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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 31, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: charities are guilty of complacency verging on complicity over sexual abuse by staff, says a damning report on international aid. the father of missing airman corrie mckeague says they now know what's happened to him. it is sunrise in benidorm. i'm here to find out how brexit will affect oui’ to find out how brexit will affect our holidays. high street help for house of fraser, with the retailer in talks with sports direct to boost its finances. a win for andy murray. he wins in washington as he continues his comeback from nearly a year out with injury. good morning. it's going to be a dry day with a fair bit of sunshine when we lose the showers in the south but rainfor we lose the showers in the south but rain for scotland and northern ireland. it's tuesday 31stjuly. our top story. there has been an "abject failure" in the aid sector to deal with sexual abuse, according to mps.
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a report by the international development committee says there's been a culture of denial since revelations earlier this year that oxfam workers paid for sex while helping victims of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. the charity has acknowledged it has further to go to tackle the issue. our global affairs correspondent naomi grimley reports. it was in the aftermath of the 2010 haiti earthquake that some of 0xfam's aid workers severely compromised its much—cherished values. they used young prostitutes when they were supposed to be helping the local population bounce back from a disaster. the charity did an internal investigation. they dismissed some members of staff and let others quietly resign without properly flagging up what had happened to the authorities or other charities. today mps said it wasn't an isolated episode. we have reached the conclusion that in the aid sector there has been complacency verging, frankly, on complicity with what has happened. that is because organisations have appeared more concerned to protect their own reputation
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in the sector rather than protecting victims and survivors. mps want the uk to take the lead and create a global register of aid workers to stop sexual predators entering the sector. though they admit it won't be easy to cover everyone. helen evans worked at 0xfam and raised her concerns about sexual abuse. she thinks the register is a good idea. this is about protecting some of the most vulnerable individuals in the world from sexual exploitation and abuse and we have to do everything we possibly can and the public reaction has shown how much they want us to do that too. so difficult, yes, but doable. 0xfam says it's now tripled its budget for safeguarding checks but this is a much bigger problem than one charity and mps are in no doubt that
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after a string of scandals, now is the time for meaningful change. we'll be speaking to international human rights consultant asmita naik about this at 0740. you can't be ill as well. i'm trying not to look at you today. so i don't get your germs. president trump has said he is willing to hold talks with iran's leaders without any "pre—conditions" and "any time they want" to discuss how to improve realations. earlier this month, mr trump clashed with the iranian president, hassan rouhani. the united states has also abandoned its support for the international deal to stop iran's nuclear weapons programme. here's our north america correspondent, peter bowes. with the us due to impose new sanctions on iran in just over a week's time, donald trump was asked at a news conference whether he'd be prepared to meet with president rouhani and under what conditions.
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i would certainly meet with iran if they wanted to meet. i don't know that they're ready yet, they're having a hard time right now. but i ended the iran deal, it was a ridiculous deal. i do believe that they will probably end up wanting to meet and i'm ready to meet any time they want to. and i don't do that from strength orfrom weakness, i think it's an appropriate thing to do. nine days ago, president trump took a more confrontational stance against iran. in a tweet, he warned president rouhani: it's becoming a familiar pattern. donald trump wages war of words with a hostile foreign leader and then he sits down with them to talk. he threatened kim jong—un with fire and fury over nuclear weapons before they met and apparently became good friends. mr trump's offer to talk with president rouhani appears to be another attempt to nurture a personal relationship
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with a foreign adversary. the us state department regards iran as the world's key sponsor of international terrorism. if such a meeting goes ahead, it will be the first between us and iranian leaders in almost a0 years. us intelligence officials have told the washington post that north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles, despite warming ties with the trump administration. the officials — speaking anonymously — told the newspaper that new evidence suggested work was still taking place at a factory near pyongyang that produced the first north korean missiles capable of reaching the united states. the father of the missing airman corrie mckeague says he believes his son will never be found. in a post on facebook martin mckeague says the evidence suggests the 23—year—old's remains are ‘somewhere within the waste disposal system. 0ur reporter keith doyle's got more on this. this seems like quite a significant
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development. yes, the huge surge in corrie mckeague, went missing on september 2a, 2016 and at was based at raf honington and he disappeared after a night out in bury st edmunds. the search was focused on a waste dump. his father has posted a statement on facebook, saying, we are certain he is someone suffer‘s waste disposal system but his remains are essentially irretrievable. he says, the experts have concluded beyond any doubt that is where he ended up on the evidence presented to the family is as thorough as it was compelling/ you say, a significant development and it seems to be that in terms of the family and police, they have come to terms with the fact that corrie mckeague, his body is now never
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going to be retrieved. thank you for the detail. parents in england need more support to help their children learn basic language skills according to the education secretary. in a speech about social mobility, damian hinds will label the issue a "persistent scandal" and offer more support for parents. department of education figures suggest that by the end of reception class more than a quarter of children lack the communication skills they need. house of fraser, the struggling department store chain, has had an offer of fresh investment. according to reports overnight sports direct founder mike ashley is behind it. sean's here to tell us more. we talked about sports direct and this morning, we have seen reports that house of fraser are in talks with sports direct‘s mike ashley to boost their standing. they also have
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a stake in house of fraser. sports direct have more than 10%. house of fraser have said that closing 31 stores and are looking to shore up their finances, with its stores and are looking to shore up theirfinances, with its investment from elsewhere or whether its investment from sports direct. we will see over the coming days and weeks. it's crunch time for house of fraser. they are looking to get this deal done. so many tales on the high street. labour's deputy leader tom watson has described a member of the party's ruling body as a loud—mouthed bully after he was recorded apparently criticising members of the jewish community. mr watson tweeted to say he was disgusted by the comments. peter willsman, an ally ofjeremy corbyn, can be heard casting doubt over examples of anti—semitism within the party, and suggests, what he described as, jewish "trump fanatics" were behind accusations of anti—semitism in the party.
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it's understood mr willsman has apologised and will not face further investigation. i've got some proper news. —— some news about frogs. one of the world's most spectacular frogs has been identified as a new species after 20 years of research at the university of manchester. it was originally discovered in panama in1925, but has been confused with the splendid tree frog ever since. the creature has been named sylvia's tree frog, after the three—year—old granddaughter of the conservationist behind the research. i thought we were going to do something without playing vision. you got a horror cold today. i should advise that i'm sorry to eve ryo ne should advise that i'm sorry to everyone for being here. you go to
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bed and it's not nice for anybody. i'm sitting as far away from you as possible. it's been the most talked about show of the summer and after eight weeks of couplings, dumpings and drama love island has the winners of love island 2018 are millions of 2018 are viewers tuned into the dating show to see dani dyer, daughter of eastender actor danny dyer, and jack fincham a pen salesmen from essex to win the £50,000 cash prize. we'll be discussing the shows phenomenon later on in the programme. i know many people are saying, why are you doing that? it's not the reason why i'm not well was that, but i watched quite a lot of it. there was a solicitor, i can't and her name. she said she has already
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earned in a month. by doing what? appearances, articles. now you're saying it's not going to last. somebody somewhere is. i've got great news. andy murray is playing tennis again and in the last 15 minutes or so, he has won. we we re we were all very worried. andy murray has in the last half hour won just his second competitive match in over a year. he came from a set down to beat mackenzie macdonald in washington as he continues his comeback from hip surgery. britain's most decorated paralympian dame sarah storey says there should be a women's tour de france. at the moment, women only race the one day la course. a reminder that we'll be speaking to geraint thomas live on breakfast just after 8 o'clock. england opener alistair cook says he feels sorry for adil rashid over his selection
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for next week's first test against india. rashid's embroiled in a club vs country row over his decision to only play the short form of the game for his county yorkshire. one of the most colourful characters in boxing — tyson fury — says he's close to securing another shot at a world title. he made his return to the ring after a drugs ban last month, and says a deal to fight the wbc champion deontay wilder is almost done. it's only because he is not in the i’ooiti it's only because he is not in the room i can say, i'm not sure about that show. they are not exclusively ducks, they are birds and ducks. i'm only allowed to wear them when the bossis only allowed to wear them when the boss is on holiday. occasionally i
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wear a more dramatic show. we always slightly different things from the bossis slightly different things from the boss is on holiday. good morning, carol. we have got some rain on the way. some heavy showers across the south—east, a band of rain across scotla nd south—east, a band of rain across scotland and northern ireland. temperatures are going to rise but if you're on your summer holidays, it is going to turn very hot spare inland. by the weekend, if you are inland, but he had temperatures in the 40s. 0n the coast, it will be as you expect, a bit further inland. it does get progressively warmer until you are right there in the middle. bear that in you are right there in the middle. bearthat in mind. you are right there in the middle. bear that in mind. rain coming to scotla nd bear that in mind. rain coming to scotland and northern ireland. heavy
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showers at the moment across the south—east. they will clear and we will see a fair bit of sunshine. you can see the extent of august cloud across the uk at the moment. this is what will bring the rain across western parts of northern ireland and into western scotland. courtesy this front wrapped around the area of low pressure. to be surprised if we do still hear the odd rumble of thunder. 0ff we do still hear the odd rumble of thunder. off they go, they dragged the crowd behind them. a lot of dry and sunny weather. the west, slightly different because we have that front coming in. introducing the cloud, introducing the rain. behind it, there still will be some drizzle. temperatures about 15 in stornoway to 25, 26 and the south—east. into this evening and overnight, you can see how this cloud advances from the weather front. producing some more rain
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across western scotland. it also got some clear skies. tonight, a wee bit cooler than the nights that has just gone. tomorrow, we are looking at four degrees drop which will be a relief to many of us. as we go through tomorrow, but there that of sunshine across england, wales and eastern scotland. introducing more cloud and rain. and you can see from the yellow, it's not going to be warm. a lot of wales, it's going to get that bit warmer with temperatures up to about 27, possibly a little bit more and we are looking at the high teens to the low 20s as we push across northern england and scotland. still a lot of dry weather and sunshine. have got
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rain on and off coming in from the west, pushing eastwards across parts of northern ireland. look at those temperatures continuing to climb into the high 20s. and as we head into the high 20s. and as we head into friday, some parts of the south—east will be looking at 32, possibly 32 greece and we are looking at the mid to high 20s. the low 20s in scotland. it is warming up low 20s in scotland. it is warming up wherever you are. thanks, carol, see you in half an hour. let's take a look at today's papers. front page of the guardian this morning has our lead story about sexual abuse in charities. mps saying it is endemic across the sector. the main picture is of former zimbabwean president robert mugabe casting his vote in the election yesterday, the result is expected over the next few days. the times have a picture ofjeremy hunt and his chinese wife.
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he was in beijing yesterday where he said his wife was from japan, and then had to apologise for what he called a terrible mistake. brexit also makes the front page and the anti—semitism row in the labour party. the mirror have jack and dani, the love island winners, on the front page. a story about a 17—year—old whose dad says playing the popular game fortnite made him suicidal. defence of the rail industry is the main strory on the telegraph. we were looking at this yesterday with an eye on northern rail and the picture is of john goldfinger palmer. his wife says she has given up hope of finding his gangland killers. the most read stories on the bbc website. missing airman corrie mckeague's story is the most popular. we were speaking to keith doyle. in suffolk somewhere. his dad says he is in
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the waste disposal sysyem in suffolk somewhere. horrible story, that is the most read on the website this morning. north korean building missiles in number two and love island results are the third most popular story this morning. that of course making lots of the papers as well. what have we got on the inside pages? mark carney‘s comments in an interview he gave about donald trump and the impact on the economy around the world, trump's protectionist low road poses threat to jobs, says mark carney, donald trump's approach of creating a stand—off with china and taxes and tariffs. that will run and run. it's the way he goes about his business, has a go at them, pops at them on social media, then arranges a meeting. then it's all fixed. then changes his mind at the end of the meeting! this on the guardian. this
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isa meeting! this on the guardian. this is a sad picture. i think it's happy because i've read what it is. old post office telephone boxes away the restoration. i thought it was the end of the line for them. a specialist company in red hill in surrey lines them all up, you could open that as a tourist attraction in itself. they restore them and then what? who knows. doctor who fans could do something with them. toilet? need curtains. you could even make a phone call in there. they might actually be on a high street somewhere. frosted glass telephone boxes! if it's a shower, unless you're an exhibitionist. which i'm not. what's in there? the back page of the times this morning. the series between england and india sta rts the series between england and india starts tomorrow at edgbaston and they're saying in the times and lots of the papers this morning that
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there's a chance 10,000 seats potentially could be empty for each of the first two days of the test because of the timing of the matches between england and india, which had been governed india's schedule. they area big been governed india's schedule. they are a big pull, india will be a big draw, it is a crowd puller but actually they're not selling as many seats and they haven't sold as many as they expected. some great pictures in the papers today of the grumpiest face you ever want to seek. he's not in a good mood. jose mourinho —— want to see. 0n tour in the united states, back page of the mirror, do you get what they've done? not looking that happy. this is the back of the express, even better. he's had quite a lot to say about manchester united not buying enough players. not doing very well, the players themselves not up to scratch but actually when you look at their squad, do you think... come
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on! they're not in bad shape. ten days away from the start of the premier league. yes, do you think he's ramping it up? yes. i love the ivy he's ramping it up? yes. i love the joy in this picture, a model, daisy mae, both are lower legs were amputated when she was 18 months old because they birth defect and she's woi'i because they birth defect and she's won a modelling contract with river island. a spokesperson for river island. a spokesperson for river island said we required a model with lots of energy and looked great in active wear, and doesn't she just!|j have active wear, and doesn't she just!” have three little stories for you. would you like to see a massive cat? always. this is mogzilla. does she know to go on a diet? this is called bronson, not mogzilla. —— does she need. she has been put on a diet to shed some weight. a big cat! we've talked about this many times, the
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tea debate. apparently the tea debate is over. 80% of people put the milk in last so there's no point in discussing it any more. doesn't it depend on whether you're using a teabag or a teapot? it does. i've read into this... can you stop doing extra research? he does everything. it doesn't deal with the teapot scenario, it is only the bag, so still up to for debate. didn't you go to still up to for debate. didn't you gotoa still up to for debate. didn't you go to a tea factory? we thought we had drawn the line under then. you will like this, a mum leaves her three—year—old son downstairs when she goes to dry the hair but she leaves a pot of lutalo on the table and this is what happened. —— nutella. harrison, in the kitchen,
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himself and the chair covered in nutella. it is a giant pot. not looking very happy about it. do you think you would ever eat it again?” would love to know what happened there actually. he has put his hand in the nutella and covered himself in it. i would love to know the thought process. i like chocolate spread, i'm going to cover myself in it... and let it all off! see you both later. thanks worry much. good morning. as usual, many britons will be heading to europe for their summer holidays this year, with around 18 million travelling to spain alone. so what effect, if any, has brexit had on our holiday plans? 0ur brussels reporter adam fleming is in benidorm for us this morning. it looks lovely there. good morning. firstly, can i say, i spend my entire life standing outside boring buildings in brussels waiting for people in suits to come out of quite boring meetings, so
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thanks for sending me to levante beachin thanks for sending me to levante beach in benidorm, such a treat! you've got a typical benidorm morning, the combination of people out for a jog, spanish people out for a stroll and people still stumbling home after quite a late night at one of the many bars in benidorm. everyone's having lots of fun in the sun, which i decided to slightly ruined by talking about brexit. here's what happened. it's the last summer before brexit, which could change how we holiday. it's not been decided yet whether british tourists will need a visa or not, and even if they don't they could still be affected by the eu's new travel authorisation system coming in in 2020, where visitors from outside the eu have to register on a website and pay seven euros. if we need to do it, we need to do it. it's a break, isn't it? it's a holiday, so we need to get away. what if you had to pay extra money to get a visa? everything's extra these days. we pay everything extra, there's taxes, you know what. you shouldn't really have to pay
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for everything to come to spain, should you? well, if the uk's not in the eu any more... i know, it feels not that far away. you could drive to spain. however they get here, 18 million people travel to spain from the uk every year. so many, it sometimes feels less like benidorm and more like britain. the english breakfasts aren't going anywhere, but some home comforts will have to be negotiated in the brexit talks, such as... the mobile phone roaming has gone now because of the eu, if it was to come back because of brexit, how would you feel? i'd have to be careful how i use my phone abroad. so you know your european health insurance card, which means you get free medical care, what if that disappeared? you'd just have to be like america and you pay private, wouldn't you ? i'm going to show you the newest hotel innovation at the rh canfali... tracey says uncertainty about brexit isn't affecting bookings for next summer yet.
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just as well, because her company's just opened this new hotel. the best thing about the hotel is this, the view. benidorm and the levante beach. i think sometimes a lot of scaremongering goes on with the brexit and people are made to feel very nervous, but i think it's in everybody‘s interest to have an agreement for everything so business can be as normal as possible for everybody. right, back at the airport. the eu and the uk will have to agree new rules when it comes to aviation, and if there's no deal in march next year, there's talk about emergency plans being put into place to keep planes flying. but if all goes to plan, there will be a transition period where nothing changes until the end of 2020, so next summer should feeljust like this one. for the costa blanca, brexit is manana, manana. so people are pretty relaxed for two
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big reasons. number one, they think there's going to be that transition or implementation period running from brexit day next march to the end of 2020, when nothing should change for how we go on holiday and the second big reason is there's so much big business between spain and the uk, everyone thinks it's in everyone's interests to get a deal, so that's why here are pretty relaxed. it's not just so that's why here are pretty relaxed. it's notjust the sunshine. what's interesting is there's already been a bit of a brexit affect in benidorm. after the referendum and the vote to leave, which was two summers ago, the value of the pound against the euro went right down and that made people's holidays here much more expensive. the pound has gone up again in the next few years after that but not what it was, people here running businesses have noticed signs of a
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economising, instead of booking for 14 economising, instead of booking for 1a days, they will make holidays for eight to 12 days, instead of excursions, they are going themselves so there's an effect already. people in the travel industry here for decades feel they have seen it all, whether it's the arrival of low—cost flights, the ash cloud, air—traffic control strikes or the euro crisis, the travel industry feels they are used to dealing with things so they think they can do brexit. however, i haven't spoke to anyone who thinks there will be the chance of no deal in march. the dry weather is causing a potential crisis for our canals. ricky boleto is in east lancashire for us this morning to tell us more. dan, not very good, i will let you
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off on that pun. we are live all morning next to the leeds and liverpool canal network and you won't caa single boat passing through the lock this morning because it is closed —— won't see a. a50 mile because it is closed —— won't see a. a 50 mile stretch of the canal has been closed down because of the hot weather, there isn't enough water in the reservoirs that fill these ca nals the reservoirs that fill these canals with water so they've had to close them down. we'll be finding out what impact that's had on the local area and how you go about closing a big stretch like this one. first time for the news, travel and weather wherever you're waking up like this one. —— this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm good morning from bbc london news, i' m charlotte good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. sadiq khan says a new youth service is needed to tackle the roots of violent crime after a 50% funding for in the last five years. the mayor is to announce funding later
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for schools and youth centres working with vulnerable young people to provide activities to encourage them to stay off the streets during them to stay off the streets during the sub holidays and. the government insists tackling violent crime is a priority. commuters on south—western railway are facing disruption this morning in the latest of a series of strikes on the network. members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute over the role of guards on trains. further industrial action is planned in the coming weeks. south—western railway says they expect to run a reduced service on most routes. a nursery group in the capital is trialling yoga and mindfulness for three year olds. the london early yea rs three year olds. the london early years foundation introduced in the sessions after one of its nurseries had to go into lockdown during the westminster terror attack. they believed children need to find coping strategies to combat the stress of inner—city living. they'll be piloting it in five sites and hope to roll it out in all 39 if it's a success. ijust it's a success. i just feel like the children
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it's a success. ijust feel like the children need something, that helps them to support them. everyone has their mobile phone on, everyone has social media, where do children get quiet and where do they get chance to bid and where do they get chance to bid and get space to feel safe and able to do and get space to feel safe and able todoa and get space to feel safe and able to do a deep breath? let's look at the travel situation and there is a good service on the jew this morning, as well as the strike action on salt western railway there are electrical supply problems meaning no services between haslemere and guilford causing delays into waterloo. 0n the roads, congestion into the blackwall tunnel this morning. traffic is lower, as you can see, because of surface water following the rain. you can see, because of surface waterfollowing the rain. 0n you can see, because of surface water following the rain. 0n the a2, a lane blocked by a broken down car southbound at kidbrooke causing traffic to slow. at the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. for some it's a damp start this morning, some heavy showers, some still around but it will clear leading to a brighter,
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drier and sunny afternoon. the showers are heavy and you could see some thunder. from mid—morning, a drier picture, sunshine for the afternoon, some patchy cloud, quite warm with a maximum of 25 or 26. the lead in the evening and overnight, mainly clear. some patchy cloud around and a minimum of 13. a bright start into wednesday. high pressure sta rts start into wednesday. high pressure starts to build over the next few days and as a result, look what happens to the temperatures. as we head from wednesday into thursday, gradually they start to rise. 30 for thursday, friday, 31 or 32 and in some places we could get up to 32. lots of hot, dry and sunny weather as we head into the weekend. with the latest from the bbc london news room in half an hour. plenty more on the website at our usual address. for now, back to dan and
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louise. goodbye for now. good morning — welcome to breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. tour de france winner geraint thomas says his victory was the "stuff of dreams" and has fuelled his hungerfor more success. we'll be speaking to him later in the programme. she was known as the human swan as she soared through the skies to find out why numbers of the birds were declining. sacha dench will be here tell us what she found. also this morning, it's been the most talked about show of the summer, but love island has finally crowned its happy couple. we'll look back at the tv phenomenon of the year. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. sexual exploitation and abuse is "endemic" across the aid sector, according to a new report from mps. the international development committee says there's been a "culture of denial" since revelations earlier this year that 0xfam workers paid for sex while helping victims of the 2010
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earthquake in haiti. the charity has acknowledged it has "further to go" to tackle the issue. we reached the conclude —— the conclusion in the eight sector that there has been complacency verging on complicity with what has happened and that is because organisations have too often appear to be concerned with protecting their own reputation within the sector rather than protecting victims and survivors. us intelligence officials have told the washington post that north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles, despite warming ties with the trump administration. the officials — speaking anonymously — told the newspaper that new evidence suggested work was still taking place at a factory near pyongyang that produced the first north korean missiles capable of reaching the united states. meanwhile, president trump has offered to hold unconditional
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talks with iran at any time, without any preconditions. earlier this month, mr trump clashed with the iranian president, hassan rouhani. but he's now said he wants to work out "something meaningful" to replace the nuclear agreement which the united states abandoned in may. the father of the missing airman corrie mckeague says he believes his son will never be found. in a post on facebook martin mckeague says the evidence suggests the 23—year—old's remains are ‘somewhere within the waste disposal system' following his dissapearance after a night out in suffolk, two years ago. police believe corrie climbed into a waste bin and was taken away by a refuse lorry. parents in england need more support to help their children learn basic language skills according to the education secretary. in a speech about social mobility, damian hinds will label the issue a persistent scandal and offer more support for parents. department of education figures suggest that by the end of reception class more than a quarter of children lack the communication skills they need. labour's deputy leader tom watson has described a member
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of the party's ruling body as "a loud mouthed bully" after he was recorded apparently criticising members of the jewish community. in the recording, peter willsman — an ally ofjeremy corbyn — accuses them of making up claims of anti—semitism in the party. it's understood mr willsman has apologised and will not face any further action. officials in zimbabwe say voting in yesterday's presidential election was peaceful and the turnout was high. it‘ the first general election since the fall of former president robert mugabe. the opposition party is aiming to end nearly forty years of rule by zanu pf. last year was the fifth warmest in the uk since records began in 1910. the met office's state of the climate report says nine of the ten hottest years have occurred since 2002. rainfall has also increased over the last decade. if you're a car lover, these pictures might be
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painful to watch. this bulldozer is crushing over £6 million worth of luxury cars and motorbikes. porsches, harley—davidsons and lamborghinis were all targeted as part of the crackdown on illegally imported cars to the philippines. the country's president says he hopes it'll be a deterrent to criminals. these pictures continue, there is a shot of the president sat there are watching with a hard hat on. quite a bit of footage, isn't it? it's a statement. what a waste. go on, you are going to say something sensible. you can sell that, make a difference, builder playground. half
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the hospital. speaking of hospitals, he is recovering. we are all a little bit worried about him when he had to pull out of wimbledon. the great news is, in the last hour or so, he's won his second competitive match in over a year. it wasn't easy for him. he had to come from a set down to beat mckenzie mcdonald as he comes back from hip surgery. he has dropped to 839 in the world rankings. there's not been much time for geraint thomas to rest after winning the tour de france. with the success comes media attention at a level he won't have experienced before. he returned to the uk yesterday and told the one show what it's been like since sunday evening and that his future with team sky still has to be sorted. it's just been crazy. you know,
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it'sjust been crazy. you know, you think about the race and the racing pa rt think about the race and the racing part in all that and suddenly you win and it's all over and it's crazy and you don't expect anything else and you don't expect anything else and it's just a whirlwind. and you don't expect anything else and it'sjust a whirlwind. what are your thoughts from here, now? and it'sjust a whirlwind. what are yourthoughts from here, now? here, on the sofa. chill out a bit. i haven't signed a new contract yet so quite good timing, really. i'm sure we will be asking about that when it talks to others. after 8 o'clock this morning we've got the tour de france winner geraint thomas live on the programme. and whilst the men's tour goes from strength to strength — what about the women? well britain's most decorated paralympian says there should be a women's tour de france. at the moment the only official competition is the one—day la course event. but storey rode with a group of women who were cycling every stage of the tour ahead of the men, and says there is an appetite for a women's equivalent.
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they wanted to see the women on the side of the road just zooming past so that i think there is a case brit to be there and it won't happen overnight, the women haven't trained for three weeks, they need notice for three weeks, they need notice for it to happen but maybe when the french have the olympics in 2024, why not put on a whim in‘s to the price of the same time and give the win in‘s pellet on time to train for it? one of the most colourful characters in boxing — tyson fury — says he's close to securing a shot at another world title. a warning there's some flash photography coming up. the former heavyweight world champion made his return to the ring last month after a drugs ban, and will fight the italian francesco pianetta in belfast next month. but he's looking beyond that, and says a deal to fight the wbc champion deontay wilder in december is almost done. ican i can reveal negotiations have been strong for december. we're almost done with this deal but it won't be locked in over francesco pianetta. he will give me the right fight and the right to work to prepare for
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deontay wilder. england opener alistair cook says he feels sorry for adil rashid over his club vs country row. rashid's been picked to be part of the england squad to play india in the first test next week despite only playing the short forms of the game for his country yorkshire. he hasn't played first class cricket in almost a year, and has been told he'll have to play in the county championship next season if he's to continue his test career. ican i can understand why it's caused a bit of fuss but, you know, you just have to get on with it. we have to look at the positives. we got a different style of english spinner. a little bit of mystery as well. that's what we should be excited about. and lionel messi's been using some unorthadox training techniques as he prepares for pre—season training. here he is showing off his skills with his dog hulk in his back garden. that is his dog, in his back garden,
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still completely owning a dog. look at that. his left is not bad. it's a great video. it is a great dog. until now the decision to allow patients in a permenant vegetative state to die had remained in the hands of the law. but yesterday's ruling by the supreme court means if doctors and relatives agree, they will no longer need the permission of a court to withdraw food and water. some of the thousands of families affected have welcomed the ruling but opponents warn patients have lost a layer of protection. john deighan is a pro—life campaigner and director of the society for the protection 0f unborn children. specifically talks about patients on what is called a vegetative state. what do you think of the ruling? i'm
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alarmed by the ruling. it means that in the uk patients can be deliberately dehydrated and start with the express intention of ending their life. i think that's alarming. also in this case, it means it can be done without any court doing it. this is about people in a permanent vegetative state and it's a difficult time to families and in many cases, they have agreed this is the course of treatment. why put them through going to court which brings enormous stresses? covers people in a so—called persistent vegetative state but also those in a minimally conscious state, those who can be intermittently aware of. it's not about withdrawing treatment, there are times when you've got to accept that treatment is burdensome for the patient. this is about providing a patient with the necessity of life. food orfluids
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don't treat any conditions. it's a basic care that should never be deprived. the reality is, there is a lwa ys deprived. the reality is, there is always a lot of emotion for families round about these situations. i have all the sympathy in the world to families that had to undergo this. we live in a society where we have the reports that —— the resources to help them. the nhs has to put the patient at the heart of the decision. we recognise that and we have sympathy for them but the law and the policy of the nhs has to rise above the particular emotional situation and it has to apply principles which protect all patients. it's notjust a family decision, its doctors in that. if a person had set out in their will their wishes, would you change your mind? i think often we look to the
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future and say, we don't like to be in that situation but the reality of experiencing it and being dehydrated is an unpleasant way to have your light ended. someone shouldn't be allowed to say that they shouldn't have their light ended in that way. 0k, and are you going to challenge the ruling? this is the supreme court. the supreme court is the highest authority in the uk. we'll have to find a way of someone following that to strasbourg. it's a decision that conflicts with human rights laws. they say you cannot deprive someone of life that conflicts with human rights laws. they say you cannot deprive someone of life but here we have doctors and the court now turning their back on those doctors who can decide to deliberately and delight by starting a patient and dehydrating them. that is quite alarming. if we can find someone to challenge them, we would do that. thank you very much of your time, we will be speaking to a
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sister of an accident victim later. let us know what you think. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this morning we have thundery, showery rain moving across south—west england and wales, clearing to the north sea and for most it will be dry and sunny but there's another system coming to parts of western scotland and northern ireland, introducing rain and windy conditions. we've got various fronts, that will produce showers away to the near continent, the second one will bring rain initially to northern ireland and then later into western scotland. we lose the rain, it pulls the cloud with it, heads to the north sea and then for much of england, wales and eastern scotland, we will hang onto a largely dry day with sunshine but you can see as the next front comes in from the west, it will pull in a
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lot of cloud and also rain with it. as it moves away from northern ireland, find it you will see drizzle so still quite damp. —— you will find it drizzly so still quite damp. early sunshine but that system from the west will drift eastwards, taking the cloud with it and taking splashes of rain with it as well and it will be noticeably breezy in the north. 0ne it will be noticeably breezy in the north. one thing you'll also notice is where it's been so sticky overnight, temperatures aren't going to be as high. for example, in london, the lowest temperature anywhere in london last night was 17. tomorrow we're looking at 13. first thing under those clear skies we start with sunshine. cloud building through the day and then we've got this next system sweeping in from the atlantic, from south—west, introducing rain in
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across northern ireland and clipping cumbria and also south—west scotland. under the cloud, temperatures will be that bit lower, but not cold, and where we have the ambers, temperatures will be higher. tomorrow we start to see them climb more or less across—the—board, but especially in the south—east with highs of 27 or 28. that leads us into thursday, again a lot of dry and sunny conditions. the front moving from the west to the east will introduce rain but it's going to continue to get warmer, temperatures continuing to climb. by then, we're looking at around 30 possibly in and around london and we're looking at the low to mid 20s for the rest of the uk. friday sees temperatures rise that bit higher, 32, 33 despite what you will see in the charts. in the south—east, lots of dry weather around with a fair bit of sunshine with a few showers here and there. if you're heading to spain or portugal, particularly to ward the end of the week, and you're
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staying in land, not coastal areas, it could get to the mid— 40s so make sure you're prepared for that. very hot. thanks very much, carol. nothing like an early warning from carol. how vulnerable is yourjob to the rise of techology, computers and artificial intelligence at work? sean's got more on this. good question. the rise of the robots is happening. it is something that's taking people's jobs around the country and will the rate get quicker? that's what we're looking at at the moment. technology is obvisously a part of all of our lives now. and according to the government, within 20 years being skilled with technology will be an essential part of nine in every ten jobs too. that's a problem because a quarter of adults in the uk lack even the basics. and that's already affecting businesses. around three quarters of large companies, and half of all smaller ones, say they can't find workers
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with the right tech skills. this morning nesta, a charity that promotes innovation in areas like education, has said we need to do more. eliza easton is their principal policy researcher and shejoins me now. good morning. good morning. it can be daunting when you hear the stories of the rise of robots and needing digital skills, what kind of skills are you talking about? 0ur skills are you talking about? our research we released today builds on previous research that shows around 20% ofjobs are at risk of declining in the run—up to 2030, so we wanted to get under the skin and workout in terms of digital skills, hailed by government as a solution, what do we need and what we found is there's a big split. a digital skill doesn't future proof yourjob in the way you might think. there are some routine digital skills, things like clericaljobs if
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you're inputting data that actually mean yourjob is likely to be given over to a robot. even if you have digital skills? even if you have that broad group of digital skills. things like animation or data analysis rather than just data things like animation or data analysis rather thanjust data input that really sets it apart. animation is one other in your report you look at differentjobs is one other in your report you look at different jobs that is one other in your report you look at differentjobs that are most at risk and ones where there is growth prospects and the ones most at risk, office administration, payroll, tax accounting, administration, business administration, administrative jobs, how do you go after 20 years of business administration to animation and design and process engineering, it's 1 and design and process engineering, it's1 million miles away? the first app is moving from a job being routine, which makes it likely to be automated, to something less routine that first step. that doesn't mean becoming an animator in lots of
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jobs, it could be about being more creative in terms of analysing the data you put —— first step. there's different ways you could do it. policymakers at one, at nestor weakening investment is made in retraining, proper investment by government... once you're out of the education system... it is stagnant. there's lots you could be learning and we would say lifelong learning will become increasingly important. there's lots of questions about what employers should do. there are big in lawyers, some of whom quite recently have said they're trying to rhys gill their employees, that makes sense for them too —— re—skill. makes sense for them too —— re-skill. marks and spencers have created a data academy and they want to offer all employees the chance to go through it, should we see more of that and are the businesses doing enough? it depends on what the retraining does. data input, for
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example, it's likely to exist in jobs that are probably going to disappear by 2030 because quickly computers can input that data. data analysis, on the other hand, when you're analysis, on the other hand, when you' re really analysis, on the other hand, when you're really understanding and able to manipulate the data to find out new things, that's going to becoming greasing the importance of we need to think carefully about which one we look at. not the easiest link to make. thanks very much, eliza easton, from nesta. notan easton, from nesta. not an easy leap to make. if you're inajob not an easy leap to make. if you're in a job that is exposed, speaking to your employer and getting them to train you isn't straightforward. really good advice and i guess start looking now. thank you both very much. forward planning needed. despite the rain many of us have had over the past few days, it remains one of the driest summers for years, and the effects are still being felt. large stretches of canals in the north of england have been closed due to low water levels. ricky boleto is at one of the affected stretches of water in east lancashire.
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good morning. good morning. yes, welcome to beautiful lancashire this morning. we're on alongside the leeds and liverpool canal network and you went see any boats passing through the lock this morning because it's closed —— won't see. a 50 file my —— 55 mile stretch has been closed because of the dry weather we've had. it starts in wigan in greater manchester and goes to lancashire and then ends up in ga grave in skipton in north yorkshire. it's been very dry. the reason they've this route is the reservoir, one of the five that tops up the water in this canal, the levels are really quite low. we'll be looking at levels later this morning. let's find out more about the impact this is going to have on the surrounding area, the people who use these ca nals area, the people who use these canals and also businesses around here. joining me is daniel
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greenhouse, who works for the canal and river trust. this will have a big impact on those using these ca nals big impact on those using these canals regularly? closing the lock flights means boaters who would travel up and down the locks will have to change their plans and we're genuinely sorry for that disruption but the rest of the leeds liverpool canal is open for people to enjoy on their boating holidays. we have 2000 miles of navigable canals and it is in this country, 95% are unaffected by these closures. the tow path is still open for people to cycle and enjoy time with your family and walk the dog. i accept it will cause disruption and we're sorry for that. this has angered many because it's not as easy as punching a new route into the sat nav, if this is your only way it's hard to find an alternative route. the canal network goes throughout england and wales
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and there is genuinely alternative routes. you can go down to see the lovely yorkshire countryside, you can go down the rest of lancashire into greater manchester and you can go into greater manchester and you can 9° up into greater manchester and you can go up to lancaster and down into the midlands and down south. there's ple nty of midlands and down south. there's plenty of places to enjoy your boating holidays. how do you go about closing this 55 mile stretch, is it with lock and key? we just closing the lock flight. we ta ke we just closing the lock flight. we take the top lock and bottom lock and we effectively padlock it shut with chains and locks and what we do is we disconnect the paddle hearing, like taking the top off the tap so nobody can run any water through. daniel, we will talk to you later. everytime one of these locks is operated 3000 litres of water is used. there hasn't been enough rain to top up and we will find out more this morning about how that's affecting the local businesses. ricky, thank you very much. tour de france winner geraint thomas
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will be with us just after 8am and if you want to send a question, we're getting loads of interesting ones already, and some we will definitely ask him as well... and some that we won't? you know what it's like when we get so many questions. we will ask him about his resting heart rate. you're obsession with heart rates. we will get to the bottom of that one. you can find us on social media, twitter and facebook. send us through an e—mail on the e—mail address. we will get to that and we will have geraint thomas with us and we will have geraint thomas with us just after and we will have geraint thomas with usjust after 8am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. sadiq khan says a new youth service is needed to tackle the roots of violent crime after a 50% funding fall in the last five years.
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today he's announcing funding for schools and centres that work with vulnerable young people to provide activities to encourage them to stay off the streets during the summer holidays. the government insists tackling violent crime is a priority. commuters on south western railway are facing disruption this morning in the latest in a series of strikes on the network. members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute over the role of guards on trains. further industrial action is planned in the coming weeks. south western railway say they are expecting to run a reduced service on most routes. a nursery group in the capital is trialling yoga and mindfulness for three year olds. the london early years foundation introduced the sessions after one of its nurseries had to go into lockdown during the westminster terror attack. they believe children need to find coping strategies to combat the stress of inner city living. they will be piloting it in five sites and hope to roll it out in all 39 if it's a success.
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ijust feel like the children need something that helps to support them. everyone's got their mobile phone on, everyone has social media, where do children get quiet and where do they get chance to be and get space to feel safe and able to do a deep breath? let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's are minor delays on tfl rail this morning but a good service on all other lines. as well as that strike action on south western railway, there are also electrical supply as well as that strike action on south western railway, there are also electrical supply problems meaning no services between haslemere and guildford causing delays into waterloo. 0n the roads, there are delays on the m25 anticlockwise betweenjunction 6 for godstone and the clackett lane services because of an accident blocking the inside two lanes. 0n the a2 there's a lane blocked by a broken down car southbound at kidbrook, and that's causing traffic to slow down. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning.
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well, for some of us, it's quite a damp start out there this morning. we've had some heavy showers. still one or two around but they will clear, leading to a much brighter, drier and sunnier afternoon. the showers this morning are quite heavy and you may even hear a rumble or two of thunder. from mid—morning onwards, though, a drier picture. lots of sunshine as we head through the afternoon. a bit of patchy cloud but the temperature feeling quite warm. we're looking at a max of around 25 to 26 celsius. a lovely evening as well in the sunshine, and then overnight it is predominantly clear. you might get a bit of patchy cloud around. the minimum temperature between 11 and 13 celsius. a lovely bright start as we head into wednesday. high pressure starts to build into our weather over the next few days, and as a result, look what happens to the temperatures. as we head through wednesday and thursday, gradually they start to rise. we're looking at 30 for thursday. for friday, 31, maybe even 32. we could, in one or two places, maybe get up to 33 celsius, so lots of hot, dry and sunny weather as we head into the weekend.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning — welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: charities are guilty of complacency verging on complicity over sexual abuse by staff, says a damning report on international aid. the father of missing airman corrie mckeague says they're now certain they know what's happened to him. good morning. from beautiful benidorm. i'm here to find out how brexit will affect our holidays. centrica, the parent company of british gas is about to give an update on how it's performed for the first half of this year. a win for andy murray. he wins in washington as he continues his comeback from nearly a year out with injury. this morning, it's a dry start the
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many when we lose the showers in the south—east but we have rain coming in across western scotland and northern ireland. it's tuesday 31stjuly. our top story. there has been an "abject failure" in the aid sector to deal with sexual abuse, according to mps. a report by the international development committee says there's been a "culture of denial" since revelations earlier this year that 0xfam workers paid for sex while helping victims of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. the charity has acknowledged it has "further to go" to tackle the issue. 0ur global affairs correspondent, naomi grimley reports. it was in the aftermath of the 2010 haiti earthquake that some of 0xfam's aid workers severely compromised its much—cherished values. they used young prostitutes when they were supposed to be helping the local population bounce back from a disaster. the charity did an
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internal investigation. they dismissed some members of staff and let others quietly resign without properly flagging up what had happened to the authorities or other charities. today mps said it wasn't an isolated episode. we have reached the conclusion that in the aid sector there has been complacency verging, frankly, on complicity with what has happened. that is because organisations have appeared more concerned to protect their own reputation in the sector rather than protecting victims and survivors. mps want the uk to take the lead and create a global register of aid workers to stop sexual predators entering the sector. though they admit it won't be easy to cover everyone. helen evans worked at 0xfam and raised her concerns about sexual abuse. she thinks the register is a good idea. this is about protecting some of the most vulnerable individuals in the world from sexual exploitation and abuse
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and we have to do everything we possibly can and the public reaction has shown how much they want us to do that too. so difficult, yes, but doable. 0xfam says it's now tripled its budget for safeguarding checks but this is a much bigger problem than one charity and mps are in no doubt that after a string of scandals, now is the time for meaningful change. we'll be speaking to international human rights consultant asmita naik about this at 0740. north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles despite better relations with the trump administration, according to media reports in the united states. unnamed us officials told the washington post that spy satellites had spotted continuing activity at a site that has previously produced the weapons. we can now speak to our seoul correspondent laura bicker. it's a subject we seem to be
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returning to quite regularly. what is set internationally in meetings and via these satellites, what is the latest we know about this? well, we've spoken to the commercial satellite analysts had seen these images. there are two new buildings. all in all, activity has continued at this site where the first intercontinental ballistic missiles we re intercontinental ballistic missiles were built which are capable of reaching the united states. on the face of it, alarming. 0n the face of it, it may even break the promise made to donald trump 2—d nuclear is the korean peninsula. 0r made to donald trump 2—d nuclear is the korean peninsula. or does it? if you look at what kim jong—un has signed up for, its vague. he never said he would stop making weapons, he said he would stop testing missiles. in his new year ‘s address, he talked about putting
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mass production of nuclear missiles on the agenda so when it comes to how to move forward, the united states needs to nail down details of how they go about trying to compel zhong yang to give up its nuclear weapons. the father of the missing airman corrie mckeague says he believes his son will never be found. in a post on facebook martin mckeague says the evidence suggests the 23—year—old‘s remains are ‘somewhere within the waste disposal system‘. keith doyle reports. these are the last known images of corrin mckeague. he was 23 when he went missing after a night out in 2016. cctv pictures show him walk through the town but then he disappears. police believe he got into a wastebin. his mobile phone single was tracked and appeared to follow the path of a bin lorry. a massive search of waste disposal
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sites took place but it was called off earlier this year. his father martin has now said his son is no longer missing. in a facebook post, he said, police have presented him with compelling evidence that experts concluded beyond any doubt that corrin mckeague ended up in the suffolk waste disposal system. he was known to sleep in the or on bins. he said the area was too toxic and fast to search. since his disappearance, corrin‘s girlfriend gave birth to his daughter. now the family say they know what happened to their son, a memorial has been planned. labour‘s deputy leader tom watson has described a member of the party‘s ruling body as "a loud mouthed bully" after he was recorded apparently criticising members of the jewish community. peter willsman — an ally ofjeremy corbyn — can be heard casting doubt over examples of antisemitism within the party. joining us now from the westminster newsroom is our assistant political editor, norman smith.
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good morning to you, norman. we‘ve talked about what‘s been happening with the labour party in regards to this with some weeks. —— labour party. how significant is it? it matters, at the least because it keeps the whole argument of anti—semitism bubbling along but it matters because mr wilson is a key ally ofjeremy corbyn, is known in 30, 40 years, ally ofjeremy corbyn, is known in 30,40 years, one of his leading supporters on the national executive committee and it matters because these remarks won‘t need at some local labour party meeting on a wet wednesday, they were made at the full meeting of the national executive committee, the ruling body of the party, suggesting such views are getting an airing right at the top of the party but i think what is really angered many labour mps is what is regarded as the double standards in terms of the treatment being meted out to mr willsman who
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will not face disciplinary proceedings. he has apologised and thatis proceedings. he has apologised and that is considered an end to the matter but that contrasts with mps like margaret hodge and ian austin who are facing discipline recharges after they raised concerns over the party‘s attitude to anti—semitism. this latest episode will simply further increase the pressure for jeremy corbyn to take a tougher stand for those supporters were judged to be making anti—semitic remarks. zimbabwe‘s opposition leader, nelson chamisa, has claimed his party is winning the country‘s elections resoundingly. he said he had results from 10,000 polling stations, and was ready to form a government. it‘s the first general election since the fall of former president robert mugabe. in the last few minutes, we‘ve had results through for centrica — the company that owns british gas. sean, what can you tell us?
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first glance, if we build down into the bit of centrica that affects most people, british gas, profits in the residential surprise that supplies are down 20%. a tin continuing problem british gas. they‘ve seen the accounts fall by another 340,000 over the first half of this year so still 12.5 million customers but the last year also, we‘ve a continuing number of people leaving british gas. this is still an issue for them. clearly a very competitive energy supply market and there are comments about what they will then have to do going forward as energy caps coming. we will get into this in half an hour and we have more details. still tough times for british gas. they have seen significantly colder weather than
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normal. high consumption led to additional costs for them. thank you. until now the decision to allow patients in a permenant vegetative state to die had remained in the hands of the law. but yesterday‘s ruling by the supreme court means if doctors and relatives agree, they will no longer need the permission of a court to withdraw food and water. some of the thousands of families affected have welcomed the ruling but opponents warn patients have lost a layer of protection. the decision cannot be based on the fa ct the decision cannot be based on the fact that the family is finding it burdensome to care for their loved one. we recognise that, we have sympathy to them but the law and the policy of the nhs has to rise above the particular emotional situation and it has to apply principles with —— which protect all patients. we are joined now by writer cathy rentzenbrink, whose brother matty was left in a permanent vegetitive state after an accidentjoins
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from her home in cornwall. thank you so much becoming on the programme. first of all, can get a reaction to what you think this decision will mean? well, i think it‘s a modest and compassionate step will stop if everybody involved in the care of the team, all the medical team, relatives, there is no need to go to court. that seems to me to be quite sensible and compassionate. everything we think about life and death is changed at the moment by the way that we are capable of keeping people alive in a way we just couldn‘t do it a few yea rs way we just couldn‘t do it a few years ago. more people would have died at the scene of accidents and we are able to keep people alive. sometimes the years and years and yea rs sometimes the years and years and years with a possibly wouldn‘t want to be. you are someone who has been
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through that incredibly difficult decision—making process with someone else involved and that was your brother. it was that like? well, it was just awful. i brother. it was that like? well, it wasjust awful. i loved my brother beyond anything. he was knocked over bya beyond anything. he was knocked over by a car. he was operated on. surgery preserved his life but denied that, the surgeon said to my dad, i have saved your son ‘s life and we don‘t know yet whether that was the right thing to do and as it turned out, it wasn‘t really the right thing to do. my brother never recovered. he had periods where he could sleep and that was about it. it was eight years before he died. eight years before the accident, the event that took his life, and that was very difficult to navigate because when we think about being a
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good human and we love people, i never expected when i woke up over the next few years, nobody expects to have to do that and that‘s the situation families are being placed in and it‘s unthinkable and dreadful, very new, in a whole millennia of human experience, in the context of that, this is about five minutes old that we are grappling with so people have to think about how we deal in this situation. listening to you that‘s a decision you have to formulate, the person you have to formulate, the person you love, to bring about what you wa nted you love, to bring about what you wanted to get to, you have to say you want them to die but essentially that‘s not the case because you don‘t want them in that situation in the first place. yeah, of course i didn‘t want my brother to die, i wanted him yeah, of course i didn‘t want my brother to die, iwanted him not yeah, of course i didn‘t want my brother to die, i wanted him not to be knocked over in the first place, i wanted him to get better, i wanted there to be some sort of hope. given
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none of that was available, given his life had been saved... it isn‘t anyone‘s fault, people aren‘t doing anything wrong, it‘s the fact medically now we can keep people alive and we need to work out what happens when life is being prolonged really beyond any sense or purpose. it's really beyond any sense or purpose. it‘s really a problem that‘s not going away, it will only increase because we‘re getting better at it all the time. we need some... there needs to be some sort of plan for when life—saving mechanisms don‘t work, as in they don‘t preserve anything we would think of as being life. but all of this is. it used to be that life and death were binary things, you are either dead or alive but now there are shades of grey in the middle —— is new. we spoke earlier to someone who‘s very much the pro—life side of things. there are ethical and moral
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questions as well to this, i‘m sure you would appreciate. even though you‘ve been through this personal situation with your brother, matthew, do you consider those and some of the concerns about relatives and medical staff making decisions based on something else like money or whatever if they‘re in that situation themselves? it's situation themselves? it‘s a big, horrible, tangled, difficult situation with no easy a nswe rs difficult situation with no easy answers in it. again, this is why i think everyone, doctors, lawyers, everybody has to think about what the best way through is so i wouldn‘t negate anybody‘s concerns really. this ruling isn‘t opening the gates to some kind of free for all where we can all go around bumping off our relatives if we don‘t like them. it‘s very clear in a specific case, where everyone agrees, that takes lots of time, lots of people pour lots of care into it, in those cases families don‘t need to be taken to a court
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case. it is sensible. it‘s quite a small step. treatment... most treatments that are withdrawn, doctors don‘t have to go to court to getan doctors don‘t have to go to court to get an agreement for it. it‘s aligning that. that‘s what we‘ll need to happen over the next few yea rs, need to happen over the next few yea rs , we need to happen over the next few years, we will need to align all the ca re years, we will need to align all the care in people whose... who‘s been prevented from dying. my brother was prevented from dying. my brother was prevented from dying. it wasn‘t bringing him to his death that was the unnatural human intervention, it was the fact he was stopped from dying. if his accident was a few yea rs dying. if his accident was a few years earlier, he would have died in the road. that would have been the best thing i think. not at the time i would‘ve wanted it, and i don‘t wa nt to i would‘ve wanted it, and i don‘t want to negate the work done by the ambulancemen, the nursing staff and the surgeon, they all thought they we re the surgeon, they all thought they were doing the best thing to save his life but it turns out that wasn‘t the best thing so at some point we had to adjust to put things
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back the way they really should have been but we didn‘t know that. it is so hard, all this, it‘s so difficult and there aren‘t really any easy a nswe rs. a good explanation of the whole area, which many of our viewers will appreciate. thanks for joining area, which many of our viewers will appreciate. thanks forjoining us and sharing your open and honest thoughts. thank you. very powerful testimony there. how is the weather? there has been rain, carol, but the temperatures are coming back? absolutely right. good morning. by the end of this week, temperatures across the border will have risen and for parts of the south—east, we‘ll have temperatures back up into the low 30s. what we have this morning is rain on the cards. thundery showers at the moment moving away from the south—eastern quarter, including the midlands, and it will brighten up behind them, and another area coming in from the north—west will introduce some more in the way of rain. you can see it
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is this weather front connected with this area of low pressure bringing rain into northern ireland, northern and western scotland and hereto it will be noticeably breezy. there goes the thundery showers first thing this morning. behind them the cloud will clear and a fair bit of sunshine for most of england, wales and eastern scotland barbie odd shower, the showers the exception rather than the rule. the cloud brings in the rain —— bar the. cooler under the band of cloud and rain, in stornoway, 15. in the sunshine, highs of 25 or 26. through the evening, still early evening sunshine but the weather front from the west will continue to advance slowly eastwards, taking splashes of rain with it in doing so. breezy in the north, clearer skies and not as breezy in the south but you‘ll also notice it won‘t be as stuffy tonight. for example, last night it didn‘t get lower than 17 in london.
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tomorrow, 13, which will feel much better. through tomorrow, we start with a lot of sunshine, but we‘ve got a new system from the south—west. you can see it crossing ireland, moving into northern ireland, moving into northern ireland and then to possibly clip cumbria and the isle of man and then on into south—west scotland. the yellow is indicate the temperatures will be lower, but further south, the amber indicates temperatures are on the up —— yellows. temperatures approaching the high 20s in the south—east but generally the high teens to the mid—20s for the rest of the country. as we move into thursday, lots of sunshine in central and eastern england and for a time, eased in wales. you can see how we‘ve got cloud and rain coming our way as well —— eastern wales. the rain not particularly heavy and temperature—wise, temperatures rising, 30 potentially in the south and then the low to mid 20s or most
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of the rest of the uk. 0n and then the low to mid 20s or most of the rest of the uk. on friday, lots of dry weather around, a fair bit of sunshine with areas of cloud coming and going. the odd shower not impossible but temperatures will be perhaps the main feature. by then, 31 or 32 despite what you see in the charts, and widely the low to high 20s more or less across—the—board. thank you very much, carol. thanks for your nice message about my cold as well. appreciate it. i think you‘re getting better. as well. appreciate it. i think you're getting better.” as well. appreciate it. i think you're getting better. i timed the inta ke you're getting better. i timed the intake of painkillers and everything, i timed intake of painkillers and everything, itimed it intake of painkillers and everything, i timed it and hopefully i will get through until 9:15am. everything, i timed it and hopefully i will get through until 9:15amm that why you started badly?” started badly. but it's picking up! let‘s have a look at the front pages of this morning cost boss papers. -- this morning‘s papers. front page of the guardian this morning has our lead story about sexual abuse in charities. mps saying it is endemic
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across the sector. the main picture is of former zimbabwean president robert mugabe casting his vote in the election yesterdaym, the result is expected over the next few days. the times have a picture ofjeremy hunt and his chinese wife. he was in beijing yesterday where he said his wife was from japan and then had to apologise for what he called a terrible mistake. —— yesterday. brexit also makes the front page and the antisemitism row in the labour party the mirror have jack and dani the love island winners on the front page. and a story about a 17—year—old whose dad says playing the popular game fortnite made him suicidal. defence of the rail industry is the main strory on the telegraph. we were looking at this yesterday with an eye on northern rail. and the picture is of john goldfinger palmer. his wife says she has given up hope of finding his gangland killers. 0n the jeremy hunt
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0n thejeremy hunt thing, you mentioned somebody once incorrectly introduced their wife with the wrong name. with her there i take it. this is my wife... and she's called... what is it, brain fade or something? i would be in trouble for an awfully long time if that‘s the case. i would be in trouble for an awfully long time if that's the case. you would, wouldn‘t you. long time if that's the case. you would, wouldn't you. and rightly so. as usual, many britons will be heading to europe for their summer holidays this year, with around 18 million travelling to spain alone. so what effect, if any, has brexit had on our holiday plans? 0ur brussels reporter adam fleming is in benidorm for us this morning. looks lovely in benidorm this morning? good morning. i‘ve been working i promise but the other night i saw loads of tribute acts, only could you see little mix, coldplay, ac/dc and two different take thats. there‘s a brexit effect in benidorm, and it has been for the last two
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summers, it‘s been to do with the value of the pound, which bought three year rose since 2016. people have been booking shorter hoes hotel stays —— shorter hotel stays and fewer excursions —— 3 euros. let‘s find out what‘s been going on. it‘s the last summer before brexit, which could change how we holiday. it‘s not been decided yet whether british tourists will need a visa or not, and even if they don‘t they could still be affected by the eu‘s new travel authorisation system coming in in 2020, where visitors from outside the eu have to register on a website and pay seven euros. if we need to do it, we need to do it. it‘s a break, isn‘t it? it‘s a holiday, so we need to get away. what if you had to pay extra money to get a visa? everything‘s extra these days. we pay everything extra, there‘s taxes, you know what. you shouldn't really have to pay for everything to come to spain, should you? well, if the uk‘s not in the eu any more... i know, it feels not that far away.
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you could drive to spain. however they get here, 18 million people travel to spain from the uk every year. so many, it sometimes feels less like benidorm and more like britain. the english breakfasts aren‘t going anywhere, but some home comforts will have to be negotiated in the brexit talks, such as... the mobile phone roaming has gone now because of the eu, if it was to come back because of brexit, how would you feel? i‘d have to be careful how i use my phone abroad. so you know your european health insurance card, which means you get free medical care, what if that disappeared? you‘d just have to be like america and you pay private, wouldn‘t you ? i‘m just going to show you the newest hotel innovation at the rh canfali... tracey says uncertainty about brexit isn‘t affecting bookings for next summer yet. just as well, because her company‘s just opened this new hotel. the best thing about the hotel is this, the view.
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benidorm and the levante beach. i think sometimes a lot of scaremongering goes on with the brexit and people are made to feel very nervous, but i think it‘s in everybody‘s interest to have an agreement for everything so business can be as normal as possible for everybody. right, back at the airport. the eu and the uk will have to agree new rules when it comes to aviation, and if there‘s no deal in march next year, there‘s talk about emergency plans being put into place to keep planes flying. but if all goes to plan, there will be a transition period where nothing changes until the end of 2020, so next summer should feeljust like this one. for the costa blanca, brexit is manana, manana. people are pretty relaxed about
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brexit here to be fair for two reasons, number one, the whole thing about the transition period coming in next year and lasting until 2020 means nothing will change immediately. secondly, there‘s so much business between the uk and spain, it‘s in everyone‘s interest to do a deal that deals with this stuff. having said that, i haven‘t spoken to anyone here preparing for contingency plans if brexit talks go wrong by march next year and they need to pull something out of the bag. in terms of when we find out how our holidays will be affected, i‘m not sure. the first year of the brexit talks has focused on the divorce related issues, wrapping up britain‘s membership, things about money, people living permanently on either side of the channel and northern ireland, these issues about holidays and visas and whether people can work here temporarily in the holiday industry, that is for phase two of the brexit talks, which have only just started.
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phase two of the brexit talks, which have onlyjust started. we don‘t know how much detail the negotiators will go into about this future relationship. there‘s a tussle going on now between the uk and the eu about how detailed the blueprint for the future is going to be. that‘s enough from benidorm. i‘ll give you more details about brexit and holidays later in the programme. is the news, travel and weather where you are. —— let‘s get the. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m charlotte franks. sadiq khan says a new youth service is needed to tackle the roots of violent crime after a 50% funding fall in the last five years. today he‘s announcing funding for schools and centres that work with vulnerable young people to provide activities to encourage them to stay off the streets during the summer holidays. the government insists tackling violent crime is a priority. commuters on south western railway are facing disruption this morning in the latest in a series of strikes on the network. members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute over the role of guards on trains.
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further industrial action is planned in the coming weeks. south western railway say they are expecting to run a reduced service on most routes. a nursery group in the capital is trialling yoga and mindfulness for three—year—olds. the london early years foundation introduced the sessions after one of its nurseries had to go into lockdown during the westminster terror attack. they believe children need to find coping strategies to combat the stress of inner city living. they will be piloting it in five sites and hope to roll it out in all 39 if it‘s a success. ijust feel like the children need something that helps to support them. everyone‘s got their mobile phone on, everyone has social media, where do children get quiet and where do they get chance to be and get space to feel safe and able to do a deep breath? let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a part suspension on tfl rail this morning between liverpool street and shenfield, but a good service on all other lines.
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that is now severely delayed. as well as that strike action on south western railway, there are also electrical supply problems meaning no services between haslemere and guildford, causing delays into waterloo. greater anglia isn‘t not running between stratford and shenfield while emergency services deal with an investigation. 0n the roads, there‘s congestion on the approach to blackwall tunnel this morning. traffic is slower there as you can see because of surface water following the rain. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. well, for some of us, it‘s quite a damp start out there this morning. we‘ve had some heavy showers. still one or two around but they will clear, leading to a much brighter, drier and sunnier afternoon. the showers this morning are quite heavy and you may even hear a rumble or two of thunder. from mid—morning onwards, though, a drier picture. lots of sunshine as we head through the afternoon. a bit of patchy cloud but the temperature feeling quite warm. we‘re looking at a max of around 25 to 26 celsius. a lovely evening as well in the sunshine, and then overnight it is predominantly clear. you might get a bit
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of patchy cloud around. the minimum temperature between 11 and 13 celsius. a lovely bright start as we head into wednesday. high pressure starts to build into our weather over the next few days, and as a result, look what happens to the temperatures. as we head through wednesday and thursday, gradually they start to rise. we‘re looking at 30 for thursday. for friday, 31, maybe even 32. we could, in one or two places, maybe get up to 33 celsius, so lots of hot, dry and sunny weather as we head into the weekend. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. bye for now. good morning — welcome to breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. sexual exploitation and abuse is endemic across the aid sector, according to a new report from mps. the international development
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committee says there‘s been a culture of denial since revelations earlier this year that 0xfam workers paid for sex while helping victims of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. the charity has acknowledged it has further to go to tackle the issue. we reached the conclusion in the aid sector that there has been complacency verging on complicity with what has happened and that is because organisations have too often appeared to be concerned with protecting their own reputation within the sector rather than protecting victims and survivors. us intelligence officials have told the washington post that north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles, despite better relations with the trump administration. the officials — speaking anonymously — told the newspaper that new evidence suggested work was still taking place at a factory near pyongyang that produced the first north korean missiles capable of reaching the united states. meanwhile, president trump has offered to hold unconditional
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talks with iran at any time, without any preconditions. earlier this month, mr trump clashed with the iranian president, hassan rouhani. but he‘s now said he wants to work out "something meaningful" to replace the nuclear agreement which the united states abandoned in may. british gas owner centrica has reported a 20% slump in underlying operating profits for its consumer energy supply arm. british gas owner centrica reported a 20% slump in underlying operating profits for its consumer energy supply arm, to £430 million the father of the missing airman corrie mckeague says he believes his son will never be found. in a post on facebook, martin mckeague says the evidence suggests the 23—year—old‘s remains are somewhere within the waste disposal system following his dissapearance after a night out in suffolk, two years ago.
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police believe corrie climbed into a waste bin and was taken away by a refuse lorry. parents in england need more support to help their children learn basic language skills according to the education secretary. in a speech about social mobility, damian hinds will label the issue a "persistent scandal" and offer more support for parents. department of education figures suggest that by the end of reception class more than a quarter of children lack the communication skills they need. labour‘s deputy leader tom watson has described a member of the party‘s ruling body as "a loud mouthed bully" after he was recorded apparently criticising members of the jewish community. in the recording, peter willsman — an ally ofjeremy corbyn — accuses them of making up claims of anti—semitism in the party. it‘s understood mr willsman has apologised and will not face any further action. if you like high—end cars, dismayed
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to be painful to watch. over $6 million worth of illegally imported ca rs into million worth of illegally imported cars into the philippines have been destroyed. the country‘s president was watching while this was going on. this will be a deterrent hopefully to criminals. it's dramatic, isn‘t it? from one car crashed to another, here is sally with sport. that is terrible. she is crushed. i couldn't resist it, even though your supporters always magnificent. too late, no, no, no. i
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will be crushing him later. what did the guy might be talking about this morning? i love your sport. stop it, stop it. andy murray? i will talk to you and the people at home and no one else. andy murray has this morning won just his second competitive match in over a year. it wasn‘t easy for him. he had to come from a set down to beat mackenzie macdonald in washington, as he continues his comeback from hip surgery. murray, who wasn‘t ready for wimbledon, has dropped to 839 in the world rankings. there‘s not been much time for geraint thomas to rest after winning the tour de france. with the success comes media attention at a level he won‘t have experienced before. he returned to the uk yesterday and will be speaking to us just after eight o‘clock. while the men‘s tour goes from strength to strength —
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what about the women? well britain‘s most decorated paralympian says there should be a women‘s tour de france. at the moment the only official competition is the one—day ‘la course‘ event. but dame sarah storey rode with a group of women who were cycling every stage of the tour ahead of the men, and says there is an appetite for a women‘s equivalent. they wanted to see the women on the side of the road just zooming past so that i think there is a case for it to be there and it won‘t happen overnight, the women haven‘t trained for three weeks, they need notice for it to happen but maybe when the french have the olympics in 2024, why not put on a women‘s race at the same time and give the women‘s peloton n time to train for it? one of the most colourful characters in boxing — tyson fury — says he‘s close to securing a shot at another world title, a warning there‘s some flash photography coming up. the former heavyweight world champion made his return to the ring last month after a drugs ban, and will fight the italian francesco pia—netta in belfast next month.
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—— pianetta in belfast next month. but he‘s looking beyond that, and says a deal to fight the wbc champion deontay wilder in december is almost done. i can reveal negotiations have been strong for december. we‘re almost done with this deal but it won‘t be locked in over francesco pianetta. he will give me the right fight and the right to work to prepare for deontay wilder. england opener alistair cook says he feels sorry for adil rashid after criticism of his selection for the test squad. rashid could play in the first test against india tomorrow, despite choosing to only playing the short forms of the game for his county yorkshire. he has been told he‘ll have to play in the county championship next season if he‘s to continue his test career. i can understand why it‘s caused a bit of fuss but, you know, you just have to get on with it. we have to look at the positives. we got a different style of english spinner. a little bit of mystery as well. that‘s what we should be excited about. watch out, dan walker, i have
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friends in high places and i will set lionel messi's. when you. let's look at the big dog. it's a horse! it's a shetland pony. but this is very own dog and the dog is the superbly named hulk. you can see why. probably a fair few defenders around the world to know exactly how that dog feels. the poor dog isjust exactly how that dog feels. the poor dog is just confused. exactly how that dog feels. the poor dog isjust confused. i wonder exactly how that dog feels. the poor dog is just confused. i wonder if he is carrying a bit of extra weight. i‘m tried to find out what manner of dog that is. it says it is a bull
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mastiff. it‘s very big. a big old unit. are you scared of me now? a little. charities showed "complacency verging on complicity" in responding to sexual abuse within the sector, according to a damning report by mps. it follows revelations that a group of oxfam workers had used prostitutes in haiti in 2011, when they were supposed to be helping the local population recover from a major earthquake. international human rights consultant asmita naik joins us now —— international human rights consultant amista naikjoins us now from our london newsroom. thank you so much the joining us. thank you so much thejoining us. i know that you have given evidence. given what they found, these mps, complacency verging on complicity. is that something you have seen evidence of? i wholeheartedly agree
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with the conclusions and i agree the report. they have given victims of voice. they have spoken the truth and they have comprehensively addressed this issue. it‘s an incredible report. i know you have been talking about this some time ago. just tell us what you‘ve seen. way back in 2002, i was working in geneva at the time and i was part of a team with save the children. we visited three countries in west africa, doing other research but we unexpectedly came across extensive sexual exploitation of refugee children by aid workers and peacekeepers. the allegations were so endemic, we documented 40 a dangers —— agencies and nine peacekeeping battalions. how come nothing changed ? peacekeeping battalions. how come nothing changed? certainly at policy level, things did change. this is
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the first time things have come to the first time things have come to the global agenda and they were high—level policy changes. international working groups on that kind of work. that workers continued to this day that the issue the lack of implementation of these policies. the international development committee is calling for a new global register of aid workers, just one of several measures it‘s asking to be implemented. will these suggestions make any difference? the time has now come to external oversight on this issue. what has happened is, while the issue has been recognised, the agencies have been recognised, the agencies have been left own devices. i think the pressure needs to come externally and the recommendation i welcome the most is the recommendation for an
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independent ombudsman. what about theissue independent ombudsman. what about the issue of trust? it‘s had a big impact. it's very sad because charities do important work that same time, they have to be accountable for their actions. i would advocate that we need increased standards and we need to hold charities to their standards and redirect funding. who do the best project isn‘t victims. and redirect funding. who do the best project isn't victims. so much of this work is done in emergency situations. is it getting people at these early stages? obviously betting is an important way of addressing this. the problem as you have identified, you are working in
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crisis environments and working with a lot of local aid workers. we are talking about areas where there are no devious checks, no functioning rule of law, the criminal system thatis rule of law, the criminal system that is operating. it‘s difficult to see how betting would address this. making sure that everyone understands what‘s expected of them behaviourally and are sanctioned. thank you very much, thank you. a little reminder, if you just switched on the television, geraint thomas is going to be with us fresh from his two fronts wind. and thank you for your questions as well. which is your favourite? you for your questions as well. which is yourfavourite? i like your ones but i enjoyed the one saving, geraint thomas has had a lot of attention, i think he is a lecturer
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in wales in visual effects has been getting many congratulations, with the same name. his name at twitter is @geraintthomas and the other geraint has 86 at the end of his twitter name. carroll, a rainbow. there‘s a rainbow because we‘ve got rain and showers in the forecast. heavy, thundery showers at the moment moving to parts of south—east england, the south—east quarter with dry weather following behind with sunshine, but more rain coming in across the north and west of scotla nd across the north and west of scotland and northern ireland. you can see what‘s been happening through the night. these are the heavy, thundery showers drifting to parts of the midlands and again heading to east anglia, we have some at the moment still cracking away. this system connected around an area of low pressure bringing rain, initially across northern ireland and then through western scotland
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and then through western scotland and it will be breezy in the north of the country. this morning, off goes the showery rain, in hot bid to the cloud follows then we have a fair bit of sunshine for england, wales and not the scotland but towards the west, cloud will be building, bringing the rain by the afternoon —— north—west scotland. crossing northern ireland leaving damp and risley commissions. we might see some of that in cumbria but generally form most of northern england, the rest of england and wales it will be dry apart from the odd shower —— for most —— drizzly conditions. temperatures in the sunshine, 25 or 26. conditions. temperatures in the sunshine, 25 or26. in conditions. temperatures in the sunshine, 25 or 26. in the cloud or rain, closer to the mid—teens and may be the high teens for some. through the evening and overnight, that band of cloud and rain will continue to move to the east. as it comes across parts of england and wales, it won‘t be much more than a band of cloud and you can see some clear skies. tonight is not going to
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be as muggy in the south as last night. 0vernight lows at 4am probably closer to 30 and the temperature climbing through the rest of the morning. through the rest of the morning. through the rest of the dye, a fair bit of sunshine around. blue skies —— day. then the rain crossing northern ireland, in towards parts of north—west —— south—west scotland —— crossing northern ireland. we could see some in north—west england. temperatures tomorrow 16 to 26. on thursday, the rain will be coming again from the west to the east with the attendant cloud and brighter skies the further south and east you travel. this will be where the highest temperatures will be on thursday the. again, creeping up once more towards the 30 degrees mark —— on thursday. across—the—board, turning mark —— on thursday. across—the—boa rd, turning that mark —— on thursday. across—the—board, turning that bit warmer. friday, lots of dry weather around, cloud building at times but
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friday we could see 32 or 33 in the south—east, and widely we will see the low 20s to the high twenties. carol, thanks very much. we will see you later on. we‘ve had an update from british gas this morning. sean has the details. lots of intriguing things going on? a good way to figure out what our energy usage was, the beast from the east, then it was warmer, when did we turn the heating off? this morning we‘ve had results from its parent company, centrica, for the first half of the year. centrica is big business, it does everything from oil and gas exploration and production to getting energy into people‘s homes and overall profits were down 4%, but drilling down into british gas, which is the part of the business that affects lots of households nationwide, profits were down 20%. still made £430 million but quite a
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fall on the first half of last year. 340,000 customers left the company in the first six months of the year as well. lots for the business to react to hear. rik smith is an energy expert from the price comparison site uswitch. good morning. an interesting set of figures, when you see a big energy companies say they made less than the year before, but we have the beast from the east, it was colder, why were they making less, weren‘t we using more? customers were using more energy, it was cold for a protracted period when we were burning more gas and british gas sales expensive gas to put it simply. but why are the profits still down? costs have increased, wholesale costs and network costs, everything that goes into making up a bill have risen in price. don't they pass those on? they do, british gas made a clear reference in their results they didn‘t pass all of it on and they made reference to the fa ct on and they made reference to the fact other energy suppliers have increased prices since they did earlier in the year. there are
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suppliers that have increased prices more than once in 2018, so it could bea more than once in 2018, so it could be a reference to things to come. do you think we could see big price rises from british gas on the horizon? anything is possible, wouldn‘t want to set too many expectations but there are more than one energy supplier who have increased energy prices more than once, in the big six and the smaller suppliers. one to watch. we saw lots of customers continuing to leave british gas. 1.4 million accounts down on this time last year. where are people going? we see customers switching to a variety of different suppliers. there‘s over 70 energy suppliers. there‘s over 70 energy suppliers in the industry offering a variety of great products, from fixed, variable and green tariffs and we seeing switching to some of... the small suppliers offer better service than the big suppliers that we are seeing. they
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are moving to smaller suppliers, not the other big six? -- we are seeing. it's the other big six? -- we are seeing. it‘s a mixed picture. both sets of a variety of good quality savings. savings of £480 are possible, which is why it is worth voting with your feet. you wouldn't make that saving every year? that's right, but what you would do is you would prevent yourself defaulting on to the standard variable tariff, where you would pay the extra. on the standard variable tariffs, there‘s been huge changes in that market, price cap powers are coming in for the regulator. how are you seeing that changed consumer behaviour because the tariffs won‘t exist in some places? we don't see the price cap asa places? we don't see the price cap as a silver bullet. it will help customers who are vulnerable and who need the support, but for most of us who are able to take advantage of the cheap deals available now, it is worth switching and saving today.
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there‘s an expectation that actually suppliers may price up to the cap, that would be concerning if we saw that would be concerning if we saw that because that‘s the suppliers reining back on competition and relaxing into a world where they don‘t have to compete so hard for customers because they can more easily hold onto them. that's why it‘s been more controversial than lots would expect. rik smith from uswitch. dixons carphone, they have 1.4 million accounts hacked last year, actually it is 10 million. we will have more after 8am for you. thanks very much. despite the rain many of us have had over the past few days, it remains one of the driest summers for years, and the effects are still being felt. large stretches of canals in the north of england have been closed due to low water levels. ricky boleto is at one of the affected stretches of water in east lancashire. good morning. we are in lancashire
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this morning the and liverpool canal, a 55 mile stretch of britain‘s longest canal network has been closed that leeds and liverpool canal. that‘s been because of the lack of rain that leeds and liverpool canal. this is one of the reservoirs that feeds the water into the canal and it‘s extremely low. normally it is up to the lighter stone. it hasn‘t been prolonged rain because it‘s been incredibly dry since may. they have had to close a portion of the canal route. that is from wigan in greater manchester all the way to skipton in north yorkshire. how do you go about closing part of the canal route and what impact will it have on business? that‘s what we are here to find out this morning. why have you had to make this decision? it's been
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one of the driest and warmest summers on record and we haven't had enough rainfall to replenish the water levels in our reservoirs. they we re water levels in our reservoirs. they were 100% fall in april and as we've let water in the canal in the summer season, we haven't had the rainfall to refill the reservoirs. this will impact on an awful lot of people. nigel, you have a cruising business, this will really impact you? what‘s happening? what we've done is move our base of operations so we've still got water to float in and we're about 12 miles from where we are, and we've got everything set up so are, and we've got everything set up so customers are, and we've got everything set up so customers can are, and we've got everything set up so customers can still have a great holiday. we don't know when they're going to reopen the 55 mile stretch, it could be a couple of months. that‘s bad news, right? it could be a couple of months. that's bad news, right? it's not worse than moving because it's all, is, we've got it sorted and everyone knows what they're doing. --
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organised. how have you closed it? when we say we close the lock flights so boats can't go up and down, we have trained the gates, padlocked them and we've disconnected the operating gear so the locks can't be used —— chained. bid to are open and the rest of the 2000 miles of navigable canals and rivers are available to be used for holidays —— rivers are available to be used for holidays — — the rivers are available to be used for holidays —— the tow paths are open. 1500 baths are used so lots of water needed, they are hoping for more rain. excellent water—based statistics there. a gentle reminder, people are switching on all the time, geraint thomas, tour de france winner, will be here in about ten minutes on brea kfast. thank you for your excellent questions, we will ask him some of them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news,
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i‘m i‘ m charlotte i‘m charlotte franks. sadiq khan says a new youth service is needed to tackle the roots of violent crime after a 50% funding fall in the last five years. today he‘s announcing funding for schools and centres that work with vulnerable young people to provide activities to encourage them to stay off the streets during the summer holidays. the government insists tackling violent crime is a priority. commuters on south western railway are facing disruption this morning in the latest in a series of strikes on the network. members of the rmt union have walked out in a dispute over the role of guards on trains. further industrial action is planned in the coming weeks. south western railway say they are expecting to run a reduced service on most routes. a nursery group in the capital is trialling yoga and mindfulness for three year olds. the london early years foundation introduced the sessions after one of its nurseries had to go into lockdown during the westminster terror attack.
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they believe children need to find coping strategies to combat the stress of inner city living. they will be piloting it in five sites and hope to roll it out in all 39 if it‘s a success. ijust feel that, you know, the children need something that helps them to support them. everyone‘s got their mobile phone on, and everyone‘s got social media. where do children get quiet? where do children get time just to be? where do children get space just to feel safe and able to just do a deep breath? let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the district line and also on tfl rail this morning between liverpool street and shenfield. as well as that strike action on south western railway, there are also electrical supply problems meaning no services between haslemere and guildford, causing delays into waterloo. greater anglia isn‘t not running between stratford and shenfield while emergency services deal with an investigation. and there are delays on the m25 anticlockwise betweenjunction 6 for godstone and the clackett lane services because of an accident blocking the inside two lanes. let‘s have a check
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on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. well, for some of us, it‘s quite a damp start out there this morning. we‘ve had some heavy showers. still one or two around but they will clear, leading to a much brighter, drier and sunnier afternoon. the showers this morning are quite heavy and you may even hear a rumble or two of thunder. from mid—morning onwards, though, a drier picture. lots of sunshine as we head through the afternoon. a bit of patchy cloud but the temperature feeling quite warm. we‘re looking at a max of around 25 to 26 celsius. a lovely evening as well in the sunshine, and then overnight it is predominantly clear. you might get a bit of patchy cloud around. the minimum temperature between 11 and 13 celsius. a lovely bright start as we head into wednesday. high pressure starts to build into our weather over the next few days, and as a result, look what happens to the temperatures. as we head through wednesday and thursday, gradually they start to rise. we‘re looking at 30 for thursday. for friday, 31, maybe even 32. we could, in one or two places, maybe get up to 33 celsius, so lots of hot, dry and sunny weather as we head into the weekend. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc
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london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. that‘s bbc.co.uk/london. now, though, it‘s back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. coming up shortly we‘ll be speaking to tour de france winner geraint thomas. but first — our headlines today... charities are guilty of ‘complacency verging on complicity‘ over sexual abuse by staff — a damning report on international aid. i‘m in boiling benidorm to find out if brexit will affect the way we travel. dixons carphone says the personal details of 10 million people were hacked last year — much higher than previously thought. i‘ll have more in a moment. a win for andy murray. he wins in washington as he continues his comeback from nearly a year out with injury. heavy, thundery showers will clear
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that southeast in a couple of hours, many having a dry, sunny day, except for western scotland and northern ireland, who can expect some rain. i will have more in 15 minutes. it‘s tuesday, 31st ofjuly. our top story... there has been an abject failure in the aid sector to deal with sexual abuse, according to mps. a report by the international development committee says there‘s been a "culture of denial" since revelations earlier this year that 0xfam workers paid for sex while helping victims of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. the charity has acknowledged it has further to go to tackle the issue. our global affairs correspondent naomi grimley reports. it was in the aftermath of the 2010 haiti earthquake that some of 0xfam‘s aid workers severely compromised its much—cherished values. they used young prostitutes when they were supposed to be helping the local population bounce back from a disaster. the charity did an internal investigation. they dismissed some members of staff
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and let others quietly resign without properly flagging up what had happened to the authorities or other charities. today, mps said it wasn‘t an isolated episode. we have reached the conclusion that in the aid sector there has been complacency verging, frankly, on complicity with what has happened. that is because organisations have appeared more concerned to protect their own reputation in the sector rather than protecting victims and survivors. mps want the uk to take the lead and create a global register of aid workers to stop sexual predators entering the sector. though they admit it won‘t be easy to cover everyone. helen evans worked at 0xfam and raised her concerns about sexual abuse. she thinks the register is a good idea. this is about protecting some of the most vulnerable individuals in the world from sexual exploitation and abuse and we have
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to do everything we possibly can and the public reaction has shown how much they want us to do that too. so difficult, yes, but doable. 0xfam says it‘s now tripled its budget for safeguarding checks but this is a much bigger problem than one charity and mps are in no doubt that after a string of scandals, now is the time for meaningful change. the father of the missing airman corrie mckeague says he believes his son will never be found. in a post on facebook martin mckeague says the evidence suggests the 23—year—old‘s remains are somewhere within the waste disposal system. keith doyle reports these are the last known images of corrie mckeague. he was 23 when he went missing after a night out in bury st edmunds in september 2016. cctv pictures show him walk through the town, but then he disappears. police believe he got
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into a waste bin. his mobile phone signal was tracked and appeared to follow the path of a bin lorry. a massive search of waste disposal sites took place, but it was called off earlier this year. his father, martin, has now said that his son is no longer missing. in a facebook post, he said police have presented him with compelling evidence that experts concluded beyond any doubt that corrie ended up in the suffolk waste disposal system. he was known to sleep in or on bins. he said the area was too toxic and vast to search. since his disappearance, corrie‘s girlfriend gave birth to his daughter. now that the family say they know what happened to their son, a memorial is being planned. keith doyle, bbc news. us intelligence officials have told the washington post that north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles, despite better relations with the trump administration. the officials — speaking anonymously —
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told the newspaper that new evidence suggested work was still taking place at a factory near pyongyang that produced the first north korean missiles capable of reaching the united states. meanwhile, president trump has offered to hold unconditional talks with iran at any time, without any preconditions. earlier this month, mr trump clashed with the iranian president, hassan rouhani. but he‘s now said he wants to work out "something meaningful" to replace the nuclear agreement which the united states abandoned in may. i would certainly meet with iran if they wanted to meet. i am not sure they wanted to meet. i am not sure they are ready yet. they are having a hard time now. i ended the iran deal, it was a ridiculous deal, i think they will want to meet and i am ready to meet any time they want to. iam am ready to meet any time they want to. i am not doing that from strength from weakness, i think it is an appropriate thing to do. the owner of british gas — centrica — has reported a 20 per cent slump in profits
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in the first half of the year. it said 340,000 people have left the energy provider. centrica‘s chief executive said its household gas and electricity supply arm was hit by last year‘s pre—payment price cap, the ongoing loss of customers and rising wholesale energy prices. we have had quite a challenging first half, with very extreme weather patterns, rapidly rising wholesale energy costs and, against that, our total margin has been sta ble that, our total margin has been stable and though operating profits broadly stable, down 4%. street the centrica story is something we are following this morning, but you also have something that broke ten minutes ago, dixons carphone, and the amount of personal information that was lost? we heard they had this hack last year that affected nearly 6 million payment cards. that had been accessed, but almost all of them were protected by
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chip and pin. they also said at the time at1.2 chip and pin. they also said at the time at 1.2 million sets of personal data sets, e—mail addresses, time at 1.2 million sets of personal data sets, e—mailaddresses, names, that kind of thing, work accessed. they said today they have looked into it further and 1.2 million was considered a lot, they are now saying 10 million sets of personal data have been accessed. they say there is no fraud on the back of this, but they are clearly, the information commissioner‘s office, for example, that would look at the data, they would look at it anyway and they will surely now be more concerned by the fact it is so much bigger than what they said a month ago. carphone warehouse were fined a month ago for a similar breach. big issues for dixons carphone to get on top of. thank you very much. extraordinary numbers as well. labour‘s deputy leader tom watson has described a member of the party‘s ruling body as "a loud mouthed bully" after he was recorded apparently criticising members of the jewish community.
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we will bring you detail later on. that is the tweet from tom watson. it‘s understood mr willsman has apologised and will not face any further action. sit down, everybody, get yourself a cup of tea, we have a fantastic guest. after becoming the first welshman to win the tour de france, geraint thomas says his triumph has been unexpected and "the stuff of dreams". we‘ll see if he‘s come to terms with his mammoth achievement yet. but first, let‘s remind ourselves of that incredible journey. music: "found what i‘ve been looking for" by tom grennan even looking back at those images makes me smile. so lovely to see you back on breakfast. how are you? and
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congratulations, as well! thanks. yeah, it is still a massive whirlwind, really. it is not sinking in yet. maybe when i get home. incredible. what, three weeks, but the last 48 hours has just been crazy. at what point are you going to visit cardiff? i know you saw some of the members of your former clu b some of the members of your former club yesterday on the one show, but iimagine club yesterday on the one show, but i imagine there is quite a welcome awaiting you? yet, it is pretty insane. i stayed off social media throughout the race, pretty much, but i went on after the time trial on saturday when i had won it, and the response has just been crazy. really looking forward to going back, seeing my mates and family. 0bviously just celebrating back, seeing my mates and family. 0bviouslyjust celebrating with everyone. it will be really nice. you look suitably, i imagine, quite exhausted by the experience. just
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talk us through the last day, going to the champs elysees, seeing everybody supporting you, what was that like? it was like nothing i've experienced before. the last stage is normally hard, you mentally switch off a bit. but the buzz i got, the stuff of dreams, really. when i was a kid, i was running home from school to watch the end of the stages. to be the one winning the race, it still doesn‘t seem real to me. i‘ve done so many interviews, everybody says, winner of the tour de france, it isjust bonkers. you still have to pinch yourself listening to that? you know how popular cycling is in this country, through the olympics and various other world championships, success in the tourde other world championships, success in the tour de france as well. but he went into this tournament, and
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you have drunk a lot of casual viewers into it. chris froome was meant to be the man to win another grand tour, and i know you have spoken about the moment where team sky said, ok, geraint, you are in control, you are our main man now, we are going to support you now as being the potential winner of the yellow jersey at the end of this tour de france. i‘m interested in the personal relationship between you and chris froome. that could have been awkward. what was it like when he had you in a room alone, 0k, g, as he calls you, what happens now? it was anything but awkward. he was a true gentleman about it, really. we get on really well, we have been in the same team for ten yea rs have been in the same team for ten years now, maybe 11 years. 0bviously it must have been tough for him. he was going for his fifth tour de france, which is of easily a joint record. his fourth consecutive, back—to—back grand tour. so there was a lot on the line for him as
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well. but we were both just open and honest from the start. we both have our own ambitions, obviously. i was a back—up leader, i did not have to commit fully to him. i think after stage 17, maybe, the last mountaintop finish, froomie lost a bit of time, after that stage it didn‘t have to be said, it was pretty obvious i had the best chance of finishing for the team. he fully accepted that, fully committed. to have somebody of his calibre helping me wasjust... well, great, obviously. just explain, a lot of people are not close followers of cycling, you have supported him for four wins, he is then supporting you, in practical terms, what an amazing person to support you, what does that mean in practical terms? basically, he would ride in the wind
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for me, keep me in the front, in a good position. so i don‘t have to spend any extra energy, or... he didn‘t, but he could go back and get mea didn‘t, but he could go back and get me a bottle from the car, basically just wait on me hand and foot. give meajaror just wait on me hand and foot. give me a jar or something. were you ever tempted to say, froomie, go get me a bottle ? tempted to say, froomie, go get me a bottle? i should have made more of it, really. we have three days, i think, where he was at my service, so to speak. i should have milked that a little bit more. it is because you are a nice man, geraint. we have had loads of questions. some of them have been quickfire. louise is interested in is as well, paul and mandy askin, you‘re resting heart rate, what is that normally? it is around 45. decent, then.
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pretty low, i guess. not incredibly low, that is something that louise wa nted low, that is something that louise wanted to ask from the start. i am sure you are aware, many people are asking about this other geraint thomas, for those who are not on twitter, there is an actor called geraint thomas, with that twitter handle, and he has been getting a lot of attention? i came across a couple of years ago, after any big when he gets a lot of messages. this one has been the biggest. i think you said something like his twitter followers have gone up by about 1000. i think he is quite enjoying it, to be fair. he is also welsh, so i think he is basking in reflected glory. it's crazy, really, the welsh thing. let's talk about practicalities as well, you have not signed a contract yet. i know it is
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early days. you had just won, have you started the conversation or are you started the conversation or are you going to leave that a bit?” think it is something that will get sorted pretty soon. quite good timing, really. quite fortunate that ididn‘t do timing, really. quite fortunate that i didn‘t do it before the tour. timing, really. quite fortunate that i didn't do it before the tour. did they want you to sign it before the tour? yeah, i could have. but we just delayed it a little bit. probably the best thing i‘ve ever done, after winning. a very clever move. dave would like to know, we have made mention of this many times, whitchurch high school, where you went, also home to gareth bale and sam warburton. dave says, if spielberg was going to make a film about whitchurch high school, who would you like to play you? i'm really bad with actor‘s names. sorry, all i can think of now is,
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like common mr bean —— it is, like, mr bean... you can't have rowan atkinson! i am sure sam warburton would be played by somebody from thor. you have your yellowjersey? it is just thor. you have your yellowjersey? it isjust here. tell us a little bit about your school and your physical education department. they seem to have done something special with you and the other people there, what is special? it's remarkable, the fact that myself, as you mentioned, gareth bale, sam warburton, i think i was a couple of yea rs warburton, i think i was a couple of years ahead of them in school, but all within three years. they have gone on to do what we have done, and thatis gone on to do what we have done, and that is insane, really. 0bviously
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gone on to do what we have done, and that is insane, really. obviously it is the biggest school in wales. so percentage—wise they have the best chance of producing someone decent. but i think the three of us, it is a really nice story. 0bviously but i think the three of us, it is a really nice story. obviously the school were really supportive when we we re school were really supportive when we were there. yeah, it‘s really nice. one of the things that has been great is that nobody has had a bad word to say about you, either in the build—up to the tour de france, in the past, or since you have won. do you think you are the type of winner that the sport needed at this moment? yeah. i think so, it was good for me, i‘m certainly enjoying it. it's good for me, i‘m certainly enjoying it. it‘s really nice to get those sort of comments. especially from fellow riders on the pallet on, and outside of that, people that have grown up, outside of that, people that have grown up, rugby players messaging me, asa grown up, rugby players messaging me, as a kid i have been watching them and enjoying seeing them play, and suddenly they are messaging me saying how much they have enjoyed watching me. i received video
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m essa g es watching me. i received video messages from dan carter, will carling, thierry henry. did you get a phone call from arsene wenger? yeah, the morning we were flying back to london. just saying congratulations, he was watching and really enjoyed it. didn‘t look like i was ever going to crack. just, like, iam i was ever going to crack. just, like, i am an arsenalfan, so that was just like, i am an arsenalfan, so that wasjust bonkers, really, to be speaking on the phone to arsene when i was sat in the airport. talking about watching, we are just a little bit happy about what you said about bbc breakfast yesterday and over the weekend. we have got you, i think you might have caught a glimpse of it already, something very sought—after. your very own bbc brea kfast sought—after. your very own bbc breakfast mug. we don‘t give many of those out. thank you. thanks a lot. cani
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those out. thank you. thanks a lot. can i give you a tip? don‘t put it in the dishwasher. you have to wash it by hand. ok. well, thanks a lot. such a pleasure. it has been watching you, and wonderful to speak to you. congratulations, thank you very much indeed. cheers. great to get him on. thank you for all of your comments and messages and all of your questions. we got through a couple of them. if you‘re wondering why we gave him the mug, if you didn‘t see the interview yesterday, he said he was looking forward to getting back to normality, sitting with a cup of coffee watching bbc brea kfast with a cup of coffee watching bbc breakfast in the morning. anyway, moving on, heart write—down. breakfast in the morning. anyway, moving on, heart write-down. 45 beats per minute! how is the weather looking? i haven‘t even got a bbc breakfast mug. lucky! we have heavy and thundery showers across east anglia, eastern england
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and it will clear into the north sea. for most of us it is going to be dry and sunny. however, the system coming in from the west will bring some more rain and also some thicker cloud across western and northern scotland, and northern ireland. you can see what has been happening over the last few hours. these are the heavy, thundery showers that have been pushing across southern and central parts of england, getting into the east. those are the ones that were clear in the next few hours. at the same time, the pressure over the atlantic, the weather front draped around it, is bringing in the rain from the north—west. you can see the isobars, here it is going to be breezy. there go the showers. here comes the sunshine. we could see one or two micro showers, west wales, south—west england, that will be the exception rather than the rule. it will be well ensconced across parts of scotland. moving through northern ireland, a lot of dampness and drizzle across it. for england and wales it is dry and
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sunny, with the odd shower here and there. temperature wise, if you are stuck under the cloud it will feel cooler, with highs of 15. 2546 in the further south. this evening and overnight, we see the advancement of the cloud and rain. there will be some clear spells. last night, the temperature in london did not fall lower than 17 celsius. the minimum temperature is likely to be 13. these are the temperatures if you are leaving at 6am you can expect. first thing in the morning there will be a fair bit of sunshine around. a bottle dry weather, actually. through the day, rather like today, the cloud is going to build on the west, heralding the arrival of the band of rain and zooming across northern ireland and getting into western scotland, the isle of man, north wales and later we will see that push further east. i thursday, still a lot of fine weather, with the cloud continuing to come in from the west, rain moving west to east. the sunniest
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skies will be the furthest south and east you travel. the temperatures are continuing to climb. in the south—east on thursday we could well hit 28, 20 nine. across the board we are looking at temperatures creeping up. on friday, a lot of dry weather, temperatures again continuing to climb. somewhere in the south—east could have 30 to 33. for the uk as a whole we are looking at the low 20s, to the high 20s. we are going to see a return to that weather over the weekend. i will put a good word in for you and see if we can get you a bbc brea kfast and see if we can get you a bbc breakfast mug. 20 years! to be fair, iam only breakfast mug. 20 years! to be fair, i am only allowed one when i am here. i think the weather is something the next guest will be interested in, not just something the next guest will be interested in, notjust for the next few weeks and months but the years ahead. wildlife conservationist sacha dench was so worried about the declining number of bewick swans in the uk that she literally took to the skies
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to investigate what was going on. we followed her journey. she used a motorised paraglider to trace their four and a half thousand mile migration, facing sub—zero temperatures, and painful injuries. unsurprisingly she was nicknamed the human swan, and she‘s with us now. good morning again. how are things going? there has been a big piece of research. we are used to watching you in the skies, flying with swans and watching them on their migration. there is new research out. what has that told you about what we know so far about these bewick swans? a big part of flight of the swans was getting people involved. getting them to tell us things they might have noticed. we also got a load of researchers together. there was something like seven together. there was something like seve n co nfe re nces together. there was something like seven conferences spontaneously occurred. all of the researchers came up with lots of different things could be. thejourney came up with lots of different things could be. the journey we came up with lots of different things could be. thejourney we have been on since then was going through
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all of those and trying to feedback. 0ne all of those and trying to feedback. one of those was that here in the uk, a really obvious thing is that we have a lot less wetlands here than there used to be. there is obviously less food for as —— less food for swans. when they get back to the uk, they are exhausted, is there enough food? farmers making room for them. good news, then? really nice to see. when they are arriving back, they‘re often they are arriving back, they‘re ofte n cro ps they are arriving back, they‘re often crops being left out for them. that is really inspiring. it means we can tick off one thing on the list. we have footage be flying over russia, you have been back and took some people with you? there were other researchers, there was kind of a gathering there. we were not sure what the reception was going to be.
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i spent a lot of time talking to people, illegal hunting in russia was an issue. people talked about it to me all the time. what reception would beget? to be honest, we ended up would beget? to be honest, we ended up with 25 really influential people in hunting and lots of other areas, tourism, putting their hand up and saying, yes, we agree this is an issue. we have a group there, really trying to solve the issue, which is fantastic from our point of view. how about changing the mindsets? some of them shoot them and eat them, don‘t they? some of them shoot them and eat them, don't they? it is not a major pa rt them, don't they? it is not a major part of their diet. a big thing is if you can show us that the swans are declining, we can modify behaviour. they just are declining, we can modify behaviour. theyjust don‘t have agriculture, so they have different something. there is a lack of understanding of different species. 0ne understanding of different species. one of the exciting things was that on the journey there was one particular government official who put his hand up on camera and said,
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i committed to giving out information on all of the different swa ns information on all of the different swans with the hunting licenses we give out. there are 50,000 of those. we went back this time to try to get that going, and he produced a piece of paper, he had already done it last year. it was, like, oh, my gosh, it is notjust on paper, the russians actually moved. you have big hands for the future, we are sure we will get you back on when you go back to australia. we will get you on the next leg of your journey. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. temperatures on the rise as we move through the week, particularly in the south—east where they looked to be into the 30s by thursday or friday. a largely dry day for most. cloudy skies with patchy fabrics of rain for the north west. that is courtesy of this
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weather front, bringing west. that is courtesy of this weatherfront, bringing cloudy skies and fabrics of rain for northern ireland and western scotland. the isobars on the northern half of the uk are slightly closer together, indicating it is a fairly breezy day. a good deal of dry, bright weather across england and wales, plenty of sunshine and one eye showers for parts of wales in south—west england. cloudy skies across ireland, outbreaks of rain working into western scotland through the day. temperatures in a high teens, mid 20s. a maximum of 25 celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, i think we will see the rain tending to ease across northern ireland. clear spells developing. becoming more confined to the north—west of scotland. a good deal of dry weather, clear spells, one eye showers feeding into the west in the early hours. temperatures overnight between 11 and 13 celsius. tomorrow we start off i largely dry, fine note for much of central and southern england. a little bit more ina way southern england. a little bit more in a way of cloud for parts of wales in south—west england. a good deal of sunshine as we move through the
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day. perhaps one two showers for parts of wales, southwest aland and western parts. turning cloudy with fabrics of rain moving into the day for northern ireland, western parts of scotla nd for northern ireland, western parts of scotland and north west england. temperatures started to creep up, highs of 27 celsius. cloudy skies. and, northern ireland, parts of wales. again, shari outbreaks of rain. the best of the sunshine in the south—east and we will see temperatures creeping up, looking at highs of 30 celsius in the south—east. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson.
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bp is back on track — the oil giant‘s latest results beat forecasts as it finally moves forward from the deepwater horizon disaster almost a decade ago. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday the 31st ofjuly. bp says it made $2.8 billion in the three months to the end ofjune thanks to rising oil prices — but what about its debt levels as the oil giant announces new investment plans? also in the programme... brexit bites in benidorm — the spanish holiday destination is seeing fewer brits vacationing there, and numbers are likely to keep falling as the march deadline approaches.
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