims of revenge porn.
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and also to fevzi turkalp, who is a social media expert. he also does weekly podcasts. thank you both forjoining us. laura, what is your response to this pilot scheme in australia? we think it is a fantastic initiative, anything that gives a bit of control back to victims, where they can take proactive measures to try and tackle it, is a positive thing. you say it is positive but this involves people who have nude photographs, if it was you, a nude photograph, you would then send it pre—emptively to facebook, for example, another human being who you don't know would look at the photograph and, i suppose, give it a fingerprint which means that it can't then be shared publicly after that, that is my understanding? yes, they already have a database of hashed images
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where organisations like mine have supported people, we have given them the image, said this is already happening to prevent it being reuploaded. this is just happening to prevent it being reuploaded. this isjust trying happening to prevent it being reuploaded. this is just trying to prevent it being uploaded in the first place. i know people have an issue about having a human involved but there are no technical solutions that can take that out, there needs to be somebody in that position, but they are specially trained, working with our organisations to make sure it is as safe as possible. is that the best way to deal with this problem? it is a brand—new project, it has never been done before. certainly it puts them steps ahead of other social networks are currently don't have anything, so i think anything we do as a step forward is positive. obviously it remains to be seen how positive it is with people in the pilot. fevzi, do you think, if this does come in, it is likely people will take up
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facebook on this other?” it is likely people will take up facebook on this other? i think some well but i doubt very many would do that because it will involve a degree of trust, human being looking at the image, you will have to trust that no—one misbehaves and stores those themselves. but even if they do, if they do do it, there is the issue of how effective this will be. they use a lot of intelligent software to scan the image and produce a digital fingerprint of the image which means nothing matching the fingerprint should be able to be uploaded but the problem with that if there are a myriad ways of altering images so that it could trick, at the moment, even the best artificial intelligence programmes. we see examples of that with youtube, where they try to prevent copyrighted material from being uploaded and you see all sorts of tricks on videos from youtube to try to make it look like a different video, even though a human being will see it as being the same. so what you are saying is people who have the same photograph could tweak it slightly and potentially would be able to post the same photograph, virtually, online anyway? yes, it
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depends on how smart the artificial intelligence software is, but at the moment it is possible to call any artificial intelligence. it makes it artificial intelligence. it makes it a bit harder, but i think that, combined with the fact that people who are worried would have to have those images in their position already, which they won't always do, and then be willing to take the risk of forwarding it to facebook and all others on the risk that, because a relationship has broken down and they were read, so they have to balance this in their mind between sharing the image themselves and hoping it does not get shared by their ex—partner. hoping it does not get shared by their ex-partner. laura, you run a helpline for victims of revenge porn, how big a problem is it? since we launched we have had over 7000 calls to our helpline, it is a significant issue and the threat to post images can be just as detrimental as people actually doing it, so i think this is positive and we do welcome it. do you think other platforms will follow if this is successful? i would really like to
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see that. this is a brand—new thing, quite ground—breaking. hopefully it will have some effect, it will be a deterrent perhaps for people and make it harder to upload and certainly we would love to see the technology rolled out much more widely. fevzi, do you think, realistically, this could become one of the solutions for dealing with revenge porn? i think it can become pa rt of revenge porn? i think it can become part of the solution. once a digital fingerprint has been created then it should be possible to share that social media platform so that an individual doesn't have to register their image with multiple organisations, perhaps a single truly independent organisation produces the hashes and provided to the social media platforms would be a better solution. ok, thank you both. joe fox went from being homeless,
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to a fluke meeting with american rapper asap rocky while busking in london. he then became rocky's main collaborator, featuring five times on his latest number one album. we caught up with him before a "shelter from the storm" gig for the homeless. is this coming well? working—class background, didn't know my dad, i had one half sister, single—parent family. if you are into music and have no support from yourfamily it into music and have no support from your family it is into music and have no support from yourfamily it is hard to into music and have no support from your family it is hard to pay for it all. i was in bands but it is beg, steal or borrow. i am not a great criminal so steal or borrow. i am not a great criminalsoi steal or borrow. i am not a great criminal so i had to busk and sell cds and all sorts. london is crazy
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expensive to live in so when i met rocky immediately let me stay in his hotel. i'd just tried to connect with my family, and they didn't want to know. yeah, i was lucky to meet him when i did. i didn't know who he was, i knew the name asap. ijust tried to sell him a cd, like i was doing at the time, you know? we went down into the studio. the first song i played it was listen up katie. and i played him a song called welcome to the ghetto, and head down low and he wasjust saying "are these your songs? are these your songs?" and i said, "yeah, these are my songs." and that was it, really. # i want a melody to save this soul. # i want a feeling that i used to know. when i was homeless, it was... i was never... never knew about places like this.
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but i think it's amazing. sometimes i think that a performer is only as good as his crowd. hopefully everyone will know where i'm coming from. i just want to play the songs, man. i've got a really good band, i've got an amazing team, i love everyone at my label. yeah, i just want to keep writing songs, you know? thank you. applause. thejudgement in the uber tribunal has just come in. the company has lost their appeal. that's against an earlier ruling that was made last year that it should treat its drivers as workers rather than self—employed independent contractors. uber has lost that appeal. they are expected to pursue a further appeal, possibly to pursue a further appeal, possibly to the supreme court. we will bring you more on that story when we have it. women vaccinated against human papilloma virus, or hpv, which is thought to cause about 99%
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of cervical cancers, may only need three smear tests in their lifetime, a new study has suggested. since 2008, the hpv vaccine has been offered to girls aged 11 to 13 and reported cases have fallen sharply since then. a team from queen mary university of london found that screenings at age 30, 40 and 55 would offer the same benefit to these young women as the current 12 screenings. the study comes ahead of planned changes to the screening programme in england for 2019, and similar adjustments in scotland and wales. earlier we discussed the impact of hpv and those new proposals. mandy parker was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2015 after a routine smear test and she had to have a hysterectomy. she told me how she was diagnosed. it was through my regular screening, soi it was through my regular screening, so i haven't missed one every three yea rs. so i haven't missed one every three years. i went injune of 2015. but i
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had no symptoms. i went along as normal, had the screening and u nfortu nate normal, had the screening and unfortunate they called me back because i had abnormal cells. in september of 2015! had a radical hysterectomy because of early—stage cervical cancer. i was told if i hadn't gone for screening it would bea hadn't gone for screening it would be a totally different story. i am here to tell the tale now and it's so important and it's so great to have the new hpv screening, because thatis have the new hpv screening, because that is exec what caused my cervical cancer. you were approaching the screening, and it would have been another three years otherwise. women lead busy lives and it's so easy to put it off. it's so important to attend on time so they can detect early changes. it wasn't as bad as it could have been. how do you feel about the news today? you have two teenage daughters. it's brilliant. they have both been vaccinated and it's been absolutely fine. i would
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encourage everyone to have the hpv vaccine. that caused my surgical cancer. along with the bank vaccine and the new screening programme. it's excellent. it stops people getting cervical cancer in the end, that's what we want. it's really exciting times for cervical cancer because we know what causes it, we can look for it and we are turning the programme over so we can look for it and we are turning the programme over so we can can look for it and we are turning the programme over so we can look for that rather than abnormal cells, which say better and simpler test. when will it come in? this is what the study has found. when could this new screening the study has found. when could this new screening programme the study has found. when could this new screening programme kick in?” think the important thing to say is that this is a model. what researchers have done is that if this happens, and it happens in this way, then it would be safe for woman to have many fewer screens. what the programme is doing at the moment is
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concentrate on changing from the y concentrate on changing from the cytology test, looking at cells undera cytology test, looking at cells under a microscope, to looking for the presence of a virus. we'll get that into place by the end of 2019. the other thing to say is that the girls who have been vaccinated are coming up to 21 and 22. we start screening at 25. we know that screening at 25. we know that screening is being taken up by less women. generally the rates of people taking up screening are declining. why do you think that is? all sorts of reasons. before i go there, i wa nt of reasons. before i go there, i want to say that i will probably be dead by the time the current 25—year—olds are right the way through the programme, because it does not finish until 65. we need to be clear that for women who have not been vaccinated, it's incredibly important they get their screening test. people need to get their three screens in a lifetime. the key thing
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is having the hpv vaccine at a young age. how long, once you have had that, and schoolgirls are having the hpv vaccine, how long does it last? a good question, and part of what the reason of what peter has done as a model, we have been vaccinating, and across the world we have been vaccinating since 2008 or so. the evidence is very strong that it lasts a long time. but we are continuing to gather the data to see if people remain protected. nicola, do you want to come in before we come back to the reasons why? the main aim of the surgical screening programme is prevention rather than early diagnosis. it does pick up some cases of cervical cancer, but a lot of women who get abnormal results, those cell changes are free cancer risk, they can be dealt with so it can be moved in dublin before it can have the chance to develop
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into cancer. when a lot of women go through the smear process, they will be fine. hopefully it can be dealt with before it turns into cancer. could we in theory get to a stage where you really do minimise cases of serious cervical cancer? i don't wa nt to of serious cervical cancer? i don't want to use the word eliminate.“ people took the screening off or up as the programme currently is now, we would stop more than 80% of cases of cervical cancer. it's an incredibly effective set of things to do. having said that, you say there are declining numbers of women going for screening. why is that? it's interesting. i think it's a mix of reasons. apart from the obvious that it's not necessarily the procedure itself, although it doesn't take very long, it might not be the most comfortable thing to do for people. some people find it
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uncomfortable. and some people are worried they will find it uncomfortable. people lead busy lives. if you have three jobs and four children, you have other things to worry about and it can be difficult to get access to a gp or a clinic to do these things. and some really interesting work suggests that about five to 8% of people who have never had it, have never heard of it. the plot of a new bbc drama the boy with the topknot is based on the real life memoirs of sathnam sanghera. born to traditional sikh parents in wolverhampton, sathnam went on to study at cambridge and became a successfuljournalist. but it wasn't until his late twenties that he learnt a painful family secret about mental illness in his family. in a moment we'll be joined by sacha dahwan who plays sathnam, but first let's watch a clip. i went with daddy to see his doctor at the clinic the other day. dr dutta? yeah. good man. yeah. why don't we ever talk about daddy's schizophrenia ? what's there to talk about?
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well, dr dutta mentioned aggression. what are you saying? when was the last time you saw daddy be aggressive? never, he'd have never. he's the kindest, gentlest man. no, i'm not saying he isn't. he is on medication now. he's been on medication since before you were born. why are you bringing this up now? indi, i didn't know this until two days ago. of course you knew. i didn't. you knew. i didn't. and sacha is with us now. . how did you first hear about this role? every year the bbc announced the projects they will do and i saw this one. i had gone through other projects and knew the ones that i wouldn't be seen for and then i saw the boy with the top knot. i thought the book was amazing and i had reservations because i thought they could tip it on its head and it
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wouldn't be as good. i auditioned for it, and it happened. you almost didn't audition for it.” for it, and it happened. you almost didn't audition for it. i didn't. the story is so personal to me as well. i have always played characters that are incredibly different to me. this was so close to home and i wasn't sure i was ready enough to put that to the forefront. but it was actually my girlfriend who had a serious word with me and said, you are turning this down because you are scared of the challenge. the challenges you are scared of the most are the ones you should do. it's the best thing i have ever done. the best thing you have ever done. the best thing you have ever done. the best thing you have ever done? yeah, i'm so proud of it, and i'm doing the press for it now and realise how important it is. not the fact it is representing us, our background, but the fact it is putting mental illness at the forefront as well. people just don't talk about it. when you say it is closely related to elements of your own life, could you give me
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examples? not just own life, could you give me examples? notjust being from an indian background, it's that at the age of around 30 i felt very disconnected from my roots. i wasn't going home as much. i knew my family, my parents, they were going through some difficulties and i chose to avoid it and run away from it. around the age of 30 i confronted it. i just it. around the age of 30 i confronted it. ijust got to communicate with my parents a bit more and it was the best thing that happened. it changed everything. it freed me and made me realise, and i love my work as an actor, but it's not everything. family is really important, which is what this drama is about. i have seen some of this and it's really a deeply moving story. i come from a sikh family and it comes across as very authentic. a lot of the detail is very authentic, i could relate to it and a lot of the conversations could have happened in my household. how did you feel about getting across the
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authenticity. and this isn't a fictional character, this is sathnam's life. exactly what you said, it's not just sathnam's life. exactly what you said, it's notjust about a generic indian community, it's specifically sathnam's story. i had the book and i had sathnam at hand and i met him straightaway when i got the part. i realised i had to be sensitive because the story is still going on for him at the moment. i met him because i wanted to get his blessing. after chatting for five minutes we both realised we had so much in common. i realise that his story is so much my story, the story i was scared of telling. he said to on the part. you are playing me, but it's all you as well. —— own the part. in particular it explores a lot of sathnam's mother and how she deals with her husband's mental illness. that's a big thing. it made
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me realise the amount of respect i have for my parents, particularly my own mum. particularly sathnam's mum. i have an immense respect for her, she's the most selfless woman i have ever met. to think what she has been through, you wouldn't even think it. the fact she came over at such a young age into new country and then had to contend with her husband having an illness that they both know what it was. just the lack of communication and being able to speak the language. sathnam did not find out until much later on, he had secrets he didn't tell his family about. what was it like when you finally saw the finished version? did you watch it with sathnam's mum? what was the reaction?” did you watch it with sathnam's mum? what was the reaction? i watched it with sathnam. we were both terrified. you never know. you do the best is you do, but you don't
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know until it gets to the edit what it will be like. i realise that as much as it is about a sikh family, and sathnam's family and mental illness, it's about any family. it made me think about my own family. it's been a pleasure to have you on. the boy with the topknot is on bbc2 on monday at 9pm. thank you for your company today. turning cooler as we move through this weekend. plenty of good spells of sunshine around today. for northern ireland, scotland and north west england there are some showers and they will be particularly frequent in north—west scotland where it could be blustery and heavy with the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures between six and 13 celsius. through this evening and overnight we will see rain pushing in from northern ireland into western parts of the uk as we go through the night, england and wales turning particularly wet. in the far
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north, holding onto clearer spells, a chilly start to the day with one or two showers persisting for the far north of scotland. brightening up far north of scotland. brightening up in northern ireland and northern england. cloudy in the south and west where rain will become increasingly patchy as we move through the day. temperatures at a maximum of 13. chilly start to on remembrance sunday. some good spells of sunshine around and perhaps the odd isolated shower in coastal areas, but feeling chilly with the northwest breeze. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11. the latest round of brexit talks are under way
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in brussels as pressure mounts on the eu and britain to break the deadlock in the negotiations. theresa may warns pro—eu conservatives that the brexit process won't be blocked and sets out plans to put the exact exit date into law. meanwhile, a leaked european commission document says northern ireland may have to abide by eu customs rules to avoid a hard border with the republic. uber loses its appeal against a ruling on the employment rights of its drivers.

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