Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 27, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
this is bbc news. the top stories developing at 11am. the heatwave continues to cause have travel disruption as people head abroad on holiday bass heavy rain is forecast in other parts of the country. we had a two our weight to get to the check—in. once we got there... we only had to wait for five hours. the government ends its contracts with private companies running probation services england and wales. five people have died, and five have been injured, in a crash between a car and a minibus in northern scotland. donald trump's former lawyer, michael cohen, is claiming that the president had advance knowledge of a meeting between his campaign team and russian officials. president trump has always denied being aware that his team had been expecting to receive damaging information about his rival, hillary clinton. north korea has handed over
11:01 am
the remains of 55 american soldiers who were killed during the korean war in the 1950s. while some have been enjoying the heat, it has caused major disruption for commuters and holiday makers at the start of school holidays. eurotunnel has cancelled thousands of day—trip tickets on friday in an attempt to ease queues, after passengers faced five hour delays on thursday. warnings of delays are still in
11:02 am
place. uk air traffic controllers are expected to see a busy day. there are due to handle 8841 flights ina 24—hour there are due to handle 8841 flights in a 24—hour period. despite the arrival of storms in parts of the country, the uk'sjuly temperature records could be broken today with a high of 37 celsius is being expected by the met office. meaning the record set in 2015 may be beaten. let's get more information now from oui’ let's get more information now from our correspondent who is in folkestone. first of all those cancellations and at reducing delays that we saw yesterday, are they having an impact? not really. we are looking at delays pre—checking of around 30 minutes. two our weights at the turn all. although they have cancelled many day tickets are still
11:03 am
having issues with those carriages and theirair having issues with those carriages and their air conditioning and those units have been taken out of commission. they are still running ata commission. they are still running at a limited service. you've got many people turning up today who would like to buy tickets and are being told that they are not selling any tickets today and others who are being offered refunds if their travel is not essential. some people whose tickets were cancelled did not know about this and have also been turning up. that is highly probable. eurotunnel online on twitter is trying to respond to as many people. there are lots of worried holiday—makers who are tweeting that they have a day tickets for tomorrow and wondering that they can still travel. earlier this morning eurotunnel said they would try to respond to as many comments as possible but they won't be able to individually reply to all of them. so definitely there maybe a slight
11:04 am
crisis of customer service there. are turning up and are not sure if they can use those tickets. as you said before many day tickets have been cancelled. just briefly, olivia, take us through the travel situation elsewhere on the roads and airports and so on. as you were saying it is one of the busiest days to travel. we have had schools breaking up. friday moving into the weekend. many families will be looking to escape the scorching weather to go abroad on holiday. airports will be seeing packed schedules. not only that, we have got forecasts of torrential rain and showers as afternoon so police are quite concerned that the conditions on the roads and motorways might get hazardous in the afternoon with a lot of wet weather. we're going to ta ke lot of wet weather. we're going to take you live now into the enquiry about child protection policies in
11:05 am
the anglican church which is hearing a written statement from prince charles. on each occasion i naturally replied as i believed that to be the polite thing to do. there was often a delay on my part given other priorities at the mind of my attention. my recollection is that these exchanges were normally instigated and driven by peter ball in addition to a handful of telephone calls. having refresh my memory to help with your enquiry i notice that this has been borne out of the date in question. with a significant passage in time i cannot 110w significant passage in time i cannot now recall with certainty when the following exchange took place and when there was one titular conversation or more than one. peter ball told me that he had been
11:06 am
involved in some form of indiscretion that prompted his ready as nation —— fronted his resignation at gloucester. the police and crown prosecution service service had decided to take no action. this sequence decided to take no action. this sequence of events seem to support the claim that it came from and individual and that the individual had a grudge against him and the complaint was false and the individual had profited from the complaints by selling his story to the newspapers. the matter was described by him as close. peter ball added that various people within the church did not like him and had themselves used the complaint to curtail his ministry and forces resignation. when this exchange took place i did not know about the nature of the complaint.
11:07 am
the true context in details of this complaint andl the true context in details of this complaint and i now understand many others against peter ball did not come to my attention until the time of his trial and conviction in 2015. my main source of information before this was mr ball himself. i should add that i was so preoccupied with the public... it seems important to say that in the 19805 and 19905 there was a presumption that people 5uch there was a presumption that people such as bi5hop5 could be taken at their word and a5 a result of the high office they held were worthy of tru5t high office they held were worthy of trust and confidence. that has changed over the years as evidence ha5 changed over the years as evidence has caused us all to be more challenging. at the time there was on my part presumption of good faith. i believe i was far from alone in taking view. i was certainly not aware at that time of
11:08 am
the significance or impact of the caution that peter ball had accepted or indeed sure i had even been told about it. whilst i note that peter ball mentions the word in a letter to me in 2009, i was not the way until recently that the caution carries an acceptance of guilt. i was aware that the crown prosecution service at decided not to be shooed the case against mr ball. this seemed to support his case as set out in his letter. i recall that peter ball told me that following his resignation of bishop of gloucester he would lose the house in which he lived and that as a consequence both he and his brother michael would become homeless. consequence both he and his brother michaelwould become homeless. he told me that their monastic vows meant they had very little money. in this context i occasionally sense of the brothers small gifts of money as idoto the brothers small gifts of money as i do to many people in need. and peter ball's interest in becoming a
11:09 am
tenant of a duchy of cornwall property then arose. a significant pa rt of property then arose. a significant part of the duchy's businesses is in the raging of lucent 's of provinces. the details of the eventual rental were handled as usual by duchy staff. i was aware of the transaction but did not assist would—be selection of the house. sometime later, in 1997, peterand michael ball became tenants of a dodgy property until early 2011 when they moved on. at no stage did i ever seek to influence the outcome of either the police investigations into peter ball, nor did i instruct or encouraged into peter ball, nor did i instruct of encouraged my into peter ball, nor did i instruct or encouraged my staff to do so. i understand from documents a ng 00021. only page 21, please, danny, fio 00021. only page 21, please, danny, no other pages. where is it? i understand that a
11:10 am
membershare of where is it? i understand that a member share of the gloucestershire police seems to recall that he come under pressure in 1992 or 1993 which related in some way to some form of interest between myself and my staff in peter ball. this is untrue. indeed, the time of the police investigation, i had no knowledge of these matters. it follows therefore that i did not authorise and could not have authorised any such action and nor would i have done. likewise,
11:11 am
i have no recollection of any contact between any of member of my staff with gloucestershire police. i was clear at the time as i have remained clear that the police must be able to carry out their investigations in the proper manner without external pressure or influence. we have looked at our files and can find no record of any of these matters. it is always possible that my name was taken in vain as can unfortunately happen from time to time. as i make clear, asi from time to time. as i make clear, as i swear in this statement, there isa gap as i swear in this statement, there is a gap between rumour and fax. in a similarvein, i do not is a gap between rumour and fax. in a similar vein, i do not recall receiving a letter from michael ball in... danny, could you get up page 11, please. just to remind you you're watching a
11:12 am
statement from prince charles being read to the enquiry into child protection policies and practices in the anglican church. the investigation is focusing on nest of destination —— following an investigation. we've heard in this written statement description of written statement description of written exchanges between himself and the former bishop. beginning when peter ball told the prince of wales that he had been involved in some form of indiscretion which had led to his resignation as bishop of gloucester. prince charles is saying that he did not know the nature of
11:13 am
the complaint at the time of this exchange. let's continue to listen. nevertheless, i have made available to you copies of the private correspondence received from michael ball in case that could help your enquiry in any way. i understand that a conversation took place between sussex police and the metropolitan police royalty protection team in 2013 and a sussex police informed the metropolitan police informed the metropolitan police that they had visited peter ball's home and removed items that included a letter sent from me. i believe the metropolitan police asked whether or not this letter was releva nt asked whether or not this letter was relevant to their inquiry. i further understand that the metropolitan lease were not enquiring about the investigation itself. they only wished to establish facts about the property that had been removed and its correct ownership. the
11:14 am
metropolitan police were told that the letting question is not relevant and that it was to be returned by sussex police to peter ball. probably in 1994 although i can't be certain of the date, i recall seeing the then archbishop of canterbury at the then archbishop of canterbury at the event and take on that opportunity to ask amongst other issues about peter ball as he had lately been my local bishop. i rememberthe lately been my local bishop. i remember the archbishop was supportive of peter ball and thought him a good man and priest. i do not think we discussed any detail although i recall that the archbishop was perhaps thinking of bringing peter ball back to public ministry at some stage. i understood there were some complications but these were not described. as this was clearly a matter for church authorities i took note position on it. other than this conversation with the then archbishop i do not re call with the then archbishop i do not recall any specific conversations regarding peter ball, although i was aware that mr ball was himself keen
11:15 am
to persuade the church to return to some form of ministry within the church. the inquiry was asked about a note. on the 30th of august 19 94. this was this reads... peter after me about... the huge damage that could be done by the media to peter michael and the church could not be ignored. that is the note that we have. my private secretary meets regularly with the office of the
11:16 am
archbishop of canterbury to discuss a range of matters. having seen the document it was clear that the meeting took place in the normal course of business. i cannot shed any light on what the players to have been a brief mention about mr ball at the end of the meeting. i have no recollection of discussing the matter. i have also been shown a copy of my letter of the 14th of december 2001 addressed to peter ball. as far as i can recall this letter convey that i could not assist peter ball in any approach he was thinking of making to the archbishop to seek a return to public ministry. i recall peter ball receiving this request around this time and my declining to assist. it follows that i was not involved with any discussions with lambeth palace on this matter. you have asked about contact between myself and institutions in respect of peter ball between 1993 and 2015. to the best of my knowledge and belief i
11:17 am
have dealt with these contacts in the information i have given above andl the information i have given above and i can only hope this will be of some assistance to you. i have been shown in extract of an interview of the church's inquiry into peter ball la st the church's inquiry into peter ball last year. it suggested there were some i’uitioui's last year. it suggested there were some rumours of an interest from me in peter ball being given some alternative employment. can we get this up, please, danny? at page three. we're just we'rejust going to we're just going to pull away from that inquiry into child protection policies and practices in the anglican church. the investigation focusing on peter ball in particular, the former bishop of gloucester who is said to be a close
11:18 am
friend of prince charles. what you have just heard being friend of prince charles. what you havejust heard being read out as friend of prince charles. what you have just heard being read out as a letter from prince charles to the inquiry. detailing exchanges between himself and peter ball, saying that when peter ball told him that he had been involved in some form of indiscretion he did not know the nature of the complaint at that time of the exchanges. peter ball was jailed in 2016. julie abusing teenagers and young men. prince charles said that it was entirely handled by dodgy staff. at no takes a controversial move to privatise some probation services in england and wales is to be reversed, costing
11:19 am
the government 170 million pounds. the contracts will end two years early, after ministers admitted they are not delivering the reduction in reoffending they promised. here's our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds. this is the kind of innovative idea the government hopes to encourage when it is privatised probation services. it's a sobriety tag, which detects if the wearer has been drinking. it is designed to be worn by offenders who broke the law while under the influence. the scheme is operated by a community rehabilitation company, set up three years ago to manage lower—level offenders not in prison, orjust released. in england and wales there are 21 crc‘s, they are paid by their results, how much they cut reoffending. but they have been criticised for not maintaining the crucial relationship between offenders and their probation officer. there has been a 2% fall in the numbers of people ending up back in prison. but the government says the company's bid too low
11:20 am
for their contracts, resulting in the need to cut costs and services. so, ministers are rethinking. it is important that we have a probation system that helps people rehabilitate. the existing contracts are not working as well as they might do, they are not working as well for us in order to ensure that we can help rehabilitation. so we want to bring those to an end early, we want to improve some of the services in the interim. the government will spend an extra £170 million to shore up the service for the next two years. ministers admit the changes were ambitious, but they say they want the private sector to continue to be involved in a future system. tom symonds, bbc news. let's cross live to leeds and speak to the labour's shadowjustice secretary richard burgon. can you say definitively that the
11:21 am
problems that have occurred would not have happened in a publicly owned probation service because clearly labour this morning is complaining about privatisation and clearly has an ideological opposition to privatisation. i am really sorry. if i can interrupts. we have a problem with the sound. we didn't hear woody said at the beginning of the answer. you start again please? the government's ideological obsession with privatisation caused the probation services to be privatised in the first place in 2015 under chris grayling who fails in every department he goes to and wastes public money. he shouldn't be let near public office again in my view.
11:22 am
the government has spent money unnecessarily on bailing out these companies. they are failing to protect the public. actually, it is a failed privatisation and the probation services were doing much better prior to this disastrous privatisation and 2015. the number of re—offenders has reduced very slightly but those who do reoffend are committing crimes more frequently. on that question that i asked you, can you say definitively that this would not have happened in a publicly owned probation service? it wasn't happening when it was publicly owned in 2015. this is an unnecessary costly privatisation. i understand the point you make about reoffending but it makes very little odds to the public who are more at risk as being on the bad end of reoffending. probation is meant to
11:23 am
keep the public safe. it is not about pursuing profit. half £1 billion being thrown at these failing privatised probation companies in the last two years is just wrong. it is not good in terms of the public purse. it is not value for money and it is actually failing. you should not be throwing good money after bad just because chris grayling and the rest always think the private sector is better than the public sector regardless of the evidence on the ground. the government thinks the private sector has a role still to play in the probation service beyond 2020. they say they'll put out contracts to tenderfor say they'll put out contracts to tender for that say they'll put out contracts to tenderfor that period. say they'll put out contracts to tender for that period. these think there is any role for the private sector in the probation services at all because it is not that long ago in labour's history that it did seem pretty keen on these private initiatives. we have commissioned a review which is being chaired by lord ramsbottom and that review is looking at what a publicly owned is
11:24 am
probation service would look like under a labour government. there will be an interim report at the end of the year and a final report by easter next year. it is clear by every objective observer, regardless of their own political persuasion in terms of party that this privatisation of the probation services has fails, is costing more money, not keeping the public safe and at the end of the day this racket has got to stop. the government has thrown half £1 billion at this failing privatised companies that are failing to do what they are meant to do which is to keep the public safe. i know that chris grayling, theresa may and the rest have got an ideological obsession with farming things out to their friends obsession with farming things out to theirfriends in the private obsession with farming things out to their friends in the private sector but this isn't working. what matters is what works. this is not keeping the public safe and it is not saving the public safe and it is not saving the taxpayer money. it has got to stop. in 2020, let's not give it to
11:25 am
other private sector firms, let's bring it back in house sellers keeping the public safe and reducing reoffending can be put first and not the profits of these failing private companies. ok. roberts justice secretary —— shadowjustice secretary —— shadowjustice secretary thank you very much. five people have died and and another five have been injured after a car and a minibus crashed in moray just before midnight. the collision was on the a96, three miles east of keith. police, firefighters and paramedics were assisted by an air ambulance and a coastguard helicopter. the casualties were taken to hospital in inverness. one of the injured is believed to have life threatening injuries. our correspondent rebecca curran is at the crash scene on the a96 in moray. is there any clearer picture of what happened and what the circumstances we re happened and what the circumstances were of this horrific crash? the circumstances are still not clear but the horror that unfolded here last year is clear to see when we
11:26 am
arrived here earlier this morning. the road has now been cleared but just on that bender there there was a minibus and a four by four that had collided just before 12 o'clock last night. as you say police have confirmed that five people have sadly died. anotherfive confirmed that five people have sadly died. another five are injured. one of them with attention life—threatening injuries. we do not know much about the people that sadly lost their lives. we do not know where they had been coming from and where they were going. we don't even know which vehicle they were in. we did see a number of suitcases that were in the back of one of the minibuses. as you say there was a huge emergency services response to this incident last night. seven ambulances were sent to the scene. a special response unit and a coastguard helicopter. we have had an update from the scottish ambulance service in the last hour. they say that survivors of the crash we re they say that survivors of the crash were taken to various hospitals. one
11:27 am
was airlifted to hospital in inverness. the child was taken to royal aberdeen children's hospital. it is not clear what condition he or she is in today. the scottish ambulance service has praised the paramedics and said they were faced with very difficult circumstances. police have been here through the night and into today. they have just left in the past 20 minutes. they have been working hard to establish the circumstances and we are expecting an update in the next hour or $0. expecting an update in the next hour or so. they have scheduled a news conference at half past 12 today. this is a really busy road. it goes from aberdeen to inverness. it is between huntley and keith. a member of the scottish parliament for this area said that this is one of scotland's busiest roads and that it is truly difficult to take this tragedy in. donald trump's former lawyer, michael cohen, is reported to have claimed mr trump knew
11:28 am
advance about a meeting between members of his election campaign team and russian officials. his aides were expecting to receive damaging information about mr trump's rival, hillary clinton. the president has always denied that he knew anything about the meeting, 2016, until a year later. cnn and nbc say mr cohen is willing to testify to the contrary. we will have more on that story coming up. now it is time for the weather. a bit of a shift in the air as we move through this weekend. we will see showery outbreaks of rain. we have already seen thunderstorms today and we have more those on the way this afternoon. some might cause
11:29 am
disruption. torrential downpours falling on dry ground. with hail and lightning mixed in as well. in eastern parts of england and scotla nd eastern parts of england and scotland and it will gradually work its way north. you can see we have a weather front there and that is bringing some showery outbreaks of rain. temperatures are still warm and not heart with a maximum of around 34 to 35 celsius possible in the south—east. further showers and thunderstorms and more prolongs periods of rain overnight which could cause disruption. it will be a wet start the northern scotland. the second is more showery band of rain working its way up from the south—west. it will be a breezy day. temperatures tomorrow significantly cooler than men had been with a maximum of 24 celsius. the extreme hot weather is causing
11:30 am
disruption. eurotunnel suffered long delays as some carriages had to be taken out of service because of the air conditioning. the government will terminate its contracts with probation firms to years earlier after admitting they are not delivering the benefits promised. it will cost the taxpayer £170 million. five people were killed and five others injured when a minibus crashed in moray just others injured when a minibus crashed in morayjust before the night. one of the five has potentially life threatening injuries. police scotland are asking for witnesses. michael coen has suggested the president had full knowledge of the meeting with a russian official. president trump has always denied about the meeting when the team were offered damaging information about his rival, hillary
11:31 am
clinton. it is time for sport now. let's get an update. good morning to you. geraint thomas is just three stages away from a first tour de france title. the welshman leads by1 minute 59 seconds ahead of today's mountainous stage 19 this is what thomas and his rivals will have to get through. that is a tough mountainous stage. that is the equivalent from riding from cardiff to birmingham. it features some tough climbs. the first peaks are nearly twice as high as the shard in london. the other peaks are highest then ben nevers in scotland. it is nearly double the scottish mountain. the first practice sessions is just coming to a close
11:32 am
at the hungarian grand prix. sebastian vettel is looking to close the gap on lewis hamilton at the top of the drivers' standings this weekend, he was fastest for long periods of this session, with hamilton toiling down in fifth. but there's been a late change in the closing stages, with red bull's daniel ricciardo setting the quickest time. hamilton leads vettel by 17 points in the drivers' standings. england leg—spinner adil rashid has responded to former captain michael vaughan's comments about his recall to the test side. rashid was yesterday named in the squad for the first test against india next week, despite signing a contract to play only limited overs cricket at yorkshire. the bbc commentator was not impressed with rashid's selection — despite the yorkshireman impressing with in the one day series. this is what vaughan had to say... well this was rashid's response. he does talk a lot on twitter. i do
11:33 am
not know if his opinions are hurt or he is just seeing things for the sake of it. i do not think his opinions matter two anybody. he thinks people might listen, but i do not think they do. there will be haters. i said to yorkshire i am not available. if they wanted to pick me, that was up to them. if... qpr have agreed a settlement of almost 42 million pounds with the english football league and will be under a transfer embargo for the january 2019 window. it's after an arbitration panel dismissed the championship club's claims that financial fair play rules are unlawful. the club's case relates to breaking spending limits on their way to winning promotion to the premier league in 2014. it is believed the efl have agreed to a payment schedule over 10 years. wolves goalkeeper carl ikeme has announced retirement from football. the 32—year—old came to the decision after consultation with medical experts following his year—long battle
11:34 am
with acute leukaemia. ikeme announced last month he was in complete remission from the disease. ikeme made 274 domestic career appearances in all competitions, with over 200 of them coming for wolves, the club hejoined in 2000 as a 14—year—old. the long awaited world boxing super series super—middleweight final between george groves and callum smith will take place in saudi arabia on the 28th of september. the fight was due to be held injune but was delayed after groves suffered a shoulder injury in his victory over chris eubankjr back in february. he'll defend his wba world title against the unbeaten smith atjeddah's king abdullah sports city. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's get back to the delays
11:35 am
experienced by some travellers. thank you very much for coming along to chat to us. the focus of the problems seems to be on the railways. we have the eurotunnel problems continuing into today. the double whammy of the air conditioning problems and such hot weather. there is a lot of pressure. this is the busiest time of the year. yes, i must say, the eurotunnel problem are unforgivable. a p pa re ntly eurotunnel problem are unforgivable. apparently they are telling us they had problems with the air conditioning units and some of their shuttle trains have been taken out of service. but really, you know, the weather is not that exceptional. we are only having whether that is coming every summer we are only having whether that is coming every summer in the mediterranean, italy, greece, wherever. we are not in the mediterranean, to be fair. no, but the equipment the manufacture and
11:36 am
make to deal with this, the trains and rails and everything is all stuff that is made internationally and therefore to certain standards and therefore to certain standards and should be able to withstand weather of 38 celsius. so inexcusable, as far as you are concerned? absolutely. for this to happen at the worst time of the year, people's tickets cancelled if they want an overnight stay or a quick journey they want an overnight stay or a quickjourney there they want an overnight stay or a quick journey there and they want an overnight stay or a quickjourney there and back, they are being banned from travelling. it is shocking. where those cancellation for tickets the only option open to them's they could try and run more trains through the night, we ought to have contingency plans. -- they ought to. they knew this was going to be the peak weekend. it is the end of the school term, lots of people going to france. it should have been predictable. we talk about extremes of weather, high temperatures like
11:37 am
we are seeing of weather, high temperatures like we are seeing now. of weather, high temperatures like we are seeing now. leaves of weather, high temperatures like we are seeing now. leaves on of weather, high temperatures like we are seeing now. leaves on lines, however much snow falls in the wintertime. does the uk not do enoughin wintertime. does the uk not do enough in terms of forward planning for the weather that we get and perhaps for future weather? we were hearing from the environmental committee yesterday that these hot summers are going to be on the increase. tell us what is going on in terms of forward planning. we are affected by climate change. it is likely we are going to get more extremes likely we are going to get more extre m es of likely we are going to get more extremes of weather. there is an issue about this. you cannot spend tens, hundreds of millions on snowploughs or extra facilities to deal with the hot weather when it is only going to happen occasionally and you are going to end up spending vast amounts of largely public money on things that is not going to be used. i do think we have to have a bit of blitz spirit here. grin and
11:38 am
bear it. make sure you travel with water and all that kind of stuff. you know, i do think we make too much of a fuss about it. ok, kristian, thank you very much. let's go to our correspondent who is keeping an eye on the enquiry for us. the detailed letterfrom keeping an eye on the enquiry for us. the detailed letter from the prince of wales. it it in context for us, please. this is regarding the case of peter ball who was a seniorfigure in the the case of peter ball who was a senior figure in the church of england for several decades. he was the bishop of lewis and gloucester. in 2015, he was jailed for 32 months free sexual abuse of teenagers and young men he had actually been cautioned by police back in 1993.
11:39 am
this enquiry has been looking at whether there was a cover up from people within the church and within hype racers who tried to influence his case. —— within high places. today they were looking at the relationship with them prince charles. peter boll had called the prince a good friend. we heard extracts from letters. forgive me if i read some of them to you. in 1996 the prince of wales wrote to him saying... sorry, let's start in 1995. i wish i could do more. ifeel so desperately strongly about the monstrous wrong is that being done to you and the weight you have been treated. he went on to say the public perception of him was based on public perception of him was based o n eve nts public perception of him was based on events and characters based entirely on lies, convention, speculation and sensation. we also
11:40 am
heard about the property that prince charles duchy estate had rented out to peter and his brother, following his resignation and his caution. he said, iam his resignation and his caution. he said, i am so glad that... had been in touch with you. i pray he will be able to find something suitable for you both in due course. in 1997, i have been taught your house has been bought successfully. it looks rather nice and i hope the rent will not be too bad. you mentioned that letter, it was a letter in terms of evidence today. a statement by prince charles. he did say, at no stage did i seek to influence the police investigation and nor did i instruct or encourage my staff to do so. he addresses that property that was rented out. he said he became aware
11:41 am
that peter ball and his brother would become homeless, following their caution, his caution, and he went on to say, in that context he occasionally sent the brothers smart guests occasionally sent the brothers smart gu ests of occasionally sent the brothers smart guests of money, as he did so for many people in need. -- small gifts of money. thank you very much. some news coming in to us from police in yorkshire. we are hearing that a six—year—old boy has died in east yorkshire following reports that a child had been seriously injured atan that a child had been seriously injured at an address in the church lane area. they were called to the house yesterday afternoon around 4pm. this news just house yesterday afternoon around 4pm. this newsjust coming into us today. the police say the initial indication is that the boy's death
11:42 am
is asa indication is that the boy's death is as a result of a pellet gun injury, but they are still investigating the circumstances. the investigation is at an early stage. the child was taken to hull royal infirmary but sadly passed away. that coming into us from police in yorkshire. a day after the eu's chief negotiator ruled out the uk's proposal for a future customs arrangement, theresa may is travelling to salzburg to try and get support for her brexit plans. she'll meet the austrian leader and the czech prime minister this afternoon, as she seeks to reduce the risk of britain leaving the eu without a deal. our correspondent bethany bell is in salzburg. hello to you. theresa may could have done without that statement at this particular time. what is she hoping to achieve from these meetings? well, this visit has been described asa well, this visit has been described as a bit ofa well, this visit has been described
11:43 am
as a bit of a charm offensive by the prime minister. what she is maybe hoping for is the idea she may be able to relax the position of some of the eu 27, to make them a little more open to her suggestions of continued free movement of products after brexit. but that is probably going to be very, very difficult. everything i am hearing from austrians, from the czech republic, they say that britain must not be allowed to cherry pick, that they are firmly behind the chief negotiator michel barnier. the question is that the austrians are saying they do want a positive conclusion to brexit. they do not wa nt to conclusion to brexit. they do not want to see a note deal. they say that will be catastrophic for everyone, although they say it will be more catastrophic for britain than for the eu 27. ok, bethany, thank you very much. bethany well in salzburg. there will be more throughout the day on the prime
11:44 am
minister's visit to austria. there'll be a spectacular sight in the skies tonight, as we witness the longest total lunar eclipse of the century. the moon will pass through the widest point of the earth's shadow from 8.15 this evening. rain clouds and thunderstorms could scupper the view for some skygazers. our science correspondent victoria gill explains. our familiar satellite is heading into our own planet's shadow. tonight, as it rises over the uk at 9pm, the moon will be turned a dusky red as the earth passes between it and the sun. this particular lunar eclipse, or blood moon as it's known, will be the longest this century, lasting for one hour and 43 minutes. you need to be able to have a clear, south—eastern horizon as the moon comes up. see low down to the south—east and then as it rises, you will see it more and more clearly. and then the eclipse finishes about quarter past ten. it's just lit by the light that's
11:45 am
fitlered through the earth's atmosphere, which is why it looks this sort of dusky red. at the same time, our celestial neighbour mars will reach the nearest point to earth possible in its own journey around the sun. when they are at their nearest point to each other it is known as a close approach of mars. the minimum distance is 54.6 million kilometres, but that significantly improves our view of the red planet. so, clouds permitting, there could be a celestial show tonight with a brighter red planet in the same sky as a blood red moon. victoria gill, bbc news. joining me now is a senior research associate at lancaster university. very good to have it with us. for this lunar eclipse tonight, the uk is in this lunar eclipse tonight, the uk isina this lunar eclipse tonight, the uk is in a fantastic position, weather permitting, to witness this. that is right. we are perfectly lined up to get a beautiful display tonight. as
11:46 am
we have heard, it should be visible from the uk from nine o'clock tonight. it will have started earlier on in the uk for other parts of the world. for the uk, 9pm. so nine o'clock until what time?m will last until about her past 12 this evening. the full eclipse will happen at around quarter past ten. that gives us one hour or one hour and a half to witness this beautiful blood red moon. it is safe to look at, isn't it? it is. the main reflects sunlight that has been through the earth atmosphere. it gets reflected off of the main's service and back to us. it will be like looking at the moon normally, but it will be darker because it is in the earth's shadow. in terms of trying to spot markers, that'll appear like trying to spot markers, that'll appearlikea trying to spot markers, that'll appear like a bright star, where is the best position to see that and we are is it in relation to the main?
11:47 am
it is below the moon, closer to the horizon. it will be on the south—east horizon, not too high up in the sky and morris will be beneath that. it should be obvious. it is the planet mars. will you be going to see it, together with a big group of people? yes, i am going to be heading to some cute to be maxfield, with a nice view of the south—east and the southern horizon. —— heading to a nice field. south—east and the southern horizon. -- heading to a nice field. we have been reporting this will be the longest lunar eclipse for a very longest lunar eclipse for a very long time. at that and context for us. tonight we have a perfect coincidence of events going on. the moon will be passing through the centre of the earth's shadow and it is quite far away from us at the moment, so that means it will be spending the longest amount of time
11:48 am
it will ever do in a lunar eclipse in our shadow. as we heard earlier, thatis in our shadow. as we heard earlier, that is the longest time this century. it is a long window for us to go and see the moon tonight. fingers crossed for clear skies for eve ryo ne fingers crossed for clear skies for everyone wanting to see it. thank you very much. first the headlines. the heatwave is continuing to cause traffic disruption. heavy rain is forecast for other parts of the country. the government is ending its contracts with probation services in england and wales. five people have died and five more have been injured during a crash in northern scotland. it has cost the bank... in april,
11:49 am
almost 2 million customers lost access to online banking services after the bungled introduction of the new computer system. gsp says only 37% of 130,000 complaints have been resolved so far. —— gsp. a new independent review has been set up to look at the impact on consumers. the access to cash review will look at the affects of new technology, including contactless cards. they will be cheered by the former head of the service. it is funded by the uk's biggest group of cash machines. uk's biggest group of cash machines. uk road hauliers could be in line for compensation. it comes two years after the european commission that. if the claim succeeds, what more than 600,000 should be covered. the mega meltdown following the new
11:50 am
computer system has pushed the bank into the red for the first half of the year. it has pushed one of the biggest it problems in british banking history. let's get more from this now from francis. so, the bank is counting the cost and it is a big one. this does not take into account fines, which could result in all of this. yes, there is more cost to come. it has taken a big hit already from this big it disaster. that has also fed through into its parent company, which had a loss in the second quarter of 2018. they have not even resolve all of the complaints yet. we will have compensation there and quite a substantial fines. will be chief executive has said i know how frustrated customers have been. it
11:51 am
was not on the level of service we pride ourselves on. this was the bank that wanted to attract new customers, doesn't it? it had all sorts of things to try and attract people back and apparently some people back and apparently some people are still transferrin but it is possible that might be before the meltdown. but they have lost about 26,000 customers because of this so far. the bank is saying it is tackling the issue, it has resolved the problems but still only one third of all of those complaints have been handled so far. do you think it is lacking on the customer service front as well? i think the customer service service front as well? i think the customer service failure is the bigger issue. it meltdown is happen but the way the bank handled it from a customer service but the way the bank handled it from a customer service point of view was too little, too late. it treated customers with a fair amount of disrespect and even contempt. i think some redress and big action is
11:52 am
needed on the customer service side to address that. was it notjust needed on the customer service side to address that. was it not just the fa ct to address that. was it not just the fact customers could not access the accounts, it meant it was easier for fraudsters to remove money from those accounts as well. how confident as the industry and customers, really, that these issues have been fully resolved and the it system is now operating as it should be? the bank assures us it is operating properly and the problems are behind it. i imagine there will be problems from time to time. the problem is when you lose confidence like that, it is difficult to recover it. it can take years before the stigma of, oh, yes, that is the bank whose it melted down and let fraudsters in, goes. it is a huge hit for them, really. many thanks. to amazon now. from online bookstore to retail, media and data giant — and all —
11:53 am
round titan of the internet. its march towards becoming a trillion dollar company continues after another huge quarter of earnings. amazon made revenues of almost $53 dollars in the three months to the end ofjune — up 39 percent% on the same time last year. 2.5 billion of that was profit — the most it's ever made in a quarter as it normally reinvests most of what it makes. shares have surged in recent months, they are up 58% this year and 500% since 2015. that's pushed up amazon's stock market value by $300bn since the beginning of the year to $890 billion now second only to apple as the most valuable company. they are both closing in on that magic trillion dollar valuation and it's made founder and boss, jeff bezos, far and away the richest person on the planet, with a net worth of $150bn. that's almost twice as rich as number two, warren buffett. earlier i asked the theme of
11:54 am
thematic research at global data what could stop amazon in its tracks. the company is getting too big. resident trump is concerned it is getting too big. the regulators now, they are using historical remedies for a next—generation company. the traditional remedy is to break amazon up. what makes them stronger is the data they hold on customers. if regulators split the data and gives it back to the true owners of the data, the customers, you and me, and the customers can decide whether amazon has access or not, that would create competition. the global domination continues by amazon. let's check in with the financial markets now. it's share price up marginally. it is since...
11:55 am
now, the assets are being sold by the australian mining firm. price was up 3% also. the shares have surged today after the household goods giant says its infant formula business boosted sales. up by nearly 8%. that is all the business news. back to you. whether you are travelling today are hoping to see the lunar eclipse, let's have a look at the forecast. todayis let's have a look at the forecast. today is the last day of the heat wave, turning fresh as we move into the weekend. we sought 35.1 celsius yesterday in surrey. it looks like we are going to see similar temperatures for parts of east anglia and kent. as you move into the weekend, it is turning fresher, more unsettled. showery outbreaks of
11:56 am
rain. those area of low pressure brings rain, and the wind will become a feature of our weather. a change for what we are seeing recently. we are seeing storms are today. these are the storms and the last three hours. they are tending to die out in scotland. this afternoon, further thunderstorms and the forecast. while not everyone will see one, that could be torrential downpours mixed in there. there is the potential for disruption. good spells of sunshine. it is cloudy in the west with more prolonged spells of sunshine. temperatures are down for many. dirty five celsius in the south—east. —— 35 celsius. if you're hoping to see the lunar eclipse, you may catch it but you may see a thunderstorm. those thunderstorms in the east in particular could cause
11:57 am
disruption. temperatures overnight little cooler than they have been of late. 13 to 19 celsius. tomorrow, we start off with more prolonged heavy spells of rain in the north. that will work its way north—east in the day. it showery band of rain pushing north—west in the morning. dreyer in the south—east. the temperatures will be different. cooler for people. a maximum of 24 celsius and the breeze as well. feeling noticeably cooler than it has done. as we move overnight into sunday, our next area of rain coming up from the south west. that will bring cloud and outbreaks of rain. strong winds in the south and disruption on sunday is a possibility. that rain working its way east as we move through the day. it is becoming increasingly showery and the best of
11:58 am
brightness in the east. temperatures are similar, the height genes or 20s. —— the high teens. that was your forecast. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at midday. the heatwave is continuing to cause travel disruption as people head abroad on holiday. we arrived in folkestone last night and had a two—hour wait to get from the slip road to the check—in. once we got there we were really looked after and they did give us priority because of the people we were carrying on board. so we only had to wait for five hours. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse hears a statement from prince charles in the case of a bishop who was who was convicted of abusing 18 young men. five people have died, and five more have been injured, in a crash between a car
11:59 am
and a minibus in northern scotland the government is ending its contracts with private companies running probation services in england and wales the agreements will end in 2020 — at a cost to the taxpayer of £170 million. social media users are being urged to stop scrolling through sites for a month as part of a new campaign to improve mental health. in good morning. it's friday 27th july. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live while some have been enjoying the heat, it is causing disruption for commuters and holiday makers at the start of the summer getaway. eurotunnel has cancelled
12:00 pm
thousands of day trip tickets in an attempt to ease queues, after passengers have faced five—hour delays as air—conditioning units failed on trains. warnings of delays are still in place. meanwhile, uk air traffic controllers are expecting to see the busiest day of the summer as hundreds of thousands take to the skies on their summer holidays. nats, the uk air traffic control service, is due to handle 8,841 flights in 24 hours. train operator northern says trains in the leeds and york area are expected to be delayed or cancelled until at least 3:15pm today. it's advising customers in the yorkshire area not to travel after what it described as a "severe infrastructure failure "caused by lightning strikes. " and despite those lightning strikes in parts of the country, the uk'sjuly temperature record could be broken today. a high of 37c is still expected
12:01 pm
by the met office, meaning the record of 36.7c, set in 2015, may be beaten. let's get more information from olivia crellin who's in folkestone. overlooking the eurotunnel there. you are telling us earlier that eurotunnel were cancelling some tickets in an effort to deal with some problems that we saw yesterday with huge queues. it is having some effect but there are still some cues, aren't there? there are indeed. and later start by saying it is absolutely scorching here. i can't imagine how hot it must feel being stuck in a car in a queue. those queues are still in place. there is a 30 minute wait time pre—check—in and then two hours in the terminal. the dues have reduced and that is partly due to them cancelling those number of day
12:02 pm
tickets. also there is an additional number of overnight trains to try and reduce the delay.|j number of overnight trains to try and reduce the delay. i mentioned the cancellation of some tickets for day trips and other tickets. but people have been turning up. not eve ryo ne people have been turning up. not everyone got the news in time. some people have been turning up to find they could not travel which must have been immensely frustrating. that is correct. many people have not heard that they won't be allowed to travel on a day tickets. a lot of people are turning up trying to buy tickets. that is not about either. obviously when you're trying to deal with this magnitude of cancellations it is going to be difficult to reach everybody. eurotunnel has been quite transparent about this on their twitter account and online. they said that they cannot respond to all queries and questions on twitter even though many people are still confused about the current state of affairs. they have said however that they won't be cancelling next day tickets so that is if you're going
12:03 pm
out today in coming back on saturday. and there are delay times returning from calais. just finally give us an overview of the general travel situation, notjust on the roads. obviously. there is really hot weather here and we are looking at thunderstorms later. that might mean hazardous conditions on roads across the country. obviously, it is one of the first days that people are on summer one of the first days that people are on summer holidays. children and families are looking to travel, getting to airports and getting to the eurotunnel. that is going to cause increased traffic on the road. somebody tweeting about they are looking at travelling on the eurotunnel today and they are going to be seeing traffic on thes 20. so all in alland to be seeing traffic on thes 20. so all in all and lots of different issues for holiday—makers at the moment. —— traffic on thes 20. let's cross tojohn grant, who is in saarbrucken near the french—german border.
12:04 pm
john and his family waited in the queue at folkestone for six and a half hours yesterday. you must be grateful to be out of your car. tell us what it was like. it was terrible. we arrived at 10:30am on friday and with no further warning we got into the access point for the channel tunnel lakes check—in. it took about 15 minutes to get through there but then we were stuck in a queue for approximately two hours before we could even get into the car park of the main terminal. there is clearly issues and we had no further updates from many of the staff. the staff we re from many of the staff. the staff were doing what they could but we had three children in the car with us and it was extremely hot and uncomfortable and there were no services available. in total we spent about five hours just waiting in queues. there was nowhere to go and there were no refreshments. there were no updates. we had to go now updates from people who were away from area to see exactly what
12:05 pm
was happening. did you have any water or any snacks with you? three children underfive water or any snacks with you? three children under five must have water or any snacks with you? three children underfive must have been demanding snacks. we set off from undisturbed for i am in the morning and we were going to the south of france to provence. we were quite well set up for a 20 hourjourney but we weren't expecting to spend six or seven hours sat at folkestone. we were lucky. we had our staff inside. we had a lot of snacks and we did share with other people around us. eurotunnel has said that it was to do with the air—conditioning of the vessels. they knew summer was coming. we had aircon in my they knew summer was coming. we had air con in my land rover but i did notice that we must have used a fifth of a tankjust sat there are idling away which is no good for the money or the environment. you said that the staff who were there were trying to do their best. but in terms of the flow of information how was that? was there any useful information in terms of how long you are going to be at a standstill
12:06 pm
before you could get moving? no, unfortunately. there were zero information that came forward. i did approach various members of staff. everyone is very courteous and was nothing that could be done. the staff are brilliant for what their situation was but they didn't have the information. we know that the transport for the trucks was going through and that eurotunnel from london was going through it was just ours that wasn't. i'm a regular traveller on eurotunnel and it is always warm and hot down there. i don't get the theory of keeping people on the motorway for five hours and 35 degrees over putting someone on a hours and 35 degrees over putting someone on a hot train to 35 minutes ina someone on a hot train to 35 minutes in a tunnel. i simply don't get it. the staff were good but unfortunately the system failed. it is notjust us but there were a lot of people that were suffering considerably more than us. we were helping people out. the british red cross was there and it was quite a sad state of affairs. i somewhat dreading the return journey? were
12:07 pm
not looking forward to that! fortunately we are here for some time. we didn't make it to provence. we're in the westside of france near the german border. we're coming back at the end of august and hoping that it may have cooled down or they might have some trains with air conditioning. we have been here in the winter as well and eurotunnel failed because it was too cold. so we now have trains don't work in the heat and don't work in the cold. it's not looking the future really. well, john, you have done more than yourfairshare of well, john, you have done more than your fair share of waiting well, john, you have done more than yourfair share of waiting in line for your holiday. i hope the rest of your travels are very smooth. thank your travels are very smooth. thank you very much the talking to us. john talking to was there after spending 6.5 hours in a queue yesterday at eurotunnel. two teenage boys are missing after swimming outdoors during the heatwave, in separate incidents. in the first, a 17—year—old boy disappeared while swimming at a disused quarry near the village of bishops itchington,
12:08 pm
in warwickshire, just before 6.30 last night. meanwhile, a boy missing after getting into trouble in water off clacton pier in essex yesterday has been named locally as 14 14 —year—old ben quartermain. pier workers and emergency crews managed to rescue a boy he was with. other news now and prince charles has denied using his position to influence a police investigation into disgraced paedophile bishop peter ball. an inquiry into child protection policies and practises in the anglican church today heard a written statement from the prince. the former bishop of gloucester was jailed in 2015 for sexually abusing teenagers and young men and was said to be a close friend of charles'. in the letter, the prince said... our correspondent has been following
12:09 pm
the hearing. this is regarding the case of peter ball who was a senior figure in the church of england for several decades. he was bishop of gloucester. in 2015 he was jailed for 32 months for the sexual abuse of teenagers and young men. he had actually been cautioned by police way back in 1993. this enquiry has been looking at whether there was a cover—up from people within the church and within high places who tried to influence his case. today we looked at the relationship between peter ball and the prince of wales. peter ball had called the prints are good friends and we heard some extracts from some letters between the two men. i'm going to read some of them to you. in 1996 the prince of wales roads to peter
12:10 pm
ball saying... lets start a 1995. he wrote to peter ball saying "i wish i could do more. ifeel so desperately strongly of the monstrous wrongs that have been done to you and away you have been treated he went on to say that the public perception of him was based on events and characters based entirely on lies, invention and speculation and sensation. we also heard about the property that prince charles duchy estate had rented out to peter ball and his brother following estate had rented out to peter ball and his brotherfollowing his resignation from his position and that caution. he said, "i am so glad that caution. he said, "i am so glad that by, as it is but in the letter... " in 1997, he goes on," they tell me that your house was
12:11 pm
bought successfully. it looks rather nice and i hope that wrens won't be too bad." you mention that letter, that was a letter used in evidence to date, statements given by prince charles and he did say that at no stage did he ever seek to influence either the outcome of the police investigation into peter ball or instruct or encourages staff to do so. he addresses that property that was rented out. he said," that he became aware of peter ball and his brother would become homeless following his caution. he went on to say that in that context the occasionally sent the brothers small gifts of money as he did so for many people need. a six—year—old boy has died following what is thought to have been a "pellet gun injury". police were called to sproatley in east yorkshire yesterday afternoon to reports a boy had been seriously injured — he later died
12:12 pm
at hull royal infirmary. police say they're looking into the circumstances and the investigation is at an early stage. five people have died and a further five injured after a car and a minibus crashed in moray, in the north east of scotland just before midnight. the collision was on the a96, three miles east of keith. police, firefighters and paramedics were assisted by an air ambulance and a coastguard helicopter. the casualties were taken to hospital in inverness. one of the injured is believed to have life—threatening injuries. our correspondent rebecca curran is at the scene, she told me the cause of the crash is not yet known. the horror that unfolded here last night was clear to see when we arrived here earlier this morning. the road has now been cleared but just on that part there there was a minibus and a four by four which collided, just before 12am last night. as you say, police have
12:13 pm
confirmed that five people have sadly died and another five are injured. one of them has potentially life—threatening injuries. we do not know much about the people who sadly lost their lives. we do not know where they had been coming from or where they had been coming from or where they had been coming from or where they were going or even which vehicle they were in. we did see a number of suitcases that were in the back of one of the minibuses. as you say the word is a huge emergency reserves his response to this incident last night. seven ambulances were sent to the team, a special response unit and a coastguard helicopter. we have had an update from the scottish ambulance service in the past hour which said that survivors of the crash were taken to various hospitals, one was airlifted and the child was taken to royal aberdeen children's hospital. it is not clear what condition he or she is in today. the scottish ambulance service has praised the paramedics that attended the scene. they say
12:14 pm
they were faced with very difficult circumstances. the headlines on bbc news... the heatwave is continuing to cause travel disruption , whilst heavy rain is forecast for other parts of the country as the train operator northern cancels trains in the leeds and york are due to lightning strikes. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse hears a statement from prince charles in the case of a bishop who was who was convicted of abusing 18 young men. five people have died, and five more injured, in a crash between a car and a minibus in northern scotland. sport now. starting with formula 1. the red bulls were fastest but sebastien
12:15 pm
betta was only 700th of a second behind as he looks to close the gap on lewis hamilton. hamilton struggled in hungary and was down in fifth. queens park rangers have been signed with £42 million and one bill to make any transfers in the january tra nsfer to make any transfers in the january transfer window after a football league arbitration panel dismissed their claims that football's financialfair their claims that football's financial fair play rules are unlawful. they are... it is believed the afl would let them settle the fine over ten years. the wolverhampton goalkeeper has announced his retirement from football. the 32—year—old's decision has come from advice from medical experts after his battle with leukaemia. he announced last month he was in complete remission. he is made more than 200 appearances for wolves. the long—awaited world
12:16 pm
boxing super middleweight final will ta ke boxing super middleweight final will take place in saudi arabia in september. the fight was due to be held in june but september. the fight was due to be held injune but it was delayed after george groves suffered a shoulder injury in his victory over chris eubank junior. just before shoulder injury in his victory over chris eubankjunior. just before we 90, chris eubankjunior. just before we go, stage 19 of the tour de france, the last mountain stage in the pyrenees is under way. there is full coverage on the bbc sport website and we will have more view in the next hour. a controversial move to privatise some probation services in england and wales is to be reversed, costing the government 170 million pounds. the contracts will end two years early, after ministers admitted they are not delivering the reduction in reoffending they promised. here's our home affairs
12:17 pm
correspondent, tom symonds. this is the kind of innovative idea the government hopes to encourage when it is privatised probation services. it's a sobriety tag, which detects if the wearer has been drinking. it is designed to be worn by offenders who broke the law while under the influence. the scheme is operated by a community rehabilitation company, set up three years ago to manage lower—level offenders not in prison, orjust released. in england and wales there are 21 crcs, they are paid by their results, how much they cut reoffending. but they have been criticised for not maintaining the crucial relationship between offenders and their probation officer. there has been a 2% fall in the numbers of people ending up back in prison. but the government says the company's bid too low for their contracts, resulting in the need to cut costs and services. so, ministers are rethinking. it is important that we have a probation system that helps people rehabilitate.
12:18 pm
the existing contracts are not working as well as they might do, they are not working as well for us in order to ensure that we can help rehabilitation. so we want to bring those to an end early, we want to improve some of the services in the interim. the government will spend an extra £170 million to shore up the service for the next two years. ministers admit the changes were ambitious, but they say they want the private sector to continue to be involved in a future system. tom symonds, bbc news. joining us from north london is the chief executive of the howard league for penal reform. at the time that chris grayling embarks on the privatisation of these companies there were lots of warnings whether they would work. it seems they have not. why do think that what was the
12:19 pm
key issue? chris grayling destroyed a successful probation scheme. it was working very well. it was seen by the electorate to function excellently. but that was all swept away for ideological reasons. not for practical reasons, not because he wanted to protect the public but for ideological reasons. he wanted to privatise it. what happened has been disastrous. what's changed then? he split it into two parts. we still have a remnant of the public sector running the very dangerous people who have committed crimes and then he divided the other part into 21 areas and gave them to private companies. they have been very lucrative to the private companies. they have been screaming about not making a lot of money on it but they
12:20 pm
have been making profits. what do they know about people in wales was magid has been a disaster. the national audit office has not good value for money. the justice national audit office has not good value for money. thejustice select committee had that is not working. inspectors have said it's not working. i have pleased that the government has recognised it as a disaster but the solutions are not going to get two grips with the real failures. the government says there is still a role for private companies and post—2020 it wants to tender contract and invite private companies to tender for new contracts. in terms of the actual interactions with people leaving prison and is trying to help them manage their behaviour and their lifestyle, what were the differences between the probation system that existed before this and probation system that the government is now
12:21 pm
saying isn't working? private companies manage people coming out of prison but they also manage thousands of people every year that a given community sentences. some of these companies say to give them a ring every six weeks. they don't even know who is calling in. that is the level of management that people who have committed crimes are getting from these private companies. obviously that is very cheap and enhances their profits. that has been the problems. people have not been given support. all we know is that if somebody has a challenging life and has committed crimes, what works in them is what the probation service used to do which is have a personal relationship, help them get housing and ajob, make relationship, help them get housing and a job, make sure they recognise that they have done something wrong, apologised to victims, change their life. that was working. all that has
12:22 pm
been swept away and all you're getting instead is a call every six weeks. thank you very much free time. apologies that we had some issues with the sound on that interview. the 30—year—old man has been sentenced to six years in prison for the manslaughter of charlotte brown who died after falling in the thames . you may know from our coverage of this case that jack shepherd went on the run before his trial. he was sentenced to six years today for manslaughterfor sentenced to six years today for manslaughter for gross negligence. but in his absence. this was despite the peel from the victim's family to
12:23 pm
show up. police are appealing for help in trying to locate jack shepherd who as i say skipped bail and was absent for this trial. the fatal accident happened in december 20 15. the fatal accident happened in december 2015. the jury fatal accident happened in december 20 15. thejury in fatal accident happened in december 2015. the jury in this case had sent a note to the judge expressing concern about the current lack of licensing on private boat ownership on the thames. and saying that the lack of clarity regarding safety matters greatly increased the risk of similar incidents. that news just coming in thatjack shepherd has been sentenced to six years in prison after the death of charlotte brown after his speedboat capsized on the thames three years ago. the online retail giant, amazon, has reported record profits, donald trump's former lawyer, michael cohen, is reported to have
12:24 pm
claimed mr trump knew in advance about a meeting between members of his election campaign team and russian officials in 2016 . his aides were expecting to receive damaging information about mr trump's rival, hillary clinton. the president has always denied that he knew anything about the meeting, until a year later. cnn and nbc are reporting mr cohen is willing to testify to the contrary. cbs correspondent laura podesta spoke to us earlier and told us the latest developments. this meeting was between trump's campaign advisers and russians who potentially had dirt on hillary clinton. cbs news has learned that michael collins is now saying that in the months before the election candidate tromp approved of that meeting at trump tower. he did not attend that meeting but it was attended by his son. to remind you cohen's allegation comes just days
12:25 pm
after one mac's lawyer released a tape recording of the president discussing the release of a he said that it is back was up against the wall he will live like crazy because he has lied all his life. cohen himself is under investigation but he is not yet been charged with any crimes. north korea has started to hand over the remains of american soldiers killed during the korean war in the 1950s. the repatriation of the fallen soldiers was agreed at last month's singapore summit between president trump and kim jong—un. our seoul correspondent laura bicker witnessed the ceremony at osan airbase in south korea. after nearly 70 years, the fallen soldiers are welcomed home with an honour guard. one by one the small caskets wrapped in the united nations flag
12:26 pm
were carried back onto american soil, a us airbase in south korea. this is just the start of their final journey. next week they will be taken to hawaii where they will to check that they are the remains of us soldiers. this appears to fulfil a key pledge made by kimjong—un to president trump during the singapore summit. it comes in the same week as north korea appears to be dismantling one of its main missile launch sites. but what does north korea want in return? kim jong—un chose his date well to keep his word. today marks the 56th anniversary of the signing of the armistice which officially ended the korean war. in north korea they call it the day of victory. in tears and rapture, veterans run into the arms of chairman kim. mr kim is trying to persuade
12:27 pm
the world that he's focused on building his country's economy rather than building nuclear weapons. some doubt his sincerity. presidents trump however will see this as a promise kept and thanked him in a tweet. "after so many years, this will be a great moment "for so many families. "thank you to kim jong—un," he said. in seoul, korean war veterans from around the world gathered to remember the millions who died and they hope that at some point peace will one day come to the peninsular. for the last 30 years we have not seen anything very positive. i think today we are starting to see a few positive things happening. the return of these remains may breath new life into a peace process that has seem stalled since the singapore summit. the fundamental problem remains that north korea is yet to hand over any of its nuclear weapons and until it does the us will still believe that it poses a global threat.
12:28 pm
the time is almost 12:30pm. let's ta ke the time is almost 12:30pm. let's take a look at the weather forecast as we head into the weekend. we need for some of us it would end with a big bang and it already has in the last 24 hours. there has been some big thunderstorms in northern and eastern britain. still some heat around but it is mainly in east anglia and the south—east. as i say, we could see some storms across some eastern parts. vicious ones. thunder and lightning and gusty winds. but it is very hit and miss. look how warm the evening is still going to be tonight. and then saturday it is a big change. the s. coming off the
12:29 pm
atla ntic a big change. the s. coming off the atlantic and is much fresher for all of us. we will notice a huge drop in the temperature particularly across the temperature particularly across the south—east and east anglia. some of us will have rain and the wind will increase as well. it will be windy on the coast around western and southern britain. the teens into the low mid 20s. it is all change and what to change it is. hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines: the extreme hot weather is causing disruption for commuters and holiday makers at the start of the summer getaway. eurotunnel suffered long delays as some carriages had to be taken out of service because of problems with the air—conditioning. prince charles has denied seeking to influence a police investigation into disgraced paedophile bishop peter ball who was convicted of abusing 18 men. the independent inquiry into the historic child sex abuse scandal in the anglican church today heard a written
12:30 pm
statement from the prince. five people were killed and five others injured when a minibus and and a car crashed in morayjust before midnight. police said one of the five has "potentially life—threatening injuries". police scotland are appealing for witnesses. the government will terminate its contracts with private firms which run probation services in england and wales two years early, after admitting they are not delivering the benefits promised. the agreements will end in 2020 — at a cost to the taxpayer of £170 million. donald trump's former lawyer, michael cohen, has claimed the president had full knowledge about a meeting with russian officials during his presidential campaign in 2016. mr trump has always denied knowing about the meeting at trump tower, when his team were offered damaging information about his rival hillary clinton. a man has been sentenced to six
12:31 pm
yea rs a man has been sentenced to six years in prison in his absence after killing a woman in a speedboat crash on the river thames. greg mckenzie is following the case outside the old bailey. greg, the family of the victim had appealed for him to turn up victim had appealed for him to turn up to basically, they said, do his duty and assume the responsibility of his guilt. he did not, did he? that is right. the defendant did not appear in court to be sentenced and has not appeared throughout the trial. he has been handed down a sentence of six years to the defendant. thejudge sentence of six years to the defendant. the judge said the sentence i can compose with my public duty is one of six years. he went on to say that the defendant
12:32 pm
did have personal circumstances, he was a man of previous good character and he went on to say he had read the 4—page statement that had been issued by the defendant's lawyers earlier this week. not withstanding his absence, it is clear from the statement that this is a person who has had many problems in his life, both past and present. he. he said he accepted the defendant did show general remorse, although this was u nfortu nate general remorse, although this was unfortunate that was not manifested with his attendance at court or entering a guilty plea to his defence. the family were in court today and the victim's mother, charlotte brown, who died back in 2015 in december, a cold night, had gone out on a speedboat on the river thames. both had been drinking and the boat hit what is believed to be a clerk and the pair were thrown into a water and unfortunately
12:33 pm
charlotte died. her mother has given an impact statement on the court and she has said, every day is a struggle and every event is impossible. she goes on to say, empty is still empty, gone is still gone. missing charlotte is still missing. she goes on to say that charlotte will not have the chance to have a baby, get married or even settle down. she says that the defendant should be in court and admit the responsibility of taking cha rlotte's life. admit the responsibility of taking charlotte's life. the fact he is not here, the family are not happy about that at all. what is being done to try and find jack shepherd? that is the question. thejudge did say try and find jack shepherd? that is the question. the judge did say he would deal with the fact that jack is not at court. they do not know where he is. the defence believes he is possibly abroad. arrest warrants
12:34 pm
are out for him. he is a wanted man and has been for a couple of days now. when he returns, thejudge says it is his case that he himself will pass a separate sentence for the fa ct pass a separate sentence for the fact that jack shepherd has absconded, technically. ok, greg, thank you very much. greg mckenzie. back now to our main story — and hundreds of thousands of people are on the move in the uk, heading off on holiday. it's the busiest day of the summer in the skies of the uk, with almost 9,000 flights taking off and landing. ben thompson has been at manchester airport for us. welcome to the air traffic control tower on what is the busiest day of the year. 9000 take—offs and landings across the country, if a share of them done here in manchester. you have the sense of how many planes are awaiting this
12:35 pm
morning. what a logistical challenge that will pose for the staff who work here. i spoke to tricia, an operator this morning. there is so much you have to get right today. what are the biggest challenges to make sure everyone can get where they are going on time and safely? the biggest challenge is security. it is really important people understand what they can and cannot ta ke understand what they can and cannot take through security and we have the people and the process right to make sure we accommodate that. we have recruited extra security staff, we are making sure everything is running smoothly today. it is a huge logistical challenge. even if one pa rt logistical challenge. even if one part of the chain runs down, it can have repercussions. how much planning goes in? a lot. we plan well in advance. we have touch points through the day where we are doing status reports, right to the end, whether that is the terminals
12:36 pm
or the operations. good luck with it. tricia, thank you very much. you get a sense of what is involved women talk about your ports. this morning between six and seven was pretty much the busiest time. lots of people are jetting away on a summer of people are jetting away on a summer holiday. it means all of these planes have to get out of here and it means work for all of the tea m and it means work for all of the team here. the team have their work cut out. there'll be a spectacular sight in the skies tonight, as we witness the longest total lunar eclipse of the century. the moon will pass through the widest point of the earth's shadow from this evening and will be visible in the uk from 8.50pm onwards. rain clouds and thunderstorms could scupper the view for some skygazers. our science correspondent victoria gill explains. fingers crossed if you want to see it, you can do. our familiar satellite is heading into our own planet's shadow. tonight, as it rises over the uk at 9pm, the moon will be turned a blood red as the earth passes
12:37 pm
between it and the sun. this particular lunar eclipse, or blood moon as it's known, will be the longest this century, lasting for one hour and 43 minutes. you need to be able to have a clear, south—eastern horizon as the moon comes up. so we'll see low down to the south—east and then as it rises, you will see it more and more clearly. and then the eclipse finishes about quarter past ten. it's just lit by the light that's fitlered through the earth's atmosphere, which is why it looks this sort of dusky red. at the same time, our celestial neighbour mars will reach the nearest point to earth possible in its own journey around the sun. where they are at their nearest point to each other it is known as a close approach of mars. the minimum distance is 54.6 million kilometres, but that significantly improves our view of the red planet. so, clouds permitting, there could be a celestial show tonight with a brighter red planet in the same sky as a blood red moon. victoria gill, bbc news.
12:38 pm
joining me now from our bristol studio is elizabeth pearson, astrophysicist and news editor at sky at night magazine. good to have you with us. for you, the most interesting thing you have been telling us is the fact there is so much publicity, so much interest, lots of people will be getting involved and hopefully seeing the lunar eclipse. that is why i love these kind of events. you do not need specialist knowledge, any special equipment, you can just need specialist knowledge, any special equipment, you canjust go out there with your own eyes, click out there with your own eyes, click out at the sky and see it. —— look up out at the sky and see it. —— look up at the sky. i think it is a great way to get the book interested in astronomy, space and science. yes, you want people to be inspired by this and use it as a platform to get people interested in those topics. absolutely. i remember one of the
12:39 pm
first things that got me into astronomy was going out and seeing the milky way for the first time. we keep hearing stories about people when they first saw a meteorite or a solar eclipse is one of the big ones as well. hopefully there will be some out there who see this in the sky tonight and want to learn more and get more involved. and find it and get more involved. and find it an awe—inspiring expedience, hopefully. tell us what we can see and what is the best way to see it and what is the best way to see it and the position of mars. i think we are going to get a good view of mars as well, aren't we? yes, mars is at its closest approach and so it will be brighter in the sky. it will only seem be brighter in the sky. it will only seem like a dot in the sky. when the moon first rises at ten past nine in the evening tonight, it should come up the evening tonight, it should come up through the eclipsed. you should look to the south is to seek that. it will keep rising for the next hour. at about 10pm,
12:40 pm
it will keep rising for the next hour. atabout10pm, mars it will keep rising for the next hour. at about 10pm, mars will, it will keep rising for the next hour. atabout10pm, mars will, up underneath it and there is ten minutes when you will be able to see both of them together, if you have a clear view. after that, it will still be fully equipped until ten past ten and then it will slowly start to go back and it will go back to the silvery colour we know so well. i use staying in bristolto watch this or are you travelling for a better view? i am going up to birmingham tonight, which hopefully has better weather. that is going to be one of the big things, because the weather forecast is not brilliant. hopefully there it looks better. you have to hunt through the calendar is —— you have to hunt through the clouds to find it. that helps the chase. hopefully you get clear skies, and everyone else as well. thank you very much. we've got dry january for alcohol
12:41 pm
abstinence and stoptober for those who want to quit smoking — now there's scroll free september: a campaign calling on children to give up social media for 30 days. it follows growing concern about the impact of platforms like twitter, instagram and facebook on young people's mental health. the initiative, which was launched by the royal society for public health, has even had the approval of the nhs. joining us now from the royal society for public health is ed morrow. good to have you along to top about this. dry january, the good to have you along to top about this. dryjanuary, the springboard for this idea. tell us about the links between social media and the mental health of particularly children. it is an issue we have been looking at since last year when we as 2000 young people, who are aged between 16 and 24, about the
12:42 pm
impact they thaw social media platforms were having on them. there area platforms were having on them. there are a lot of positives, it helps people to express themselves and feel connected. the net impact for most people was a negative one. most people were feeling inadequate about their bodies and self—esteem, people had a sense of missing out. a lot of people were experiencing cyber bullying and a lot of people were waiting in the night, so having an effect on sleep. this is notjust a young people's issue. we would like all to sign up to the campaign. young people's issue. we would like all to sign up to the campaignm is about all age groups. you talked about missing out, that is going to bea about missing out, that is going to be a challenge, in terms of encouraging people to stop scrolling through the social media for one month. it is and that is why this is important. because of the slightly addictive nature that some social media platforms can have. we are offering different options for people to take part. if you are
12:43 pm
feeling brave, give it up for 30 days. if that is too tough, may be give it up at social events, in the bedroom, in the evening. reconnect with people in real life. scroll free september light, if you like. some people have grown up all those knowing about social media. —— young people. it has always just been there. i guess it is encouraging a certain generation of people to think about different ways of engaging with the world and engaging with people around them. yes, the idea is not seeing, give it up forever. we do not expect people to do that, it is not realistic or desirable. what we can do is, what are the bits that i missed, what makes me feel good about social media, what makes me feel bad, what
12:44 pm
are the times i am using when it is not helping me very much? and build that healthy relationship going forward. you are going to be doing a lot of publicity, i guess, in the run—up to september? lot of publicity, i guess, in the run-up to september? we are, absolutely. we are encouraging people to go on the website. if they do that, they can sign up and we can give them hints and tips of how to get through the month and also tell us at the end how you did. was there a positive impact your mental well—being? a positive impact your mental well—being ? have a positive impact your mental well—being? have of young people have told us they think it will have a good effect on their sleep, their real world relationships and their overall mental health. perhaps it will become an annual fixture. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news... the heatwave is continuing to cause travel disruption as people head abroad on holiday. the operator northern says
12:45 pm
trains in the leeds and york face cancellations due to lightning strike. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse hears a statement from prince charles in the case of a bishop who was convicted of abusing 18 young men five people have died, and several more injured, in a crash between a car and a minibus in northern scotland it seems like much of the western hemisphere has been fighting extreme temperatures or wildfires this week. now it's california's turn, with temperatures of 37 degrees and blazes leaving at least one person dead and hundreds fleeing their homes. rebecca hartmann reports. high temperatures, erratic winds and low humidity are fuelling wild fires in california as firefighters struggle to control blazes on both ends of the state. the governor for california has declared states of emergency in two counties, shasta county in the north and riverside in the south. in northern california, the out—of—control wildfire
12:46 pm
is threatening the city of reading. the blaze has killed at least one person and has tripled in size over the past few days. residents have been ordered to evacuate as soon as possible. further south, a suspect was arrested on wednesday and accused of starting a fire that has now grown to 75,000 acres, causing the evacuation of thousands of homes. there are around 75 major wildfires burning in the us, in what is an unusually active fire season. california has been sweltering under record temperatures in recent weeks and forecasts show little sign of relief. rebecca hartmann, bbc news. the prime minister is in austria.
12:47 pm
our correspondent is in salzburg and she told me what theresa may is hoping to achieve. this visit has been described as a charm offensive. she is hoping that she might be able to relax some of the eu 27's position, to make them more open to her suggestions of the free movement of products after brexit. but that is probably going to be very, very difficult and everything i am hearing from the austrians, we are hearing from the austrians, we are hearing from the czech republic, is they say britain must not be allowed to cherry pick. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier. the austrians are saying they do want a positive conclusion to brexit. they do not want to see a note deal, they
12:48 pm
say that would be catastrophic for everyone. although, they say it will be more catastrophic britain than the u 27. "eu 27. on monday zimbabwe will hold a general election ? and for the first time in 38 years former president robert mugabe will not be standing. emmerson mnangagwa, mugabe s former deputy, is the ruling party zanu pf s presidential candidate. can the man who overthrew robert mugabe in november last year, shingai nyoka is in harare as the country prepares to head to the polls for what's expected to be a closely fought race. we talk about the opinion polls. some say emmerson mnangagwa will win, others say it is a closely contested race and at neither will be able to achieve a majority to achieve a run off. both are new to the election, they are contesting for the first time. they are contesting against 21 other
12:49 pm
candidates and it is believed that might split the vote and they are offering similar promises. emmerson mnangagwa is saying he wants to be engaged with the international community, to bring zimbabwe back into the international fall after about 20 years of isolation and policies that drove investors away. on the other hand, the candidate says they need a younger leader and emmerson mnangagwa has failed in government. he is promising what he calls as a real transformation of over hauling the economy. there is high and employment. the hospitals have run out of medicine occasionally. zimbabweans are looking for someone who will turn this economy around and provide the jobs they desperately need. and whoever wins this election, it has
12:50 pm
been a whoever wins this election, it has beena campaign whoever wins this election, it has been a campaign marred in violence, hasn't it, particularly in the rural areas? well, this has probably one of the most free elections that i certainly have witnessed. i have covered elections here for the last 18 years or so. that is an admission that has been made by observers, there is generally freedom of movement and political parties have been able to campaign freely in some of the former strongholds, were there was violence. there is concern about what they call soft violence, intimidation. it is subtle, beneath the surface, they say voters are being coerced to attend rallies and they are being bribed with food aid. this has been denied there is any kind of soft intimidation or forcing anyone to attend the rallies but
12:51 pm
other is concerned about the impact of this soft intimidation. for fans of the beatles and sir paul mccartney, it was a once—in—a—lifetime experience. yesterday, sir paul rocked liverpool's cavern club with a surprise gig in front of an audience ofjust 250. it's the venue wherejohn, paul, george and ringo made their names. naomi cornwell was there to witness the return of beatlemania. this is the moment fans have been waiting for. the excitement had been building since sir paul dropped a massive hint. we have a little secret gig somewhere in liverpool. some fans spent the night outside the cavern club, hoping to get in early, only to find out that tickets were being given out across town at the echo arena. they were told there were no tickets.
12:52 pm
they were running across the streets to the arena. only the first 110 managed to get them. it was a once in a lifetime. yes, i am late from work. i am not really bothered. i got a ticket. it was amazing. chance of a lifetime. absolutely overwhelmed, overjoyed. delighted. could not believe it. superfans. we follow paul over the world. i have this tattoo of the beatles. and i also have this one. it is the signature of paul mccartney. # roll up for the mystery tour. for the lucky ones with tickets, they have already gone in, but matthew street is crowded full of people. someone with a loud—hailer made an official announcement telling everyone that sir paul will not come outside to make an appearance.
12:53 pm
they are not deterred. they are waiting here, hoping for a glimpse. all those years ago we came here and played, you know, and we didn't know if we would ever have any future, but we did ok. it was amazing. i can't believe thatjust happened. i am shocked. extraordinary. my head is melted. mind blowing. amazing. it was just unbelievable. and, if you missed out, he will be back playing to a few people at the echo arena in december. it is time now to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. in a moment, the one o'clock news with jane help. but first, the weather forecast. for some of us, a sweltering hot
12:54 pm
afternoon out there. after today, it is all change. the winds are going to pick up, it will turn fresher, a dramatic drop in the temperatures. this is the weather system that is responsible. a lot of cloud coming in through ireland there. ahead of his weather system, the winds are coming in off of the continent. you can see in france where we are getting the high 30s. we could still hit the mid—30s in anglia today. such will be the heat, we will see thunderstorms breaking out. we have seen thunderstorms breaking out. we have seen thunderstorms and there could be violent ones which on today. through parts of eastern england. flash flooding, hail and winds. we have got the lunar eclipse, of course. the best time to view it will be from 9pm until around quarter past ten. as i say, these
12:55 pm
showers are hard to predict. some areas will be overcast this evening with rain, other places will have clear skies. saturday morning, the weather front moves through and that means the gate to the fresher air will be open. it will still be relatively warm on saturday morning. temperatures in the high teens in the south. the temperatures will not rise a great deal because of those fresh atlantique winds, bringing showers and dusty conditions around some of the coast. i think best temperatures on saturday, 24 celsius in the south—east. it will feel like 16 or 17 for most of us. the weather system 16 or 17 for most of us. the weather syste m kee ps 16 or 17 for most of us. the weather system keeps moving in from the atla ntic system keeps moving in from the atlantic on sunday. another weather system atlantic on sunday. another weather syste m ca n atlantic on sunday. another weather system can bring wet weather to the hills of wales and the west country.
12:56 pm
very gusty wind. perhaps 50 mph. we are talking about a massive chains to our weather. there will be sunshine in between. you will notice those temperatures, they will be a lot, a lot lower than late. the transport network struggles in the extreme weather at the start of the summer holidays. northern rail urges people not to travel in yorkshire because of lighnting damage. eurotunnel cancels day trip tickets, to ease the backlog caused by the failure of air conditioning. we've got passengers with special needs and terminal illnesses. and what happened was they prioritised that we could get the next train. so, we were supposed to travel at 20 past nine. but we ended up actually travelling at ten to three. we'll have the latest on the weather's impact
12:57 pm
across the country. also this lunchtime... some private probation contracts are scrapped, at a cost of £170 million, after failing to deliver expected improvements. five people are killed and another five injured in a collision
12:58 pm
12:59 pm
1:00 pm

38 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on