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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 25, 2017 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: the queen has used her christmas message to pay tribute to survivors of the manchester terrorist attack. she recalled meeting some of them in hospital. i described the hospital visit as a privilege because the patients i met we re privilege because the patients i met were an example to us all. showing extraordinary bravery and resilience. meghan markle has made her first public appearance with the royal family in sandringham for a christmas service. the archbishop of canterbury in his christmas sermon, laments what he calls ‘tyrannical leaders," "deceiving their people." and in rome, pope francis calls for a negotiated solution to end the conflict between israel and the palestinians. london's euston station opens as a shelter today serving christmas dinner to hundreds of homeless people in the capital. good evening and
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welcome to bbc news. the queen has paid tribute to manchester and london in her christmas day broadcast, for the way the cities have dealt with terror attacks this year. looking back at 2017, she said their "powerful identities shone through adversity." earlier, she attended the traditional christmas day service at sandringham, along with other members of the royal family, including prince harry and his fiancee meghan markle. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. it's a day for family, with its own established pattern. for the royal family, that means a visit to church, led by the queen. and there, very much at home already, the royal family's soon—to—be newest member, meghan markle. alert to everything
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that was going on, and waiting for her cue in terms of royal protocol. a neat curtsey, as the queen left by car. and then walking across to speak to members of the crowd who had been hoping to meet her, before lunch, and then the queen's christmas broadcast. # god save the queen...#. the central message of this year's broadcast was one of solidarity with two british cities. this christmas, i think of london and manchester, whose powerful identities shone through over the past 12 months in the face of appalling attacks. the queen said it had been a privilege to witness the extraordinary bravery of young people injured in the manchester attack. very wicked. mmm. to target that sort of thing. yeah. yeah, it's... she spoke, too, about what she called the "sheer awfulness" of the grenfell tower fire. our thoughts and prayers
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are with all those who died, and those who lost so much. and we are indebted to members of the emergency services, who risked their own lives this past year saving others. television has made it possible for many of you to see me in your homes on christmas day... and there were personal touches. the queen recalled that it's 60 years since she delivered the first live christmas day tv broadcast. and that is how i imagine you now... six decades on, the presenter has evolved somewhat. and it's 70 years since she and the duke of edinburgh were married. he retired from solo duties this year, but... i know his support and unique sense of humour will remain as strong as ever, as we enjoy spending time this christmas with our family, and look forward to welcoming new members into it next year. a christmas message which acknowledges the passage
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of time, but which reminds us that more than six decades now after she came to the throne, the queen remains strongly committed to her role as head of state. nicholas witchell, bbc news, at buckingham palace. the archbishop of canterbury, has used his christmas day sermon, to reflect on what he described as "tyrannical leaders around the world." justin welby said 2017 had seen ‘populist leaders,‘ deceiving their people. it comes as christmas celebrations in bethlehem have been quiet, after the violence which followed president trump's decision, to recognise jerusalem, as the capital of israel. in rome, pope francis called for an end to the suffering of children, and for peace in the middle east — as our religion editor martin bashir reports. bright sunshine lit up the basilica in st peter's square. but pope francis chose to focus his christmas day message
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on how conflict and oppression are casting a dark shadow over the world. he said that christmas makes us focus on the christ child, and thereby pay attention to the sufferings of children, particularly in the holy land. "we seejesus in the children of the middle east," he said, "who continue to suffer because of growing tensions between israelis and palestinians." "on this festive day, let us ask the lord for peace forjerusalem." the anglican archbishop in jerusalem, the most reverend suheil dawani, said that christ himself wept over the city 2,000 years ago, and with donald trump's decision to officially recognisejerusalem as the capital of israel, that grief continues. when he wept at that time, he wept for the absence of peace
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and love in the life of people who live here. i'm afraid that our lord jesus is really still weeping for this city. happy christmas! at canterbury cathedral, archbishop justin welby said that though christ was born without any political leverage, he provides more freedom to individuals than the world's most powerful leaders. but midway through preaching, his own powers of speech began to fail... unlike the budget, it's not gin. laughter. in rome, canterbury and here in jerusalem, christian leaders have taken the opportunity of this day to challenge the wisdom of the world that they say puts power before people and has failed to protect the most vulnerable members of society, our children. martin bashir, bbc news, injerusalem. the palestinian foreign ministry has reacted angrily to guatemala's plan
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to move its embassy in israel tojerusalem. guatemalan presidentjimmy morales said he made the decision after speaking to israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu. president trump had threatened to cut aid to nations that voted against the us in a recent un vote on the issue. the russian opposition leader alexei navalny, who's an outspoken critic of vladamir putin, has been formally barred from competing in next year's presidential election. the central electoral commission says he's ineligible because of a disputed corruption conviction which he says is politically motivated. he's urged his supporters to boycott the vote, in march. translation: it would exclude millions from the political system itself, because it won't allow them to take part in the election in any way, and this is what your decision is about. a bus has ploughed into an underpass near a moscow train station killing
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at least four people and injuring a number of others. the bus swerved off one of the russian capital's busiest roads, close to the slavyansky boulevard metro station this morning. the driver has been arrested. the case of a 33—year—old british woman who appeared in court today accused of smuggling drugs into egypt has been adjourned. the family of laura plummer say the hearing has been put back 2a hours after she became visibly upset. the shop worker, from hull, was arrested in october when she was found with nearly 300 tramadol tablets in her suitcase. the painkiller is legal in the uk, but not in egypt. the police watchdog is investigating after a man died, when the car in which he was a passenger crashed, as it was being pursued by officers. the collision happened early this morning in liverpool. a man was arrested at the scene. forces must refer cases that involve a death after police contact to the watchdog.
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ten people have been killed in a suicide bomb attack close to afg hanistan‘s national intelligence agency in the capital, kabul. the bomber targeted people as they arrived for work. the so—called islamic state group said it carried out the attack. anbarasan ethirajan reports. the mangled remains of a car hit by the suicide bombing. most of the passengers of the car died in the impact of the explosion. the bomber was on foot, and detonated before the security guards could stop him. two guards were among the dead. several people were injured. translation: i heard a big boom, then realised it was an explosion. i was so scared, and then the security forces arrived. translation: the sound was so loud, it was dusty, and people were fleeing from every corner. security forces came quite soon.
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and fearing the possibility of a second explosion, they stopped people getting close to the area. the islamic state group said it carried out the attack. it comes a week after militants stormed a building near the same intelligence agency. in may, a truck bomb killed at least 150 people in the heavily protected diplomatic district. the repeated attacks raised questions over the ability of the security forces to prevent such incidents. as a bitter power struggle continues between the afghan presidency and local leaders, some are worried that the political crisis is distracting the government's efforts in tackling the growing islamist insurgency. anbarasan ethirajan, bbc news. london's euston station has been turned into a shelter for the homeless, as rail workers
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and charity staff served around 200 rough sleepers a full christmas lunch today. volunteers worked overnight, after the last train left on christmas eve, transforming the concourse with decorations, and laying out tables. caroline davies reports. festive preparation under the departures board as network rail volunteers prepare for their homeless guests. they're part of our community, they're here every day, and i think some places would maybe just shun them away, but for us, they are an important part of the community, they're here, we have to engage, we have to look after them and make sure that they're safe. local charities invited 200 guests to enjoy some festive music and a four—course meal — a meal which was only possible thanks to the donations from 45 different businesses and groups. jed has been squatting since he was 18. it's unique, like, they've got this space on christmas day. it's quite interesting to see
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somewhere like this on christmas day and see it put to some good use. jesse now squats, too, but spent many years living in a tent, moving around the uk. you know, it's a nice, relaxing environment, it takes us out of the usual chaos of our lives, you know. as well as leaving well fed, guests were also given sleeping bags and thermal clothes to help them endure the winter cold. for these guests, for now, some christmas cheer on the concourse. caroline davies, bbc news. a 41—year—old man who was stabbed in a restaurant on teesside on christmas eve has died. mazhar ali, from stockton on tees, was stabbed inside manjaros restaurant in middlesbrough, yesterday afternoon. he was taken to the james cook hospital in midlesbrough, but died this morning. a 20—year—old man was arrested yesterday and remains in police custody. south yorkshire police have launched an investigation following the death of a 30—year—old man in barnsley.
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emergency services were called to a property in the worsbrough area this morning. a 27—year—old woman who was also at the property has been arrested on suspicion of murder. well, christmas is meant to be a time of giving for all but one family from west yorkshire has gone further than most with their seasonal goodwill. the clarkes from halifax collected clothes, sleeping bags and food and drove to calais. they've been giving them to some of the thousands of refugees and migrants still in the area despite the closure of the so—called jungle camp. here's their story in their own words. i'm katie clarke from halifax, west yorkshire. good morning! we have had people leaving donations. thanks very much, that's great, and they are clearly marked. so we've filled our van up with mats, sleeping bags, blankets, hats, socks, gloves. bye, everyone!
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my name's andy clarke. there are some people who say that they should stay where they are and try to manage it within their countries. i mean, my own personal view is that you don't move away from your family of origin, your friends of origin, your culture, your religion, your home, everything, and put yourself into the most precarious positions, if there is not an extremely good, valid reason for doing that. nice to meet you. a lot of the individuals that we speak to are professional people. unfortunately, they have felt that their lives are in danger, and that's why they've had to move. i'm nikki. i think they are probablyjust trying to keep themselves busy, aren't they, playing football. we met some guys who really kindly took us to show where they had been living.
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so we followed them down this little path that started to get muddier and muddier. it looks like chaos, doesn't it? it'sjust really, really shocking, and it's really sad that anybody has to live like that. we can't go back. in my country, there is a very dangerous guy. that is why we live here. here is safe. i know it is not a good life, but we are safe. seeing the living conditions and the desperation, yeah, things were shocking, but it was also really quite, quite nice to have that opportunity to talk to them. time now for the headlines on bbc news. the queen is paid tribute to the people of london and manchester in her christmas day broadcast. meghan markle has made her first public appearance
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with the royal family as she attended the traditional christmas day service at the church on the queen's sandringham estate in norfolk. in his christmas blessing, pope francis calls for a negotiated solution to end the conflict between israel and the palestinians. week you disappointed that your dreams of a white christmas did not come true? well, five british women got more of their share. they are crossing the atlantic... the antarctic, even, unaided. earlier today my colleague christian fraser spoke to expedition leader, major natalie taylor, who told us more about their journey. oh, well, we have 2a hours of daylight currently in antarctica. we're are six women, six women from the british army. at the moment we've done eight hours of skiing today. it was —20 when we started,
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and it's about —25 with wind chill. but we've been really blessed with beautiful sunshine, if not a little bit cold and draughty when we're skiing. we're currently in the tents now, melting snow, having our christmas dinner, which for me is mashed potato and chicken, which has been dehydrated and rehydrated with water. oh, that sounds very appetising! tell us what's gone right and what's gone wrong so far on the expedition. oh, well, day two of the expedition, we were going up a glacier across to the south pole, then crossing the antarctic landmass. on day two there were 60—knot winds. so we had to stop skiing quite quickly and put the tents up, which required all six of us to put one tent up. normally two of us can do it, but with the wind we had to work together to get the tent up. also, one of our team—mates, sandy, got a bit ill and we had to work as a team to help distribute the weight and get her through about nine days of not feeling great.
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what's gone well is the team have worked really well together and got to the south pole, and we've been really blessed with amazing weather at the south pole. we've had good visibility, if not a bit cold, so we can navigate quite easily. we should make the point that women are underrepresented on expeditions like this. so you're making a point, but you're also hoping to provide some scientific data. explain that to us. yes, that's one of the really exciting parts of the expedition that sometimes doesn't get spoken about. we're going to hopefully do the largest body of evidence collected of women and men doing antarctic crossings. the previous expedition, last year, from the men collected some data. we're looking at how our body uses energy and if it gets metabolised in a different way after we've spent such a long time crossing antarctica. we're also looking at our hormones and seeing if there is a change in our fertility and things when we are out on the ice for so long. just to see how that affects women in general and see if that can change things.
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we're also wearing a sports bra with a special device in to measure our heart rate and breathing rate, so we'll have a whole load of data to look at, to see what happens to women when they push themselves to these kinds of extreme limits. you've already mentioned how you're working as a team. how do you plan out your day? it's one of the harshest environments that you're working in. how do you decide what you will do on the route for a particular day, and how do you rest enough? yes, it's really quite a simple life we have. we're on tokyo time now, so we can have the sun behind us, so we can navigate with our shadow as well as the compass. we get up at 6:30 in the morning, and whoever is on cooking duty gets up and puts the stove on, and that takes effort because it's so cold you have to wear your gloves. we start skiing at 8am. 0ur tents go down, we pack our sledges up and we ski on a set bearing, set direction for the next few hundred kilometres,
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and then when we get to a certain latitude and longitude, we change our bearing to miss crevasses. every day is the same. we ski for nine hours, and we finish skiing at about 6pm, then it takes about two and a half hours for our evening routine. if we're lucky, we can be in bed by 9:30pm, so we can get a good nine hours of sleep before we start all over again the next day. crisp as is marked in many different ways around the world but funnily enough many celebrations seem to involve water. let's take a look... it's a bit like english
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weather here at the moment, but we're just delighted to be here. lovely people, lovely atmosphere. i'm afraid we've got silly hats on, but that's part of the deal. merry christmas! well, obviously, tea is incredibly british...! merry christmas and a happy new year. not quite in sync with the big day
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but for boxing day the weather will feel more christmassy. cold air pushing back in across the uk. 13 degrees across the uk. ice on untreated surfaces as boxing day begin in parts of northern england and scotland. sleet in the northern pennines. low levels in places do not be surprised if you wake up to a wintry scene. wintry showers to northern scotland stop on the day, chilly winds. mixture of rain, sleet and snow in northern england. showers in north—west england. some wintry. in the south, some sunshine for a change after several grey, murky but mild days. it will feel warmer. “—
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murky but mild days. it will feel warmer. —— colder. much of letter into the afternoon as wintry showers continue in northern scotland. really quite wet again here. difficult driving conditions. that rain extending further east across southern england as we go into the eveleigh evening. take advantage of the sunny weather while you can. sunny conditions for the afternoon in the southern scotland and central belt, compared to the morning. showers in to northern scotland and ice as we go through the night. in the wednesday morning, some sleet and snow developing in the northern flank of this system. wet snow on the back of this as it pulls away eastwards. a lot of uncertainty at paik close attention on that part of the forecast if you are travelling. sunny weather coming back. low
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temperatures and frosty into wednesday night and thursday morning. thursday, a gap between weather systems. a system coming in from friday. thursday, crisp and sunday. friday into the weekend, weather systems from the atlantic, cloud cloutier, west but milder. the queen has used her christmas day message to pay tribute to survivors, of this year's terror attacks in manchester and london. earlier, the royal family had gathered at sandringham for a christmas service, along with prince harry's fiancee, meghan markle. the archbishop of canterbury in his christmas sermon, lamented what he called "tyrannical leaders," "deceiving their people." and one of london's busiest railway stations, makes the most of no passengers today, providing lunch for the homeless. good evening.
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the queen has paid tribute to manchester and london in her christmas day broadcast, for the way the cities have dealt with terror attacks this year. looking back at 2017, she said their "powerful identities shone through adversity." earlier, she'd attended the traditional christmas day service at sandringham, along with other members of the royal family, including prince harry and his fiancee meghan markle. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. it's a day for family, with its own established pattern. for the royal family, that means a visit to church, led by the queen. and there, very much at home already, the royal family's soon—to—be newest member, meghan markle. alert to everything that was going on, and waiting for her cue
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in terms of royal protocol. a neat curtsey, as the queen left by car. and then walking across to speak to members of the crowd who had been hoping to meet her, before lunch, and then the queen's christmas broadcast. # god save the queen...# the central message of this year's broadcast was one of solidarity with two british cities. this christmas, i think of london and manchester, whose powerful identities shone through over the past 12 months in the face of appalling attacks. the queen said it had been a privilege to witness the extraordinary bravery of young people injured in the manchester attack. very wicked. mmm. to target that sort of thing. yeah. yeah, it's... she spoke, too, about what she called the "sheer awfulness" of the grenfell tower fire. our thoughts and prayers are with all those who died, and those who lost so much.
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and we are indebted to members of the emergency services, who risked their own lives this past year saving others. television has made it possible for many of you to see me in your homes on christmas day... and there were personal touches. the queen recalled that it's 60 years since she delivered the first live christmas day tv broadcast. and that is how i imagine you now... six decades on, the presenter has evolved somewhat. and it's 70 years since she and the duke of edinburgh were married. he retired from solo duties this year, but... i know his support and unique sense of humour will remain as strong as ever, as we enjoy spending time this christmas with our family, and look forward to welcoming new members into it next year. a christmas message which acknowledges the passage of time, but which reminds us that more
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than six decades now after she came to the throne, the queen remains strongly committed to her role as head of state. nicholas witchell, bbc news, at buckingham palace. the archbishop of canterbury, has used his christmas day sermon, to accuse populist leaders around the world, of deceiving their people. his address came as christmas celebrations in bethlehem took place in a peaceful atmosphere, after the violence which followed president trump's recent decision, to recognise jerusalem, as the capital of israel. as our religion editor martin bashir reports, pope francis in rome, used his christmas message, to urge the world to seek peace in the holy land. bright sunshine lit up the basilica in st peter's square. but pope francis chose to focus his christmas day message on how conflict and oppression are casting a dark shadow over the world.
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he said that christmas makes us focus on the christ child, and thereby pay attention to the sufferings of children, particularly in the holy land. "we seejesus in the children of the middle east," he said, "who continue to suffer because of growing tensions between israelis and palestinians." "on this festive day, let us ask the lord for peace forjerusalem." the anglican archbishop in jerusalem, the most reverend suheil dawani, said that christ himself wept over the city 2,000 years ago, and with donald trump's decision to officially recognisejerusalem as the capital of israel,
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