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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 27, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: holiday misery for thousands, as long delays caused by the heat continue to cause disruption at eurotunnel. it is the busiest day of the year for eurotunnel. it is the busiest day of the yearfor our airports eurotunnel. it is the busiest day of the year for our airports as the big summer the year for our airports as the big summer getaway begins. i am eating the air—traffic controllers here in manchester to find out how you —— how they are keeping the planes moving. police appeal for help to catch a man convicted of manslaughter. jack shepherd will be sentenced today for killing charlotte brown in a speedboat crash. he's on the run after skipping bail. we find out how to get the best use of the lunar eclipse. day two in paris, gerard thomas will make history. good morning from city hall in london, yesterday we had the
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hottest day of the year so far, the mercury hitting 35.1dc. today, the temperatures are likely to be the hottest in east anglia and we have some thunderstorms intraday's forecast. (music) and back to where he once belonged — paul mccartney delights fans with a secret gig at the cavern club nearly sixty years after the beatles first played there. it's friday the 27th ofjuly, our top story this morning. disruption is continuing for commuters and holidaymakers, after high temperatures were blamed for delays. today is due to be slightly cooler, but thousands of tickets have been cancelled in an attempt to ease the queues. simonjones is in folkestone. no one will be looking forward to queues today if they are
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up forward to queues today if they are up planning a getaway for the summer. up planning a getaway for the summer. it is already very muggy here, well over 20 degrees. it was like that throughout the night and the rain that eurotunnel was praying for overnight didn't appear. that means that down there on the terminal there have been some very, very long delays. eurotunnel says overnight people were having to wait for around four hours on this morning by running extra trains they have brought that to around 2.5 hours. some people on twitter have told me this morning that they have been working overnight for a total of around seven hours and still, some don't know when they are actually going to get on the train is. this is all down to the heat, according to eurotunnel. they say with hot cars driving onto hot trains, in some of the carriages the air—conditioning hasn't been able to cope and for that reason they have decided for welfare issues they won't use those carriages. that means long waits at the terminals and passengers who have been caught in this, for them it has been pretty
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grim. to a half hours queueing from the motorway down to the check—in terminal, sat on the embankment terminal, sat on the embankment terminal 40 degrees heat with and scrolling over our beta. absolutely ridiculous. why this has happened, i don't know, why better give you the jets warning, everybody congregate and then they tell you. jets warning, everybody congregate and then they tell youlj jets warning, everybody congregate and then they tell you. i don't understand it, hot weather? we arrived at ten o'clock this morning. you can see the water the eye and me, nice on the feature. —— feet. like a carnival, but with a little less fun and a bit more weight in —— waiting. on a day like today, eurotunnel would expect to transport around 4000 cars. if they are full with passengers heading off on holiday that is could be a lot of people affected. 0vernight they cancelled people going on day trips,
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so cancelled people going on day trips, so potentially thousands of people affected by that and the warning is problems are likely to continue throughout the day. thanks very much, we'll keep you updated throughout the day. police have appealed for help to catch a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speedboat crash on the river thames. jack shepherd, who went on the run after skipping bail before his trial, will be sentenced today for the death of charlotte brown. ben ando reports. december 2015 and jack shepherd ta kes december 2015 and jack shepherd takes his date charlotte brown for a late—night trip on the river thames in his speedboat. after reaching the houses of parliament, they turned out, but moments later the boat capsized after hitting southern floating in the water. a police filmed at the moment shepherd, who was clinging to the wreckage, was rescued. but charlotte, who liked to be known as charlie, spent too long in the icy water and died later in hospital. shepherd, who had been
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warned before that speeding on the thames, admitted to police that he hadn't asked her to wear a black jacket. there were two in between the two seats in the front, i didn't point them out and we weren't wearing them anyway and i didn't ask if she gives him or anything. tests reveal the boat had faulty shearing, shepherd, who had been bailed went on the run but yesterday was found guilty by manslaughter of gross net negligence. anyone knows where jack shepherd is, iwould negligence. anyone knows where jack shepherd is, i would ask them to contact police immediately. we are all contact police immediately. we are a ll fully contact police immediately. we are all fully resolved to ensure cha rlotte's all fully resolved to ensure charlotte's family get the justice and closure they deserve. warrant has been issued for his arrest, but he is still on the run he can be sentenced in his absence. for manslaughter, the maximum term available to the judge, although rarely given, is one of life imprisonment. north korea has begun handing over the remains of american
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soldiers killed during the korean war in the 19505. the repatriation of the fallen soldiers was agreed at last month's singapore summit between president trump and kim jong—un. 0ur seoul correspondent laura bicker witnessed the ceremony at 0san airbase in south korea. contracts will and a controversial move to privatise some probation services in england and wales is to be reversed, costing the government £170 million. the contracts will end two years early, after ministers admitted they are not delivering the reduction in reoffending they promised. here's our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds. this is the kind of innovative idea the government hopes to encourage when it is privatised probation services are. is a sobriety tag, which detects if the wearer has been drinking. it is designed to be worn by offenders who have broken the law, under the influence. by offenders who have broken the law, underthe influence. ischaemic is operated by a community
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rehabilitation company, set up three yea rs rehabilitation company, set up three years ago to manage lower—level offenders not imprisoned, just released. in england and wales, there are 21 crc‘s, have been criticised for not making the crucial relationship between offenders and their probation officer. there has been a 2% fall in the numbers of people ending up back in as an. but the government says the compa ny‘s in as an. but the government says the company's bid too low for their contracts, resulting in the need to cut costs and services are so ministers are rethinking. it is important that we have a probation system that helps people rehabilitate, the existing contracts are not working as well as they might do, they are not working as well for us in order to ensure that well for us in order to ensure that we can help with rehabilitation, so we can help with rehabilitation, so we wa nt we can help with rehabilitation, so we want to bring those to an end early, we want to improve some of the services in the interim. the
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government will spend an extra £170 million to shore up the service for the next two years. listers admit the next two years. listers admit the changes were ambitious, but they say they want the private sector to continue to be involved in a future system. a day after michel barnier will out a future customs arrangements theresa may is travelling to salzburg to get support for her brexit plans. she's hoping to win support for the government's latest proposals, and reduce the risk of britain leaving the eu without a deal. there'll be a spectacular sight in the skies tonight, as we witness the longest total lunar eclipse of the century. the moon will pass through the widest point of the earth's shadow from 8:15 this evening. rain clouds and thunderstorms could scupper the view for some skygazers. here's our science correspondent victoria gill. 0ur familiar satellite is heading into our own planet's shadow. tonight, as it rises over the uk
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at 9pm, the moon will be turned a dusky red as the earth passes between it and the sun. this particular lunar eclipse, or blood moon as it's known, will be the longest this century, last for one horu and 43 minutes. the lunar eclipse happens when the moon passes into the shadow of the earth, so it's directly in line with the sun, earth and the moon, and it's actually passing right through the centre of the earth's shadow, where the earth's shadow is at its widest and lasts longest, almost as long as a lunar eclipse could be. at the same time, our celestial neighbour mars will reach the nearest point to earth possible in its own journey around the sun. when they are at their nearest point to each other it is known as a close approach of mars. the minimum distance is 54.6 million kilometres, but that significantly improves our view of the red planet. so, clouds permitting, there could be a celestial show tonight with a bright red planet in the same sky as a blood red moon. let's give you one more story.
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a zoo in egypt has denied painting black and white stripes on a donkey to make it look like a zebra. a visitor to the zoo in cairo posted these images online, which have since been shared around the world. aside from it's small size and pointy ears, there were also black smudges on the animal's face. you would think it would have been, kind of, conclusively decided i now whether it was a donkey or a zebra. that poor donkey, that donkey was fine being a donkey. why it are they tried to make it something it is not? i remember at colchester zoo in the 1970s they had three 2 0chs,
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donkey mothers and zebra fathers. a we re half donkey mothers and zebra fathers. a were half stripy and half donkey telescopic stripey legs and stripy bottom. is true, ask them expect in the 70s, three were born. before the days of the internet. how are you? very nervous for sure and thomas. —— gerard thomas. —— geraint thomas. it isa it is a huge test ahead today for him. forget the 3 peaks challenge, imagine cycling up and down ben nevis 4 times in a day, and throw in snowdon for good measure, that's what lies ahead for the tour de france riders today. so it's a good job yesterday's stage
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was relatively flat and trouble free for the yellowjersey of leader, gerraint thomas, who is1 minute 59 in front. but nairo quintana reminded us all what can happen and was treated for his injury as he continued on his bike. on a busy night of european football, rangers had a good win in croatia against oziek, in the first leg of their second europa league, qualifying round. alfredo morelus with the only goal. elsewhere, aberdeen drew with burnley. ireland have caused a shock at the hockey world cup by beating india 1—0 to top pool b. the result means england cannot now qualify automatically for the quarter finals but should still get through. and the ufc champion conor mcgregor has avoided prison in the united states after pleading guilty to disorderly conduct in new york.
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he's now required to undertake anger management treatment and community service. a little more for you surely. did you say it was called a zedonk. they did. zonkey is another one. piggyback to the 70s, that would be lovely. i don't think you are in the pictures, it is not you, just the zedonk. carol, i going to make sense of the weather for us, there's not much here the studio. it is lovely here at city hall this morning. looked at my view. it is a mild start, a monkey start as well.
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temperatures in the east of england and london are currently between 20 and london are currently between 20 and 22 celsius. that would be a pretty good daytime temperature, but across the board we are looking generally again to the need to high teens. yesterday was a high temperature was 35.1dc in wesley in surrey. the hottest day of the year so surrey. the hottest day of the year so far. all areas in the uk had temperatures around the mid—to high 20s. temperatures around the mid—to high 205. a temperatures around the mid—to high 20s. a hot and sticky day. we are looking at today is potentially the last hot day of this current heat wave, east anglia is still likely to see high temperatures but for the rest of us it will be lower than yesterday and we are looking at nasty thunderstorms. 0n the charts, we have got some thunderstorms already, eastern parts of england, some in the south—east, not everywhere, and we have also got some in the north—west and south—east of scotland. is to go through the day, it will ease for a time and then they go to rejuvenate
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and the really heavy and the met 0ffice and the really heavy and the met office has a weather warning for them for eastern parts of england, north london heading up towards the south—east of scotland copy those could be vicious. we have also got some rain coming in from the west. as we go through the evening these are going to get cracking because we are going to get cracking because we are going to emerge as they push across yorkshire into south—east scotla nd across yorkshire into south—east scotland and the north sea. rain coming in behind. not as hot as the nightjust gone. tomorrow we will have some more rain across eastern parts of the country. the heaviest will be a across aberdeenshire, angus, because it will be slow—moving. you will see a lot of rain ina slow—moving. you will see a lot of rain in a short amount of time. meanwhile we will have more rain coming in as well. a drastic change in temperatures tomorrow, going right the way down. it is also going to be windy across central and southern parts. noticeably so. on sunday it could be windy in central and southern parts of the uk. what
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we have on sunday is rain coming from the south—west moving north—east was as we go through the day. temperatures are going to be around about 21, so a huge difference from what we have been used to. whoever has been doing the rain dance, it worked, because we are plenty of rain in the forecast. the ramifications of the thunderstorms today are the disruption to transport, large hail, frequent lightning and the potential for some showers as well. it looks absolutely stunning. with the light behind you and the sunrise just on the water. it just looks behind you and the sunrise just on the water. itjust looks beautiful. thank you. it is gorgeous. i get to go to some lovely places. you really do. you are very lucky. she is still talking. you said something to her. i know. she was being polite. let's have a look at the papers.|j i know. she was being polite. let's have a look at the papers. i thought i would pick up with the sun, what
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carol was talking about, the thunderstorms, and it says the scorch could go on for decades, bait to the future. on the guardian that, some are based pictures —— bake to the future. this is derbyshire, youngsters enjoying the pool and the story is about the facebook share value dropping. ben was covering that yesterday. the daily mirror quoting alex ferguson, sir alex ferguson, who praised hospital staff who helped him recoverfrom a brain haemorrhage which he suffered. he said he wouldn't be here without the staff's vital care. great news to see he is on the road to recovery. and he said he would go and watch the football later in the season. he was looking really well. the front of the mail talking about household spending more than they earn for the
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first time in 30 years according to figures for the office for national statistics. and a kiss on the front of the daily telegraph, the duke and duchess of sussex, and the duke's tea m duchess of sussex, and the duke's team triumph for his charity, money for centobale. yes. teenagers told to getjobs for the summer. young people should stop studying for work and this is what esther mcvey has said. holidayjobs give young people a sensualjobs. it took me back to my summer jobs —— a sensualjobs. it took me back to my summerjobs —— young people a summerjob. my summerjobs —— young people a summer job. i could my summerjobs —— young people a summerjob. i could size up a child and get them into their uniform. summerjob. i could size up a child and get them into their uniformm seems like an odd job for a child to do. i was seems like an odd job for a child to do. iwas in a seems like an odd job for a child to do. i was in a child. seems like an odd job for a child to do. iwas in a child. i seems like an odd job for a child to do. i was in a child. i was about 18. just last year. yes, of course.
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i had to get the balance between the pa rents i had to get the balance between the parents who wanted to go to or three sizes bigger and the kids who didn't wa nt to sizes bigger and the kids who didn't want to look like idiots when they went to school on their first day. any memories? i remember in 1986 working in the sewers, which was a cool and peaceful place to keep out of the sun. he will might have a horrible thought about it. i found it pleasant. it was so peaceful. any cameras down there? the lagoon creatures of cameras down there? the lagoon creatures of cause cameras down there? the lagoon creatures of cause and lots of frogs. what about you, charlie? yes, i would mow, frogs. what about you, charlie? yes, iwould mow, i frogs. what about you, charlie? yes, i would mow, i would do a bit of gardening. just for yourself? and i would get paid for it as well. i had no skills in that direction. look where we have ended up. in the papers, picking up on the tour de france, this is why it could be so perilous on these narrow mountain passes for the tour de france leader geraint thomas. this is a picture
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one of his mates send him after wednesday's stage. he didn't realise that this fan actually grabbed his um and this time he says he would ta ke um and this time he says he would take no chances. was he really grabbing his arm? trying to touch him. he had his hand right across his arm and that is why he is going to play it safe. it is usual for daniel craig, james bond, to be asked for selfies, but here he is asking for one with liverpool winning over manchester city in america. he is having a selfie with mo salah. because liverpool have won, they scored twice. and a quick glance... glad you are honest. sir paul mccartney did a gig at the
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cavern club, which caused a stir, and he played some of the old numbers, and some new stuff as well. some of the fans queued for ages to get in, quite hard to get a ticket, we re get in, quite hard to get a ticket, were in tears in the audience, tears of delight, needless to say because it was quite an occasion. there we go. mike, see you later. the time is 6:21am. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. 1800 migrant children had been reunited with their families after a judge ordered the us government to stop the zero tolerance policy aimed at tackling illegal immigration. more than 2500 children have been separated from their parents and detained at the us— mexico border. 0ur correspondent speaks with the families involved. jessica has had to wait in what has been the worst time of her life. earlier this year, us immigration
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officials took away her six—year—old son, not telling her where they were sending him. evenjoking, she says, that they were giving him up for adoption. the last time we saw her, yessica had been desperately trying to find out anything she could about her son's whereabouts. finally, weeks later, the agony is over. "i'm the happiest woman in the world," she says, "having this little one with me." and across the us, there has been a flurry of reunions of immigrant parents and their children, after a court gave the trump administration a deadline. but this is certainly not the happy ending for many migrants. the us has already deported hundreds of parents without their children, and we know it currently views many more to be ineligible for reunification, and we ourselves have just spoken on the phone with a mother inside this detention facility who was one of many immigrant parents who are still waiting to hear as to when they'll see their child again. maritza came from honduras with her 11—year—old daughter,
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from whom she was separated. she's seen no sign they'll be reunited. translation: in here, you feel forgotten because you are locked in four walls. we spend our days waiting for good news, but nothing comes. iam not a bad person. my only mistake is coming here illegally. for maritza, coming across the border in the window during which donald trump suddenly decided to implement a much tougher stance has been a disaster. but others celebrated that change, including many whose job it is to catch illegal immigrants. the idea of adding a consequence to an unlawful act paid dividends. even if it meant separating families? if you are shopping with the child at walmart and you're shoplifting, you get arrested. is that child going to go with you to countyjail? no, they will be separated, because you as an individual who violated the law need to be prosecuted. but some parents have
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paid the very high price of being deported without their sons and daughters. lawyers have been shocked by government tactics used to get parents to sign away the right to reunification. deportation officers are going into people's barracks and they're going into the cafeterias, and some people truly feel they are being forced to sign this without the presence of an attorney, and now they are not ever going to have a chance to reunify with her child. this is changing the course of a child and a parent's life forever. in what has been a choatic process, it is clear yessica realises how lucky she is to be back with her son. "if i could do it all again," she says, "i would never have come over here with him." it is the worst thing to happen to other, to be separated from her child. she now hopes for a better future in the us where the immigration case is being considered. but hundreds of parents who wanted the same thing for their families are still living through agony.
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aleem maqbool, bbc news, in el paso, texas. there is plenty coming up today. it is to be the busiest of the summer at it is to be the busiest of the summerat uk it is to be the busiest of the summer at uk airports and ben is at the patrol tower in manchester airport and it is another glorious view this morning. the blue skies as the morning greets. yes, my inner nerd is loving being here this morning and i have a better view than carol. take a look around here. the airport might look quiet this morning but it is the busiest hour of the busiest day, or it is set to be because it is the busiest of the year as far as the skies are
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concerned and the airports handling all those passengers getting away on their summer holiday. these are some of the plane. 9000 takeoffs and landings expected over the next 24 hours. between 20 to seven and eight is the busiest time of day so all of these will end up on the runway going to all sorts of places, particularly malaga, barcelona, the top destinations for summer holidays and you can see some of the planes manoeuvring. we are going to look at how the airport copes with this and how the airport copes with this and how they handle the passengers coming through, and crucially how the traffic controllers keep the planes in the skies. we know of problems with some forms of transport as far as delays are concerns that we will find out what they are contending with to make sure everyone gets where they wa nt to make sure everyone gets where they want to go safely and on time. we will talk about that later and i will talk about that later and i will introduce you to some of the air traffic controllers in manchester. good morning.
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0ne one of the most common medical conditions for men could be treated ina conditions for men could be treated in a five—minute operation, saving the nhs millions of pounds. benign prostatic enlargement is traditionally treated by surgery. but researchers for imperial college health partners believe that new treatment using implants could halve post—operative complication rates. they say it could save the nhs £27 million pounds a year in related costs. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murdering an 18 year in lambeth on wednesday. latwaan griffiths who's from southwark was found with injuries in denmark road after being dropped off by a second person on a moped, who then drove off, shortly before 7pm. police are keen to speak to the moped rider in connection with the incident. the weeks of hot, dry conditions have had a huge impact on london's parks and gardens — as you can see from these
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aerial photographs taken before and after the hot weather hit the capital. the grass has gone from lush green to parched yellow. you can see the dramatic changes in victoria park, regents park and hyde park over the last few weeks. whipsnade zoo has four new baby tigers. these endangered amur tiger cubs were born four weeks ago, and have started taking their first steps outside. their mother naya first carried them around the enclosure, so they could get to know their home — now they are exploring on their own. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's are severe delays on the district line this morning and london 0verground is part suspended between hackney downs and cheshunt and hackney downs to enfield town due to overhead line problems. 0nto the roads and the a13 is building up london bound from movers lane east in barking. in wanstead park: bective road is closed between woodford road and dames road due to a police investigation. and in belmont: the a217 belmont rise is blocked partially by a fallen tree at the junction with northdown road.
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good morning. well, after the hottest day of the year yesterday it is still going to be warm today but there is a slight change in the weather on the cards. there is a chance of seeing a few thunderstorms and showers this morning and into this afternoon. not everyone will see them. they could be heavy at times. we will see bright spells today. sunshine with temperatures of 32 degrees. it won't be quite as hot. it will still be pretty warm. into this evening we will continue to see thunderstorms into the early hours of tomorrow morning. they should gradually clear a way. which is sickly conditions tomorrow morning. temperatures down to 15 degrees. it will still be a pretty warm night ahead. as we go into the weekend things are looking a lot fresher. temperatures are down into the low 20s. there is a chance of
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more showers across the weekend. into the start of next week temperatures begin to rise and we will see the return of the dry and bright weather. things are looking a little bit cooler this weekend. there is a chance of seeing thunderstorms. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. there's plenty more news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning — alfie dingley has a rare form of epilepsy that causes up to 150 seizures a month. his mum hannah's campaigned for his medicinal cannabis to be legalised — a move granted by the government yesterday. she'll be with us just after 7. # the magical mystery tour
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sir paul mccartney rolls back the years at liverpool's cavern club, the venue that made the beatles famous. and tonight will see the longest eclipse of the moon this century. we'll find out everything you need to know in order to get the best view. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. disruption is continuing for commuters and holiday makers using eurotunnel, after high temperatures were blamed for delays. although today is due to be slightly cooler, thousands of tickets have been cancelled in an attempt to ease queues. the company said the hot weather had caused some on board air—conditioning units to break down. police have launched an appeal for help to catch a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speedboat crash on the river thames. jack shepherd, who's on the run after skipping bail, will be sentenced today for the death of charlotte brown. she was thrown overboard from the boat in december 2015. north korea has started to hand over
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the remains of american soldiers killed during the korean war in the 19505. their repatriation was agreed at last month's singapore summit between president trump and kimjong—un. it's estimated that more than 5,000 us soldiers went missing in action between 1950 and 1953. a controversial move to privatise some probation services in england and wales is to be reversed, costing the government £170 million. the partial privatisation of the system, which was introduced three years ago, had been strongly criticised. the contracts will end two years early, after ministers admitted they are not delivering the reduction in reoffending they promised. just a day after the eu's chief negotiator ruled out the uk's proposal for a future customs arrangement, theresa may will travel to salzburg to try and get support for her brexit plans. she'll meet the austrian leader and the czech prime minister, as she seeks to reduce the risk of britain leaving the eu without a deal. the online retail giant amazon has
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reported record profits after it breached out, it made 12 times more than the same period last year. the firm now plans to take on the global healthcare industry, firm now plans to take on the global healthca re industry, though firm now plans to take on the global healthcare industry, though some us politicians say they are concerned by the compa ny‘s politicians say they are concerned by the company's increasing. tonight will see the longest total lunar eclipse of the century, as the moon passes through the shadow of the earth for one hour and 43 minutes. it will be visible from 8:15 this evening, but rain clouds and thunderstorms could scupper the view for some people. the event will coincide with the closest approach of mars in 15 years. iam going i am going to try to watch that. at 815 i have a feeling we won't see it. a skyscraper in southwest china that boasts what its owner calls the world's largest man—made waterfall has
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attracted national ridicule. the tower in the city of guiyang was built with a spectacular 108—metre cascade, but it's only been turned on six times in two years. it costs $120 an hour to pump water all the way to the top, which has been mocked as a waste of money. rather spoil the view from the windows beneath as well. just a thought. well, if you are constantly hearing, it is only on six times every two years. what do you think? i don't know if you have ever filled up i don't know if you have ever filled upa bath i don't know if you have ever filled up a bath and thought about it, i had a similar thought. it has started to come into the kitchen from the ceiling stock i thought that was a thing of comedy films.
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not quite as dramatic as that. you think it is silly? dramatic to look at, visually stunning! drama very high today. the next 34 hours will effectively decide the tour de france and if gerard, —— macro ones “— tour de france and if gerard, —— macro ones —— geraint thomas will be neither. geraint thomas has a massive day in the mountains to get through today, but he's effectively just two stages away from fulfilling his dream. if he can get through this, the dream could be on. after today, the trying trial on saturday and the procession into paris. thomas still in the leaders yellow jersey, was trouble free, on the latest mainly flat stage 18. a breeze through the trees on the road into pau, although it wasn't for all.
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this shows what can happen, wednesday's stage winner nairo quintana, crashed with adam yates, you can see the damage done to his arm, but they're made of tough stuff. and quintana wasn't going to hang around for a doctor, back on his bike and they treated him as he rode along from the open top car — a steady hand if ever it was needed. frenchman arnoud demarr, won the stage with thomas coming home safely in the peleton, and leads overall, by1 minute and 59 seconds. but thomas won't have slept thinking about paris just yet, there's a monster coming over the hill. 125 miles lourdes, to laruns, thats like riding from cardiff to birmingham, the first peaks you see, may look like mole hills, but they're still nearly twice the height of the shard in london — and they're just for starters. they then have 3 major peaks which are much higher than ben nevis in scotland — infact the highest point — in the middle there, the col du tournalet, is nearly twice as high as the scottish mountain and involves one stretch of constant climbing for over 12 miles. imagine the pain and after that
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you still have another summit to climb near the end. ifi if i had that in front of me, doesn't now have good an athlete you are. mentally... you know the pain thatis are. mentally... you know the pain that is coming, notjust once, but several times. that is why they half down like our true they are. —— that is why they are like they are. now sir alex ferguson says he wouldn't still be alive, if it wasn't for the medical care and support he received after suffering a brain hamourage back in may. he'll soon be watching football again at old trafford, but for now has sent this message of thanks via manchester united. believe me, without those people who gave me such great care, i would not be sitting here today. so thank you from me and my family, thank you very much. this has made me feel so humble, as all the messages i've had from all over the world wishing me the best and the good wishes that resonate very, very strongly with me. so thank you for that support you have given me. doesn't he looked well! great to see
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him back. —— look. it was a pretty good night for scottish clubs in the race to reach this seasons europa league. hibs came back from 2 goals down to win 3—2, aberdeen held premier league burnley to a 1—1 draw, while steven gerard's rangers got an away win in the first leg of their qualifying tie. alfredo morelus with the goal in croatia, against 0siek. and blaine hudson's late winner gave weslh champions the new saints a narrow lead in their europa league second qualifying round tie against gibraltar‘s lincoln red imps. northern ireland's crusaders, though lost 5—1 in slovenia. if you are wondering why a gibraltar tea m if you are wondering why a gibraltar team is called lincoln, it was a tribute to lincoln city, when they toured there in the 70 and they loved it so much. that was the nickname for lincoln city, so they adopted that. ireland have guaranteed their place
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in the quarter—finals of the women's hockey world cup, with a shock victory over india. they secured a 1—0 win, thanks to anna 0'flanagan's deflected effort. the result means ireland — who are competing in their first world cup in 16 years — will top pool b. not such good news for england though, as they can no longer qualify automatically for the last eight. england face ireland this sunday to determine where they will finish in the group. it is an absolute dream experience, we will be pinching ourselves for a couple of days anyway. we came in here with belief and did a lot of homework and we have played the things before, we knew we could get results. absolutely it is an unbelievable experience. there was an extraordinary finish in the super league where leaders st helens came from behind to beat warrington with the very last kick of the match. the scores were tied at 12—12, as the full—time hooter sounded, but saints' danny richardson kicked this penalty from inside his
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own half to secure a 14—12 win and extend their lead at the top to 12 points. now that is performing under pressure! it is. from inside your own half, your last chance. two—weight ufc champion conor mcgregor has avoided prison in the united states, after pleading guilty to disorderly conduct in new york. mcgregor had faced multiple charges after attacking a bus of other fighters in april. the irishman is now required to undergo anger management treatment and community service. i think you want to bring up the subjects of zedolds. we should explain to everyone. the story about this fake donkey. we are assuming it is fake. in cairo, they have painted
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a donkey so it looks like a zebra. we don't know. but then you suggested there are... back in the 70s, colchester zoo, i suggested there are... back in the 70s, colchesterzoo, isaw suggested there are... back in the 70s, colchester zoo, i saw the zedonks, they basically have zebra mothers and a donkey father. photos have been sent in. i was sceptical about what you said about the donkey. we have got a photo sent to us. donkey. we have got a photo sent to us. so many of you got in touch with us! this photo was taken on the third ofjuly 1936. way us! this photo was taken on the third ofjuly1936. way before your time. p zookeeper at london zoo displaying a hybrid donkey, a zedonks, accommodation of a donkey and a zebra and has a zebra striped legs are. just as he described! 0verall legs are. just as he described! overall it is a zebroid, a zebra hybrid, but the zedonk is the
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donkey. i saw it in the 1970s,. time is 6:42 a.m.. let's return to travel and the effects of the weather. 9000 flights apparently take off and are lending today. very busy. in the control tower at manchester airport, iimagine control tower at manchester airport, i imagine they are going to be paying close attention to what is going on. i cannot believe they have let you in there, those are the best views around the. these guys behind me working pretty hard. the busiest hour of the busiest day. 0ver me working pretty hard. the busiest hour of the busiest day. over the next 60 minutes they will handle quite a view plain speakers today is the biggest day of the year for that summer getaway. the biggest planes out here heading to europe, spain, italy, ryanair, out here heading to europe, spain, italy, rya nair, easyjet. out here heading to europe, spain,
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italy, ryanair, easyjet. it is the job of the tally here to make sure they take off and land safely. living tradition to ian from air—traffic control. how is it, what do you do hear? here, we are as possible for the safe movement of aircraft to and from manchester airport. we are expecting around 700 aircraft today. in the uk, about 8800, put 5 million flights per year. a really big job and making sure they will take off and land on time. so meeting to our contending with, that many passengers may not appreciate. it is one big team at that. it is notjust the air traffic control, it is the airport from security to air—traffic control. we work hard to deliver the holidays for the passengers. come here, i wa nt to for the passengers. come here, i want to introduce you to sam. he has been on the night shift, stayed up
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to show us what is going on. sam, show us what you look at here and how all of this works. that is a map? rest of this is done visually and we can use it to see where the aircraft are on the ground. how long have you been doing this? three years now. most people will assume this is a really pressurised job and i am keeping my voice down because these quys keeping my voice down because these guys have to concentrate. how did you get into it? was skills did you need for thejob? you get into it? was skills did you need for the job? my mum's brother was a pilot. that is what led to it. skills white it is 3d spatial awareness. everyone has different backgrounds. you have guys with different degrees. there is a head teacher in my course. they have come into it from that. all sorts of
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different backgrounds. it is more about how your mind works rather than being academic in thejob. stressful? pressurised, not stressful. you get home and yourjob is done. you don't have anyone ringing you. we will let you go and have a sleep. thank you. let me introduce you to susie, the boss, sorry, tricia, chief operating officer here at manchester airport. 0ne officer here at manchester airport. one thing is getting the plane into the skies. you have to deal with the passengers in the terminal buildings as well. and security. that is a pinch point. yes. today we have 100,000 passengers coming through. this is the busiest hour. two hours ago it was the busiest time for the terminal. it is important to have a smooth passage through the terminals. despite best efforts there will be oblongs. what is the most difficult bit? security. --
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problems. making sure people are aware of what they can and cannot ta ke aware of what they can and cannot take through. making sure they present things in a way that x—ray operators can see. whether it is liquids or gels. and then making sure that if we have to reject a bad for a search we can do it efficiently and in a secure way. really good to talk to you. thank you very much. we will be here all morning. i will take you outside to look at the airfield. fascinating to see the place in action to see what the guys do. it is a pressurised job. they clearly have to get it right. the busiest hour on the busiest day. we will show you around a little more a little later. thank you. fascinating look around. and we can you. fascinating look around. and we ca n fly you. fascinating look around. and we can fly as it were directly to london and the view where carol is this morning. looking stunning. good morning. good morning. i am at city hall. you just saw the river thames and the city of london behind me. it
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was quite an muggy start to the day once again. temperatures in eastern england 20— 22. for the rest of the uk we are looking at the mid—to—high teens. during july so far we have had 14 days somewhere in the uk where the temperature has been 30 degrees or above. those 14 days haven't been consecutive days. in that sense we can't compare this summer with the summer of 1976. if you hope to see the lunar eclipse you hope to see the lunar eclipse you will be lucky because of the cloud around and a fair bit of rain as well and some thunderstorms. perhaps the best chance you have is in oxford, 0xfordshire and the north of scotland. we are talking of heat. yesterday we had the hottest of the year so far. the mercury scooted up to 35.1 in surrey. most of us had temperatures of at least the mid—to high 20s, some locally had the low 30s as well. today what we are
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looking at is potentially the last day of the current heat wave, unless you are in east anglia, where it will be hot and muggy, and some thunderstorms, currently across north—east scotland, western scotla nd north—east scotland, western scotland and in the south—east of england. there is a loan of them from the wash into east anglia. —— a line of them. they will rejuvenate later on. at the same time we have some rain coming in from the west. temperature—wise we have highs of 33, 34, maybe 35 in east anglia. for most of us not as hot as yesterday. the net offers has a weather warning up the net offers has a weather warning upfor the net offers has a weather warning up for the thunderstorms across central and eastern england. this ru ns central and eastern england. this runs from 2pm until midnight and you can see why. rejuvenate through the evening i and overnight heading up to the wash before they clear off at the north sea. there will be rain coming in behind them and in from the west. not as hot if you like
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tonight as it was in the night that is just tonight as it was in the night that isjust gone. so tonight as it was in the night that is just gone. so tomorrow there is more heavy rain in the east. it swings away from eastern england. it lingers across eastern scotland. it will be slow—moving across angus and aberdeenshire. you can see a lot of rain. meanwhile a lot of fun coming from the west introducing showery rain and tomorrow you will notice a drop in the temperatures and also it will be windy across central and southern england, as it will be on sunday. sunday we see the rain coming from the south—west of england. some of that will be heavy. as it pushes north—east was through the day. by then all of us have temperatures closer to where they should be at this stage ofjuly. we are looking at the high teens into the low, possibly the mid—20s. are looking at the high teens into the low, possibly the mid—20sm feels cool when you look at those temperatures, even though it is the average. thank you very much. good morning. when the government announced the part privatisation of the probation service, it hoped that shaking up the system would result in less reoffending. but now it's terminating a number of contracts,
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after admitting they are not delivering the benefits they promised. the decision comes at a cost of £170 million. let's talk to ian lawrence from the trade union that represents probation staff in england and wales. very good morning to you. thank you for your time. how would you describe what's happened in connection with the privatisation? it has been a disaster. no two ways around it. our members are livid at the content of the announcement that going to be made today, later on. why are we seeing all this money pumped back into a failing system which we want about four years ago when the government ploughed on and instead of listening to the critics it is doing more of the same by offering new contracts to new bidders after 2020. can you just explain that for us, because people hearing this announcement will think this is going to curtail the amount private companies are involved, can
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you explain what you describe will be happening about the money going back into these companies? well the government will shore up existing contracts for the 21 private providers until the end of 2020, they intend to allow a re— tendering exercise for a much smaller number of co ntra cts exercise for a much smaller number of contracts as yet unspecified. and our point is privatisation in the probation service has failed. it has not produced the results that chris grayling said it would and all conventional evidence and independent evidence proves it. so instead of sitting down with the experts talking about how we can rebuild the probation service that is publicly owned and accountable we have more of the same pain and our members will be very angry indeed. so when you hear david gauke, the justice secretary, saying, his words, insisting there is a role for the private sector in the probation service, and saying reoffending rates have fallen, what do you make of that? well, two percentage points a p pa re ntly of that? well, two percentage points apparently in the last four years
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hardly constitutes a raging success. we did a lot better in the publicly owned service many years ago when we we re owned service many years ago when we were in charge of the whole system. so there is no empirical evidence that privatisation has worked. in fa ct that privatisation has worked. in fact the evidence to the contrary is out there. without the unions saying it, so has thejustice select committee, her majesty's inspectorate of probation. people need to listen in higher circles of government. we are getting more of the same flawed ideology. when you say your members will be furious about what happened and what is going to happen next, where might that lead you? i will listen to what our members have to say about the situation. the first thing government ought to do while it ploughs upwards of £190 million of public money into a failing system is pay al is in that people a decent standard of pay for their living. this is ridiculous. some of our people have waited seven years for a pay rise and would not be pleased seeing this money produced from the money tree to shore up failing
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companies. are we talking about industrial action? possibly down the line. we will always take the view that we would like to negotiate with ministers and everybody else about pay, terms and conditions and we would like to think this consultation will tell the government that actually they shouldn't be doing this and that if members are of the view that industrial action is a route forward i will absolutely listen to that. cani i will absolutely listen to that. can i ask you mr lawrence, one part of this is about as a union, your reaction and at the heart of it there are people who have committed offences who the probation service should be helping. and as you described it a moment ago, the advances are not great enough and the system is not working. that has been acknowledged by the select committee. at its heart, there is a real problem with people who will reoffend who are not being helped by the system. the system is letting people down and it is too much reliance on a prison centric judicial system. we need more
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community interventions provided by skilled practitioners who understand their communities, understand the needs of the public and offenders. and what we have seen is the fragmentation of service, de professionalisation of our people's skills and the whole thing needs a major review but not in this direction. it is the wrong course. ian lawrence, thank you for your time this morning. the secretary of napo, representing probation workers. thank you. for fans of the beatles and sir paul mccartney, it was a once—in—a—lifetime experience. yesterday, macca rocked liverpool's cavern club with a surprise gig in front of an audience ofjust 250. it's the venue wherejohn, paul, george and ringo made their names. naomi cornwell was there to witness the return of beatlemania. this is the moment fans have been waiting for. the exciting had been
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building since sir paul dropped and massive hint. we have a little secret gig somewhere in liverpool. some fans spent the night outside the cavern club hoping to get in early only to find out that tickets we re early only to find out that tickets were being given out across town at the echo arena. they were told there we re the echo arena. they were told there were no tickets. they were running across the streets to the arena. the first 110 managed to get them. across the streets to the arena. the first 110 managed to get themm was a once in a lifetime. yes, i am away from work. i am not really bothered. i got a ticket. i got a ticket. it was amazing. chance of a lifetime. absolutely overwhelmed, overjoyed. delighted. super fans. we follow paul over the world. i have this type two of the beatles. and i
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also have this one. —— tattoo. this type two of the beatles. and i also have this one. -- tattoo. for the lucky ones with tickets they have already gone in but matthew street is crowded full of people. someone with a loudhailer made an official announcement telling eve ryo ne official announcement telling everyone that sir paul will not come outside to make an appearance. they are not deterred. they are waiting hoping for a glimpse. all those yea rs hoping for a glimpse. all those years ago we came here and played, you know, and we didn't know if we would ever have any future, but we did 0k. it would ever have any future, but we did ok. it was amazing. i can't believe thatjust did ok. it was amazing. i can't believe that just happened. did ok. it was amazing. i can't believe thatjust happened. i am shocked. extraordinary. amazing. it was just unbelievable. shocked. extraordinary. amazing. it wasjust unbelievable. and if you missed out he will be back playing toa missed out he will be back playing to a few people at the eacho arena
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in december. what a great night. certainly was. good morning. 0ne good morning. one of the most common medical conditions for men could be treated in a five—minute operation saving the nhs millions of pounds. benign prostatic enlargement is traditionally treated by surgery. but researchers for imperial college health partners, believe that new treatment using implants could halve post—operative complication rates. they say it could save the nhs £27 million pounds a year in related costs. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murdering an 18—year—old in lambeth on wednesday. latwaan griffiths who's from southwark was found with injuries in denmark road after being dropped off by a second person on a moped, who then drove off, shortly before 7pm.
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police are keen to speak to the moped rider in connection with the incident. the weeks of hot, dry conditions have had a huge impact on london's parks and gardens, as you can see from these aerial photographs taken before and after the hot weather hit the capital. the grass has gone from lush green to parched yellow. you can see the dramatic changes in victoria park, regents park and hyde park over the last few weeks. whipsnade zoo has four new baby tigers. these endangered amur tiger cubs were born four weeks ago, and have started taking their first steps outside. their mother naya first carried them around the enclosure, so they could get to know their home. now they are exploring on their own. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the district line this morning and london 0verground is part suspended between hackney downs and cheshunt and hackney downs to enfield town due to overhead line problems. 0n the trains, c2c services are suspended via laindon between upminster and pitsea due to electrical supply problems. 0nto the roads, and traffic is building on the a102 woolwich road
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towards the blackwall tunnel. in wanstead park, bective road is closed between woodford road and dames road due to a police investigation. and in belmont, the a217 belmont rise is partially blocked by a fallen tree at the junction with northdown road. let's have a check on the weather now with rich davis. good morning. well, after the hottest day of the year yesterday, it's still going to be warm today but there is a slight change in the weather on the cards. there's a chance we'll see a few thunderstorms and showers morning and into this afternoon. not everyone will see them. they could be heavy at times. we will see bright spells today. some sunshine with temperatures of 32 degrees. it won't be quite as hot. but it will still be pretty warm. into this evening we will continue to see thunderstorms into the early hours of tomorrow morning. but they should gradually clear a way. we should see dry and clear conditions tomorrow morning.
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temperatures down to 15 degrees. it will still be a pretty warm night ahead. as we go into the weekend things are looking a lot fresher. temperatures are down into the low 20s. there's also a chance of more showers across the weekend. into the start of next week temperatures begin to rise once again and we will see the return of the dry and bright weather. so things are looking a little bit cooler this weekend. there is a chance of seeing thunderstorms today. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. there's plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: holiday misery for thousands as long delays causd by the heat continue to cause disruption at the eurotunnel. it's the busiest day of the summer in britain's skies as the sunmmer getaway begins.
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—— summer. i'm in the control tower at manchester airport — the uk's third biggest — to meet the people who are keeping all those air passengers safe. police hunt a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speedboat crash on a first date and then going on the run before his trial. red moon rising. we'll find out why tonight's lunar eclipse will be the longest this century and how to get the best views. in sport, two days from paris, but gerraint can take nothing for "gerainted" because today there's a huge mountainous stage ahead for geraint thomas, which threatens his dream of winning the tour de drance. good morning from city hall in london. it is a mighty start, yesterday it was the highest temperature of the year so far, 35.1. today, east anglia will hold on to the high temperatures, the re st of on to the high temperatures, the rest of us won't, and there are thunderstorms in the forecast. it's friday the 27th ofjuly, our top story is that disruption
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is continuing for commuters and holiday makers using eurotunnel, after high temperatures were blamed for delays. although today is due to be slightly cooler, thousands of tickets have been cancelled in an attempt to ease queues. let's get more information from simonjones, who's in folkestone. bring us up—to—date with the situation. the temperature is certainly rising here this morning, thatis certainly rising here this morning, that is likely to mean longer queues down there. we are expect in up to 14,000 cars to try to get to the terminal today, multiply that by those cars being filled with families trying to get on holidays and a lot of people potentially affected. the company is blaming air—conditioning on some of its trains. they say that hot cars driving onto hot trains, the air conditioning cannot cope and it has taken some of it out of service. euro train said the delays right now are two and a half hours, but some people on twitter have said overnight they waited for up to seven hours. this is the third day
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problems and many commuters have had enough. to an half hours queueing from the motorway down to the check—in terminals. that on the motorway embankment in 34 degrees heat with ants crawling all over our feet, no water, absolutely ridiculous. why it has happened, i don't know. why do a don't give you advance warning everybody, gates and then they decide. i am happy but i don't understand it. hot weather? we have been here five hours, arrived at ten o'clock this morning. you see the water behind me, nice on the feet vomit it is like a carnival with a little bit less fun and a little bit more waiting. eurotunnel has run extra trains overnight, but it is warming as the bridges rise again, even if it is not as hot as yesterday, there are likely to be further delays. some people down there were hoping to get out of
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britain, somewhere bit cooler, but it is likely that as they tried to do that, it will be hot conditions down there. simon, thank you. police have appealed for help to catch a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speedboat crash on the river thames. jack shepherd, who went on the run after skipping bail before his trial, will be sentenced today for the death of charlotte brown. ben ando reports. december 2015 and jack shepherd takes his date, charlotte brown, for a late—night trip on the river thames in his speedboat. after reaching the houses of parliament, they turned back, but moments later the boat capsized after hitting something floating in the water. a police filmed at the moment shepherd, who was clinging to the wreckage of upturned boat, was rescued. but charlotte, who liked to be known as "charlie", spent too long in the icy water and died later in hospital. shepherd, who had been warned before about speeding on the thames, admitted to police that he hadn't asked her to wear a blackjacket. neither of us were wearing lifejackets, although there were two
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in between the two seats in the front, but she wouldn't have known they were there because i didn't point them out and we weren't wearing them anyway and like, i didn't ask if she could swim or anything. tests reveal the boat had faulty steering, shepherd, who had been bailed, went on the run but yesterday was found guilty by manslaughter of gross net negligence. if anyone knows where jack shepherd is, i would ask them to contact police immediately. we are all fully resolved to ensure that charlotte's family get the justice and closure they deserve. a warrant has been issued forjack shephard's arrest, but if is still on the run he can be sentenced here this morning in his absence. for manslaughter, the maximum term available to the judge, although it's rarely given, is one of life imprisonment. ben ando, bbc news, at the old bailey. the collision was on a 96, three
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miles east of keith. police, fire and paramedics were assisted by an airambulance and a and paramedics were assisted by an air ambulance and a helicopter. the casualties were taken to hospital in inverness. 0ne casualties were taken to hospital in inverness. one of the victims is leave to have had life—threatening injuries. that and believe that. —— believed. north korea has started to hand over the remains of american soldiers killed during the korean war in the 19505. their repatriation was agreed at last month's singapore summit between president trump and kimjong—un. it's estimated that more than 5,000 us soldiers went missing in action between 1950 and 1953. a controversial move to privati5e some probation services in england and wales is to be reversed,
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costing the government £170 million. the contracts will end two years early, after mini5ter5 admitted they are not delivering the reduction in reoffending they promised. here's our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds. this is the kind of innovative idea the government hopes to encourage when it is privatised probation service5. it's a sobriety tag, which detects if the wearer has been drinking. it is designed to be worn by offenders who broke the law while under the influence. the scheme is operated by a community rehabilitation company, set up three years ago to manage lower—level offenders not in prison, or just released. in england and wales there are 21 crc‘s, they are paid by their results, how much they cut reoffending. but they have been criticised for not maintaining the crucial relationship between offenders and their probation officer. there has been a 2% fall in the numbers of people ending up back in prison. but the government says the company's bid too low for their contracts, resulting in the need to cut costs and services. so, ministers are rethinking. it is important that we have a probation system that helps
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people rehabilitate. the existing contracts are not working as well as they might do, they are not working as well for us in order to ensure that we can help rehabilitation. so we want to bring those to an end early, we want to improve some of the services in the interim. the government will spend an extra £170 million to shore up the service for the next two years. mini5ter5 admit the changes were ambitious, but they say they want the private sector to continue to be involved in a future 5y5tem. tom symonds, bbc news. one of britain's most talented young snowboarders has died at the age of 18. ellie soutter won a bronze medal for great britain at last year's youth 0lympic winter festival. she also carried the british flag at the closing ceremony. this month she was named in the senior gb squad for the snowboard cross europa cup. a day after the eu's chief
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negotiator ruled out the uk's proposal for a future customs arrangement, there5a may will travel to salzburg to try to get support for her brexit plans. she'll meet the austrian leader and the czech prime minister, as she seeks to reduce the risk of britain leaving the eu without a deal. there'll be a spectacular sight in the skies tonight, as we witness the longest total lunar eclipse of the century. the moon will pass through the widest point of the earth's shadow from 8:15 this evening. rain clouds and thunderstorms could scupper the view for some skygazers. 0ur 5cience correspondent victoria gill explains. 0ur familiar satellite is heading into our own planet's shadow. tonight, as it rises over the uk at 9pm, the moon will be turned a dusky red as the earth passes between it and the sun. this particular lunar eclipse, or blood moon as it's known, will be the longest this century,
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lasting for one hour and 43 minutes. you need to be able to have a clear, south—eastern horizon as the moon comes up. sea low down to the south—east and then as it rises, you will see it more and more clearly. and then the eclipse fini5he5 about quarter past 10. it's just lit by the light that's fitlered through the earth's atmosphere, which is why it looks this sort of dusky red. at the same time, our celestial neighbour mars will reach the nearest point to earth possible in its own journey around the sun. when they are at their nearest point to each other it is known as a close approach of mars. the minimum distance is 54.6 million kilometre5, but that significantly improves our view of the red planet. so, clouds permitting, there could be a celestial 5how tonight with a brighter red planet in the same sky as a blood red moon. victoria gill, bbc news. specialist doctors in the uk will be able to legally prescribe medicinal
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cannabis to patients from the autumn. the decision follows a government review sparked by high profile cases of children like alfie dingley. the six year old has severe epilepsy and takes cannabis oil to control his 5eizures. his mum hannah's with us now, and we're also joined by professor steve alexander, one of the experts who gave advice on the issue. will talk about the reaction in a second, can you just remind people of us about the condition. he had pch19, it is not common. cannabis oil is really important. the only thing that used to rescue him was intravenous 5teroid5 thing that used to rescue him was intravenous steroids and he had that weekly and that is extremely dangerous. i did lots of research,
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medical cannabis kept coming up, with agreements of our doctors in the uk we took him to holland in september and he is now very, very well and obviously we had a bat with the government to get his licence. he is back on and the question was how did you get that medicinal cannabis wa5 how did you get that medicinal cannabis was back we went to the home office and had lots of meeting. we had to go through a vigorous, surgical 5tyle proce55 we had to go through a vigorous, surgical 5tyle process that was difficult and hard on the family and very worrying and obviously we got our licence on the 19th ofjune and that they sainte—genevieve 5aid our licence on the 19th ofjune and that they sainte—genevieve said they would do a review into medical cannabis and i feel the would do a review into medical cannabis and ifeel the process would do a review into medical cannabis and i feel the process we went through really did trigger that. —— -- sajid —— sajid javid. we should legali5e people like us but actually make available. professor steve alexander, good morning. you are one
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of the people advi5ing alexander, good morning. you are one of the people advising the board on how to view this. what angle were you coming into this discussion at? well i guess the way in which we, from a pharmaceutical aspect, we regard the cannabis plant is being way too varied. in that would be a reliable medicine. so we look at which in ways we could use reproducible levels of pharmaceutical cannabis derived drugs, which would allow us to be confident that when we are looking at cases in the clinic, that we have the reproducing ability that the agents forget now will be as productive in five years time. this i5a productive in five years time. this is a discussion that has been taking place for a long time. the home 0ffice denied this before, why do you think, we mentioned it wasjune 19 when this review was announced,
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this has happened very quickly. wa5 there a feeling when you are advi5ing there a feeling when you are advising that was a decision that needed to be made quickly? i think ithink so, i think so, yes. i think there was an urgency about it. one of the things they look at is that the uk is not the only place where it is being explored. we have to look at it in being explored. we have to look at itina being explored. we have to look at it in a wider context. within europe and north america there are many places where medicinal preparation of cannabis is available. can ijust ask you, this is such an important decision for you and your family, for alfei. i assume the reluctance e of the government to give the green light to the cabin space product, cannabis oil in this case is the 5ugge5tion cannabis oil in this case is the suggestion that it is the start of cannabis being used more widely —— alfie. a green light to think. can you address that? i think that is unfounded. we have morphine in hospitals. we don't have a regulated
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heroine market. you have to be sensible here. cannabis has been used in other countries, around the world it has been used as a medication for thousands of years —— heroin. it is used in 27 countries legally. my big concern with this announcement is, while it is great, we must be careful that the advisers to the home office don't ensure that the only drugs available are pharmaceutical drugs that have been through long clinical trials. that would mean that a company like bendrocan, would still need a licence to use drugs. it is important we don't make this narrow availability. there has to be companies who are using, making medical cannabis to gmp standards and making good products available around the world that should be available here and that is really important as well to think about what is going to be available. when
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i hear "don't limit it to drugs not on long clinical trials", i thought they were thorough and a good thing and that was a protective against companie5 and that was a protective against companies that don't do that.|j companies that don't do that.” think they are a very good thing and they are very important. what we have to understand is many other countries recognise the evidence and the nhs needs to ensure that we recognise other evidence as well from long—term use in other countries from all of the other data that other countries have collected and we must not say we are only going to collect data from this country. we can use the data from all around the world. can you pick up all around the world. can you pick up on the concerned that there will be enough testing on the products available? i think it is essential and what you can draw on is that there are examples, the cannabinoid extract, which has been approved in the food and administration in the
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us for infantile intractable epilepsy and so you can draw on evidence from those studies which would quite rapidly progress through the licensing process in the uk. thank you. alfie all good? he is wonderful, thank you, very happy little boy. it was a wonderful experience. i used to be very frightened of taking him to public places because it was so upsetting andl places because it was so upsetting and i would cry at most times i left and i would cry at most times i left a party. and that time i took him he left and we had a lovely day and i was just... left and we had a lovely day and i wasjust... he is doing really well. this has been a miracle for him. i wa nt this has been a miracle for him. i want all of the parents who are suffering like we did to ensure they don't have to suffer if they don't have to. he is doing really well. thank you. it is coming up to 7:18am and carol has a marvellous view from south bank this morning.
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it is stunning. but the skyline, what's behind it, is soon to change. it could indeed because there are fun to reach our i5 it could indeed because there are fun to reach our is in the forecast. it is beatable at the top of city hall looking over the city of london andi hall looking over the city of london and i don't know if you can see the tao of london behind me. it is quite a muggy start to the day —— tower of london. in the last hour in the 5outh london. in the last hour in the south coast of lincolnshire there was 12 south coast of lincolnshire there was12 millimetres of rain. that is a lot of rain in a small amount of time. and nearby bury st edmunds has had its first rain in 51 days. that i5 had its first rain in 51 days. that is quite a state. yesterday we had the hottest of the year so far —— 5tat. it reached 35.1 in surrey. many part5 5tat. it reached 35.1 in surrey. many pa rt5 had 5tat. it reached 35.1 in surrey. many part5 had temperatures up into the 205 or indeed the low 305. today it is likely to be east anglia that has such high values as in 33— 34,
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maybe 35. for the rest of us it won't be as hot. today we have thunderstorms on the forecast. we have thunderstorms acro55 part5 thunderstorms on the forecast. we have thunderstorms acro55 parts of south—east england. also north—east scotla nd south—east england. also north—east scotland and western scotland. in between a lot of dry weather. thunderstorms will ease off through the morning but they will rejuvenate and at the same time we have weather fro nts and at the same time we have weather front5 coming from the west introducing showery rain. there will bea introducing showery rain. there will be a lot of dry weather around. thunderstorms are fairly hit and mi55. temperatures a bit lower than they were yesterday. the met office has a weather warning for central and eastern england for the thunderstorms. it ru n5 and eastern england for the thunderstorms. it runs from 1400 through until midnight and they could be vicious. they are hit and mi55. if you catch one it could lead to local fighting and travel disruption. —— local flooding. to local fighting and travel disruption. —— localflooding. and there could be some unusually large hail with gusty wind around it. that will move into the north sea. tomorrow we have a lot of rain for
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eastern pa rt5 of tomorrow we have a lot of rain for eastern parts of the uk. a weather front, the tail end of which will move into the north sea clearing eastern england, but hang acro55 northern and eastern scotland and we 5till northern and eastern scotland and we still have a weather front coming in from the west producing rain on and off through the day. central and 5outhern off through the day. central and southern england will be windy and temperature—wise it will be a huge drop compared to what we have been used to. it will be closer to what it should be for this time injuly. more windy in central and southern england and on sunday we have the rain coming in from the south—west drifting north eastwards through the course of the day. temperatures by then generally the mid—to—high teen5 or indeed into the low 205. so compared to the 305 or the high 205 many of us have been used to that will feel quite different. thank you very much. and some of the things carol wa5 very much. and some of the things carol was talking about will be interesting for some of the emergency services, the fire
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service, the warnings about barbecues in the park. there have been instances of grass fires in london particularly in the fire brigade asking all councils in the capital to put a temporary ban in place. the deputy a55istant came —— commissioner will speak to us. deputy assistant commissioner charlie pug5ley from london fire brigadejoins us now. we should be asking about why you are asking for the temporary ban. there has been a serious risk. lots of parks have put bans all warnings on smoking in barbecues generally. absolutely. there is been a real impact with over 43 large fires already in london and it is a real challenge for the control officers and the firefighters. so with the call for the temporary ban we are asking the public to help us. it is about helping to preserve our open green spaces and also to protect the houses and homes around them. so we
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hope the public can get on board with this. ironic we are talking to you on the day that carol has been talking about thunderstorms particularly in the east and south—east making their way through and across the next couple of days. is it going to make a difference, is the band a little too late?” is it going to make a difference, is the band a little too late? i don't think so. while i am not a weather expert i think it will take more than one or two days a wet weather to cu re than one or two days a wet weather to cure the exceptionally dry conditions we've been having an it i5 conditions we've been having an it is about getting the public on board with the message which is about this irresponsible barbecues, take care, barbecue in a safe condition, try to avoid barbecuing in open spaces because it is so dry. if we have more dry days conditions could be ju5t more dry days conditions could be just as bad. so you say you want to get the public on board. what do you need to inform them of in terms of the dangers? i can imagine we saw some pictures, you know the foil
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tray barbecues you take with you to the park for a picnic, pop it on the ground, what is the harm in that and what is the potential impact it could have if it sets the ground like? with the barbecue, even after you finish u5ing like? with the barbecue, even after you finish using it initially, hot cole5 could 5moulderfor you finish using it initially, hot cole5 could 5moulder for a long time and after the public go if they don't clear it away or if there is wind taking the cole5 away, there is a danger that it could ignite fires and scrub and i think we have seen manchester up and down the country, london and other places, how the fires in grass and dry conditions can spread quite unpredictably —— coals. with some wind or other conditions, there are not many places that are not boarded by homes, and also the impact on the environment. many of these open spaces are homes to types of wildlife that not seen elsewhere and it is the spaces we like to enjoy. so it's really about not being the
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fun police, we arejust so it's really about not being the fun police, we are just trying to ask people to be responsible, try to avoid smoking, barbecues, things like that in these spaces to help to preserve our open land for everyone. you can ask, but a ban would be legally enforceable. how can you enforce this? i think it will be exceptionally hard to enforce. we arejust asking exceptionally hard to enforce. we are just asking the public and eve ryo ne are just asking the public and everyone else to get on board with it. it is great if people don't smoke outdoors and the barbecues, eve ryo ne smoke outdoors and the barbecues, everyone loves to get out in summer to enjoy the conditions. once you have spent a lot of time where there has been devastation from a fire that it has been devastation from a fire thatitis has been devastation from a fire that it is the smell, conditions, the kids can't play, so it really impacts the communities, so some help from the public in the short will make the spaces for everyone else. deputy assistant commissioner from the london fire brigade, thank
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you so much for talking to us. coming up on breakfast, we'll be looking at a new idea offering disabled children fun, fitness, and friendship. fiona lamdin's in bristol to tell us more. yes, we are in bristol, the country's very first pop—up gym for children with disabilities. just a very quick look around. this is the soft playroom. if i can take you next door into the indoor playground. this just opened a couple of minutes ago. the children are coming in for the first time. first reaction is? fantastic. it is great to have somewhere to play in the summer. —— reactions? it is great. brilliant. we will come back to you shortly. before we go to the news, i just want to show you the sensory room , where news, i just want to show you the sensory room, where the children have flocked to. all sorts of lights, fish, it isjust... what is it like? amazing. there is nothing
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like it anywhere and it is just great. and your son is seven? adam, yes. he loves it. it isjust amazing. it has made such a difference to our lies. excellent. we will chat to you later in the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm charlotte franks. one of the most common medical conditions for men could be treated in a 5 minute operation, saving the nhs millions of pounds. benign prostatic enlargement is traditionally treated by surgery. but researchers for imperial college health partners believe that new treatment using implants could halve post—operative complication rates. they say it could save the nhs £27 million a year in related costs. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murdering an 18—year—old in lambeth on wednesday. latwaan griffiths who's from southwark was found with injuries in denmark road after being dropped off by a second person on a moped, who then drove off, shortly before 7pm.
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police are keen to speak to the moped rider in connection with the incident. the weeks of hot, dry conditions have had a huge impact on london's parks and gardens, as you can see from these aerial photographs taken before and after the hot weather hit the capital. the grass has gone from lush green to parched yellow. you can see the dramatic changes in victoria park, regents park and hyde park over the last few weeks. whipsnade zoo has four new baby tigers. these endangered amur tiger cubs were born four weeks ago, and have started taking their first steps outside. their mother naya first carried them around the enclosure, so they could get to know their home. now they are exploring on their own. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the district line this morning and london 0verground is part
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suspended between hackney downs and cheshunt and hackney downs to enfield town due to overhead line problems. on the trains, c2c services are suspended via laindon between upminster and pitsea due to electrical supply problems. onto the roads, and traffic is building london—bound on the a40 western avenue greenford flyover. in wanstead park, bective road is closed between woodford road and dames road due to a police investigation. let's have a check on the weather now with rich davis. good morning. well, after the hottest day of the year yesterday, it's still going to be pretty warm today, but there is a slight change in the weather on the cards. there's a chance we'll see a few thunderstorms and showers this morning and into this afternoon. not everyone will necessarily see them. they could be heavy at times. we will see some bright spells today. some sunshine with temperatures of 32 degrees. it won't be quite as hot. but it will still be pretty warm. into this evening we will continue to see thunderstorms into the early hours of tomorrow morning. but they should gradually clear away. we should see dry and clear conditions tomorrow morning. temperatures down to 15 degrees.
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it will still be a pretty warm night ahead. but as we go into the weekend, things are looking a lot fresher. temperatures are down into the low 205. there's also a chance we will see more showers across the weekend. into the start of next week temperatures begin to rise once again and we will see the return of the dry and bright weather. so things are looking a little bit cooler this weekend. there is a chance of seeing thunderstorms today. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. there's plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. disruption is continuing for commuters and holiday makers using eurotunnel, after high temperatures were blamed for delays. although today is due to be slightly cooler, thousands of tickets have been cancelled in an attempt
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to ease queues. the company said the hot weather had caused some on board air—conditioning units to break down. police have launched an appeal for help to catch a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speedboat crash on the river thames. jack shepherd, who's on the run after skipping bail, will be sentenced today for the death of charlotte brown. she was thrown overboard from the boat in december 2015. a controversial move to privatise some probation services in england and wales is to be reversed, costing the government £170 million. the partial privatisation of the system, which was introduced three years ago, had been strongly criticised. the contracts will end two years early, after ministers admitted they are not delivering the reduction in reoffending they promised. a day after the eu's chief negotiator ruled out the uk's proposal for a future customs arrangement, theresa may will travel to salzburg to try to get support for her brexit plans. she'll meet the austrian leader and the czech prime minister,
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as she seeks to reduce the risk of britain leaving the eu without a deal. tonight will see the longest total lunar eclipse of the century, as the moon passes through the shadow of the earth for one hour and 43 minutes. it will be visible from 8:15 this evening, but rain clouds and thunderstorms could scupper the view for some skygazers. the event will coincide with the closest approach of mars in 15 years. the skies, if you are lucky, should be stunning. a skyscraper in southwest china that boasts what its owner calls the world's largest man—made waterfall has attracted national ridicule. the tower in the city of guiyang was built with a spectacular 108—metre cascade, but it's only been turned on six times in two years. it costs $120 an hour to pump water all the way to the top, which has been mocked as a waste of money.
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so they don't do it it often, so you wonder what the point is in the first place. it reminds mike that he left the bar thriving. that is my immediate thought. —— barf running. —— bath running. not such a grand scale, two stories. take us through the tour de france. he is so close, but today is a huge test, so many mountain climbs and in the past he has had and it history of u nfortu nate the past he has had and it history of unfortunate thing is happening in tournament. everything crossed, pray for him. obviously he is still racing, but he has to stay safe.
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for him. obviously he is still racing, but he has to stay safem isa racing, but he has to stay safem is a final chance for his rivals to attack. anything can happen, you have those slow passes where you are new to crowd. he just needs to stay out of trouble. if he does that, he can possibly when it. geraint thomas has a massive day in the mountains to get through today, but he's effectively just two stages away from fulfilling his dream. if he can get through this, the dream could be on. after today, the trying trial on saturday and the procession into paris. thomas still in the leaders yellow jersey, was trouble free, on the latest mainly flat stage 18. a breeze through the trees on the road into pau, although it wasn't for all. this shows what can happen, wednesday's stage winner nairo quintana, crashed with adam yates, you can see the damage done to his arm, but they're made of tough stuff. they treated him as he rode along! frenchman arnoud demarr, won the stage with thomas coming home safely in the peleton, and leads overall, by1 minute and 59 seconds. but thomas won't have slept thinking about paris just
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yet, there's a monster coming over the hill. 125 miles lourdes, to laruns, thats like riding from cardiff to birmingham, but just look at the number of mountains in their way. the first peaks you see may look like mole hills, but they're still nearly twice the height of the shard in london — and they're just for starters. they then have 3 major peaks which are much higher than ben nevis in scotland — infact the highest point — in the middle there, the col du tournalet, is nearly twice as high as the scottish mountain and involves one stretch of constant climbing for over 12 miles. imagine the pain and after that you still have another summit to climb near the end. incredible. now, sir alex ferguson says he wouldn't still be alive, if it wasn't for the medical care and support, he received after suffering a brain hamourage back in may. he'll soon be watching football again at old trafford, but for now, has sent this message of thanks via manchester united. believe me, without those people who gave me such great care, i would not be sitting here today. so thank you from me and my family,
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thank you very much. this has made me feel so humble, as all the messages i've had from all over the world wishing me the best and the good wishes that resonate very, very strongly with me. so thank you for that support you have given me. what a welcome he will get when he returns to watch the football at old trafford. it was a pretty good night for scottish clubs, in the race to reach this seasons europa league. hibs came back from 2 goals down to win 3—2, aberdeen held premier league burnley to a 1—1 draw, while steven gerard's rangers got an away win in the first leg of their qualifying tie. alfredo with the goal in croatia, against osiek. and blaine hudson's late winner gave welsh champions the new saints a narrow lead in their europa league second qualifying round tie against gibraltar‘s, lincoln red imps. northern ireland's crusaders, though lost 5—1 in slovenia. ireland have guaranteed their place
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in the quarter—finals of the women's hockey world cup, with a shock victory over india. they secured a 1—0 win, thanks to anna o'flanagan's deflected effort. the result means ireland will win pool b. not such good news for england though as they can no longer qualify automatically for the last eight. england face ireland on sunday to determine where they will finish in the group. it is an absolute dream experience, we will be pinching ourselves for a couple of days anyway. you know, it is brilliant for us but it is not outside the realm of possibility. we came in here with belief and did a lot of homework and we have played the teams in our pool before, we knew we could get results. absolutely it is an unbelievable experience. ireland are deftly in the quarter—finals, england are
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guaranteed a place, will not guaranteed, but they know they will be in the play—offs at best to get to the last stage. if they had eaten ireland they will get an easier play—off, if they lose they consider a play—off place. play—off, if they lose they consider a play-off place. you are pretty confident. yes, because you are talking about the likes of south korea and italy, but they will get an easier play—off if they beat ireland, but still i think there will go through to the quarterfinals. there was an extraordinary finish in the super league where leaders st helens came from behind to beat warrington with the very last kick of the match. the scores were tied at 12—12 as the full—time hooter sounded, but saints' danny richardson kicked this penalty from inside his own half to secure a 14—12 win and extend their lead at the top to 12 points. he had a slight breeze behind him. never in doubt. brilliant,
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absolutely brilliant. we are talking —— talking to chris for you. —— chris foy. in an hour's in an hour '5 time, from glasgow. we will be talking about the european xavi chips coming up in glasgow, but we will ask in about the tour de france and if thomas can survive this on the mountain. in the meantime, he has a melon. would you like to know why? is it something to do with the moon and mars? we are talking about a lunar eclipse. let's talk to professor teresa anderson from jodrell bank, who can explain how and why it will occur. i love it when you explain things with fruit and this is a red onion. ifi with fruit and this is a red onion. if i hand them to you will you give usa if i hand them to you will you give us a graphic imagination about what will happen this evening? so, the moon. and is about the quarter the
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size of the earth. it should really be 30 melon is our way. —— away. let's pretend. what happens tonight is the earth and the moon and the sun, which is 109 melons beat and about a kilometre away behind me. am i going about a kilometre away behind me. am igoing to... about a kilometre away behind me. am i going to... you are the earth. no, this is the earth. mike needs to, the sun is behind you. keeping its 30 melons away. if you just stop there. if the sun is their shining towards the earth, what will happen is mike is going to move the moon into the shadow of the earth, you move the moon into the shadow of the earth, that is the eclipse. so when
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you are right behind the earth, that is the eclipse. that is what will happen tonight. you can no longer see miami? i can't. we will talk about the colours as well, see you later. you carry on. get going. there is lots of talk about the colours that we are going to see, blood red. why are we going to see gregs? . —— reds? the sun hits the earth and causes a shadow but the sun is very big so the sun has a umbra, the dark pit and the light of debt, the penumbra, it passes through the atmosphere and a little bit of it still hits the moon. as we know, when we see
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sunrise or sunset, we see a red sun coming out and that it was when we look to our atmosphere, all of the molecules in the atmosphere and the blue light, so this is the same reason why the sky is blue. it is a thing called green scattering. —— rain. accounts as the blue light of them and instead of the blue lights coming from the sun, it means that it basically takes the blue light out of the light that is going to the atmosphere. that is why when you look you just see the red bits and it is the same effect, effectively, the light goes through the earth's atmosphere. it will be a little darker than normal but this bright colour. so when people from 8:15am onwards... it doesn't rise until about nine o'clock. when we step into our guardians onto our balconies, and look upwards, what should we be looking for? first ring
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is, to look up because it will be rising. find the horizon, is the best tip, it won't go high up when it is an eclipse. try to find somewhere without buildings or tree in the way he. the sun should be setting at the same time, it should be spectacular. the setting sun on your right and the moon should come up your right and the moon should come up here. it will be a bit darker than usual, when the moon comes up it looks a lot bigger than it does normally. everything quite low in the sky. yeah. you will have the setting sun and the red moon. i am looking forward to it if the thunderclouds don't wipe it out. there is a chance to see it online. but i think going out to look at it is fantastic. on standby right now we have a person who knows, carol. she has been telling us the best
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place to watch it. we will go from the sun and the moon and how they are turning around to carol, who will tell us what is happening on earth. well, first of all, the lunar eclipse. there is a lot of cloud and rain around this evening and overnight. the best places to see the eclipse will be 0xfordshire, possibly north of scotland as well. i hope i am wrong and many of us get to see it. in london outside city hall there is a fantastic view. it is already really warm. it is not surprising. overnight temperatures did not drop drastically. the three highest lowest temperatures were 21 in st james's park highest lowest temperatures were 21 in stjames's park london, 20.6 in langdon, and 20 in cromer in norfolk. these would be good temperatures by day but by night it is too hot for me. yesterday the
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highest of the year so far was when the mercury scooted up to 35.1 in surrey. a lot of the uk saw temperatures from the mid—to high 205 and locally some of us saw 30 into the low 305. 35.1 was the highest. today east anglia is likely to have the highest temperature and we are looking at thunderstorms in the forecast. currently we have thunderstorms in north—east scotland, west scotland and parts of south—east england. not all of us are seeing them. if you catch one it will produce a lot of rain. through the morning many of them will ease. they will rejuvenate later on. meanwhile in the west we have weather fronts coming in, meanwhile in the west we have weatherfronts coming in, bringing showery rain. in between there it is a lot of dry weather and sunshine. temperatures today lower than they we re temperatures today lower than they were yesterday foremost. the met office has a weather warning out for
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the thunderstorms for central and eastern england. it runs from 2pm until midnight. it will produce a lot of rain in a short amount of time with beat hail and unusually large hail and gusty winds. through the night it will swing off into the north sea with some showers coming in from the west and temperature—wise not as high as the nightjust gone. tomorrow, more rain across eastern parts of the uk. it will linger across eastern scotland. we could see large totals across aberdeenshire and angus and at the same time we've got rain coming in from the west and that will be on and off through the day. in between, something brighter. it will be windy for central and southern england, noticeably so, but for all of us we will notice the drop in the temperature. if anything it will be windier on sunday for central and southern england with gusts of up to 50 mph. and rainfrom southern england with gusts of up to 50 mph. and rain from the south—west
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will be moving north—east and by sunday we are looking at temperatures in the high teens, low 205, roughly where they should be for this time injuly. 205, roughly where they should be for this time in july. thanks very much. we are staying with the theme of summerand we we are staying with the theme of summer and we are looking towards the skies. 9000 flights taking off and landing and ben is at the control tower of manchester area for us with the amazing scene. good morning. yes, good morning. welcome to the top of the air traffic control tower in manchester. look at the scale of the challenge for the guys here today. the busiest day of the year as far as the summer getaway is concerned. we have the best view in the house to witness what they have to do. 9000 takeoffs to witness what they have to do. 9000 ta keoffs and to witness what they have to do. 9000 takeoffs and landings across the country today. they have their work cut out. let me introduce you to the boss of manchester airport. morning. a really busy day for you.
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you have to get it right. people coming through want to get where they are going on time safely. yes. absolutely. it is all about planning. we plan in vans. a b team working together to make sure the component parts of the journey works. —— bigger team. component parts of the journey works. -- bigger team. there are certain challenges facing the industry right now. not least in heathrow with the permission for the extra runway. a lot has been made about regional expansion. i can see off your shoulder a lot of money spent in manchester. you think it is the right model. spend it in the regional airports, not the big hubs. a fa ct regional airports, not the big hubs. a fact we need to remember is whatever happens at heathrow it is unlikely that a new runway will be built for release around ten years. we have lots of spare capacity here already. we are at 28 million passengers with capacity on the existing runway at manchester to go to 55 million passengers. we are investing £1 billion in infrastructure to match the terminal
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capacity with runway capacity and transform customer experience through the terminal and we are delighted with that capacity. essentially you have the opposite problem with heathrow. you have the ru nway problem with heathrow. you have the runway capacity and not be terminal capacity which is what you are changing. absolutely. we are spending £1 million a day at the moment. the first pier opens in april next year. the terminal au prince in april 2020 and we have a huge catchment in manchester with 22 million people within two hours of manchester airport and we are absolutely focused on making sure that we make the maximum benefit from that. we are the 15th biggest airport in the world for the number of routes we offer. we offer routes to the far east, the middle east, lots into the us and we have one of the strongest route networks into europe as well so there are a lot of positives to look forward to. i want to ask about brexit as well because it is an industry that will be
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affected, the airline industry. we talked about open skies and people coming to this country. what does it mean for you on a day—to—day level? we are working with all stakeholders, particularly the airlines, and also working long and ha rd airlines, and also working long and hard with the government to make sure that they are very clear about the importance of getting agreement to ensure that we get continuity of travel after the brexit exit. and we are confident that government understand the importance of making sure that we get a real racks at agreement. it is up on their agenda. that is the same for european governments —— brexit agenda. we wa nt governments —— brexit agenda. we want that turned into action so we have clarity and confidence to plan for the future. for now, it was good to talk to you. good luck with the project. i want to introduce you to peterjackson. we heard from the boss of the airport about the
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importance of regional airports —— pippa. people are fed up with having to go through heathrow to get where they are going and that is a big trend and that is what customers have told you they want. yes, we have told you they want. yes, we have seen growth in regional partners, so they used a shorthaul routes. now we have seen they have developed long haul routes. you can get from manchester to beijing, singapore, seattle, a few use ago you couldn't, and that is exciting for holidaymakers. let's talk about today, the busiest of the year, we just finished the busiest hour, where are the people going, because the weather is glorious in the uk, why are they going on holiday?m the weather is glorious in the uk, why are they going on holiday? it is true that the uk is popular at the moment and the seaside towns are all full although it is not likely to replace full although it is not likely to re pla ce two full although it is not likely to replace two weeks in spain for holidaymakers. a lot of aircraft will be going to malaga and palmer and majorca. interestingly this summer turkey had a resurgence as well and so the tour operators have seen huge increases in turkey with
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the brits returning in droves and it is great value this year. it is really nice to see you. thank you. steve, cameraman, come with me. i will show you this view on the airfield. two runways in operation at manchester. the north one they are using for takeoffs and the one closest to us they are using for landings and they can get through the busiest day, 9000 takeoffs and landings over the course of the day in the uk airspace, so everyone at the top of air traffic control really does have their work cut out. i will see you very shortly. try not to distract them much. thank you. they say never to look directly at the sun. that is the advice. conservationists say that the race is on to stop plants like poppies and cornflowers from vanishing from the english countryside. they say modern farming techniques are harming more than 120 species of wildflower. let's speak to trevor dines from the conservation charity plantlife. good morning. morning. you don't
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think of poppies being endangered. you think of things, when i was reading notes on this, flowers such as buttercups reading notes on this, flowers such as buttercu ps and reading notes on this, flowers such as buttercups and pheasant? poppies are the in —— iconic part of britain and wendy dca field full of poppies? that's what's disappearing from the landscape. —— iconic part of britain. a big field of poppies. alongside that we are growing small, unusual, rare plants, like pheasants eye and corn poppy. these things are found in less than 30 fields in the whole of england and they are part of the decline of this special and amazing group. what is the reason? it is intensification of agriculture. the need to produce more food, the use of herbicides and
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fertilisers as well. i am a farmers son and! fertilisers as well. i am a farmers son and i remember when my dad was farming he was spraying the field and it is about showing farmers what they have on the farms and getting them interested in the plant again and once you do that they are often going to take real pride in giving back. is it possible to balance the needs of farmers to use land to create crops to make money from and still have all the lovely flowers people remember? that is the beauty of it to give the plants a chance and they will come back. it is about leaving just a margin of the field not sprayed. the project we are involved in is called "colouring the m . involved in is called "colouring the margins" and if you do that they will come back. farmers need support for that and they need advice and financial support to help to do that and they need us to be there to overlook and to be able to tell them. we are working with 50 across them. we are working with 50 across the country across england to bring some species back from the brink. interesting you talk about financial support because we have been
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reporting this week and the last couple of weeks about the difficult farmers dipping into winter supplies of feed etc and so they are struggling in that sense. what else is this project trying to do?m struggling in that sense. what else is this project trying to do? it is not only looking after the plants. it is looking after the wildlife that thrive on them as well. there isa that thrive on them as well. there is a huge range of invertebrates, bees and butterflies, feeding on the pollen of the species. and other things, harvest mice, brown hair, all the iconic animals of the english countryside —— hare. things like the core 19... english countryside —— hare. things like the core 19. .. what is it? a lovely little bi rd like the core 19. .. what is it? a lovely little bird that feeds in winter. and these plants really come back quickly if we give them the chance. so getting the plants back will help as well. have you got a favourite? weasel snout is a lovely... favourite? weasel snout is a lovely. . . that favourite? weasel snout is a lovely... that is a great name. it
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has a lovely seed pod on it with tea m has a lovely seed pod on it with team little eyes and a little weasel‘s snout. team little eyes and a little weasel's snout. would we have seen that? no, it is very rare. i know it in about two or three fields in wales where i am, the plant behind you, pheasant‘s wales where i am, the plant behind you, pheasa nt‘s eye, wales where i am, the plant behind you, pheasant‘s eye, i have never seenin you, pheasant‘s eye, i have never seen in the wild and that is what i wa nt to seen in the wild and that is what i want to get out and see. part of it is getting people to appreciate wildflowers and to get onto the plantlife website wildflowers and to get onto the pla ntlife website and wildflowers and to get onto the plantlife website and look at getting engaged. we want to capture people's memories of the plant and how they engage with them, you know, poppies were once called funder flowers, thunder cups, and the belief was if you cut the flower it would start of a thunderstorm. with all of the thunderstorms forecast at the moment, don't go and pick poppies. whoever is in charge of flower na m es poppies. whoever is in charge of flower names is very inventive. they are absolutely fantastic, it is poetry in the countryside. and a quick word on how to monitor if things are improving in terms of
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wildlife? that is an essential part of it. we are doing every introduction programme. a lot of these species we are introducing to sites where they used to be found. there is a grass called interrupted prone which we thought was extinct. we introduced it to a fight in kent and that is spreading through the reserve “— and that is spreading through the reserve —— a farm in kent. who needs ajurassic park? reserve —— a farm in kent. who needs a jurassic park? we reserve —— a farm in kent. who needs ajurassic park? we have reserve —— a farm in kent. who needs a jurassic park? we have a reserve full of extinct species. monitoring is important. it is that getting into a farmers' fields and recording the species to see how they respond to the management. really interesting. thank you very much. if you find a weasel snout, let us know. he would love to see one. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you soon. good morning from bbc london new. one of the most common medical conditions for men could be treated in a
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five—minute operation, saving the nhs millions of pounds. benign prostatic enlargement is traditionally treated by surgery. but researchers for imperial college health partners believe that new treatment using implants could halve post—operative complication rates. they say it could save the nhs £27 million a year in related costs. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murdering an 18—year—old in lambeth on wednesday. latwaan griffiths who's from southwark was found with injuries in denmark road after being dropped off by a second person on a moped, who then drove off, shortly before 7pm. police are keen to speak to the moped rider in connection with the incident. the weeks of hot, dry conditions have had a huge impact on london's parks and gardens, as you can see from these aerial photographs taken before and after the hot weather hit the capital. the grass has gone from lush green to parched yellow. you can see the dramatic changes in victoria park, regents park and hyde park over the last few weeks. whipsnade zoo has four new baby tigers.
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these endangered amur tiger cubs were born four weeks ago, and have started taking their first steps outside. their mother naya first carried them around the enclosure, so they could get to know their home — now they are exploring on their own. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the district line this morning and london 0verground is part suspended between hackney downs and cheshunt and hackney downs to enfield town due to overhead line problems. on the trains, c2c services are suspended via laindon between upminster and pitsea due to electrical supply problems. onto the roads, and traffic is building london bound on the a40 western avenue greenford flyover. and in wanstead park, bective road is closed between woodford road and dames road due to a police investigation. let's have a check on the weather now with rich davis. good morning. well, after the hottest day of the year yesterday, it's still going to be pretty warm today, but there is a slight change
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in the weather on the cards. there's a chance we'll see a few thunderstorms and showers this morning and into this afternoon. not everyone will necessarily see them. they could be heavy at times. we will see some bright spells today. some sunshine with temperatures of 32 degrees. it won't be quite as hot. but it will still be pretty warm. into this evening we will continue to see thunderstorms into the early hours of tomorrow morning. but they should gradually clear away. we should see dry and clear conditions tomorrow morning. temperatures down to 15 degrees. it will still be a pretty warm night ahead. but as we go into the weekend, things are looking a lot fresher. temperatures are down into the low 205. there's also a chance we will see more showers across the weekend. into the start of next week temperatures begin to rise once again and we will see the return of the dry and bright weather. so things are looking a little bit cooler this weekend. there is a chance of seeing thunderstorms today. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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now though it's back to charlie and naga. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... holiday misery for thousands, as long delays caused by the heat continue to cause disruption at the eurotunnel. it's the busiest day of the summer in britain's skies, with almost 9,000 flights taking off and landing in one 24 hour period. i'm in the control tower at manchester airport, the uk's third biggest, to meet the people who are keeping all those air passengers safe. police hunt a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speedboat crash on a first date, and then going on the run before his trial. red moon rising — we'll find out why tonight's lunar eclipse will be the longest this century and how to get the best views. in sport, two days from paris, but geraint can take nothing for granted, because today, there's a huge mountainous stage ahead, for geraint thomas, which threatens his dream of winning the tour de france. good morning from city hall in
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london. yesterday we had the highest temperature of the year so far. 35.1 celsius. east anglia kingsand on to high temperatures today. for the rest of us it would be so hot. and there are some dishes thunderstorms in the forecast. more in 15 minutes. —— fissures. it's friday the 27th ofjuly. our top story this morning. disruption is continuing for commuters and holiday makers using eurotunnel, after high temperatures were blamed for delays. although today is due to be slightly cooler, thousands of tickets have been cancelled in an attempt to ease queues. let's get more information from simonjones who's in folkestone. simon, you have got a glorious view of potentially what could be some really headache inducing traffic jams. can you explain why the sheet is affecting the number of people able to travel? it is a glorious
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view and glorious weather already up here on the cliffs overlooking the terminal, but not glorious for the people down here. we are expecting around 12,000 cars, many of them filled with families trying to get away on their holidays. eurotunnel said as the temperature rose yesterday, in some of the carriage is it simply became too hot, with hot cars going onto already hot trends. the air conditioning could not cope. they had to take some of the capacity out. what we are hearing this morning is delays are already getting worse during the course of the morning. if you get to the terminal you have a delay of about two and a half hours. it is taking an hourto about two and a half hours. it is taking an hour to get to check—in and to the terminal in the first place. around three and a half hours in total. some people faced delays of seven hours. this is the third day of problems and it's pretty grim for people caught up in it. two and a half hours queueing from the motorway to the check—in terminals. set on the motorway
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embankment in 34 degrees heat with ants crawling over her feet. the water, absolutely ridiculous. why it has happened, i don't know. i they couldn't give us advance warning, i don't know. i don't quite understand it. hot weather. we arrived at ten o'clock this morning. you can see the waterfall behind me. nice on the feet. the children are having fun. it's like a carnival but with less fun and a little bit more waiting. eurotunnel has told around 400 day—trippers who are going to france for the day that they can't travel today, because they want to concentrate on the holiday—makers and trying to get them away on their holidays. they would be handing out water. as the thermometer temperature rises, it's likely carriages will be taken out of service again and the delays will get even bigger. simon, thank you. five people have died
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and and another five have been injured, after a car and a minibus crashed in moray in northeast scotlandjust before midnight. ken gibsonjoins us now from aberdeen. ken, bring us up—to—date? ken, bring us up-to-date? good morning. this accident happened before midnight last night. it involved a car and a minibus. if four by four car. they collided just outside the town of keith in moray. five people were killed. five more people have been taken to hospital by ambulance. air ambulance as well asa by ambulance. air ambulance as well as a coastguard helicopter. they we re as a coastguard helicopter. they were taken 60 miles to raigmore hospital in inverness. we understand the condition of one of those five casualties is potentially life—threatening. that is just to repeat, five people killed and potentially one more life—threatening injury in this dreadful accident last night. ken gibson reporting from aberdeen. police have appealed
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for help to catch a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speedboat crash on the river thames. jack shepherd, who went on the run after skipping bail before his trial, will be sentenced today for the death of charlotte brown. ben ando reports. december 2015 and jack shepherd takes his date, charlotte brown, for a late—night trip on the river thames in his speedboat. after reaching the houses of parliament, they turned back, but moments later the boat capsized after hitting something floating in the water. a police filmed the moment shepherd, who was clinging to the wreckage of upturned boat, was rescued. but charlotte, who liked to be known as "charlie", spent too long in the icy water and died later in hospital. shepherd, who had been warned before about speeding on the thames, admitted to police that he hadn't asked her to wear a lifejacket. neither of us were wearing life jackets, although there were two in between the two seats in the front, but she wouldn't have known they were there
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because i didn't point them out and we weren't wearing them anyway and like, i didn't ask if she could swim or anything. tests reveal the boat had faulty steering, shepherd, who had been bailed, went on the run but yesterday was found guilty by manslaughter of gross net negligence. if anyone knows where jack shepherd is, i would ask them to contact police immediately. we are all fully resolved to ensure that charlotte's family get the justice and closure they deserve. a warrant has been issued forjack shephard's arrest, but if is still on the run he can be sentenced here this morning in his absence. for manslaughter, the maximum term available to the judge, although it's rarely given, is one of life imprisonment. ben ando, bbc news, at the old bailey. north korea has started to hand over the remains of american soldiers killed during the korean war in the 19505. the repatriation of the fallen soldiers was agreed at last month's singapore summit between president trump and kim jong—un. laura bicker witnessed
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the ceremony at osan airbase in south korea. the remains of what is thought to be around 50 soldiers have now been returned to us soil in south korea. they were brought out in small caskets they were brought out in small cas kets o nto they were brought out in small caskets onto cars. there were thousands of soldiers at the airbase who stood in silence and saluted as those remains were carried out. they will now be tested to see if they are indeed the remains of us soldiers. there are around 5000 unaccounted for still in north korea after the korean war. some of the remains have been returned over the yea rs. remains have been returned over the years. there has been a load. the peace process has not exactly gone smoothly. all of this takes place on the 65th anniversary of the signing of the armistice. that will not have
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bypassed north korea. this is a major concession by pyongyang and pa rt major concession by pyongyang and part of a pledge made by kimjong—un to donald trump at the summit in singapore. it may be now that pyongyang is looking for concessions of its own from washington, perhaps an easing of sanctions. they wanted peace process to move forward. the fundamental problem remains. north korea still has nuclear and nuclear material. a controversial move to privatise some probation services in england and wales is to be reversed, costing the government £170 million. the contracts will end two years early, after ministers admitted they are not delivering the reduction in reoffending they promised. here's our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds. this is the kind of innovative idea the government hopes to encourage when it is privatised probation services. it's a sobriety tag, which detects if the wearer has been drinking. it is designed to be worn by offenders who broke the law while under the influence.
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the scheme is operated by a community rehabilitation company, set up three years ago to manage lower—level offenders not in prison, or just released. in england and wales there are 21 crcs, they are paid by their results, how much they cut reoffending. but they have been criticised for not maintaining the crucial relationship between offenders and their probation officer. there has been a 2% fall in the numbers of people ending up back in prison. but the government says the company's bid too low for their contracts, resulting in the need to cut costs and services. so, ministers are rethinking. it is important that we have a probation system that helps people rehabilitate. the existing contracts are not working as well as they might do, they are not working as well for us in order to ensure that we can help rehabilitation. so we want to bring those to an end early, we want to improve some of the services in the interim.
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the government will spend an extra £170 million to shore up the service for the next two years. ministers admit the changes were ambitious, but they say they want the private sector to continue to be involved in a future system. tom symonds, bbc news. one of britain's most talented young snowboarders has died on her 18th birthday. ellie soutter won a bronze medal for great britain at last year's youth olympic winter festival, and carried the team flag at the closing ceremony. this month she was named in the senior gb squad. a day after the eu's chief negotiator ruled out the uk's proposal for a future customs arrangement, theresa may will travel to salzburg to try to get support for her brexit plans. she'll meet the austrian leader and the czech prime minister, as she seeks to reduce the risk of britain leaving the eu without a deal. there'll be a spectacular sight
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in the skies tonight, as we witness the longest total lunar eclipse of the century. the moon will pass through the widest point of the earth's shadow from 8.15 this evening. rain clouds and thunderstorms could scupper the view for some skygazers. victoria gill explains. our familiar satellite is heading into our own planet's shadow. tonight, as it rises over the uk at 9pm, the moon will be turned blood red as the earth passes between it and the sun. this particular lunar eclipse, or blood moon as it's known, will be the longest this century, lasting for one hour and 43 minutes. you need to be able to have a clear, south—eastern horizon as the moon comes up. see low down to the south—east and then as it rises, you will see it more and more clearly. and then the eclipse finishes about quarter past ten. it's just lit by the light that's
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fitlered through the earth's atmosphere, which is why it looks this sort of dusky red. at the same time, our celestial neighbour mars will reach the nearest point to earth possible in its own journey around the sun. when they are at their nearest point to each other it is known as a close approach of mars. the minimum distance is 54.6 million kilometres, but that significantly improves our view of the red planet. so, clouds permitting, there could be a celestial show tonight with a brighter red planet in the same sky as a blood red moon. victoria gill, bbc news. those are the main stories. whether transport later. the foreign secretary is under growing pressure to intervene in a controversial custody case involving two british children living in china, whose father was murdered by their chinese mother. the family of michael simpson, stabbed to death by his
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wife last year, wants jeremy simpson, stabbed to death by his wife last year, wantsjeremy hunt simpson, stabbed to death by his wife last year, wants jeremy hunt to appeal to chinese officials when he visits the country next week. these are the children at the centre ofan these are the children at the centre of an international custody battle. seven—year—old jack and six—year—old alice scene with their father, michael, in january of last year. less tha n michael, in january of last year. less than three months later, he was dead, murdered in his shanghai home by his estranged wife, whom he met after moving to china in 2009 to work for a retail chain. she is now serving a life sentence. jack and alice have been living with their chinese grandparents in rural china since michael's death. but their english grandad wants to raise them backin english grandad wants to raise them back in the uk. he is fighting for them to be brought back here, which he says is what his son, michael, would so desperately have wanted. ian simpsonjoins us now. good morning. so sorry for your
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loss. i can't imagine it is easy to see those images given the situation? they are still fond memories. and really! situation? they are still fond memories. and really i looked at them, yes it can be upsetting at times. ifind it them, yes it can be upsetting at times. i find it up and them, yes it can be upsetting at times. ifind it up and down. one day you feel fine and the next day it starts to get to you, funny and when i'm by myself. if i'm cycling, i'm 0k. then it comes. when i'm by myself. if i'm cycling, i'm ok. then it comes. fundamentally you want your grandchildren to be brought up in the uk with you? yes, and the whole family. i spoke to the whole family when it happened. my ex—wife. my wife, who has been phenomenally supportive. my son, who isa phenomenally supportive. my son, who is a rock to me. and the whole family, the stepsisters have been phenomenally supportive. we made sure we are all going to do this and look after the kids. we all wanted to happen. yes, back here is where
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we wa nt to happen. yes, back here is where we want them. michael raised them very much in a western style. they spent two visits a year over here. they speak english. they are suffering a bit of a moment for obvious reasons. they have travelled around spain and thailand on holidays with your family. when there were already talking about a divorce, she was happy that the children go with michael because he was the real carer. as far as we're concerned that is where they be. the devil is in the detail, isn't it? you said that when your son and his wife were talking about divorce, she had already agreed that the children would go with michael? yes, she said that at the trial. that is recorded? yes, it is. you have had contact,
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d i rectly‘s yes, it is. you have had contact, directly‘s indirectly with her family, who is with the children at the moment? correct. explain what they want? i understand they are asking for a certain amount of money. there is an acceptance of the children will come back. is this the sticking point? no, it is gone now. before she was officially locked away, you can offerforgiveness in china. that is a real thing. so, away, you can offerforgiveness in china. that is a realthing. so, it actually means, we forgive you. the only sentence than is the state saying you did a naughty thing. effectively it would have been a life sentence. you probably would have got 12, 13 years. if we had given them forgiveness. we offer that within the first week after michael's death. —— offered. she said injune of michael's death. —— offered. she said in june of last michael's death. —— offered. she
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said injune of last year the family sacked the lawyer and said no. she said yes? to being forgiven? yes. and let us have the children. and herfamily said...? and let us have the children. and her family said. . . ? no. and let us have the children. and her family said...? no. if and let us have the children. and her family said. . . ? no. if went on. it came round again because she said, i'm about to be sentenced, what's going on? again she said, yes. the family this time said they wa nted yes. the family this time said they wanted money for what they said was for travel, to bring the children back every year. what they asked for was five times more than it would take. in fact, they asked for things like kirk to come to this country if released early to see the children. it means she would have travelled first class, stayed at the dorchester and got a limousine to see them. this was crazy. they wa nted see them. this was crazy. they wanted £65,000 up front with the brother. that was it. presumably the
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ultimate decision here will be in the power of the chinese authorities? yes. what is their position? is it their position that these children are chinese they should stay in the country where their mother is? what is the official position? there is no official position? there is no official position? there is no official position in that respect. we have already had onejudge official position in that respect. we have already had one judge we talked to, we have gone through three different courts. everyone seems to be worried because we are a foreigner. 0k, we don't want to upset anybody by making the wrong decision. that genuinely seems to be the issue. it must like i am a jobsworth, i don't want to make the wrong decision. one of them said we should not be talking bo dallas chimps —— simply because she is british only. she has no chinese documentation. so she should automatically come back to britain. our argument is that all british citizens, jack does have a chinese
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passport, but alice has no documentation. that means for insta nce documentation. that means for instance she cannot go to school over there because she would need an id card. so, what we want, now that she has been sentenced, we want the custody case to happen. obviously you can't have a custody case until she is sentenced. now she is finally sentenced, we want that to happen. we have had trouble getting people to commit to do it. we are hoping that with jeremy hunt to commit to do it. we are hoping that withjeremy hunt being there, he can say, look, this must happen ina he can say, look, this must happen in a reasonable time frame. the last quarter tried to put us off and gave us an approach which would take three years. we said, that's ridiculous. now we are hoping to do it in one month from when it officially starts, which should be in september. do you get to talk to the children? they won't let us. we went over there for the sentencing. we went three days early. the fco
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helped us. we were given very little notice about what was going to happen. we said we would go early, we would go anywhere, to see them. the brother said, no, you can't see them. the real reason is because he has told the children that they are both gone abroad to work. and therefore, that's why they don't wa nt therefore, that's why they don't want us to see them, in case we tell them the truth. they have told the same light to their friends, relatives, work colleagues. it is embarrassment to them. we wish you well. thank you for coming in. i should say the foreign office has issued a statement saying, "we are supporting the british relatives of michael simpson. we helped the simpson family visit their family last year and remain in contact with the chinese relatives of the children.
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let's talk about the weather with carol who has a wonderful vantage point this morning. good morning from city hall in london. a beautiful view over the river thames. it is warm already. across parts of south—east england the temperature is already between 22 and 24 celsius. in the west, west wales and west scotland in particular, we're looking at 11 house 12. yesterday's top temperature reached 35.1 celsius in wisley in surrey. many part of the uk actually work in the high 205 house the low 305. today will be different. we're looking at pabst east anglia seeing those temperatures. —— we're looking at perhaps east anglia. some thunderstorms rattling away in north—east scotland, western scotla nd north—east scotland, western scotland and the south—east corner of england. by no means are we all
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seeing them. but they are producing a lot of rain, particularly in the south—east. they will ease through the morning. they will rejuvenate later on. a lot of dry weather around. a lot of sunshine. we have weather fronts coming in from the west producing showery outbreaks of rain. temperatures today lower than yesterday. but in east anglia we could hit somewhere between 33 and 35. the met office as a weather warning out for the thunderstorms, for central and eastern parts of england. it is valid from two o'clock this afternoon until midnight. some of those thunderstorms will be torrential. you will see a lot of rain in a short amount of time which could well lead to some local flooding. there will be unusually large hail and gusty winds. it could lead to some disruption. tomorrow, we will see a weather front in the east. that will be producing some rain as well. it will clear and eastern england through the day, linger over eastern scotland, particularly angus
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and aberdeenshire, where you will see a lot of rain. at the same time, more rain coming in from the west. a huge difference in the temperatures tomorrow. a big drop. the other thing is it will be windy across central and southern england. if anything on sunday, it would be windier in central and southern england. we could have gusts of wind up england. we could have gusts of wind up to 60 mph. that may be disruptive. a new band of rain swinging in from the south—west, from the atlantic, and it would be moving north—east through the day. by moving north—east through the day. by then, temperatures would be closer to where they should be in july. carroll, can i ask you a question? do you know these storms? at this time of the year whenever we get these thunderstorms vacin schacht and sharp. i was watching the map and sharp. i was watching the map and looking at where the rain is going. are they going to be prolonged storms, or is going to be that kind of deluge that is over in ten 15 minutes?
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first of all, not all of us will catch them. for some, yes, they will be prolonged and for others they will move quite quickly. that sounds like a vague answer. that is what is going to happen. the ones later tonight will move into eastern england, south east scotland and clear into the north sea, only to be replaced by a weather front which will bring more rain tomorrow morning. i took the mickey out of you yesterday about the hot nights... by the way, you look fine this morning! it would be a little bit of relief over the weekend, to have a cooler night? yes, it would be blissful. by day it will not be as hot either. i'm looking forward to that. certainly. thank you carol. i think we can offer you pictures this morning from manchester airport. ben has been spending time there this morning. he is with the air traffic controllers. a really busy there are —— david today. people coming in and
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out. obviously going out on holiday. it is very dramatic looking at it from the tower, where they get the amazing vantage. ben is having to be really quiet this morning in the tower. 9000 flights in and out of the uk today. did you know that? we will be speaking to sir chris hoy inafew we will be speaking to sir chris hoy in a few minutes. it is coming towards the end of the tour de france. he was never a tour de france. he was never a tour de france rider. we will be talking to him about some of his knowledge of the gruelling mountains, the final sections. lots of hope, of course, for geraint thomas, currently two minutes in the lead. it could all change. mike will have the details. talking to chris holley, talking to mike. and talking to this man, mark dawson. he will talk to was about his latest thriller inspired by events which took place close to his salisbury
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home, with the poisoning, the novichok poisoning. we will get more frame time of —— time for the local news for you. yesterday was the warmest day of the year so far yesterday was the warmest day of the yearso farand yesterday was the warmest day of the year so far and wisley in surrey reaching 35.1 celsius. in the southeast 33—34dc today. scattered thunderstorms before feeling fresher through the weekend. in the west today cloud and showers. some of those can be heavy with the odd rumble of thunder knocked out of the question. central and eastern areas, sunny spells and thunderstorms, which pushed north and have the potential to cause disruption.
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temperatures generally fresher than yesterday. 33—34 in the southeast is the maximum. this evening and overnight, the chance of further thunderstorms and they could cause disruption. longerspells thunderstorms and they could cause disruption. longer spells of rain and if you hope to see the lunar eclipse it will be a story of mixed fortunes. temperatures fresher than last night but overnight lows 13—18. at the weekend more of a breeze and feeling fresher. more significant rainfora time feeling fresher. more significant rain for a time in the north, working north—east, a band of rain pushing from the south—west bringing showers. drier in the south—east in the afternoon but look at the damages, fresher than past few days. a maximum of 24 degrees. sunday, windy, further rain pushing him from the south—west and becoming patchy in the afternoon. the best of the
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brightness in the east. feeling fresher than it has done. a maximum of around 22. that is your forecast. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and susannah streeter. closing in on a trillion dollar valuation. amazon sales surge again as the internet giant rakes in $53 billion in revenue. live from london, that's our top story on friday the 27th ofjuly. as shares in the company surge — the stonkingly wealthy boss jeff bezos gets even richer — with his net worth reaching $150bn. also in the programme... us gdp figures out later could be over 4% — so is it a triumph for trump or the beginning of a bubble about to burst?
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