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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 31, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: a damning report on international aid — mps accuse charities of being "almost complicit" in sexual abuse by staff. organisations all too often have been more concerned with protecting their own reputations than protecting victims and survivors. it's emerged that salman abedi, who killed 22 people at the manchester arena, was rescued from libya by a royal navy ship three years earlier. a warning from us intelligence. they have been working on more nuclear missiles. what will the eu what will the uk
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leaving the eu looks like for our future holidays. has been an abject failure to deal with sexual abuse, say mps. there has been a culture of denial since earlier this year the oxfam workers paid for sex where the charity was helping victims of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. oxfam has metadata as further to go. it was in
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the aftermath of the 20,010 haiti earthquake they use local prostitutes it was in the aftermath of the 2010 haiti earthquake that some prostitutes thquake that some of oxfam's aid workers severely compromised its much cherished values. they used young prostitutes when they were supposed to be helping the local population bounced back from a disaster. the charity did an internal investigation. they dismissed some members of staff and let others quietly resign — without properly flagging what had happened to the authorities or other charities. today mps said wasn't an isolated episode. we have reached the conclusion that, in the aid sector, there has been complacency verging on complicity with what has happened. that is because organisations all too often have appeared more concerned to protect their own reputation in the sector rather than protect victims and survivors. mps want the uk to take the lead and create a global register of aid workers to stop sexual predators entering the sector. they admit it won't be easy to cover everyone.
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helen evans worked at oxfam and waste are concerns about sexual abuse. and waste are concerns she thinks the register is a good idea. this is about protecting some of the most vulnerable individuals in the world from sexual exploitation and abuse, and we have to do everything we possibly can. the public reaction has shown quite how much they want us to do that. difficult, yes, but doable. oxfam says it's now tripled its budget for safeguarding checks. this is a much bigger problem than one charity. mps are in no doubt, after a string of scandals, now is the time for meaningful change. let's speak now to shaista aziz — a journalist and former international aid—worker. she's in our oxford studio. thank you forjoining is. which
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countries did you working?” thank you forjoining is. which countries did you working? i have spent more than 15 years working in international aid sector. i have worked in the middle east and east and west africa and they have spent and west africa and they have spent a lot of time working in pakistan. this report, which you have been looking at, says sexual expectation and abuse is endemic across the aid sector. is that something you recognise? i welcome this report. i think it is an important moment for the aid sector. it is important that they learn from this. in terms of my own experiences, i have witnessed behaviour that is demeaning towards women carried out by aid workers. i did hear conversations and indeed see mail aid workers trying to buy sex in countries that i worked on. i
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think the most important thing is that this is not about anecdotal information, this is the narrative that aid organisations were putting forward when the oxfam story broke. they claimed it was a few bad apples. the report says it is an endemic issue. there is a systemic issue in the aid sector. that is why this report is so important. the aid sector must get to grips with the findings of mps's investigation. it is difficult for them to dismiss this documentation. is it your feeling that predatory individuals are attracted to the sector because it gives them access that they might not otherwise have to vulnerable individuals? the aid sector is no different to any other part of society where you will have sexual predators and other individuals who
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do want to abuse and exploits people. that is happening across society. we are hearing the stories of victims and survivors more than we wear. a red line has been drawn by women. they are saying enough is enough. in the aid sector, there is a toxic culture of patriarch a. people can move around very easily. it means there are individuals who will go out and who will expose the most vulnerable people. do you think the proposal for having most vulnerable people. do you think the proposalfor having more most vulnerable people. do you think the proposal for having more checks help? the system is not in place. these checks are not currently being
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used. it is needed. we need the aid sector to fund this type of mechanism urgently. i have heard commentary this morning of people seeing this is a long process and will take a long time. that is not the point. it has to happen. if we wa nt to the point. it has to happen. if we want to safeguard the most honourable people, it is vital that we do this. there is an independent mechanism that must be set up to investigate these allegations. it is beyond words that the aid sector believes they can investigate these potentially criminal activities of their own back. it is not good enough. there is a government summit on this topic in october. back in 2002, there was a un report on exploitation in the aid sector. this
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is still go on unchecked. can it be different this time? it has to be. the un has been accused of carrying out exploitative behaviour in countries where people are suffering. today's report has revealed that it peels away that narrative aid organisations keep putting out there. it is notjust a few rogue individuals. it needs to be dealt with. the faster the public deal with this, the sooner we can deal with this, the sooner we can deal with this, the sooner we can deal with it. how deal with this, the sooner we can dealwith it. how much deal with this, the sooner we can deal with it. how much damage has been done to the trust that people have placed in these aid organisations? the first damage has been done to the women who have been exploited. this has to be the
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forefront of our mains. it has to be at the forefront of the narrative. the public has every right to question and ask for accountability when it comes to these organisations. they are receiving large amounts of public funding so is only rapier able to answer the questions. the public need to be able to trust them. they are not currently tackling with the cds issues. —— cds issues. it's emerged that the man who bombed the manchester arena was rescued from the civil war in libya by a royal navy survey ship three years earlier. salman abedi killed 22 people in may last year when he detonated a homemade suicide vest. our correspondent caroline davies is here.
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do we know why this news just emerged? this seems to be a particular investigation we have heard from the daily mail. we understand this rescue took place in august 2000 and 1a. his parents were libyan. he was on holiday and 19 time. the situation deteriorated and people were deployed to get british nationals out and he was taken with his younger brother. they were taken to malta, where they were flown home. for those derrick directly affected by the bombing, they will look at this news and struggle to understand why this young man
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carried out such a horrific attack. a man who had been rescued will stop the daily mail also cites a government official who says essentially just that. he government official who says essentiallyjust that. he was rescued by the british services. it was an act of utter betrayal. according to security sources, they say that he was not radicalised at this time. he had previously been monitored but his case had been closed about a month before he was rescued. he was no longer of interest. us intelligence officials have told the washington post that north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles, despite better relations with the trump administration. the officials — speaking anonymously — told the newspaper that new evidence suggested work was still taking place at a factory near pyongyang that produced the first north korean missiles capable of reaching the united states. live to seoul, and our
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correspondent laura bicker. we shouldn't be surprised, should we? he didn't agree to give up his country's nuclear programme. what are these intelligence official saying is going on? there are two reports. those from the intelligence agency and washington post. there is also satellite imagery that has been analysed. what they told us is that they have seen a lot of activity both before the summit in singapore and after. these vehicles going in and after. these vehicles going in and out. there are two new buildings at this facility. the reason they focused at this facility is because this is where the first missiles we re this is where the first missiles were created. they are thought to be
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capable of reaching the united states. donald trump said the threat from north korea was over. when it comes to what was agreed, it was vague. kim jong—un centres comes to what was agreed, it was vague. kimjong—un centres named to denuclearisation of the korean peninsular. both the united states and north korea have different meanings. north korea believes it means getting rid of nuclear weapons across the world, notjust them solely giving away the weapons they have accumulated. they believe it is their only defence against the united states toppling their resume. how will donald trump react to this? i think the meeting itself was
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progress. the fact there was some kind of dialogue between the united states and north korea means there is progress. in south korea there have been meetings between north and south to try and find a way to ease military tensions. there are cultural exchanges. we are bringing north korea out of the set shadows and into the international committee. it may be one way to try and discuss with them ways of giving up and discuss with them ways of giving up their weapons. any analyst will tell you the same thing, that idea that north korea will hand over the nuclear weapons is not one that many believe. if donald trump believes that denuclearisation will be an easy one to do, he may have to think again. last year was the fifth warmest in the uk since records began in 1910. the met office's state of the climate report says nine of the ten hottest years have
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occurred since 2002. rainfall has also increased over the last decade. labour's deputy leader, tom watson, has described a member of the party's ruling body as "a loud—mouthed bully" after he was recorded apparently criticising members of the jewish community. in the recording, peter willsman — an ally ofjeremy corbyn — accuses them of making up claims of anti—semitism in the party. it's understood mr willsman has apologised and will not face any further action. live to westminster, and our assistant political editor, norman smith. tel is a bit more about him. how close is he tojeremy corbyn? how
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much of an impact will this have on jeremy corbyn? he has a long-time friend and political ally ofjeremy corbyn. they have worked together on the now—defunct national union of public employees. he is now a leading carbon follower. it adds significance this latest trial. he isa significance this latest trial. he is a member of the main ruling body of the labour party. although a complaint was made about his conduct, that was initially dismissed. this may not be the end of the matter. it has been said he should be expelled from the labour party for his comments. thejewish
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labour group have submitted their initial complaint. there is a recording home of him dismissing claims of anti—semitism. letters have a listen to that recording. they are trump fanatics. i am not going to be likened to trump fanatics. there is no evidence. i think we should ask the rabbis where is your evidence? let me ask you a question. how may people in this room have seen anti—semitism in the labour party? what is particularly angered some of thejewish community
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is that he has not not face any disciplinary action. there are two other members under investigation for class and they have clashed with jeremy corbyn over anti—semitism. leading jewish mps say that is simply double. have a listen to one of those labour mps.|j simply double. have a listen to one of those labour mps. i think it is appalling. i think any viewers listening to that ordeal will say, how is that possible? how was that said ina how is that possible? how was that said in a meeting? how is possible no action been taken? if we're serious about standing up to racism and being an organising station that believes in this kind of speech
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cannot be ok. we have not heard directly from heaven following the release of the tape, but he wrote to the labour party when initial complaints were made. he said his behaviour fell short. he said complaints were made. he said his behaviourfell short. he said his words have not been accurately reported. it keeps this row over anti—semitism rumbling on for the labour party. it will fuel the demands forjeremy corbyn to get a grip on some of her supporters who are behind many of these remarks. it has emerged that the manchester
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bomber was rescued from libya by a royal navy ship three years earlier. a warning from us intelligence that north korea may be building new intercontinental ballistic missiles despite the trump chem summit. intercontinental ballistic missiles despite the trump chem summitm sport, andy murray (00v) sport, andy andy murray has won his second competitive match in over a year. he came from a set down to beat mckensie mcdonald in washington and plays britain's number one kyle edmund next. dame sara storey is calling for a women's tour de france. britain's most decorated paralympian rode in the one day event but says she and others are ready for more. england s rochelle ‘rocky‘ clark has announced her retirement from international rugby. the 37—year—old — a world cup winner in 2014 — won 137 caps during her 15—year international career... she's england's most capped player of all time the company which owns the carphone
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warehouse and currys pc world has been investigating the hacks since it first revealed in june. it says personal information and e—mail addresses it said personal information, names, addresses and email addresses, and email addresses, may have been accessed last year, but not bank details and it found no evidence that fraud has resulted from the breach. the owner of british gas, centrica, has reported a 20% slump in profits in the first half of the year. it said 340,000 people have left the energy provider. centrica's chief executive said its household gas and electricity supply arm was hit by last year's pre—payment price cap, the ongoing loss of customers and rising wholesale energy prices. we've had quite a challenging first half, with very extreme weather patterns,
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rapidly rising wholesale energy costs. and against that, our total margin has been stable, and our operating profits broadly stable — down 4%. the father of the missing airman corrie mckeague says he believes his son will never be found. in a post on facebook, martin mckeague says the evidence suggests the 23—year—old's remains are "somewhere within the waste disposal system". keith doyle reports. these are the last known images of corrie mckeague. he was 23 when he went missing after a night out in bury st edmonds in september 2016. cctv pictures show him walk through the town but then he disappears. police believe he got into a waste bin. his mobile phone signal was tracked and appeared to follow the path of a bin lorry. a massive search of waste disposal sites took place but it was called off earlier this year. his father martin has said
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that his son is no longer missing. in a facebook post, he said police had presented him with compelling evidence that experts concluded that beyond any doubt he ended up in the waste disposal system. he was known to sleep in or on bins. he said the area was too toxic and vast to search. since his disappearance, his girlfriend gave birth to his daughter. now that the family seem to know what happened to their son, a memorial is being planned. he offered more support from pa rents. he offered more support from parents. by the end of reception
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class, more than a quarter of children like communication skills they need. zimbabwe's opposition leader, nelson chamisa, has said his party is winning the country's general election resoundingly and he's ready to form the next government. the zanu—pf party, which has ruled zimbabwe for almost a0 years, has insisted it is on track to retain power. more than 500 hikers have been safely brought down from a mountain on the indonesian island of lombok after being stranded by rock falls caused by an earthquake. the body of one indonesian climber killed by a falling rock on mount rinjani is still to be recovered. officials say a further 15 people have died elsewhere on the island. our correspondent rebecca henschke has the latest from the island. search and rescue teams say that almost all hikers have now come off the mountain. there are only six remaining up near the lake. they need to be brought down today. they should arrive this afternoon, in a few hours' time here. also coming off the meant as a body
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of an indonesian claimer, a man in his 20s who was killed by falling rocks. the earthquake triggered huge landslides, which blocked pathways out. officials say that they had to evacuate over a thousand hikers after the earthquake hit, the majority of them foreign nationals from countries like france, thailand as well as the netherlands. the rebuilding has begun of thousands of buildings that were damaged in the quake. we are also getting a lot of after—shocks here, which is keeping everyone tense. people are afraid to go back inside, fearing more earthquakes here. native states has abandoned its
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support for the international deal to stop england's north american programme. i would certainly meet with iran.|j am ready to meet any time they want to. i do not do that from strength or weakness. i think it is an appropriate thing to do. president trump took a more confrontational sta nce trump took a more confrontational stance against iran. in a tweet he
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warned not to threaten the eight states again. it is becoming a familiar pattern for donald trump. he wages war of words with a whole still leader and then he sets them with them to talk. he threatened kim jong—un with fire and fury. then the bekaa became good friends. mr trump is offered to speak with the president to merge a personal relationship with foreign adversary. if such a meeting goes ahead, it will be the first between us and ren eand will be the first between us and ren e and leaders in almost a0 yea rs. one of the world s most spectacular frogs has been identified as a new species, after 20 years of research at the university of manchester. it was originally discovered in panama in1925, but has been confused
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with the splendid tree frog ever since. the creature has been named sylvia s tree frog, after the three—year—old granddaughter of the conservationist behind the research. you know, it's a biologist‘s dream to actually be able to name a species. and to be able to find such a beautiful frog and to be able to name it after my granddaughter, it's absolutely amazing, really is. but it also means that this particular species that's so close to my heart can be protected for the future, and people will realise how special these frogs are. now it's time for a look at the weather. temperatures are on the rise. dry weather around but outbreaks of rain in the northwest. some cleaver spills over an easter in scotland. it is breezy in the novel half of the uk. sunny and seven england.
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temperatures in the high teens and mid—20s. this evening and overnight rain will be confined to the north—west of scotland. 12 showers feeding into south—west england. temperatures overnight between 11 and 1a celsius. tomorrow though be dry weather in england and wales. 12 showers possible. cloudier skies will feeding through the south—west. temperatures creeping up a little. highs around 27 celsius. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: a damning report on international aid — mps accuse charities of being "almost complicit" in sexual abuse by staff. it's emerged that salman abedi, who killed 22 people at the manchester arena, was rescued from libya by a royal navy ship
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three years earlier. a warning from us officials — north korea may be building new intercontinental ballistic missiles, despite the trump—kim summit. and sailor and entrepreneur tony bullimore, who became a global star after surviving four days in the upturned hull of his boat, has died at the age of 79. sport now, and here's chris mitchell. good morning. andy murray is back, but he says it was a struggle. murray won juts his second match in a year, and said afterwards that mentally it was a big one to get through. his service was broken twice in the opening set, which he lost 6—3 inside a0 minutes at the washington open. but after 2.5 hours against world number 80 mckensie mcdonald, he'd foight back to win in three sets. he'll play britain's number one, kyle edmund, next. geraint thomas says there was no friction between him
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and his team sky teammate chris froome during the tour de france. thomas, who started the tour as a 1a—1 outsider, says there was no problem at all between him and froome, who started as race favourite, as he unexpectedly became number one. it was anything but awkward. it was really... he was a true gentleman about it, really. we get on really well. we've been in the same team for ten years now, maybe 11 years. obviously, it must have been tough for him. he was going through his fifth tour de france, which was a joint record. froome lost a bit of time. it didn't need to be said, it was pretty obvious that i had the best chance of finishing for the team. he fully accepted that, fully committed. to have someone of his colour by helping me was just great, obviously —— to have someone of his calibre. britain's most decorated paralympian says there should be a women's tour de france.
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at the moment, the only official competition is the one—day la course event. but dame sarah storey rode with a group of women who were cycling every stage of the tour ahead of the men, and says there is an appetite for a women's event. they were saying, "les filles!" they wanted to see the women on the side of the road just zooming past. i think there is a case for it to be there and it won't happen overnight, the women haven't trained for a three—week tour, they will need notice for that to happen. but maybe, when the french have the olympics in 202a, why not put on an women's tour de france at the same time, and give the women's peloton enuogh notice to train for it. thousands of tickets remain unsold for the first test match between england and india, which starts tomorrow at edgbaston. it's the first of five tests over the next six weeks, and there's been some criticism of the packed schedule arranged to accommodate india. there are still around 6,000 tickets available for each
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of the first two days. tottenham manager mauricio pochettino says every player remains part of his plans, despite ongoing transfer speculation. england international danny rose is among a number of players have been linked with a move away from the london club. ii'm not i i'm not going to talk about the individual situation. i think it's all clear. everyone knows... what is going on. which is every single situation. all the players that have contracts are situation. all the players that have contracts a re pa rt situation. all the players that have contracts are part of the club. and the team. until the situation changes. england s most capped player of all time, rochelle ‘rocky‘ clark, has announced her retirement from international rugby. the 37—year—old prop, a world cup winner in 201a, won 137 caps during her 15—year international career. she became england's most capped player when she surpassed jason leonard's previous record of 11a in november 2016, and retires as the most capped female international player
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of all time. it's a massive achievement, something i never, you know, thought i'd get. to get my first cap was just out of this world. to achieve a few more than that... i hit the cap record and surpassed to jason, it's been a dream come true. and, you know, i've lived such of the retail life, i think, for the last 15 yea rs. life, i think, for the last 15 years. there has been highs and lows, but i've loved every minute of it is all to live such a fairy tale life. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. with just eight months to go until the uk leaves the european union, we've been taking a closer look at the impact of brexit on different groups of people. today, we're examining what impact brexit could have on your summer holiday, with around 18 million people travelling to spain this year alone. our brussels reporter, adam fleming, reports from benidorm. it's the last summer before brexit,
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which could change how we holiday. it's not been decided yet whether british tourists will need a visa or not, and even if they don't, they could still be affected by the eu's new travel authorisation system coming in in 2020, where visitors from outside the eu have to register on a website and pay 7 euros. if we need to do it, we need to do it. it's a break, isn't it? it's a holiday, so we need to get away. what if you had to pay extra money to get a visa? everything's extra these days. we pay everything extra, there's taxes, you know what. you shouldn't really have to pay for everything to come to spain, should you? well, if the uk's not in the eu any more... i know, it feels not that far away. you could drive to spain. however they get here, 18 million people travel to spain from the uk every year. so many, it sometimes feels less like benidorm and more like britain. the english breakfasts aren't going anywhere, but some home comforts will have
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to be negotiated in the brexit talks, such as... the mobile phone roaming has gone now because of the eu, if it was to come back because of brexit, how would you feel? i'd have to be careful how i use my phone abroad. so you know your european health insurance card, which means you get free medical care, what if that disappeared? you'd just have to be like america and you pay private, wouldn't you? i'm just going to show you the newest hotel innovation at the rh canfali... tracey says uncertainty about brexit isn't affecting bookings for next summer yet. just as well, because her company's just opened this new hotel. the best thing about the hotel is this, the view. benidorm and the levante beach. i think sometimes a lot of scaremongering goes on with the brexit and people are made to feel very nervous, but i think it's in everybody's interest to have an agreement for everything, so business can be as normal as possible for everybody.
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right, back at the airport. the eu and the uk will have to agree new rules when it comes to aviation, and if there's no deal in march next year, there's talk about emergency plans being put into place to keep planes flying. but if all goes to plan, there will be a transition period where nothing changes until the end of 2020, so next summer should feeljust like this one. for the costa blanca, brexit is manana, manana. that was adam fleming. james short is at glasgow airport which sees 9 million people pass through its terminal each year. what have people been saying about how things may change post—brexit?
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people been saying about how things may change post-brexit? let'sjust ta ke may change post-brexit? let'sjust take a look at the scene, a typical, classic scene of people queueing up for theirflights to classic scene of people queueing up for their flights to places like paris, amsterdam, berlin, and the spanish destinations, of course. in terms of what people are saying to me today, i think there's a lot of confusion and not a lot of knowledge about what kind of difference brexit is going to make to travel plans. will this place looked different? will this place looked different? will it be empty in the summer 2019? well, someone who might be able to shed a bit of light for us is alan wardle, the public affairs director. alan, what is your organisation's ta ke alan, what is your organisation's take on the impact of exit on holidays? well, many aspects of someone's holiday, from flying to arriving, passports and visas, all of that is bound up with our membership of the eu, which is why getting a deal around brexit is so important. we know the british traveller likes to go on holiday, glasgow airport making sure that politicians both sides of the channel come together and get a deal
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which is really important for the summerof which is really important for the summer of 2019 which is really important for the summerof 2019 and which is really important for the summer of 2019 and beyond. your boss says he wants to practicality and realism as opposed to ideology when it comes to brexit. but talking to people who are thinking about the holidays in 2019, what sort of things should they be bearing in mind? how should they be protecting themselves and protecting, you know, themselves and protecting, you know, the holiday they might have next year? the main message is, not to panic. politicians have said that we will leave the eu, with a deal, both sides have said that. there will not be any change until at least the end of 2020, people should feel able to book a holiday for 2019. if they really wa nt book a holiday for 2019. if they really want to be sure that they are going to be ok, if you book a package holiday, which is a flights and accommodation from an abta member, you will be guaranteed whatever happens to get your money back if something goes wrong. we fully expecting a deal, we are expecting that to happen in the autumn and we will be pushing politicians to make sure that happens on both sides. it's notjust the uk traveller who wants to
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travel. spanish hoteliers and portuguese restaurants want to get the uk traveller there, so we will be speaking to both sides to make sure that is happening to. some companies look as though they are protecting themselves against competitions in the future. ryanair are putting messages on the ticket saying, your ability to use this ticket depends on the regulatory framework. thomas cook have also put new things on their terms and conditions which seem to refer to the uncertainty around brexit. travel organisations and companies are worried about the uncertainty, that's fair to say, isn't it? the reds a lot of uncertainty, and businesses don't like uncertainty, neither do travellers so all there isa neither do travellers so all there is a lot of uncertainty. but that is the times we are living in. we need to make sure that in terms of speaking to politicians to make sure we get that deal done, to make sure that the issues that the traveller is concerned about, things like free health insurance when they go abroad to europe, making sure they can continue to travel without a visa,
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to make sure they get support from british reps when they are broad, that all of those things are place. politicians need to make sure that deal is done. organisations like abta are pushing them to make sure that does happen so that people can continue to go on holiday in 2019 and be on that. the written work to be done. people who follow the news will see that there was a lot of uncertainties —— there is some work to be done. we are trying to navigate that is we can —— as best we can, and pragmatism is what is needed. thank you. there is a belief, a hope, that things will be the same this time next year. but, as yet, we cannot say there is any certainty at this point. 0k, james, thank you very much for that. james sure. let's stay with this issue. and let's hear in the bit more detail how brexit might affect the aviation industry and what will happen to flights to and from eu destinations and indeed across eu as big. here is our reality check chris to present some of options. chris?
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everybody wants a deal. but if the uk leaves the eu without any withdrawal agreement, eu rules and regulations will, very abruptly, stop applying to the uk after march 29th next year. so, what does that mean in terms of planes being able to take off and land? well, the uk would no longer be part of the eu s single aviation market, which is the basis for flights in and out of the country at the moment — notjust to the eu itself, but to other countries with which the eu has a deal, such as the united states and canada. all in all, the eu governs uk aviation access to aa other countries. of course, you can always negotiate new agreements — but access would start at a pretty low level, and negotiations take time. that s why a sudden no—deal scenario is so alarming to the industry. the uk would no longer be governed by the regulations of the european aviation safety agency, which deal with all sorts of things, like maintenance and common standards. the uk civil aviation authority could in theory take on all the same rules, and hire lots of new staff to implement and oversee them,
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but it would also have to convince other international regulators to recognise it — another time—consuming process. and if you re following eu aviation rules, you basically have to accept a role for eu courts like the european court ofjustice as well. all of which makes it a difficult time for airlines that are already selling tickets for flights after brexit. right now, we will continue to sell in the hope and believe that when a conclusion comes to the brexit scenario, that, as i said, common sense prevails and people realise the need for travel. the biggest fear that has to be that if at the 11th hour and 59th minute there is a shutdown of air travel between the uk and europe, that is the ultimate worry. in other areas of the uk s trade relationship, if we leave with no deal, we fall back on the basic rules of the world trade organisation. but in aviation, there is no fallback position.
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either you have a deal or you don t. so, if negotiations with the eu fail — and neither side wants that to happen — there would have to be a scramble for an interim solution to keep planes in the air. that most obvious one would be some kind of stop—gap agreement to roll over current rules for a short time. but that would mean the uk s current commitments to the eu,such as legal and budget commitments, would have to continue as well. extended membership in all but name. it's worth emphasising that it would be in no one s interest to ground aircraft. everyone would be looking for a fix. but the suggestion that everything would automatically be fine for aviation in the event of no deal is hugely misleading. and this isn t about project fear — this is project complexity. ? chris morris, thank you. a nursery group in london is trialling yoga
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and mindfulness for three year olds. the london early years foundation introduced the sessions after one of its nurseries had to go into lockdown during the westminster terror attack. they believe children need to find coping strategies to combat the stress of inner city living. they will be piloting it in five sites, and hope to roll it out in all 39 if it's a success. ijust feel that, you know, the children need something that helps them to support them. everyone's got their mobile phone on, and everyone's got social media. where do children get quiet? where do children get time just to be? get space just to feel safe and able to just do a deep breath? more than half of 18 to 3a—year—olds feel that reality tv and social media have a negative effect on how they see their bodies — that's according to a new survey. the comres survey of 2,000 british adults for bbc five live also suggested that younger people were more likely to consider having cosmetic surgery. some 35% of people said shows such as love island and the only way is essex were responsible. joining me now is liam preston from the be real campaign —
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an organisation which works to promote body confidence. also in our salford newsroom is samantha jones — a former model who now works for miss swimsuit uk, an international modelling competition. and susie hollinson — a former page three glamour model, who was among the first page three models in 197a. a very warm welcome to all of you. susie, i'll begin with you, if i may. when you were a page three model, this was pre—social media, pre—reality tv, how much pressure was that when you in terms of your appearance? well, you wanted to look good. i mean, you wanta appearance? well, you wanted to look good. i mean, you want a model u nless good. i mean, you want a model unless you wanted to look good. but we weren't sort of airbrushed and, you know, the pictures were real. they might have been retouched a
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little bit, but we didn't have photo shop or anything in those days. and i think you feel that the experience that your daughter and her friends are now going through, they are under a lot of pressure in terms of how they look compared to you. not so much my daughter and herfriends, but i know of other people's daughters who were... they are very conscious with instagram and facebook. and, you know, the whole selfie culture, the whole pouting thing. my daughter is in her 30s, it's not really so much her. not all of these younger girls, theyjust see all of these things in social media and they believe that they have to look the same. and samantha, let me move on to you. i'll get you to explain to our viewers about what
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you do now, but in your modelling career prior to that, what was your experience in terms of pressure to look a certain weight was yellow of course you've got to look your best, that's the whole point of the job. there was actually a moment where i was offered a free bootjob, a breast enhancement, which i turned down, because i personally didn't believe it would enhance my life at the time. and since then, you know, the time. and since then, you know, the opportunity is always there, and it's a safe thing to do. but, like i said, me personally, it won't enhance my life, where it has other people's. you you think specifically in terms of social media and reality tv and shows like love island, has that taken things to a whole new level? well, it'sjust full of that taken things to a whole new level? well, it's just full of these people that you have been survey on. soi people that you have been survey on. so i think it's education, though. if we look at the role of
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advertising and the media and what it plays upon, it plays upon consumers. if you realise that these things aren't placed to make you spend your money, so what these things are place. it's up to you whether you choose the conditioning of these platforms are going to decide what you do with your life and how you feel about yourself. liem preston from the bbl campaign, the—mad makes a good point, this is —— from the bbl campaign, samantha may is a good point. you are encouraging people to take a step back from the images in social media and reality tv and say, not everybody looks like this, you don't have to look like this. absolutely, we think that is really important. all of the research is out there, more than half of young people often worry about the way that they look. and a third of them will do whatever it takes to look good. there are lots of pressures on young people,
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it is coming from everywhere. i think adverts around the time young people will be watching tv, especially during programmes like love island, that promote cosmetic surgery, that is the wrong message is that people should be seeing. what impact does this have in terms of mental health, perhaps leading people down the route of having procedures done, perhaps surgery done? well, we know that young people want to try and look as good as they can, there is pressure on them to do so. of the 30 young people who said they would do whatever it took, some of them were talking about plastic surgery, others will go on diets or reduce the eating because they feel they have to look a certain way. our campaign is asking people to pledge to be real, post unedited photos of themselves online to promote this natural, you are who you are, it's 0k to natural, you are who you are, it's ok to look the way you do. natural, you are who you are, it's 0k to look the way you do. susie, back to you. if girls and young women in their teens and 20s are investigating procedures and whether it is botox was surgery, you know,
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if they get into the habit of doing something like that at the very young age, is that something they are going to find difficult to shake off? well, where's it going to lead to? when other going to stop? the more they do it, the older they get, the more they are going to want to do. there comes a time, surely, when they are going to look very unrealistic. samantha, your thoughts on that and what people can do to perhaps take a more measured view of the appearance? i totally agree with the appearance? i totally agree with the be real campaign, it has lovely intentions. going back to love island, it's just a intentions. going back to love island, it'sjust a reflection intentions. going back to love island, it's just a reflection of the people who are out there. if we look at who won, danny dyer and jack, neither of them have, you know, the ascetic that we are talking about, neither of them have had enhancements. he doesn't have apps. so, of course, having to look at these things every day will have an effect on young people's minds and things. but you can't say that
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these are to blame, i don't believe. can you tell me a bit about ms swimsuit uk, if you would. you are still modelling, but is with a different aim? yes, it is an international modelling competition. and we are there to get women a platform to change their lives, whether that be a career change or whether that be a career change or whether it be that they have ove rco m e whether it be that they have overcome maybe an eating disorder and they need the self—confidence. yeah, we are in all—inclusive modelling competition. so, it doesn't matter if you've been married or if you've got children or if you've got tattoos. as long as you have a healthy lifestyle and a healthy mind and that reflect on the outside and you show us that you belong that stage and that your comfort zone, then that's what we are promoting. just a final board from you, liam. despite the glossi ness of from you, liam. despite the glossiness of reality tv shows and
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social media in some cases, we are seeing more cosmetic companies and so one promoting all sorts of people. you know, it's notjust young models. it might be older models or models with wrinkles, in some instances they are not airbrushing the images as much as might have happened in the past. we are seeing changes, aren't we?” actually think the industry is getting slightly better than it was before. but we just have to be conscious of what images young people are seeing and what pressures are being placed on them. and when half of young people out there being bullied about the way they look, we have got an issue in this country and we need to be doing something about it, and our campaign is trying to do that. liam, samantha and susie, thank you very much for your time today. in a moment, we'll have all the business news. but first, the headlines on bbc news: charities are guilty of £complacency verging on complicity" over sexual abuse by staff — says a damning report
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by mps on international aid. it's emerged that salman abedi — who killed 22 people in the manchester arena attack — was rescued from libya by a royal navy ship three years earlier. a warning from us intelligence — north korea may be building new intercontinental ballistic missiles, despite the trump—kim summit. hello, i'm ben thompson. in the business news... tech retailer dixons carphone says a huge data breach last year involved ten million customers. that's a massive revision of its earlier estimate ofjust 1.2 million. the firm has been investigating the hack, which involved personal information including names, addresses and email addresses, since it was discovered injune. british gas lost 3a0,000 customer accounts in the uk in the first half of this year, according to the firm's chief executive. speaking to the bbc, centrica boss iain conn said the rate of customer losses had halved since last year, and he hoped numbers would stabilise. the number of cars made in the uk fell last month after domestic demand fell sharply, due to what the industry body calls
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a "perfect storm of events". production fell 5.5% injune — driven by a a7.2% drop in production for the uk market. an independent review commissioned by the financial regulator into rbs's treatment of small and medium—sized firms has found no evidence that the bank deliberately profited from their collapse. but the review did find many "deficient" aspects of the firm's culture, governance and practices that led to the "widespread and systematic" inappropriate treatment of customers. maike currie is from fidelity investment management. that, nice to see you. that is damaging in some respects, especially about systematic failures. this will anger a lot of small firms on the receiving end of
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it, no evidence they profited from the demise. that's right. what is interesting is that this group within rbs, this unit known as the global restructuring unit, was responsible for handling small and medium—size businesses in trouble. ifa medium—size businesses in trouble. if a business was referred to the unit if it's get the loan repayment or if it suffered a big drop in sales and profit. but there was a conflict—of—interest, because the unit was focused on generating income by charging higherfees, by charging higher rates, and by the acquisition of property and equity. at its peak, it handled about 16,000 cases. it was in existence from 2005 to 2013. now, there's been a lot of public interest in this board, because as we know, small and medium—size businesses are the lifeblood of the uk economy. and they won't treated fairly. but what isa they won't treated fairly. but what is a key point here is that the city watchdog, the regulator, the fca, has not got the remit to look at lending to small businesses, small
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and medium—sized business. in that regard, it can't have those finds that it usually levies if there is misconduct. that's a real problem, isn't it? actually what they are saying is they have found some problems with how this all works, but they have no power whatsoever to deal with it. but they have no power whatsoever to dealwith it. that's but they have no power whatsoever to deal with it. that's right, that is the key party. what it did point out is that under the senior managers' regime, this is something that came in in 2016 and it requires senior staff, the most senior staff in banks, to treat customers fairly. so, going forward, even though it doesn't regulate lending to small and medium—sized businesses, it can lea n and medium—sized businesses, it can lean on the senior managers' regime to make sure that small businesses treat customers fairly. thank you very much, maike. its shares are up 1.596 very much, maike. its shares are up 1.5% for the. centrica's shares are down, losing
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3a0,000 customer accounts. centrica's shares are down, losing 3a0 , 000 customer accounts. that centrica's shares are down, losing 3a0,000 customer accounts. that is about 270,000 customers leaving british gas. its parent company, centrica, losing on the day. dixon is part —— dixons carphone, figures coming in worse than expected, but also the data breach is still a big problem for the firm. that's all the business news. i'll be back in the next hour. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we'll say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at midday. charities are guilty of ‘complacency verging on complicity‘ over sexual abuse by staff — says a damning report by mps on international aid agencies. in the aid sector, it has been complacency verging on complicity with what has happened. that is because organisations all too often have appeared more concerned to protect their own reputation in the sector rather than protecting victims and survivors. it's emerged that salman abedi — who killed 22 people at manchester arena — was rescued from libya by a royal navy ship three years earlier. a warning from us intelligence —
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reports of increased activity at a nulear site — despite the trump—kim summit. british gas loses more than three hundred thousand customer accounts in the first half of this year. also coming up — what will the uk leaving the eu mean for your holidays? we go on our travels to see what brexit could mean for your holiday to europe — how things like flights, visas and mobile roaming be affected? sailor tony bullimore has died of cancer at the age of 79. he became a global star after surviving for a days in the upturned hull of his boat during a round the world race in 1997 good morning.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live there has been an "abject failure" in the aid sector to deal with sexual abuse, according to mps. a report by the international development committee says there's been a "culture of denial" since revelations earlier this year that oxfam workers paid for sex while the charity was helping victims of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. oxfam has acknowledged it has "further to go" to tackle the issue. our global affairs correspondent, naomi grimley reports. it was in the aftermath of the 2010 haiti earthquake that some prostitutes thquake that some of oxfam's aid workers severely compromised its much cherished values. they used young prostitutes when they were supposed to be helping the local population bounced back from a disaster. the charity did an internal investigation. they dismissed some members of staff and let others quietly resign — without properly flagging what had
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happened to the authorities or other charities. today mps said wasn't an isolated episode. we have reached the conclusion that, in the aid sector, there has been complacency verging on complicity with what has happened. that is because organisations all too often have appeared more concerned to protect their own reputation in the sector rather than protect victims and survivors. mps want the uk to take the lead and create a global register of aid workers to stop sexual predators entering the sector. they admit it won't be easy to cover everyone. helen evans worked at oxfam and waste are concerns helen evans worked at oxfam and waste are concerns about sexual abuse. she thinks the register is a good idea. this is about protecting some of the most vulnerable individuals in the world from sexual exploitation and abuse, and we have to do everything we possibly can. the public reaction has shown quite
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how much they want us to do that. difficult, yes, but doable. oxfam says it's now tripled its budget for safeguarding checks. this is a much bigger problem than one charity. mps are in no doubt, after a string of scandals, now is the time for meaningful change. it's emerged that the man who bombed the manchester arena was rescued from the civil war in libya by a royal navy ship three years earlier. salman abedi killed 22 people in may last year when he detonated a homemade suicide vest. our correspondent caroline davies is here. this news just this newsjust emerging. given this news just emerging. given that his background was looked into it a
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surprise in this didn't come to way to public attention. we are hearing about this now. this happened in august 2000 and 1a. he was 19. he was on holiday and libya at the time. the borderforce decided to get british nationals and dependents out of libya. hem and his younger brother were both evacuated. they we re brother were both evacuated. they were picked up from tripoli and taken to malta. that was worth a hundred other british nationals. they were flown back to the uk. hundred other british nationals. they were flown back to the ukw is quite staggering about someone who was rescued by british forces then turning on his adopted country. we have heard from government sources saying this was an act of utter betrayal. he was rescued by the british services and then can carry out such a horrific bombing. security sources did not believe he
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was radicalised at this stage. he had been monitored but his case was actually closed a month beforehand. he was not a subject of interest at the time. he was a british national being evacuated. labour's deputy leader tom watson has described a member of the party's ruling body as "a loud mouthed bully" after he was recorded criticising members of thejewish community. in the recording, peter willsman from the party's national executive committee, suggested jewish "trump fanatics" were behind accusations of anti—semitism in the party. mr watson tweeted to say he was disgusted by the comments. mr willsman, a supporter of labour leaderjeremy corbyn, has since apologised and will not face any further action. live to westminster — and our assistant political editor norman smith. the ball are comparing this to the
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treatment of margaret hodge. she is facing a disciplinary investigation after a conflict with jeremy corbyn overste ps after a conflict with jeremy corbyn oversteps introduced against anti—semitism. although he is not facing disciplinary at the moment, this is farfrom over. prominent carbon supporters are saying at the very least that he should step down from the national is active committee. —— national executive committee. —— national executive committee. some think you should be expeued committee. some think you should be expelled from the labour party. the jewish labour movement have said they are going to submit a further movement —— complaint. they are demanding he is suspended and
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investigated. this may not be over. let us have a listen to that these people in the jewish community support trump. they are trump fanatics. i am not going to be lectured to by trump fanatics. they are making up information without any evidence at all. i think we should ask the rabbis, where is your evidence of severe and widespread anti—semitism in this party? let me ask you a question. how many people in this room have seen anti—semitism at the labour party? what is your answer? none. he isa he is a long—standing political ally of mr corbyn. it goes back to the
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19805. of mr corbyn. it goes back to the 1980s. he is a key corbyn supporter. the fact that margaret hodge have taken a strong stand on and make anti—semitism and are facing disciplinary. i think it is appalling. i think any of your viewers listening to the audio will ask, how is that possible that that was said in a meeting with at least a0 members of the national executive committee? how was no action taken? it is completely unacceptable. if we are serious as a party about standing up to all forms of racism and being an organisation truly believes in equality, this kind of speech cannot be ok. we have not heard from him today. in
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his letter he acknowledges that his behaviour fell short of that which may be expected of him. however, he suggested that his comments had not been accurately reported. we can all hear his comments because of that tape recording. i think this matter may be far from over. james matthews had travelled to libya. tell us a little bit about the background to this. he has never
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denied that he went to sevier and fought alongside the white pg. the kurdish militia. he was fighting the islamic state. they were fighting against the so—called islamic state and that coalition received some kind of support from the british military. he says he was part of this. he returned to britain and was arrested. earlier this year he was charged under the terrorism act. the metropolitan police said he was alleged to have attended places in syria and iraq were instructional training was carried out. we were supposed to hear legal arguments about the background to this case. that did not happen. the case
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against mr matthews has collapsed. it was said he was happy at today's decision but he is and at an expedition. is he going to get that? he emerged from court and i spoke to him. he did not want to do an interview. he put out a fairly pointed statement. he is accused the british government of changing its political calculation in relation to the white pg. he points out that turkey is an important uk market for arms sales. he asked if this was the reason why the attorney general but what he thought to be an implausible case against him. dell he was ultimately responsible for this case. he did not want to become embroiled in a political argument. defending mr mann news, he said mr
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matthews was happy and the decision to prosecute them was always extraordinary and wolseley unjustified. he has demanded a full and proper explanation about why this decision to prosecute him was taken. why it took so long. mr matthews also said that new evidence was presented today that meant that the case against him was dropped. he said that evidence wasn't made public. he wasn't aware of what evidence was presented. it could be that evidence is sensitive in security terms. we do not know. the case has been abruptly dropped. thank you for your time today. the
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words abject failure and culture of denial. the anger of you and your fellow m ps denial. the anger of you and your fellow mps emanates from the pages of the report. it is not right that young girls and women are being abused in the most vulnerable situations in the world. it is no good talking about them being prostitutes. they are not prostitutes. they are not prostitutes. they are women who are desperate to feed their families. they are desperate for help. we cannot possibly understood stand their circumstances. there was a report back in 2000 on exportation in international aid sector. you
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yourself talked about this sort of abuse being an open secret. why is nothing being done? it has been very difficult to get people to own up to it. although the new was happening, they decided to cover it up. they we re they decided to cover it up. they were more concerned about their reputations. it is all about the victims. young girls and women are being abused for men's pleasure. there are whistle—blowers and people working in the sector who are trying to draw our attention to this. the committee is saying there needs to be more of a culture change at the top of these organisations before there will be change. there does have to be because the whistle—blowers are very scared that
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they are going to be victimised. they are scared they are going to lose theirjob. that has happened. we need to stop these mainly powerful men abusing their situation. until they stop, and they change the culture within the organisation, and less it sorted out and people are not abusing women here, we will never change it in much more vulnerable situations abroad. it needs to happen in both places. there has to be a complete culture change. i think that means more women in positions of and fewer men. and perhaps fewer aid organisations investigating themselves. there is going to be a government summit in the autumn about this. what do you hope to commit of that? i think we
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ultimately want to get a vetting system. the secretary of state is being tough on this and she has led the way to see it is not acceptable to be able to have men abusing women. what we have to do is try and bring ina women. what we have to do is try and bring in a system for the whole world. we will start with an international register here of all aid workers and build it up. it will not be easy in some countries but we have to get them onside to end should use their owns systems. thank you for your time. the headlines on bbc news... charities are guilty
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of ‘complacency verging on complicity‘ over sexual abuse by staff — says a damning report by mps on international aid. it‘s emerged that salman abedi — who killed 22 people in the manchester arena attack— was rescued from libya by a royal navy ship three years earlier. a warning from us intelligence — north korea may be building new intercontinental ballistic missiles — despite the trump—kim summit. we will have your main sport bulletin. andy murray is back on the comeback trail. he has won his second match in a year. he came from a set down to when. he withdrew from england —— wimbledon on the eve of the turner meant. he admits he has lots to improve. he was pleased with the mental side of his game. he set up the mental side of his game. he set upa the mental side of his game. he set up a second—round meeting with the british number one kel edmonds. british number one kel edmonds.
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british olympian says there should bea british olympian says there should be a women‘s tour to france. there isa be a women‘s tour to france. there is a one day event but she cycled every day of this years tour the women ahead of the event and she said that is an appetite for a female equivalent. they wanted to see the women on the side of the road. zooming past. ithink see the women on the side of the road. zooming past. i think there is a case for it to be there. women having trained for a three—week tour. maybe when the french have the olympics in 202a, why not put on a women‘s tour de france. olympics in 202a, why not put on a women's tour de france. there are still thousands of tickets available for the first test between england and india which starts tomorrow. it is the first of five tests. there has been some criticism of the pipes schedule. the most capped women in
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by schedule. the most capped women in rugby union has a retired. she has brought her players —— career to close after over a hundred games. she won the world cup back in 201a. she won the world cup back in 201a. she became england‘s most capped player. she is going to continue playing for club wasps. there is a massive achievement. getting my first cap was out of this world. to hit the cap record and surpass jason has been a dream come true. i have lived such a feed till life. there have been highs and lows but i have loved every minute of it. that is all the sport now. us intelligence officials have told the washington post that north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles, despite better relations with the trump administration. the officials — speaking anonymously — us intelligence officials have told the washington post that
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north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles, despite better relations with the trump administration. the officials — speaking anonymously — told the newspaper that new evidence suggested work was still taking us intelligence officials have told the washington post that north korea appears to be building new ballistic missiles, despite better relations with the trump administration. the officials — speaking anonymously — told the newspaper that new evidence suggested work was still taking place at a factory near pyongyang that produced the first north korean missiles capable of reaching the united states. there are two reports. there is those from the intelligence agency through the washington post and reuters. there is also commercial satellite imagery, which has been analysed in the united states. we have been speaking to them. they have said they have seen a lot of activity both before the summit in singapore and afterwards. vehicles going in and out. there are two new buildings at this facility. the reason they have focused on this facility is because this is where the first intercontinental missile were created. they are thought to be capable of reaching the united states. it is important because donald trump after the summit said the threat from north korea was over. when it comes to what was agreed, it was very vague.
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it had not a lot of detail. kim jong—un signed his name to de—nuclearised of the korean peninsular. the united states and north korea have different meanings on this. north korea believes that it means getting rid of nuclear weapons across the world. not just them solely. they call their weapons their treasured sword. they believe this is the only defence against the eight states toppling their regime. how will donald trump react to this? i think the meeting itself was progress. the fact that there is some kind of dialogue between north korea and the united states means there is progress. in south korea there have been meetings between the north and south.
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they are trying to find a way to ease military tension. there is also sporting contests going on and cultural exchanges. this is a way of bringing north korea out of the shadows and into the international committee. it is one way to try and discuss with them giving up their weapons. if you ask any analyst, they will tell you the same thing. the idea that north korea are going to hand over their weapons is not one that many believe at all. if donald trump believes that denuclearisation is going to be in an easy one to do, he may have to think again. dixons carphone says the personal details of 10 million people were hacked last year — much higher previously thought. the company, which owns the carphone warehouse and currys pc world, has been investigating the hack since it first revealed it injune. it said personal information, names, addresses and email addresses, may have been accessed last year,
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but not bank details and it found no evidence that fraud has resulted from the breach. the owner of british gas — centrica — has reported a 20 per cent slump in profits in the first half of the year. it said 3a0,000 people have left the energy provider. centrica‘s chief executive said its household gas and electricity supply arm was hit by last year‘s pre—payment price cap, the ongoing loss of customers and rising wholesale energy prices. we have had a challenging first half. our total margin has been sta ble half. our total margin has been stable and are operating profits broadly stable. they have been down a‘xw. the father of the missing airman corrie mckeague says he believes his son will never be found. in a post on facebook martin mckeague says the evidence suggests the 23—year—old‘s remains
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are ‘somewhere within the waste disposal system‘ keith doyle reports these are the last known images of corrie mckeague. he was 23 when he went missing after a night out in bury st edmonds in september 2016. cctv pictures show him walk through the town but then he disappears. police believe he got into a waste bin. his mobile phone signal was tracked and appeared to follow the path of a bin lorry. a massive search of waste disposal sites took place but it was called off earlier this year. his father martin has said that his son is no longer missing. in a facebook post, he said police had presented him with compelling these are the last known images of corrie mckeague. he was known to sleep in or on bins. he said the area was too toxic and vast to search. since his disappearance, his girlfriend gave
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birth to his daughter. now that the family seem to know what happened to their son, a memorial is being planned. he offered more support from parents. parents in england need more support to help their children learn basic language skills according to the education secretary. in a speech about social mobility this morning, damian hinds labelled the issue a "persistent scandal" and offer more support for parents. department of education figures suggest that by the end of reception class more than a quarter of children lack the communication skills they need. zimbabwe‘s opposition leader, nelson chamisa, (00v) has said his party is winning the country‘s general election resoundingly and he‘s ready to form the next government. the zanu—pf party, which has ruled zimbabwe for almost forty years, has insisted it is on track to retain power. more than five—hundred hikers have been safely brought down from a mountain on the indonesian island of lombok after being stranded by rockfalls
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caused by an earthquake. the body of one indonesian climber killed by a falling rock on mount rinjani is still to be recovered. officials say a further fifteen people have died elsewhere on the island. our correspondent rebecca henschke has the latest from the island. search and rescue teams say that almost all hikers have now come off the mountain. there are only six remaining up near the lake. they need to be brought down today. they should arrive this afternoon, in a few hours‘ time here. also coming off the meant as a body of an indonesian claimer, a man in his 20s who was killed by falling rocks. the earthquake triggered huge landslides, which blocked pathways out. officials say that they had to evacuate over a thousand hikers after the earthquake hit, the majority of them foreign nationals from countries like france, thailand
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as well as the netherlands. the rebuilding has begun of thousands of buildings that were damaged in the quake. we are also getting a lot of after—shocks here, which is keeping everyone tense. people are afraid to go back inside, fearing more earthquakes here. one of the world s most spectacular frogs has been identified as a new species after 20 years of research at the university of manchester. it was originally discovered in panama in1925, but has been confused with the splendid tree frog ever since. the creature has been named sylvia s tree frog, after the three—year—old granddaughter of the conservationist behind the research. you know, it‘s a biologist‘s dream to actually be
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able to name a species. and to be able to find such a beautiful frog and to be able to name it after my granddaughter, it‘s absolutely amazing, really is. but it also means that this particular species that‘s so close to my heart can be protected for the future, and people will realise how special these frogs are. it is time for the weather. a few showers. workload and patchy rain. in north—west england. there will be particularly windy through this afternoon in the north. winds could be up to 50 miles an hour in the western isles of scotland. temperatures can be up to 26 celsius. overnight the rain will tra nsfer celsius. overnight the rain will transfer its way northwards. elsewhere it looks to be mainly dry.
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temperatures will be between 11 and 14 temperatures will be between 11 and 1a celsius. most of the country will be dry. there will be spells of sunshine. there will be closed developing in scotland and north—west england. there may be patchy rain in the afternoon. the temperatures to model may be up to 2627 degrees. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: a damning report on international aid — mps accuse charities of being "almost complicit" in sexual abuse by staff. it‘s emerged that salman abedi, who killed 22 people at the manchester arena, was rescued from libya by a royal navy ship three years earlier. labour‘s deputy leader, tom watson, has accused a member of the party‘s ruling body, the national executive committee, of being a being a "loud—mouthed bully", after he was recorded criticising members of the jewish community. a warning from us officials — north korea may be building new intercontinental ballistic
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missiles, despite the trump—kim summit. and sailor and entrepreneur tony bullimore, who became a global star after surviving four days in the upturned hull of his boat, has died at the age of 79. last year was the fifth warmest in the uk since records began in 1910. the met office‘s state of the climate report says nine of the ten hottest years have occurred since 2002. rainfall has also increased over the last decade. joining us now is one of the authors of that repor — mark mccarthy. he runs the met offices national climate information centre. thank you very much forjoining us to talk about all of this, mark, and the state of the climate report. so, what can we say, then, about whether
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in the uk, have we got firmly established passions now of warmer and wetter weather? yes, one thing this report is looking at our climate over the last 100 years or more, and one thing that we are seeing is... sorry, excuse me. are you ok, mark? seeing is... sorry, excuse me. are you 0k, mark? yes... yeah. the white mark, perhaps we ido i do hope that mark mccarthy is ok. with just eight months to go until the uk leaves the european union, we‘ve been taking a closer look at the impact of brexit on different groups of people. today, we‘re examining what impact brexit could have on your summer holiday, with around 18 million people travelling to spain this year alone. our brussels reporter, adam fleming, reports from benidorm. it‘s the last summer before brexit, which could change how we holiday. it‘s not been decided yet whether british tourists will need a visa or not,
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and even if they don‘t, they could still be affected by the eu‘s new travel authorisation system coming in in 2020, where visitors from outside the eu have to register on a website and pay 7 euros. if we need to do it, we need to do it. it‘s a break, isn‘t it? it‘s a holiday, so we need to get away. what if you had to pay extra money to get a visa? everything‘s extra these days. we pay everything extra, there‘s taxes, you know what. you shouldn't really have to pay for a visa to come to spain, should you? well, if the uk‘s not in the eu any more... i know, it feels not that far away. you could drive to spain! however they get here, 18 million people travel to spain from the uk every year. so many, it sometimes feels less like benidorm and more like britain. the english breakfasts aren‘t going anywhere, but some home comforts will have to be negotiated in the brexit talks, such as...
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the mobile phone roaming has gone now because of the eu, if it was to come back because of brexit, how would you feel? i‘d have to be careful how i use my phone abroad. so, you know your european health insurance card, which means you get free medical care, what if that disappeared? you'd just have to be like america and you pay private, wouldn't you? i'm just going to show you the newest hotel innovation at the rh canfali... tracey says uncertainty about brexit isn‘t affecting bookings for next summer yet. just as well, because her company‘s just opened this new hotel. the best thing about the hotel is this, the view. benidorm and the levante beach. i think sometimes a lot of scaremongering goes on with the brexit and people are made to feel very nervous, but i think it's in everybody's interest to have an agreement for everything, so business can be as normal as possible for everybody. right, back at the airport.
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the eu and the uk will have to agree new rules when it comes to aviation, and if there‘s no deal in march next year, there‘s talk about emergency plans being put into place to keep planes flying. but if all goes to plan, there will be a transition period where nothing changes until the end of 2020, so next summer should feeljust like this one. for the costa blanca, brexit is manana, manana. adam fleming reporting. our scotland correspondent, james shaw, is at glasgow airport, which sees over nine million people pass through its terminal each year. what have people been saying to you today, james? and in terms of airport staff, what sort of preparations are they making for brexit? lets just preparations are they making for brexit? letsjust have a look at the scene, anita mackrell, shall we? it's scene, anita mackrell, shall we? it‘s a pretty classic scene of a
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british summertime, hundreds of people queueing to get their tickets to ta ke people queueing to get their tickets to take their flights to any number of different european destinations in france, germany, belgium, spain and the balara catalans. and just to give you a sense of that, in fact —— the balearic islands. there are 70 million trips out of the uk, and 75% to eu destinations. but the question really people here, the staff and travellers if they thought about it will be wondering is, is that going to be different when britain is out of the eu in the summer of 2019? so, this is what some people told us earlier on. i'm afraid it's going to affect how we travel to the uk. actually, that's why we decided to come and visit scotland this year. we've been dreaming about it for years, and we decided to come and try it this year because we're afraid that next summer it will be a little bit more difficult. maybe not very difficult, but somehow difficult. i think it‘s hard to cut through all the noise that you hear from people. there‘s two sides of the story, and people want you to believe that this is true and this is not true. so, you can research it all day
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long, but i think there‘s a great unknown at the moment. long, but i think there‘s a great we'll see what happens. long, but i think there‘s a great the relationship with the netherlands, we're close by, so... it'll get sorted. it'll be fine, i think. we hear some questions and uncertainty, and some people thinking everything will carry on exactly as normal. we probably leave need a bit of expert knowledge on this, and waddle is from apter, which represents travel companies in the united kingdom. what kind of top line from the people that you represent about the impact of brexit? travel is one of those industries that is potentially quite... has quite a big impact of brexit doesn't go well. so, our flights, our visa—free travel, travel insurance, health insurance across europe. we are confident that the politicians say that they are going to get a good deal, and we'll be holding them to that. because, as
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you say, the of passengers flying out the, it matters to the uk, but it also matters to countries like spain and portugal as well. it's important the politicians on both sides come to a pragmatic deal to make sure that the summer of 2020 is as busy as it is this year. your boss at napster, the top man at your organisation, has said that he wants to see a bit less ideal as you and a bit more practicality about this situation, that‘s what your members needed, certainty about what is going to happen, that is an incredibly short supply at the moment, isn‘t it? so all your boss at apter. they expect the politicians to sort this out for the they take for granted that we can fly across europe and they have support from british staff when they are bearers well, they want to get it sorted out, that is the job of politicians, to do that in the uk and the eu. we have been speaking to politicians on both sides, telling them to make sure thatjob is done,
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hopefully by the autumn. if you had a top tip for people starting to think about their travel in summer 2019, what would you say to them about the kind of preparations they should be making and how they should be doing things differently because of the uncertainty of brexit?” think the main message is, don't panic. we fully expect people to be travelling to europe next summer. if you do want certainty, you can expect so much but a package holiday through apter, you are protected if anything goes wrong. holidays are way of fixing your cost is. there is a lot of uncertainty in the world, but brits like to travel, which is good for business. there are things people can do, but the main message is to make sure that people feel confident, they can feel free to fly and travels to kill you are saying that a package holiday actually gives you really solid certainty, evenin gives you really solid certainty, even ina gives you really solid certainty, even in a case of no—deal brexit —— to fly and travel. i use saying? you
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will get your holiday or your money back, is that correct? absolutely, if it all goes horribly wrong you are guaranteed to get your money back, whatever that is, whether it is brexit or the ash carter that we had a few years ago or a company fails to meet you are protected in that —— the ash clouds. if consumers wa nt that —— the ash clouds. if consumers want that detection, putting it is a best way of doing it. that could be a huge cost on travel companies if you do have to pay for holidays that can‘t take place because of brexit. travel companies want certainty, as the public do as well. you know, there's a lot that but riskier, but we are hopeful that —— a lot at riskier. the politicians have said that the deal will be done, we will be holding them to that. and the holiday— makers will be holding them to that too if that doesn't happen, hope willie we will be getting a bit more clarity come the autumn —— hopefully we will. the message is that people hope and believe that things will be able to carry on,
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much as in the way that they are today. really at this point, even with a few months to go before brexit in march of next year, nobody really quite knows. 0k, thank you, james. let‘s stay with this issue, and hear how brexit might affect the aviation industry and what will might happen in the event of no deal. here‘s our reality check correspondent, chris morris, to present some of the options. everybody wants a deal. but if the uk leaves the eu without any withdrawal agreement, eu rules and regulations will, very abruptly, stop applying to the uk after march 29th next year. so, what does that mean in terms of planes being able to take off and land? well, the uk would no longer be part of the eu s single aviation market, which is the basis for flights in and out of the country at the moment — notjust to the eu itself, but to other countries with which the eu has a deal, such as the united states and canada. all in all, the eu governs uk aviation access to aa other countries.
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of course, you can always negotiate new agreements — but access would start at a pretty low level, and negotiations take time. that s why a sudden no—deal scenario is so alarming to the industry. the uk would no longer be governed by the regulations of the european aviation safety agency, which deal with all sorts of things, like maintenance and common standards. the uk civil aviation authority could in theory take on all the same rules, and hire lots of new staff to implement and oversee them, but it would also have to convince other international regulators to recognise it — another time—consuming process. and if you re following eu aviation rules, you basically have to accept a role for eu courts like the european court ofjustice as well. all of which makes it a difficult time for airlines that are already selling tickets for flights after brexit. right now, we will continue to sell in the hope and belief that when a conclusion comes to the brexit scenario, that,
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as i said, common sense prevails and people realise the need for travel. the biggest fear that has to be that at the 11th hour and 59th minute if there is a complete breakdown, and shutdown of air travel between the uk and europe, that is the ultimate worry. in other areas of the uk s trade relationship, if we leave with no deal, we fall back on the basic rules of the world trade organisation. but in aviation, there is no fallback position. either you have a deal or you don t. so, if negotiations with the eu fail — and neither side wants that to happen — there would have to be a scramble for an interim solution to keep planes in the air. that most obvious one would be some kind of stop—gap agreement to roll over current rules for a short time. but that would mean the uk s current commitments to the eu,such as legal and budget commitments, would have to continue as well. extended membership in all but name.
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it‘s worth emphasising that it would be in no one s interest to ground aircraft. everyone would be looking for a fix. but the suggestion that everything would automatically be fine for aviation in the event of no deal is hugely misleading. and this isn t about project fear — this is project complexity. ? chris, thank you very much for that. chris, thank you very much for that. chris morris. ijust want chris, thank you very much for that. chris morris. i just want to chris, thank you very much for that. chris morris. ijust want to give you an up date on our met office guest that we had started to speak toa guest that we had started to speak to a few minutes ago and he was taken to a few minutes ago and he was ta ken unwell, that to a few minutes ago and he was taken unwell, that was mark mccarthy. we just want to let you know that yes, he‘s feeling unwell, but we have spoken to him and someone is with him and helping to look after him. hopefully he‘ll be feeling completely better very soon, and wish him well. president trump has said he is willing to hold talks with iran‘s leaders without any "pre—conditions" and "any time they want" to discuss how to improve realations. earlier this month, mr trump clashed with the iranian president, hassan rouhani.
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the united states has also abandoned its support for the international deal to stop iran‘s nuclear weapons programme. here‘s our north america correspondent, peter bowes. with the us due to impose new sanctions on iran in just over a week‘s time, donald trump was asked at a news conference whether he‘d be prepared to meet with president rouhani and under what conditions. i would certainly meet with iran if they wanted to meet. i don‘t know that they‘re ready yet, they‘re having a hard time right now. but i ended the iran deal, it was a ridiculous deal. i do believe that they will probably end up wanting to meet, and i‘m ready to meet any time they want to. and i don‘t do that from strength or from weakness, i think it‘s an appropriate thing to do. nine days ago, president trump took a more confrontational stance against iran. in a tweet, he warned
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president rouhani: it‘s becoming a familiar pattern. donald trump wages war of words with a hostile foreign leader, and then he sits down with them to talk. he threatened kim jong—un with fire and fury over nuclear weapons before they met and apparently became good friends. mr trump‘s offer to talk with president rouhani appears to be another attempt to nurture a personal relationship with a foreign adversary. the us state department regards iran as the world‘s key sponsor of international terrorism. if such a meeting goes ahead, it will be the first between us and iranian leaders in almost a0 years. peter bowes, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: charities are guilty of "complacency verging on complicity" over sexual abuse by staff, says a damning report by mps on international aid. it‘s emerged that salman abedi,
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who killed 22 people in the manchester arena attack, was rescued from libya by a royal navy ship three years earlier. a warning from us intelligence — north korea may be building new intercontinental ballistic missiles, despite the trump—kim summit. labour‘s deputy leader, tom watson, has described a member of the party‘s ruling body as "a loud—mouthed bully", after he was recorded criticising members of thejewish community. in the recording, peter willsman from the party‘s national executive committee suggested jewish "trump fanatics" were behind accusations of anti—semitism in the party. mr watson tweeted to say he was disgusted by the comments. mr willsman, a supporter of labour leaderjeremy corbyn, has since apologised and has been told he will not
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face any further action. well, some labour mps are calling for mr willsman to be removed from labour‘s national executive as a result of his remarks. our assistant political editor, norman smith, is following developments in westminster. well, there‘s been huge anger amongst many sections of the labour party following the release of that recording of pete wilson and‘s comments at the meeting of the national executive committee, where he decided not to adopt in full all of the code and examples of the international definition of anti—semitism —— pete willsman. it seems he will not face any disciplinary action over his comments. android by labour mp luciana berger, who has been among the most critical. what‘s your take on this was bought i think it‘s appalling. any of your viewers listening to that audio will ask the question, how is that possible that that was said in a meeting with at least 40 members of that astle executive committee and that
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subsequent to that no action is being taken. it's completely unacceptable. if we are serious as a party about standing up to all forms of racism and being an organisation that really believes in equality, then this kind of speech, as you heard, cannot be ok. how, then, is it possible, do you think of the labour party to accept his apology? he said he was sorry, and that seems to be the end of the matter.” he said he was sorry, and that seems to be the end of the matter. i think you have to contrast what happened in this case so far, and i seriously hope that that decision will be reconsidered, with what's happened to my colleagues dame margaret hodge and ian austin, where immediate action was taken to investigate them speaking out and speaking up against anti—semitism. it seems absolutely incredulous that this is a different course of action taken. again, anyone listening to that, too accused members of the jewish community of all surviving social media post, of calling the media on facing anti—semitism to have to
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prove it, when we saw 68 rabbis from across different nomination speaking out in advance of that meeting, calling on the labour party to listen to their concerns, very, very serious concerns shared by the britishjewish serious concerns shared by the british jewish community right across this country of the anti—semitism that we face. across this country of the anti-semitism that we face. is the disquiet purely confined tojewish mps? no, certainly not, i've been approached by many of my colleagues appalled by what is going on. this is yet another thing that has come out which, again, the party doesn't seem to be taking very seriously. this is incredibly difficult and awful issue. ijust want the leadership of my party to take this seriously and speak out against it. what you think should actually happened? we know the british board of deputies —— the head of the british board of deputies is saying this man should be expelled from the labour party. in light of the recording, because that we now have, we didn't have that recording before, it was brought to my
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attention last night and has now been made public. as a result of the recording being available, and the exact words of mr willsman is reflected upon, it is only appropriate that he is suspended and investigated and a formal inquiry is opened into that conduct, because it is totally unacceptable. will do you and otherjewish is totally unacceptable. will do you and other jewish organisations is totally unacceptable. will do you and otherjewish organisations be making a further complete? you have already made one complaint, which has been dismissed. in the light of the recording, will you be making a further complaint was bought yes, definitely. the jewish further complaint was bought yes, definitely. thejewish labour movement made one complaint, but in light of what we said and was heard in that recording, of course, that complaint will now be resubmitted. luciana berger talking to norman smith. bbc news has been told that that women are illegally taking abortion pills they ve bought online because they don t want to have to take them at clinics. in england, women must take the pill at either a hospital or clinic before travelling home to wait for the abortion to take place. but, often, it can start to happen before they get there. senior doctors and politicians
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are urging the health secretary to change the law, to allow women to take the pill at home. our reporterjean mackenzie has the story. it‘s a very physical taking over of your body. waves and waves of cramping and pain. sweating. these women are describing something we don‘t often hear about — what it feels like to have an abortion. hello, nice to meet you. i‘ve come to meet claudia, who had an abortion last year. she took a taxi home from the hospital after taking the pill. but within minutes of getting in, the symptoms had started. so, i started to feel really unwell, and just extremely nauseous. and was kind of getting that feeling in my chest like i might be about to throw up. and then i started getting cramping at the same time. i just didn‘t want to be sick in the taxi, and ijust really,
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really wanted to get home. in between getting out of the taxi and the symptoms really starting in that very physical and uncontrollable sense, that was like a minute. do you think about what could have happened if you‘d just been five minutes later? i mean, i know what would have happened if it had been five minutes later. if it had been five minutes later, all of those symptoms would have been happening on the floor of the taxi. i would have been sick in the taxi, i would have started bleeding in the taxi, and i would have started losing control of my bowels in the taxi. i lived 15 minutes away from a hospital. not every woman lives 15 minutes away from a hospital. it was so traumatic and so unexpected. 20 minutes into the journey on the tube towards home, i started to feel the effects of the pill kicking in. i started to feel nauseous,
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i started to sweat, started to get cold, went extremely pale, apparently. and then the pain and nausea was so extreme that i had to get off the tube. i lay down on a bench in the tube, and basicallyjust decided that i wasn't going to move any further. how did you feel knowing that you were starting to pass your pregnancy and you were in this hugely public place? i felt scared. and exposed. and it just felt really unfair. you know, maybe i was very unlucky to be in that small percentage of people that it happens within 30 minutes. but if it happens, then it does. what difference would it have made to you to be able to take the pills at home? i would have been able to have
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everything that one needs — no movement, a comfortable bed, a hot water bottle, painkillers. you know, i didn‘t have any of that. i had to be gawped at by men in suits. so, this is the letter i wrote to the health minister. it goes: "one year ago, i took the abortion pill..." senior doctors and politicians are nowjoining women like claudia in urging the health secretary to change the law. "allowing home use of the pill for abortions would save the nhs money, and save thousands of women like me from pain and distress. you personally have the power..." there are women on buses, there are women in taxis and cars and on tubes going through what i went through right now. and the health minister could change that overnight. yet, day— by—day, more women are being put through that experience. so, that makes me angry. very angry. jean mackenzie with that report.
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and you can see herfull investigation on the victoria derbyshire programme website — that‘s at bbc.co.uk/victoria. in a moment, it‘s time for the 1pm news with reeta chakrabarti. but first, it‘s time for a look at the weather, with alina jenkins. hello. after a wetter, windier spell of weather in recent days, the trend towards the end of the week is full something warmer and drier foremost, not for all, though. we have had some rain around this morning, heavy and thundery through the midlands, south east england and east anglia. that has now cleared away. spells of sunshine across a large swathe of the country. but not for everyone, there is an area of low pressure in there is an area of low pressure in the north—west. windy conditions and a front pushing north and east was, generating more cloud and patchy rainfor generating more cloud and patchy rain for northern ireland, north—west england and the western
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isles of scotland. this part of the country will see the strongest winds the diaz and a0 mph gust, perhaps as high as 50 in the western isles of scotland. the winds will slowly start to ease overnight, and we will lose the rain from northern ireland but keep a fair amount of cloud here. wane extending northwards across the west and north of scotland. elsewhere, a dry night, clear spells. temperatures 11—1adc, not as much of a contrast from north to south us what we have seen in recent nights. for tomorrow, for much of the country, it‘s dry with good spells of sunshine. more cloud through the afternoon, northern ireland, north—west england and parts of north wales, the spot of rain and mist and murk in places. temperature—wise tomorrow, 17—21 for northern ireland and scotland. up to 26 or 27. east england. an area of high pressure keeps on building through the end of the week. thursday, and we‘ve got this point just complicating things and
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bringing more cloud and humidity as well. misty and murky for the hills of north—west england, wales, northern ireland and the western side of scotland, patchy rain at times. further south and east, we have the drier conditions. notice how the colours are starting to build again, reds and oranges starting to develop across southern, central and eastern england. we could see temperatures getting close to 30, quite a contrast between northern ireland and scotland, 18-21dc. the northern ireland and scotland, 18—21dc. the trend for something drier and warmerfor 18—21dc. the trend for something drier and warmer for much 18—21dc. the trend for something drier and warmerfor much of 18—21dc. the trend for something drier and warmer for much of the country extending its way northwards through friday and into saturday. aside from some showery rain across the far north—west of scotland, we will see some good spells of sunshine and temperatures rising once again. sexual exploitation and abuse are widespread across the aid sector — according to a strongly—worded report by mps. their criticism comes after revelations emerged that oxfam staff paid survivors of an earthquake in haiti for sex. organisations all too often have appeared more concerned
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to protect their own reputation in the sector, rather than protecting victims and survivors. charities are warned that they can‘t continue with a "culture of denial" — we‘ll bring you all the details from westminster. also this lunchtime... salman abedi — the man who bombed the manchester arena last year — was rescued from libya‘s civil war by the royal navy three years earlier. the row over labour and anti—semitism is reignited — after a leading party member describes somejewish people as trump "fanatics". and top of the tour, now star of the studios —
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