Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 16, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

11:00 am
this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11am: the future of zimbabwe's long—time leader, robert mugabe, remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country's military. mediation efforts are taking place between president mugabe and the generals who seized power. police confirm the final death toll from the grenfell tower fire is 71. plans to encourage housing associations to borrow money the public sector bureaucracy, associations will be able to concentrate on their core and crucial mission of building homes. ahead of next week's budget, labour call for an emergency budget for public services,urging the government to make a genuine and decisive change of course.
11:01 am
also russia's presence at next year's winter olympics is in doubt. the world anti—doping agency maintain its suspension, saying russia is still failing to comply with its rules. $400 million is the bed and the piece is sold. the highest ever price paid for a work of art — a painting by leonardo da vinci fetches over £340 million. good morning. it's thursday 16th november. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the future of zimbabwe's long—time leader, robert mugabe, remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country's military.
11:02 am
two envoys from south africa have arrived in the capital, harare, to try to hold talks with the 93—year—old and zimbabwe's generals, who deny there's been a coup. the army's intervention is being seen by many as an attempt to prevent mr mugabe's wife, grace, from succeeding him. laura westbrook reports. what would have been unthinkable only a few weeks ago has happened: robert mugabe, the world's oldest leader, has lost control of the country he has ruled for 37 years. the military denied staging a coup, but it is clear that robert mugabe is no longer calling the shots. zimbabwe's ruling party, the zanu—pf, were emphatic. president mugabe is still in power. he's the man in charge of zimbabwe, officially, right now. a lot has happened. but what has not happened is a coup. the language is important,
11:03 am
and key regional bloc, the african union, has given its full support to the country's legal situations. translation: this boils down to an internal struggle the ministry informs us this is not a. iwant to the ministry informs us this is not a. i want to thank them for removing this tyrant. this boils down to an internal struggle within the governing zanu—pf. on one side, this man, emmerson mnangagwa, and on this side robert mugabe's wife, grace, one of the most powerful politicians in the country.
11:04 am
it is believed her being groomed to succeed mr mugabe has sparked this takeover. reports say the military has began to arrest those close to her. there has to be a transition away from robert mugabe but any transition needs to be credible. zimbabweans are waking up to a country that has changed dramatically. but whether it is the change they had been hoping for is far from clear. our correspondent pumza fihlani is following events from johannesburg in neighbouring south africa. do we have any real idea how discussions are going, which seemed to be designed to persuade him to
11:05 am
step down? there is nothing official yet. we are hearing this from various sources which are unconfirmed, i must stress. we're hearing that robert mugabe is not in talks with the military officers, as well as the envoys which were sent by president zuma yesterday to try to mediate a peaceful transition. also the region is very busy today because in botswana there is a regional ministerial meeting to see how the neighbouring states can help zimbabwe to get out of this crisis. so you have botswana and all eyes or on what is happening in harare. in terms of the streets, it is still quiet but tens. there are conflicting reports about where
11:06 am
grace mugabe is. our understanding as she is with her husband robert mugabe under house arrest in harare. there were conflicting reports yesterday which said she had gone to namibia. it sounds like she's with president robert mugabe. you can imagine what is happening in that room. she was hoping to be vice president. the vice president who was sacked is now back in the country. we understand the opposition leader morgan chang awry has returned from health treatment abroad to be part of the negotiating team. thank you. with me is dr sue onslow from the institute of commonwealth studies at university of london.
11:07 am
she has written extensively about robert mugabe. is he the sort of man who could be persuaded to step down from power? he isa persuaded to step down from power? he is a seasoned negotiator. at lancaster house, he was resilient and focused on what he wanted to achieve. he didn't get it, but he has considerable experience. this will be a very tense set of discussions. and how he responds to mediators will be crucial in determining what happens next whether there is a smooth transition oi’ whether there is a smooth transition or not? this is a struggle within the party the military is intimately connected to the party. the importance says that is our new pf are emphasising they have processes in play that must be adhered to.
11:08 am
that is a strong car robert mugabe house to play. he haas to comply or go along with requests for him to stand down or make it altogether more difficult. since he is refusing to relinquish control, this places the military‘s gesture in a difficult position. the african union would have to take action if it is confirmed to be a coup. house split is zanu—pf over robert mugabe? —— how split. split is zanu—pf over robert mugabe? -- how split. it has been a bitter struggle. rivalfactions both want to see the old man go. but the fight over a succession to see the old man go. but the fight over a succession is between the
11:09 am
faction following grace mugabe or the other candidate. the revolution, which was zanu—pf‘s agenda, was a powerful party card. this could take weeks. it is very murky what is going on. conflicting reports. the game is not yet played out. thank you. police believe they have now found and identified the bodies of everyone who died in the grenfell tower fire. they've put the final number of victims at 71, including a stillborn baby. in the immediate aftermath of the blaze, 400 people were listed as missing. they said the search
11:10 am
and identification operation had been "meticulous." commander stuart cundy at the metropolitan police has been speaking to our correspondent tom burridge. i can't ican‘t imagine i can't imagine the families of those who have died have gone through over the last five months. it has been a priority for us to search grenfell tower and find all those who died, recover them with dignity. and subsequently identified. yesterday, the last two identities of those that were recovered were confirmed to the satisfaction of the coroner. i now now with confidence that the number of people that have died in a result of people that have died in a result of the fire is 71 and sadly that includes a stillborn baby. it has taken so long because of the sheer challenge that grenfell tower has placed on all emergency services,
11:11 am
but particularly the specialist teams that were used to recover all those that have died. 71 people, and it is not about the number it is about the people, but the challenge of it has been immense. specialist teams have worked through 15 and a half tonnes of debris on each and every floor of grenfell tower by hand to find every fragment they can of all those who died. that has been extremely distressing to all those involved. your previous estimate was that roughly eight 80 people had perished. why have you taken the figure down and reached this figure? we have had thousands of calls. in june, based on all the information and their families and next of kin who came forward, we projected the figure might have been about 80. da two main reasons that number has
11:12 am
come down. sadly, we are investigating a number of fraud allegations. earlier this month, investigating a number of fraud allegations. earlierthis month, one man has pleaded guilty. he said his wife and child had died with the fire. equally, the calls we received reported many people missing. one person was reported missing by 46 different people. we spent months trying to track down each and every one of those people. we have tracked down around the world and we are satisfied they are alive and well. the final number, sadly it is 71 people have died. what you say to people have died. what you say to people who are still sceptical? but you say to someone who still questions the official figure? the
11:13 am
work we have in our investigation, we have cctv images of all those who came out. there is only one way in and out of the tower. we have footage of everyone who came out of the tower. we have body—worn images from police officers. 223 people came out of grenfell tower and survived. which is tremendous that so many came out of such an awful and horrific fire. with confidence, ican and horrific fire. with confidence, i can say that 223 people were in the tower that night. not all of them are residents, some were visitors. some residents were not in the tower on the night. with confidence, we can say 71 have died. they were the people we were expecting to find. when i went into g re nfell tower a few expecting to find. when i went into grenfell tower a few days after the fire had been put out, i honestly thought it was likely we would not
11:14 am
find everybody who had died. i'm so pleased for the families and the loved ones of all those who have died that we've been able to find all those who died. recover them, identify them and return as much as we possibly can back to their families. our correspondent nick beake is in west london for us now. what more have the police been seeing today? well, i havejust what more have the police been seeing today? well, i have just been listening in to a further update from commander stuart cundy and he has been giving some fern are interesting and significant detail. he hasjust interesting and significant detail. he has just told interesting and significant detail. he hasjust told us interesting and significant detail. he has just told us that grenfell tower will remain a crime scene until next spring. even though the police say that the recovery operation and trying to find the remains of victims will go on for a couple of weeks now, for potentially the next 56 months, grenfell tower ball remain the responsibility of
11:15 am
the police. we have a huge criminal investigation under way. on a daily basis, experts are going in, forensic teams, looking for any sort of evidence because the police have said this is a fire that simply should not have happened. to that end, their investigation continues. that begs the question, what will happen potentially next april or may? will the tower be knocked down? will it be demolished? the police have just said they would not stand in the way of that process but it is not one for them. it is the council and others who will be responsible for that decision. i should also say the police will say they will try to reconstruct in some way exactly how the fire took hold and spread. that will be done through computer animations and computer graphics but also physically reconstructing some flats. the police say they are treating every flat that was in g re nfell tower
11:16 am
treating every flat that was in grenfell tower as an individual crime scene. how significant is it today that the police have put a final number on the victims? they've been talking about how painstaking that work has been. how significant is that, in terms of the inquests and the broader enquiry of course? well, i think it is a significant moment. five months on after the dreadful fire moment. five months on after the dreadfulfire here, police are giving a sense of finality and if that had definite figure on the number of people who perished at night. 71. in the days after the fire, there was much anger, confusion, mistrust of authorities. some people saying there were many more people within the building that night. i spoke to a local councillor a few minutes ago. he said people here grudgingly have come to the conclusion that that figure is accurate. that was his own perspective. resigned some people about what happened in the days and weeks after the fire, but a
11:17 am
significant moment. the policing 293 people they believed were in the tower that night. they looked at emma gees worn on the bodies of police officers and cctv. they have come to the conclusion that 71 people died. the inquests that takes place next week we believe will be the final inquests. then the focus will shift to the criminal investigation. the wire enquiry of lessons that can be learned and if appropriate apportioning some sort of blame. people may have contributed through negligence or otherwise to this awful fire. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the future of zimbabwe's long—time leader robert maghaberry remains unclear leader robert maghaberry remains u nclear after leader robert maghaberry remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country's
11:18 am
military. the metropolitan police have said theirfinal military. the metropolitan police have said their final assessment is that 71 people were killed in the g re nfell tower that 71 people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. and the government has announced new measures to build more houses. it will encourage housing associations to borrow money in order to invest in more properties. the annual price of foot—ball study is out. it shows the sport is facing a challenge to retain a young fans. more than half of 18-24 retain a young fans. more than half of 18—24 —year—olds surveys said they did not believe football was being run with them in mind. and russia's hopes of competing in the winter olympics have been dealt a blow. and mark stoneman has scored a century on the second day of the final warm century on the second day of the finalwarm up game century on the second day of the final warm up game ahead of the ashes. i will have more sport in about ten minutes. the government is pledging to build
11:19 am
more homes more quickly. the communities secretary is promising new measures in the budget next week to tackle the shortage of affordable accommodation. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster for us now. there is a big debate over exactly how you define affordable accommodation. the government is trying to get this out ahead of the budget. is there a real sense of momentum behind these moves? there is when you think about the words, but too many people watching and listening to this, these are not new arguments. all political parties agree there is a problem and again today we have had another analysis of the problem from the housing minister. eat particularly about the generational divide, talking about the so—called baby boomers who have bought houses, they have gone up in
11:20 am
price, and comparing that to the younger generation. he gave a startling statistic that a third of men in their 30s are still living at home. he does say it is time to act. the question is how. he talked about a giant leap. really ramping up expectations ahead of next week's budget. he said part of the problem has been getting everyone to work together. it is notjust about government intervening, it is about the public sector and the private sector, councils and central government all working together. this is what sajid javid had to say. in the budget next week, we will show how hard we are willing to fight to get britain building. as i have said, central government can only do so much. if you are going to fix our broken housing market, if we re fix our broken housing market, if were going to repair the damage that's been done to our societies and communities, if were going to
11:21 am
make good on our promise to the next generation, then just like make good on our promise to the next generation, thenjust like in the day of churchill, we all have a role to play. will have to roll up our sleeves and get to work. most important of all, we all have to ask ourselves, what kind of country do we want this to be? the big unknown and this is how far is philip hammond the treasury prepare to go on this? sajid javid is pitching for more money. he probably wants to listen the planning rules and try and get more built on public lands, the question is whether philip hammond is prepared to do that. he's very much focused on getting down the government's deficit, holding the government's deficit, holding the purse strings pretty tight, but with this kind of rhetoric today from the housing minister, people really are expecting quite a big move in next week's budget. john
11:22 am
mcdonnell has spoken about what labour would like to see in the budget. are spending restless. that's right. this goes back to their election manifesto, talking about the need to borrow to invest. much more willing to do that than the conservatives have been in the past. john mcdonnell talking today about £17 billion a year increase in day—to—day spending to go into public services as well as things like housing. he said it will be paid for by tax rises, particularly on corporations and taking tax games away from the richest in society. he's also looking at trying to get more money off those trying to avoid their tax. labour say this is all perfectly possible without adding too much to the government's deficit. andrea leadsom is to make a
11:23 am
statement today about the new commons grievance procedure for people who say they have been assaulted or harassed. of this a lot of people will be watching to find out what precisely that is going to consist of giving the criticism there isn't really a system in place to support people? their point is if you have been a victim of sexual harassment are bullying, and iraq in parliament, it's not further different roles depending on which party you are in. they want something set up in parliament to reassure people and she is likely to give us more information on that in the next hour or so. thank you. a 500 year—old painting by leonardo da vinci has sold for more than $450 million — the highest ever paid for a work of art.
11:24 am
the painting — called salvator mundi or saviour of the world — shows christ with one hand raised, the other holding a glass sphere. it was sold at auction in new york, to an unknown buyer. our arts correspondent vincent dowd reports. we move to leonardi da vinci, the salvator mundi... christie's suggested that salvator mundi would sell for $100 million — that's around £76 million. they knew that was likely to be exceeded comfortably, but nobody could have guessed how comfortably. dating from around 1506, the image ofjesus christ is thought to have been created for the french royal family. disastrously restored in 1958, it was auctioned in london than for a mere £45, at a time most experts thought it was by a student of leonardo, not by the man himself. let's open this at 70, 75... last night, the tension was obvious as christie's auctioneer kept the bids flowing. $100 million was reached quickly, than $200 million. $190 million is bid. $200 million is bid.
11:25 am
that broke the previous record, held by picasso's women of algiers, sold for $179 million in 2015. i am selling at $240 million. can you give me $290 million alex? 300. i thought so. $300 million. it seemed that bidding had reached its climax. until the buyer, who was on the phone, was tempted to the extraordinary final amount. $400 million is the bid, and the piece is sold. it is not known who the buyer was. the sale shows the importance of rarity — this could be the last leonardo to ever reach auction, and almost half a millennium after his death, he showed us he is still the greatest star in the art world. the world anti—doping agency has decided to maintain russia's suspension for being noncompliant. it comes less than three months before the winter olympics,
11:26 am
where russia could still face a ban by the ioc. russia was suspended after a report detailed a state—sponsored doping scheme in 2014. our correspondent mark lowen is in seoul where officials from the world anti—doping agency have been meeting. take us through the details of why wada is saying russia still is not compliant and how badly could that affect russia's chances of taking pa rt affect russia's chances of taking part in the winter olympics? the board have met here in seoul and have said russia has still not complied in two key areas. you're in samples of some athletes who are suspected of having benefited from
11:27 am
doping are alleged to have been tampered with. with bottles were thought to be tamper—proof, but they are thought to have been manipulated by russian authorities. samples are still not been released for checking and also russian authorities have not accepted an independent report by an independent investigator who find that about 1000 russian athletes in more than 30 sports between 2012 and 2015 were alleged to have benefited from the state—sponsored doping. so both of those meaning that wada has taken the decision that russia is still not compliant. that puts pressure on the international olympic committee which meets on fifth december to ta ke which meets on fifth december to take a decision that russian athletes would be banned from the winter olympics. they will have to decide whether or not they will take the decision. russia has responded pretty accurately to the comments by wada today saying it is a joke and a political decision by wada. i've
11:28 am
been speaking to the president of wada, sir craig reading. the agreed road map of compliance has been fulfilled in many ways, but there are fulfilled in many ways, but there a re two fulfilled in many ways, but there are two issues which remain unfulfilled. on that basis, the situation of compliance was renewed. one alternative to an outright ban would be to tell russia that athletes who are clean, who are not alleged to have been tainted by the doping allegations could participate independently, so under a so—called neutral flag, not in the name of the russian federation. vladimir putin has already said that would be unacceptable and would lead to a russian boycott of the games.
11:29 am
inhabit it to craig brady there could be a russian boycott, he said there have been plenty of boycotts in the past, it is counter—productive and doesn't achieve anything. the winter olympics take place in less than three months here in south korea. thank you. the issue of student fees in england has been under the spotlight since labour's election promise to scrap them — a move which was credited with winning the party. support among young voters. now a social mobility charity has suggested that students from the richest homes should pay over £12,000 a year, while those from the poorest should pay nothing to attend university. for more on this let's talk to sir peter lampl who's chair of the sutton trust, the charity which came up with the policy. thank you for taking the time to talk to us. at what level do you think a student should be paying
11:30 am
fees of 12,000 orjust over £12,000 a year? at what level of income in terms of the homes they come from? let mejust back let me just back up. it is an absolute disgrace that in this country if you come from a council estate, you pay more, come out with more debt than somebody who has gone to one of the top boarding schools. that is what we are focusing on. that is what we are focusing on. that is what we are focusing on. that is the starting point? the overall levels of fees are too high, we tripled them. levels are too high. but what is most important, that from low to moderate income backgrounds. we have got kids below 25,000 income if you are above
11:31 am
£100,000 income, you will be paying 12,500. we think it's fair. it is going to allow certain children not to be put off. the levels of debt almost double those of the united states. we' re almost double those of the united states. we're looking at over £50,000 of debt, of putting for the kids we work with. new are similar children who have parents with high incomes are willing to support them through university? not necessarily. if they do not want to support them, they are going to incur more debt. but we know as a matter of fact, kids from well off households get betterjobs, able to pay back fees and in many cases parents can
11:32 am
support them financially. those from low to moderate backgrounds have no choice, money. kids from well off backgrounds used to it. you are also talking about the reintroduction of grants, ona talking about the reintroduction of grants, on a similar sliding scale? well... at the moment it does. the answer, yes. maintenance grants were abolished just over a year ago. that is why kids from council estates are paying more than those from well off backgrounds because they have got to pay more to live. we want this to be reintroduced so that kids from low to moderate income backgrounds can access the grounds and not going to end up with so much debt. thank you. thank you. it isjust after 11:30.
11:33 am
now the weather. we have got some rain moving southwards across england and wales, pretty heady across the midlands and south wales. that is associated with this cold front. spreading to the south east. going to be holding onto some high temperatures, 10—13, 14. but behind that cold front, with the sunshine it is going to the chillier. point a lot of scattered showers across scotland. clearing from the south, clear skies, cold and frosty evening. these are the temperatures for the towns and cities. the countryside, going to _3’ cities. the countryside, going to —3, and perhaps even —4. tomorrow you could have some frost on the car windscreen. plenty of sunshine across england and wales, northern
11:34 am
ireland and most of scotland. going to continue to get those showers in, wintry on higher ground. noticeably colder tomorrow, wintry on higher ground. noticeably coldertomorrow, maximum wintry on higher ground. noticeably colder tomorrow, maximum 7—9. wintry on higher ground. noticeably coldertomorrow, maximum 7—9. bye bye. good morning. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: negotiations are expected in zimbabwe to determine the future of president mugabe, who remains under house arrest following the army's seizure of power. reports say the president is locked in talks with the heads of the military and other politicians. police investigating the grenfell tower fire say they've now found and identified all the victims of the tragedy. 71 people died, including a still born baby. in a bid to build more houses, the government says it'll encourage housing associations to borrow money so they can invest in new properties. time now for a look
11:35 am
at the sport news. the price of football? yes. the bbc‘s price of football survey is out, and for the third year in a row the average ticket price has either fallen or stayed the same. our reporter katherine downes is at the home of premier league side stoke city. some of the most interesting parts of the study involving young people, it seems that they could be getting priced out? yes. as well as crunching these numbers about the cost of tickets, shirts, pies, tea, the bbc has also done a poll of 18-24 the bbc has also done a poll of 18—24 year olds and despite the fact that the majority of tickets in the premier league have either been frozen, or stayed the same, 82% of those 18—24 year olds have said that
11:36 am
the cost of the ticket as an obstacle the cost of the ticket as an o bsta cle of the cost of the ticket as an obstacle of watching football. this has prompted clubs to do more to engage. this could be the most striking statistics. today, following this bbc poll, warning is that football could be at risk with losing touch with the generation of fans. really interesting to see if clubs like stoke city can keep those fans with
11:37 am
them. what have they been doing today, about keeping those fans coming along and coming to the stadium? i have been talking to some people engaging with the young fans, and for example be have spent about £40,000 setting up a scheme, going to primary schools and giving tickets for matches, and shirts. trying hook in young fans early. to it is certainly something that they think they need to do more of, particularly for that 18—24 demographic. i spoke to the head of the community. if you look at the average age of season ticket holders, it is still the mid 405. and that is a generation, my generation, that really grew up going to matches regularly and still have that habit. the next generation do not, because the have access or affordability i55ue5. do not, because the have access or affordability issues. when they get
11:38 am
to ourage, affordability issues. when they get to our age, that next wave of fans will not be there. thank you. if you wa nt to will not be there. thank you. if you want to get the details, just go to the bbc sport website. thank you. the government's pledging to build "more homes more quickly" as part of moves to fix what it calls britain's "broken housing market". joining me now from cambridge is labour's housing minister, john healey. thank you for talking to us today. the budget coming up next week. what would you like to see on housing, beyond what you have seen from the government today? we have heard from the government today, and we have heard before and it has not need much difference. home ownership down toa30 much difference. home ownership down to a 30 year low, homelessness double and building have the level,
11:39 am
the lowest ever level of new social rented homes. the government has got to do rented homes. the government has got todoa rented homes. the government has got to do a great deal better than this andi to do a great deal better than this and i would like to see them backing labour's plans, for the big boost to building new affordable homes to rent and buy, including council homes. serious rights for private rentals and the package backing first—time buyers. rentals and the package backing first-time buyers. it is difficult to do. it was said in the speech this morning that labour's record was dismal. when the shadow housing minister was the actual housing minister, this is a quote, housing labels feel to the second world war. how do you respond to that? that was the year after the global financial crisis, the deepest recession we have had in this country for centuries. in truth, rate has gone up, new figures the bills come from that. it is still below that pre crisis level, below what we need for
11:40 am
this country. and javid said today that the government's record is just not good enough. correct. it stands in broad comparison to labour, 2 million new homes under our government, the biggest social investment, social rented homes for a generation. i take no lessons from javid but i hope he will take some lessons from labour because this is getting worse not better. theresa may has admitted it was a big part in why the conservatives did so badly in the election this summer. some discrepancy between the net addition homes figure, the government said 217,000, labour has said over 280 3000. good news? good news. i think the number of new homes actually been built actually counts. but both figures are still
11:41 am
below the level ten years ago. despite the recovery being in place for over eight years. both levels below a decade ago, financial crisis. the government has got to do better and reveals some of the decisions taken that have made the problem worse. the issue of how do you define affordable housing. this isa you define affordable housing. this is a real sticking point for many people. it is. the government has been stretching the definition to breaking point. people mistrusted. how do you define it? council and housing association, social and rented homes are important. we have been trying to fix the level of a third of affordability, average income and that is the basic rule of thumb. when you say that new homes cost 450,000, are affordable, and
11:42 am
rain that comes from places in london. annual income, peoplejust turn around, not for me, my family. that is really what the government has got to crack, and it could fall in the budget the sort of plans that labour set out for the election. helping frosting barrels, attempts to put in place consumer rights for private rentals. and dealing with this cliff edge we have seen, very low levels of affordable housing, the lowest of level of social affordable homes in this country. thank you very much. the shadow chancellor mcdonnelljohn has thank you very much. the shadow chancellor mcdonnell john has been speaking this morning, dodging the chancellor to set out a decisive change of course at the budget next week. economic correspondent is with me. this comes as we said, the
11:43 am
government was sitting out plans for getting new affordable homes. there was a little bit more about what is on the labour spending wish list. focusing at the moment, and john mcdonnell‘s speech, the nhs and housing. whatjohn mcdonnell is talking about, a big boost in overall spending. he said he will fund from scrapping the conservative cuts in corporation tax that have reduced the amount the exchequer is taken from corporation tax and putting that back to 26%. it is a policy we first hear of in the ma nifesto policy we first hear of in the manifesto before the last election. he said more money could be spent on council house is, perhaps 100,000 council house is, perhaps 100,000 council houses are you to be built. we do not have exact details about the funding but presumably from the
11:44 am
same source, scrapping the conservative cuts to corporation tax and also other cuts, capital gains tax. thank you very much. the social media companies facebook and snapchat are to trial a new service offering direct support to victims of cyberbullying. it's after a campaign led by the duke of cambridge, who set up a taskforce looking into the issue 18 months ago. he'll launch a new code of conduct for the internet later today, urging young people to "stop, speak and support" each other online. our correspondent sophie long is at king's cross in london for us now. tell us more about how and why the duke of cambridge has been involved, leading to today? the duke of cambridge variety of just leading to today? the duke of cambridge variety ofjust over an hour ago, met by two young people who have experience of cyber bullying. he is a google
11:45 am
headquarters, task force that was set upjust headquarters, task force that was set up just over 18 months ago. he said as he was sitting down with some big names in online kick, media companies and the nspcc, that this was a particularly important issue for him personally. when he was working with the air ambulance, she was dealing with a number of suicides and a number had been a result of online bullying. today, going to launch that online action plan. it is a simple plan, three step code, stop, speak, support. here's hoping this is a message that will reach young people across the country. he said this is unique and nowhere else in the world is really tackling this issue in this way. it is hoped that when children witness or experience online bullying, they will stop, pause, not add to it inadvertently by perhaps sharing
11:46 am
comments, they will stop and speak and seek out an adult and talk about it. the other thing he hopes they will do, is support other people. if they see somebody else been a victim of online bullying, they will perhaps send a supportive message, letting them know that they are not alone. he is still upstairs, at that meeting, then he's going to come down to youtube, meeting some pa rents down to youtube, meeting some parents and kids as well. some of them will have experience of the stuff happening online. it is hoped that message was good to get across to people. the purpose of this is to really support young people who have been finding life difficult in the online sphere. thank you very much. let's get more now on the 500—year—old painting by leonardo da vinci, known as salvator mundi or saviour of the world. it's sold for more than $450 million, and that's the highest amount ever paid for a work of art.
11:47 am
i'm joined by georgina adam, editor at large of the art newspaper. what an option. it was so dramatic, and if you have seen footage of that, incredible. unbelievable. 19 minutes to hammer it down, two people going for it at the end. last bid, $40 million over the previous one. extraordinary. and who buys a work of art like this? who can possibly afford this? you can imagine, we are all trying to figure this out. a lot of extremely rich people in the world. fortunes today, can be tens of billions. 450 million in that context is not huge. i do not think it could be a waste of
11:48 am
musuem. far beyond. eyes on the far east. what we do not know. more likely to be a museum or private collectors ? likely to be a museum or private collectors? many private collectors have their own museums. it could be a private collector. at this moment we have a lot of reporters trying to figure out who this is. and tell us why, this painting on the screen, has fetched this record breaking price? it is a unique piece. da vinci is probably the greatest artist ever. the best known. mona lisa, the best known i would say. he has existing paintings, 20 or even less. this is a unique piece. most are in museums. just one in private hands. you are purchasing a trophy,
11:49 am
a unique piece by the greatest living artist ever. not the greatest living artist ever. not the greatest living artist! the greatest ever. living artist ever. not the greatest living artist! the greatest everlj wonder what he would have made of this. this man renowned for futuristic thinking, as real as wonderful art. i cannot imagine. we could even ask what christ makes of it! thank you very much. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour. first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the future of zimbabwe's long—time leader, robert mugabe, remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country's military. the metropolitan police have said their final assessment is that seventy one people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the government has announced new measures to build more houses —
11:50 am
it will encourage housing associations to borrow money in order to invest in more properties. i'm jamie robertson. in the business news... first... british retail sales recorded a decline of 0.3% in october. it's the first fall since 2013, but that's the year—on—year figure. the month—on—month number, september to october, showed a similar rise in sales. that's why the office of national statistics says the underlying pattern is "steady growth". more on that in a sec. mixed news in the post for royal mail this morning. strong growth at its european parcels business helped push revenue up 2% to £4.8 billion. that's just for the first half of the year. however, its actual profits are not improving at all and fell £2 million to £250 million. royal mail was privatised in 2013 and says competition is the problem, from dhl and federal express and so on. it also says costs are rising too. online takeaway servicejust eat has
11:51 am
been given the green light by the competition and markets authority for a £200 million takeover bid of its industry rival hungryhouse. just eat said it expects the transaction will now complete at the beginning of 2018. more on those sales. uk retail sales fell by 0.3% in october compared with the same month a year earlier, according to the office for national statistics. that's the the first annual fall for four years. the most obvious explanation is that prices are rising faster than wages and that's people simply can't afford to buy as much as they used to. inflation is currently at at a five year high of 3%, while wages are rising at a rate ofjust 2.2%. the difference, crucial. let's talk a retail analyst.
11:52 am
wages a lot of the same speed as prices? absolutely. people cannot maintain the amount of product the temperatures. going back on the number that they have been buying. the values are increasing but that is because of the inflation element. it is the number of products they are actually purchasing, dropping. we know that year on year, numbers are down. but month on month, up. what has been going on? in volume terms, actually down month on month. compared to last month... people have been buying fewer products. if you take into account value and inflation, in terms of what people can inflation, in terms of what people ca n afford inflation, in terms of what people can afford to put into the shopping basket, the number of products is dropping. can you give us an idea about sectors, foot? foot and
11:53 am
clothing and footwear... regarded as the steeple of the high street both dropping in terms of volumes. some non foot products, dropping, but household products. it is the types of products you would expect. actually dropping. people are buying less eating products. in other business news.... uk consumers will spend an average of £544 this christmas, which is 38% more than the european average. that's according to a recent report from deloitte. the uk intends to spend 70% more on gifts than any other european nation surveyed. and no real surprise — chocolate is the number one christmas gift for british consumers, with teenagers expecting to receive money and children expecting books. refreshing thought!
11:54 am
engineering giant gkn has said its new chief executive is to leave the company before even taking up the role. kevin cummings had been due to assume the role on the 1st of january, but the company said it was now looking for "alternative leadership". the move came as gkn announced another write—down at its aerospace division, which mr cummings used to head. nor explanation given for him leaving. and barbie maker mattel has rebuffed the latest takeover approach from rival hasbro, according to sources quoted by reuters. that casts doubt over the potential merger between the world's two largest toy companies. mattel believes the offer undervalues it and doesn't address potential antitrust concerns — so the sources claim. quick look at the markets. mixed. or
11:55 am
be slick, because of the departure of the ceo. royal mail, actually starting up, revenues up, but worried about the profit. £ stronger. against the dollar. that's all the business news for now. back to you. thank you. we havejust thank you. we have just had some news coming to us from the metropolitan police, conforming the names of the final two victims to be identified from the grenfell tower fire. scotland yard confirmed it was a 71—year—old, victoria king, and her daughter, who was 40. police confirming they have been identified as the final victims of the grenfell tower fire, as the final victims of the grenfell towerfire, on the as the final victims of the grenfell tower fire, on the day that police
11:56 am
have released the final number of victims of the fire injune, 71, including a still born baby. we have heard from police that grenfell tower is going to remain as a crime scene until spring next year. we will have more on that coming up, but the headlines on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, though, we leave you with for a look at the weather. we have got some rain moving south across the united kingdom at the moment. it is introducing some colder, fresh conditions across northern parts of the united kingdom. but that rain band and cold front is going to continue to move south. rain fizzles out. patchy far south. rain fizzles out. patchy far south. holding onto the relatively mild conditions, 10—13, further
11:57 am
north, dropping temperatures as that moves through. tonight, the cloud and rain continues to push out of the united kingdom and with those clear skies, cold night. the united kingdom and with those clearskies, cold night. showers continuing for the north but temperatures for the towns and cities could be even more than they suggest. for the countryside, cities could be even more than they suggest. forthe countryside, —3, -4. suggest. forthe countryside, —3, —4. many of us could be waking up to some frost on the car windscreen. it is going to be a cold start on friday but sparkling sunshine across england and wales. temperatures at this stage still struggling. a lot of sunshine or northern england, not as cold across scotland and northern ireland, more cloud and showers, certainly western scotland. brisk west wind. those scattered showers group to continue for much of the day across scotland, some sunny
11:58 am
spells for northern england and showers for cumbria and lancashire. notably colder. especially the south. temperatures single figures. seven, eight, nine. forthe weekend, cold air influencing most of us. the south west going to try to nudge in some perhaps not as cold here bad we're also going have some cloudy skies and rain moving southwards. the best of the sunshine at that north—eastern quadrant of the native kingdom. temperatures about seven, eight, 12 in the south west. sunday has got low—pressure, trying to nudge in. some uncertainty as to how far east that cloud and rain nudge in. could some scattered showers here. dry. elsewhere, the best of the sunshine for eastern areas, again it is going to be on the
11:59 am
chilly side. more details on the website. bye bye. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday: the future of zimbabwe's long—time leader, robert mugabe, remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country's military. reports say negotiations are under way between president mugabe and the generals who seized power. police confirm the final death toll from the grenfell tower fire. 71 people died in the tragedy. the government announces new measures to build more houses. it'll encourage housing associations to borrow money to invest in more properties. free from the shackles of public sector bureaucracy, housing associations will be able to focus on their core mission of building
12:00 pm
homes. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell sets out labour's spending priorities — ahead of next week's budget — saying he wants to see an emergency cash boost for public services. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. we will go straight to the house of commons where andrea leadsom is updating mps commons where andrea leadsom is updating mp5 on the response to allegations of harassment at westminster. in terms, volunteers, journalists and constituency staff. it was agreed that the political parties would establish a cross— party parties would establish a cross—party working group to take
12:01 pm
this work forward. and i'm pleased to report that the group met for the first time on tuesday. the working group is made up of representatives from every party and from both houses. conservative, labour, snp, lib dem, plaid cymru, dup, green and crossbenchers. very importantly, the members and peers staff association and unite union representing parliamentary staff on the group. and are ensuring their experiences and their requirements are taken fully into account. the first meeting of the working group made clear that the voices of staff will be at the heart of this process. any new system will need the absolute confidence of those who will use it. the working group also agreed that the new procedure must be independent of the political parties. and that to inform the group over the next two weeks, we will hear from group over the next two weeks, we will hearfrom a number of group over the next two weeks, we will hear from a number of different contributors. this will include
12:02 pm
hearing from staff directly as well as groups including acas, ipsa, the parliamentary commissioner for standards and experts on a range of topics that will help us to shape a new process. anyone wishing to submit their own thoughts or suggestions to the group in writing is also very welcome to do so. this is also very welcome to do so. this is early days for the working group. and we will certainly be working quickly but thoroughly to make sure we create a new procedure that provides confidence to all who use it. i know that in addition many members of staff have expressed an interest in the provision of hr training as well as better employee support for staff. all those employing staff need a certain amount of guidance and training to enable them to be good employers. this week, the working group heard directly from the clerks of the two
12:03 pm
houses, who provided a very helpful account of the procedure used by how staff. us will recognise that the respect policy used by the house authorities provides an excellent reference point, the independent procedure we are seeking to build will take into account the specific needs of parliament and the group has acknowledged the need for more than just has acknowledged the need for more thanjust mediation. has acknowledged the need for more than just mediation. the working group has agreed that a new system should provide support, advice and action on a wide spectrum of complaints around bullying and harassment. we will do everything in our power to ensure the solution is transparent, fair and effective. and this fearless must also apply to mp5 and peers. because we do recognise that right across both houses we have many model employers who genuinely care about and look after their staff extremely well. we are working to tight time frame. but we
12:04 pm
all acknowledge it is right to address this issue with urgency. the publication of the final proposal will balance the need for fast action with the need for due diligence. the working group, including staff representatives, are considering the timetable carefully and aim to report back to the house before the house rises for christmas recess. the deputy speaker and the speaker have both said that you hope all parties will develop an appetite for change and a practical way of developing a change. that is what we plan to do. i want to thank all parties for working together. we share this duty to bring about positive change. nothing should deter them from
12:05 pm
pursuing ambitions. where are all determined to ensure this is a safe and fair place to work. thank you. andrea leadsom telling mps that the new cross—party working group set up to tackle allegations of sexual harassment met for the first time on tuesday. she says that it will report back before the christmas recess o n report back before the christmas recess on what is happening, but she said we are shipping a new process quickly but to start a system that has the confidence of those who want to use it. she spoke of the need to balance fast action with due diligence. the new process will be independent of political parties. and which will hear allegations of
12:06 pm
sexual harassment. the future of zimbabwe's long—time leader, robert mugabe, remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country's military. two envoys from south africa have arrived in the capital, harare, to try to hold talks with the 93—year—old and zimbabwe's generals, who deny they've staged a coup. the army's intervention is being seen by many as an attempt to prevent mr mugabe's wife, grace, from succeeding him. laura westbrook reports. what would have been unthinkable only a few weeks ago has happened: robert mugabe has lost control of the country he has ruled for 37 years. the military deny staging a coup, but mr mugabe is no longer calling the shots. zimbabwe's ruling party, the zanu—pf, meanwhile, are emphatic. president mugabe is still in power. he's the man in charge of zimbabwe, officially, right now. a lot has happened.
12:07 pm
but what has not happened is a coup. the language is important and key regional bloc, the african union, has given its full support to the country's legal situations. translation: the ministry has a55ued us this is not a coup d'etat. the african union is against any unconstitutional change of government. the president still has his supporters, especially in rural areas. but in the captital, harare, news of his house arrest has been welcomed. translation: i want to thank the general for removing this tyrant. he was ruling the country as if it belonged to his family. this boils down to an internal power struggle within the governing zanu—pf. on one side, this man, emmerson mnangagwa, who was fired last week from his position as vice president.
12:08 pm
and on the other side is robert mugabe's wife, grace, known as gucci grace for her extravagent spending, and one of the most powerful politicians in the country. it is believed her being groomed to succeed mr mugabe is what sparked this takeover. reports say the military have began to arrest those close to her. there has to be a transition away from robert mugabe, but more than that any transition has to be through a process that creates a government that is credible. zimbabweans are waking up to a country that has changed dramatically. but whether it is the change they had been hoping for is far from clear. dr sue onslow from the institute of commonwealth studies at the university of london has written extensively about robert mugabe and spoke to me a little earlier. robert mugabe has lost control but
12:09 pm
is still in power. he is a seasoned negotiator. we saw that at lancaster house. he has considerable experience. this will be a very tense set of discussions. and how he responds to mediators and anyone else who comes to tottenham will be crucial in determining what happens next and whether there is a smooth transition or not? this is a struggle within the party. the military is intimately connected to the party, the zanu—pf. we have to bring that in mind. zanu—pf senior processes in play which must be respected. is a congress coming up on 12 december, so this could be a protracted process of private wrangling about what happens next. that is a strong card robert mugabe has to play. he has it within his power to either comply or go along
12:10 pm
with these requests for him to step down, or to make it altogether more difficult. absolutely. since he is refusing to relinquish control, this places the military‘s decision to step in in a very difficult position. should be confirmed as a military bid to take over control, the african union will become part of the picture and will have to take action. how split is zanu-pf over robert mugabe, in terms of faction within the party? those who want to see continuing power and those who think it is time for change?” see continuing power and those who think it is time for change? i would say the rival factions both want to see the old man go. but the fight over who is his succession is the faction represented by emmerson mnangagwa, and grace maghaberry and
12:11 pm
her allies. how strong are those allies around grace mugabe? emmerson mnangagwa has the liberation movement. that was zanu—pf‘s agenda. how long do you think this could ta ke to how long do you think this could take to play out? this could take weeks. it is very murky, what is going on. conflicting reports. at the game is not yet played out. our correspondent milton nkosi is following events from johannesburg in neighbouring south africa. the game certainly has not played out. what is the latest you can tell us about any discussions happening between robert mugabe, those envoys from south africa, and the generals? yes indeed. our understanding, and i must add that there is no official announcement whatsoever, without getting this from unconfirmed reports. our sources have not been
12:12 pm
verified. we're hearing negotiations are on at state house in harare. president robert mugabe wants the military to agree and admit that their actions are illegal and the military are also trying to figure out how they can constitutionally bring back the vice president emmerson mnangagwa, who was sacked by president mugabe just last week. and how much power lies with robert mugabe, grace maghaberry and her supporters now in these discussions? of this a lot of people think it would go well for zimbabwe if robert mugabe would be prepared to work with the generals on a transition of power, but will he? there is no chance that robert mugabe will do what the military one. he was locked
12:13 pm
up what the military one. he was locked upfor what the military one. he was locked up for ten years. he fought against white minority rule. she never gives an inch. you will not agree to step down voluntarily. that is my knowledge of the man. at what we are hearing now is that there is even a catholic priest who is very close to him who is trying to mediate between him who is trying to mediate between him and the military. remember there are him and the military. remember there a re e nvoys him and the military. remember there are envoys who were sent by presidentjacob are envoys who were sent by president jacob zuma yesterday who represent south africa and the regional body. thank you. breaking news coming into us know. this is from the old vic theatre which says it has received 20 personal testimonies of alleged inappropriate behaviour by kevin spacey while he was the theatre's artistic director. the old vic
12:14 pm
theatre says it has received 20 personal testimonies of alleged inappropriate behaviour by kevin spacey while he was the theatre's artistic director. this is coming from a briefing at the old vic theatre in the last shot while. it says that those affected felt unable to raise concerns and that kevin spacey operated without sufficient accountability. the old vic is saying it is committing to a new way forward , saying it is committing to a new way forward, after releasing its conclusions following an investigation into the alleged conduct of kevin spacey. the current artistic director said, i have a genuine and deep sympathy for all of those who have come forward and said they were hurt in some way by my predecessor's actions. everyone is entitled to work in an environment free from harassment and intimidation. these allegations have
12:15 pm
been a shock and a disturbing surprise to many of us. he says it is incorrect, unfair and irresponsible to say that everybody knew. as a result of the investigation, what we have learned is how better to call out this behaviour in future. we hope to be talking to our correspondent who has been attending a briefing in the next shot while. —— short while. police believe they have now found and identified the bodies of everyone who died in the grenfell tower fire. they've put the final number of victims at 71, including a stillborn baby. in the immediate aftermath of the blaze, 400 people were listed as missing. they said the search and identification operation had been "meticulous." commander stuart cundy from the metropolitan police has been speaking to our correspondent tom burridge. the heart of myself and my
12:16 pm
collea g u es the heart of myself and my colleagues continues to be with all those affected. i can't imagine the agony of those families affected over the last five months. we have recovered remains with dignity and return them to families. the last two people have been identified to the satisfaction of the coroner. the total number of bodies recovered was 71 and that included a stillborn baby. it has taken so long because of the challenge that grenfell tower has placed on emergency services. 71 people, and it's not about a number, it's always been about the people, and the challenge has been immense. we have had our specialist teams
12:17 pm
work to about 15,500 tonnes on each and every floor of grenfell tower by hand to find every single fragment that they can of all those who died. that has been extremely distressing to the families and those involved in the operation. our correspondent nick beake is in west london for us now. in the last short while, the names of the final two victims of the fire have been released. that is right. the police say they have now identified all of the people who perished. in the last 20 minutes, scotla nd perished. in the last 20 minutes, scotland yard have released the final two names. we are mother and daughter. victoria king was 71 years
12:18 pm
old. she celebrated her 71st birthday two days before you fire. this is an image given by her family. her daughter, alexandra ata la , family. her daughter, alexandra atala, was 40. herfamily family. her daughter, alexandra atala, was 40. her family say they we re atala, was 40. her family say they were devastated. we see some comfort can come from the knowledge that vicky and alexandra were devoted to each other and spent so many mutually supportive moments together. the died side by side and now they can rest in peace together. that is the tribute from the family that the police have released over the last 20 minutes. police have also said that grenfell tower will remaina also said that grenfell tower will remain a crime scene until the spring. teams will be taken out from
12:19 pm
here on the next couple of weeks, but the criminal investigation will continue because experts will be going in on a daily basis, trying to find any evidence, putting together a picture of what caused this fire. the police have said once again this morning they will consider charges against individuals and also a charge of corporate manslaughter. they say they have not made any arrests yet and have not excreted any warrants. they have seized documents. they say the investigation will continue and it will not be until april or may that they will be able to hand over the building to the council and other authorities. at that point, the police say they will not stand in the way of grenfell tower being demolished. by next spring, the criminal investigation will be over. bubble be the end of the enquiry and what follows from that we simply don't know yet. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live:
12:20 pm
the future of zimbabwe's long—time leader, robert mugabe, remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country's military. the metropolitan police have said their final assessment is that 71 people were killed in the grenfell tower fire. the government has announced new measures to build more houses. it will encourage housing associations to borrow money in order to invest in more properties. now the sport. the bbc sport ‘price of football‘ study suggests club's may face a challenge to attract the next generation of season ticket holders. we spoke to a thousand 18—24 year olds living in britain and a huge 82% said the cost was an obstacle to them going. figures from the premier league, showjust 4% of all season tickets
12:21 pm
in the top flight were bought by young adults, prompting warnings to clubs to do more to engage with young fans. especially as 61% of young people said they were more likely to engage with the sport through a games console or pc. maybe this is the most striking — despite 70% of all supporters agreeing their football club does value fans, more than half of the teenagers and young adults we spoke to, said professional football — was not run with them in mind. it is difficult when young people go to university. the travel back home to university. the travel back home to watch games has an implication. there's just a week to go now before the start of the ashes series down under. england's form is improving with most of the top order have been in the runs on day two of four against a cricket australia 11. mark stoneman — looking to cement an opening spot alongside alastair cook — scored a century, while alastair cook, dawid malan and captainjoe root
12:22 pm
all scored half centuries. england closed day two on 337—3, a lead of 87 runs, with seven wickets remaining in townsville. everyone is critical of the opposition we are faced. but i am happy with our performance. everything has gone well in practice. i feel like my everything has gone well in practice. ifeel like my game is in good order and it will be tested a lot more from next week. no doubt about that. i am happy. england's women have their rugby league campaign after winning start in syd ney campaign after winning start in sydney this morning. they co mforta bly sydney this morning. they comfortably beat papua new guinea 36-8 comfortably beat papua new guinea 36—8 on the opening day of the tournament. more on that in an hour. the government's pledging to build "more homes more quickly" as part
12:23 pm
of moves to fix what it calls britain's "broken housing market". the communities secretary sajid javid is promising new measures in next week's budget to tackle the shortage of affordable accommodation. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster for us now. sajid javid is talking about new measures. labour say based on what they have heard today, this is all old news? this is an issue bubbling around for a very long time with politicians on all sides saying it is the priority. to —— today, theresa may will see it as her personal mission to build more houses. politicians are aware this isa houses. politicians are aware this is a generational divide. sajid javid giving his analysis of what he thinks the problem is. the so—called baby boomers are sitting in houses and they have made money. he said a third of men in their 30s are still
12:24 pm
living at home because the cost of housing has gone up so much. there is demand, but there are not enough houses being built. the question is, how far are they prepared to go on all of this? there is a suggestion that sajid javid wants to go quite a long way, may be put in government money and relax planning rules. at what will the treasury and philip hammond think of listening to the rhetoric today, it was suggest there will be a fairly substantial announcement in the budget next week. this is what he had to say. in the budget next week, you will see ju5t the budget next week, you will see just how seriously we will take the challenge, ju5t just how seriously we will take the challenge, just how hard we will be willing to fight to get britain building. a5 willing to fight to get britain building. as! willing to fight to get britain building. a5 i have said, central government can only do so much. ever going to fix our broken hou5ing market, if we're going to repair the damage done to our societies and
12:25 pm
communities, if we are going to make good on our promise to the next generation, then just like good on our promise to the next generation, thenju5t like in churchill's dei, we all have a role to play. we all have to roll up our 5leeve5 to play. we all have to roll up our sleeves and get to work. most important of all, have to ask our5elve5, what kind of country do we want this to be? how much is a government willing to intervene? that is probably the question in all of this. today sajid javid said his patients had run out with 15 local authorities who he said were under the obligation of coming up of housing plan and had not done so. he has said he will intervene and the plan will be written for them. i believe one of those councils is in the constituency of the chancellor philip hammond. labour say none of this is enough. what we have heard from the government today we have heard before and it is made very
12:26 pm
little difference. over the last 5even little difference. over the last seven years, homeownership i5 little difference. over the last seven years, homeownership is down toa30 seven years, homeownership is down to a 30 year low and homelessness has doubled. and the level of new affordable housing is half the level from seven years ago. and the lowest ever level of social rented homes. the government has to do a great deal better and i would like to see the government backed labour's plans for a big boost to building new affordable homes and new council homes. a serious set of private rights for those who rent and a package of help for first—time buyers. labour again saying they are prepared to borrow to invest in housing. they say they can raise taxes on the wealthy and corporations to raise money for housing and public services. i back
12:27 pm
i want to ask you about the statement from andrea leadsom on the new working party to tackle harassment meeting on tuesday. was there anything new in that statement? or was it simply holding statement? or was it simply holding statement could give everyone up—to—date? it's more of a progress report i think. what's interesting is we see parliament from the outside, you see mps, the chamber debate going on, it's a workplace for thousands of people. that's what she spoke of today. working party, every single political party represented. she said it is the voices of the staff that will be at the centre of the new grievance process to make sure that if the problems the nowhere to go and it will be dealt with. she has set the criteria for that has to be cross— party, criteria for that has to be cross—party, involving the commons and house of lords and it must be independent. she says it is early days, but we have to get on with this as quickly as they can. thank you. a 500 year—old painting
12:28 pm
by leonardo da vinci has sold for more than $450 million — the highest ever paid for a work of art. the painting — called salvator mundi or saviour of the world — shows christ with one hand raised, the other holding a glass sphere. it was sold at auction in new york, joining me from our oxford studio is martin kemp, emeritus professor of the history of art at oxford university. he was involved in determining whether this was an actual leonardo da vinci. it's a great pleasure to have you with us, professor. when you heard what the painting had raised at auction, tell us what went through your mind. i wasjust astonished. i thought it would struggle to reach its guarantee. christies bid a guarantee on it saying we guarantee this picture will raise $100 million and i thought it was a bit of a struggle.
12:29 pm
i went to bed and thought ever find out the next morning. by 2am, my phone was ringing, e—mails were singing and everything had gone crazy. it's quite astonishing when you think of the recent history of this painting and the fact that it sold for just £45 this painting and the fact that it sold forjust £45 in 1958? yes. it was heavily over painted at some point in history. probably the 17th century, it had become badly warped. somebody restoring it had also plained off areas sticking up. conservation was very tough in those days. it was completely over painted. what you could say after it was damaged and restored, leonardo was damaged and restored, leonardo was underneath. and tell us about the world you did, to verify it was the world you did, to verify it was the genuine article? first thing...
12:30 pm
two dealers in america saw this at a provincial seal, thought it was interesting. they had this restored, and as the over paint came off, day began to think this is more than we expected. at that point they got in touch with a number of historians and myself. i saw it in the national gallery at london, the conservation studios and i thought wow! this is quite something. then i decided to research. as any painting, owned by the national gallery or a private individual, ijust did some research. looking at the treatment of the subject, how it was put together technically, all of the aspects of leonardo science of art! he always packed and enormous amount of knowledge into those pictures.
12:31 pm
and your first instinct was that it was genuine but you obviously had to go through the process? absolutely. you can get carried away. first impressions are important, but that moment of what is traditionally called an issue of shop —— connoisseur appreciation, how can we understand how the picture was made, leonardo is a very special thing! it is different from copies and versions from followers. just 20 surviving paintings of his thought to exist. you can see why this is so special. just to reflect again on that record—breaking price. astonishing. you have got to ask, where do people come from with this money to purchase? who do you think has purchased? money to purchase? who do you think has purchased ? individual,
12:32 pm
money to purchase? who do you think has purchased? individual, museum? the suspicion, and individual. museums do not normally have those resources without trial that investors. the individual who submitted this for sale, i always get his name wrong, he owns monaco fc! a rather good owner. i am sorry that he has sold it. it is good to think it is going to be in the public domain, so that we can see this and enjoy this when we want to. fascinating. thank you. my pleasure. now the weather. the weather canvas, messy i am afraid. the weather from the weather canvas, messy i am afraid. the weatherfrom producing some rain. behind that, windy. to the south, milder and some sunshine.
12:33 pm
the weather front going to continue to move south. it stays windy, gales, severe gales, for the far north but also becoming cold across the country. we could even get as low as —4, —5. we start frosting. some mist and fog patches, but after that not a bad day for england and wales, northern ireland and scotland keeping the strengthening winds, gales to the far north, and scattered showers with hail and thunder. 7—10 the high. the north—east is likely to get the best of the sunshine but milder, wetter whether trying to stop pushing in. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines:
12:34 pm
president robert mugabe remains under house arrest in zimbabwe, as the military have seized control. negotiations are expected to determine the 93—year—old's future. reports say the president is locked in talks with the heads of the military and envoys from south africa. here, police investigating the grenfell tower fire say they've now found and identified all the victims of the tragedy. 71 people died, including a still born baby. the government says it's going to build more homes, more quickly, by encouraging housing associations to borrow money so they can invest in new properties. the old vic theatre in london has said 20 people have claimed they were victims of "inappropriate behaviour" by the hollywood actor kevin spacey. the hollywood star was the artistic director of the venue between 2003 and 2015. back now to zimbabwe and the fate of its long—time leader,
12:35 pm
robert mugabe, which remains unclear after he was placed under house arrest by the country's military. south african ministers are in the capital, harare, meeting the army and political parties. the army's intervention is being seen by many as an attempt to prevent mr mugabe's wife, grace, from succeeding him. well let's talk to alex magaisa, from the university of kent, who was former opposition leader morgan tsvangirai's chief of staff and the government's advisor on the new constitution. thank you forjoining us. what do you think, what is the educated guess about what is happening in those discussions? obviously, a lot of negotiations going on. mugabe, notoriously stubborn. very
12:36 pm
intransigent. you notoriously stubborn. very intra nsigent. you try notoriously stubborn. very intransigent. you try to hold on, if you are him, as long as you can. on the other hand, the military generals who have asserted the authority to take control, obviously are going to know that they cannot go back without risking the consequences of leaving mugabe. a lot of battles going on. my educated guess is that mugabe at some point is going to retire, asked to leave. take distant leave. leaving with some level of dignity even though this is not a good end for him, to a controversial career. how important is it for the future of zimbabwe that robert mugabe buys into the ieéi eeeee éuiéeé eu’g; e1; liei that 1ee1eeeel1é-45eee eng; e1e1ee
12:37 pm
12:38 pm
12:39 pm
12:40 pm
12:41 pm
12:42 pm
12:43 pm
12:44 pm
12:45 pm
12:46 pm
12:47 pm
12:48 pm
12:49 pm
12:50 pm
12:51 pm
12:52 pm
12:53 pm
12:54 pm
12:55 pm
12:56 pm
12:57 pm
12:58 pm
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
1:01 pm

64 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on