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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 6, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at five. chanting: hey, hey! ho, ho! kavanaugh has got to go! division and protests across america, but senators are expected to approve president trump's supreme court nomination later despite sexual assault allegations. a government review reveals that toxic air pollution is much worse in eight areas of england than previously thought. the doctor will see you all now. gps trial a scheme where some patients share their appointments. one of the fathers of british sitcom, ray galton, has died at the age of 88. if we was to kill off all the dirty old blokes like you, we wouldn't have any diseases any more. with his co—writer alan simpson he created classics — steptoe and son and hancock's half hour. going, going, actually gone. an original banksy self—destructs, moments after selling for more than £1 million at auction. and at 5:30 manchester united host newcastle at old trafford.
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we'll bring you the latest as it happens. thejudge nominated by donald trump to serve on america's supreme court, looks set to be confirmed today, despite allegations of sexual assault. brett kavanaugh is expected to receive a formal endorsement in a vote in the us senate. here's our north america correspondent, chris buckler. with the final vote nowjust hours away, campaigners have made clear they intend to keep up the pressure on america's politicians. i am so angry. i do not want to leave this place or leave the streets. they are not listening to women and they are not
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listening to survivors. four days, the senate's corridors of power have been filled with protesters, each one trying to influence the few senators still wavering over whether to support brett kavanaugh‘s nomination to the supreme court. he has angrily denied claims that he sexually assaulted christine blasey ford decades ago when they were both teenagers. after wrestling with her political beliefs, the simple question of who to believe. republican senator susan collins finally decided she would vote in favour ofjudge kavanaugh. the facts presented do not mean that president... professor ford was not sexually assaulted that night or at some other time but they do lead me to conclude that the allegations fail to meet the more—likely—than—not standard.
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do you believe doctor ford? i believe dr ford, that something happened to dr ford, i do not believe the fact shows that it was brett kavanaugh, but something happened. this confirmation process has been nothing short of a bruising and divisive political fight, but all the indications are that president trump is quietly confident that his nominee is now likely to secure a place in america's highest court. these are live pictures of the debate ahead of the vote later today — expected at 9:30, we'll have special coverage here on the bbc news channel. that will be the final vote to see
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whether a break—up and the seat on the supreme court. overnight, various senators have been taking their time to adjust to floor delivering their speeches. —— to see whether brett kava naugh delivering their speeches. —— to see whether brett kavanaugh will take the sea. we will expect that boat at 9:30pm, we will have more special coverage on bbc news. —— expect that boat. new government figures released show that levels of nitrogen dioxide in eight areas of england are much worse than previously thought. the poisonous gas, emitted from cars and other vehicles, can cause serious heart and lung disease. several councils have been told they must reduce their nitrogen dioxide levels at pollution hotspots. as sophie long reports, they far exceed legal limits. air pollution in our towns and cities has been linked to health issues like heart disease and asthma. the government's uk plan for tackling roadside nitrogen dioxide concentrations says councils with the worst levels of air pollution must take robust action. it says it will ensure
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funding is there to enable ten local authorities to implement new measures. they include fitting hundreds of buses with technology to reduce emissions. changes to traffic signalling to limit congestion. and campaigns to get people to take individual action and reduce their own contribution to air pollution. client earth, an environmental law charity, labelled the uk's air pollution a national embarrassment. it has taken so long to understand the true extent of the problem, the government, instead of dragging its feet passing the buck onto local authorities, has to take real action now to protect people's health from illegal and harmful levels of air pollution. the royal college of physicians says it contributes to around 40,000 early deaths per year. let's return now to our top story this hour, and judge brett kavanaugh — donald trump's controversial nominee for the supreme court, is expected to be confirmed by senators tonight. a little earlier while on a solo
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visit to the pyramids at giza in egypt, the us first lady, melania trump, defended mr kavanaugh‘s nomination and the investigation. i think he's highly qualified for the supreme court. i am glad that dr ford was heard, i'm glad thatjudge kavanaugh was heard, the fbi investigation was done and is completed and the senate voted. reporter: do you believe christine ford? i will move on that and i think the whole victims. .. we need to help all the victims no matter what kind of abuse they had. but, erm... i'm... i'm against any kind of abuse or violence. let's get the latest from our correspondent, barbara plett usher, whojoins me now from washington. is this a done deal? it certainly
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looks that way and i have to say, this bitter political drama that has been gripping the nation for the past few weeks extending even to africa, to the president's wife getting her response there, and consider when taking in judge kavanaugh‘s consider when taking in judge kava naugh‘s qualifications and consider when taking in judge kavanaugh‘s qualifications and the emotion that the allegations of sexual misconduct arise and the response there has not been so considered. it's been a bitterly partisan battle quite nasty at times. so there have been a lot of twists and turns, questions about how this will turn out and it all rested on four senators, through republicans and one democrat, they we re republicans and one democrat, they were the holdouts and they could have tipped the book right away in the end of their positions yesterday so we the end of their positions yesterday so we had a bitmap given their announcements, judge kavanaugh does have below. this has been quite a turbulent out there so we cannot rule out anything completely until
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the votes are in. from what we know it looks like he will be the next supreme courtjustice. it looks like he will be the next supreme court justice. that it looks like he will be the next supreme courtjustice. that will give an important political went to president trump. this episode has been described as being extremely divisive not only politically but also on the streets of america. you say his ascension to the supreme court will be a bit for mr trump but a lot of people say it is also bring into question the legitimacy of the supreme court, what are americans saying to you? well, the americans who are protesting outside capitol hill even today, even though they probably hill even today, even though they pro ba bly lost hill even today, even though they probably lost the battle are saying that they will continue their fight, obviously not againstjudge kavanaugh per se but this will galvanise them going into the midterms and i think the democrats will be hoping to use this as a mobilising force for their supporters in the midterms and beyond but there are others in
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america who have quite the opposite response, including women. they see this whole campaign againstjudge kavanaugh this whole campaign againstjudge kava naugh was very this whole campaign againstjudge kavanaugh was very politically motivated and they believe and felt was unfairand it motivated and they believe and felt was unfair and it besmirched his character in a way and his innocence and it way that it was in there believe an american and very partisan, so they are very on the opposite side. you have that polymerization running not only to the senate but also through the country and there has been concerned that it could affect the supreme court which is the one government institutions i should say that americans still have faith in. you had seniorjudicial figures a warning against this kind of partisan politics and a jogging the supreme court and especially after judge kavanaugh himself made quite partisan statements and his testimony for which he tried to backtrack later but never the less, it is something that has raised concerns from quite serious
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fair—minded legal officials to worry about the effectiveness of the subprime part. thank you very much. effectiveness of the supreme court. a reminder we will cover that boat at 9:30pm and you get hear further to why this is such an important vote for america. one week after the indonesian island of sulawesi was hit by a devastating earthquake, officials say more than 1,000 people could still be missing beneath the rubble. around 1,500 people are known to have died in the disaster. hundreds of buildings were destroyed in palu on the island of sulawesi, when it was hit by a wall of water. yet alongside the despair, there have been some stories that bring hope, as our correspondent nick beake reports. within this devastated city you find incredible stories of survival. 12—year—old football fan rizki was in an internet cafe in palu watching highlights of his beloved manchester city when the earthquake struck. "suddenly the earth started to shake," he tells us. "i started to run, my hand
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was crushed, but i was able to stick out my other hand. i waved it, someone saw me and helped me out." he still hopes to achieve his dream of becoming a footballer, joining his heroes at his favourite team. who is your favourite manchester city player? riyad mahrez. algerian international riyad mahrez became manchester city's record signing when they bought him for £60 million this summer. we thought manchester city may want to know about their young fan's amazing story of survival thousands of miles away. so we got in touch. and it turns out riyad mahrez wants to send a personal message. now, rizki doesn't know anything about this. hi, rizki. somebody wants to say hello to you. hi, rizki. how are you? i hope you're getting better. i heard that you are a big city fan.
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so ijust want to wish you a good recovery. i hope you get better and we will give you the best wishes from man city. he also said that he'd like to send you a signed shirt as well. "i can't wait to get better and wear it". in the city of sorrow, where they have lost so much... thank you. ..a smile goes a long way. the head of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, has said the chance of the uk and the eu reaching a deal on brexit has increased in the last few days. speaking to journalists in austria, mrjuncker said he was not sure an agreement could be finalised by october, but he said brussels was determined to reach an accord, saying "our will is unbroken". some patients could see theirgps in groups, under plans being considered by the nhs in england.
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doctors have been trialling shared appointments for up to 15 patients with the same condition — ranging from raised blood pressure and rheumatoid arthritis, to chronic back pain and asthma. the royal college of gps says patients like getting the support of others — while gps say it stops them having to repeat advice. earlier i spoke to dr fraser birrell and mary henfrey — a patient who's taken part in group—led sessions. i used to go to see doctor birrell each week and it was a three—hour group session and the good parts about it were people ask questions that you might not have thought of asking yourself and also it was nice to see other people and talk to them and get their experiences as well. were you ever made to feel uncomfortable, sharing your experience?
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no, never, everybody who was there seemed pleased to be there and as i say, people ask questions that you hadn't thought of asking yourself. doctor birrell, if i could turn to you now, is this a good thing for everyone? no, it won't suit everyone. i think what we're trying to do is offer people choices and the big trouble here is that we don't have enough nurses, we don't have enough doctors, waiting times are worse than we wanted, this is one possible solution where if we see people together, we can offer them better care and it's better personalised care which means we have better access, we can see the people with chronic conditions more regularly. i have to say, it's nice that mary considered that i saw each week, i ran monthly clinics for two hours but once you have parked up and the whole experience,
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the thing is people get enough care and they get all their questions answered and this is an efficient way of delivering high quality care to more people. how long has the trial been going on? this trial has been going on, we first piloted at ten years ago and we presented the data as one of the british society for rheumatology meetings where we were awarded an innovation prize. it isn't a trial, this is routine practice, and certainly gps who are doing this, around 300 practices across the country trained including 67 in the north east, the way to do it is to embed it in practice and if you offered to patients, there is a bit of reluctant initially but once they have tried, people are generally happy to stick with it because satisfaction levels are probably a bit higher, access is better and outcomes are better so it's not going to suit everybody but it's about offering people choices. sotheby‘s auction house has admitted that it was "banksy—ed", after a stencil spray painting by the mysterious artist, shredded itself after being sold for more than £1 million. the "girl with balloon" painting,
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which is one of banksy‘s most widely recognised works, was auctioned by sotheby‘s in london on friday. moments after going under the hammer, attendees were shocked to see the 2006 piece suddenly pass through a shredder hidden within the frame. banksy, whose true identity is unknown, posted a picture of the moment on instagram — with the caption "going, going, gone..." now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. for many of you, a different sort of of weather day on the way tomorrow. which will be good news for some of you who had a grey, wet day like our weather watcher here in kingston on the outskirts of london. whereas if you are in belfast, they had sunshine today, expect more cloud to come your way. that is gathering behind me at the moment because you can see the clear skies in the south this afternoon, slowly pushing south and east, but at most it is still under the zone of cloud. east anglia, southeast channel islands, wet evening, windy and cool.
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cooler into the day elsewhere, but at least with light winds sunshine will be overhead and probably felt a good deal more pleasant. we will pay the price of those cool conditions and clear skies to take us into the night. we will see a bit more cloud in the top tail of the country. rain from the southeast and channel islands gradually pushing away. but eventually arriving towards the hebrides. it is in between with a clear sky, greens on a temperature profile here not only an indication that we will see temperatures widely down into single figures, but in the countryside, many will wake up to a touch of frost as we start sunday morning. lovely crisp, but a tumble start to sunday, but again it will be a day of two halves. let's split the country into two. scotland and northern ireland first of all, today's sunshine, a lot more cloud, still some hazy sunshine in the south east, but elsewhere the cloud will bring occasional rain, most persistent across the west and a windy day with winds hitting 40, 50, maybe 60 miles an hour in one of two spots. other spots of the country, england, wales, and channel islands,
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a vastly improved day. still a bit breezy towards the southeast corner but most light winds, blue skies, sunshine, giving way a bit more cloud than an isolated chance of a shower but most will be dry. for all, even after the frosty start, temperatures up a little bit on today's values. it remains windy in the north till monday. also, we will see this weather front straddling parts of scotland and northern ireland with further outbreaks of rain. we could see minor flooding across western scotland for the day, or 100 millimetres of rain over the next few days here. some rain in northern ireland in the morning, same to in northern england, that will push this way northwards. scotland stays drive through monday. much of it stays dry as well and pleasant enough with hazy sunshine towards the south and east and temperatures back into the high teens and for all, next week will feel a lot warmer than it has done this weekend. bye for now. good evening. in the next few hours, the us senate will almost certainly confirm president trump's controversial nominee for the us supreme court — even though he's facing a series
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of allegations of sexual assault. it's thought brett kavanaugh does now have the support of enough senators — although he's still facing ferocious opposition from the democrats and protesters outside capitol hill. nick bryant reports from washinton. # hey, hey, ho, ho. # kavanaugh has got to go#. the protests are continuing but the fight now is over. brett kavanaugh will be confirmed by the us senate, on a day that could change america for decades, a milestone moment with the potential to make this a more conservative country. inside the halls of congress, protests in the offices of wavering senators who've ended up asking brett kavanaugh‘s nomination. —— backing. manchin, do the right thing. one of them as a democratjoe manchin, who's broken with his party and who was heckled as he tried to explain his decision. the senate was in session all night,
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recriminations round—the—clock. every american is entitled to the benefit of the doubt but nobody is entitled to a seat on the united states supreme court. this body has had a test and we are failing that test. this body has had a chance. this body has had a responsibility and we have surrendered that responsibility. the supreme court wields society—changing power. in the 1950s, it ordered the desegregation of southern schools. in the 1970s, it liberalised abortion rights. more recently it has handed down landmark rulings — bolstering gun rights. now it will have a decisive, conservative majority for the first time in decades. the committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you god. i do. brett kavanaugh was accused of sexual assault, an allegation he fiercely denied.
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this confirmation recess has become a national disgrace. —— confirmation process. you have replaced advice and consent with search and destroy. at the end of this vicious fight, he'll occupy a lifetime seat on america's highest court. his sponsor, donald trump, hasn't been seen in public since late thursday night but soon he'll celebrate victory. he's tweeted, it's a big day for america and it's one that gives him an instant legacy of making the us judiciary more right wing. for donald trump this will be the most successful week of his presidency. when it come at a price? a boater backlash for the congressional elections? thank you very much indeed. air pollution in parts of england is much worse than previously thought,
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according to new scientific data released by the government. it shows that nitrogen dioxide, which is emitted from vehicles and can cause heart and lung disease, will not fall to legal levels for another ten years. ministers have ordered eight local authorities to reduce levels of nitrogen dioxide at pollution hotspots. but environmental campaigners accuse the government of trying to pass the buck. jon donnison reports. it is easy to see why parts of broxbourne have some of their worst levels of pollution in the country. the government has been forced to acknowledge that this is one of eight local authorities efforts to tackle air pollution are failing. not great if you live next door. it does worry me. you do not want to be breathing in all this rubbish. they are always going on about london that we really, really do get bad traffic along here. it has been ten
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yea rs traffic along here. it has been ten years since the eu set maximum levels for nitrogen dioxide. the government had been aiming to comply by 2021. it admitted today it will not achieve that until 2028. doctors say air pollution is linked to the early deaths of 40,000 people a year in the uk. the government has told local councils they need to do more to tackle pollution hotspots. here in broxbourne research says it could ta ke in broxbourne research says it could take ten years to bring air pollution down to legal levels. client earth, the mri mental lord charity who won the case falls in government to improve its egg quality plan said ministers had shown a shocking lack of leadership. it has taken a long time to show the true it has taken a long time to show the tru e exte nt it has taken a long time to show the true extent of the problem. they have to start taking real action 110w. have to start taking real action
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now. in a statement, the government acknowledged that the action was still required. it said air quality had improved significantly in recent yea rs. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has offered an upbeat assessment of the brexit talks — saying he believes it's possible to reach a deal by the end of the year. his comments came after another senior eu official — jean claude juncker, president of the european commission — also suggested the chances of a an agreement have risen in the last few days. candidates hoping to be brazil's next president are making their final efforts to woo undecided voters ahead of the first round of the country's general election tomorrow. the far—right politician, jair bolsonaro remains the frontrunner. the economy, crime amd corruption are voters' main concerns. the death has been announced of the opera singer montserrat caballe, whose duet with freddie mercury became the signature song of the 1992 barcelona olympics. she had been suffering from ill
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health for some time and was admitted to hospital last month. her career spanned 50 years, with performances including her breakthrough at carnegie hall in new york, and she appeared alongside the likes of luciano pavarotti. she was 85 years old. and the deaths also been announced of the comedy scriptwriter, ray galton, who was 88. with his friend alan simpson, he created steptoe and son — and wrote for tony hancock. his family said he had fought a "long and heartbreaking battle with dementia." one week after the indonesian island of sulawesi was hit by a devastating earthquake and tsunami, officials say more than 1,000 people could still be missing beneath the mud and rubble. so far the official death
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toll is around 1500. hundreds of buildings were destroyed in the city of palu when it was hit by a wall of water. yet, alongside the despair, there have been stories of hope, as our correspondent, nick beake, reports. within this devastated city you find incredible stories of survival. 12—year—old football fan rizki was in an internet cafe in palu watching highlights of his beloved manchester city when the earthquake struck. "suddenly the earth started to shake," he tells us. "i started to run, my hand was crushed, but i was able to stick out my other hand. i waved it, someone saw me and helped me out." he still hopes to achieve his dream of becoming a footballer, joining
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his heroes at his favourite team. who is your favourite manchester city player? riyad mahrez. algerian international riyad mahrez became manchester city's record signing when they bought him for £60 million this summer. we thought manchester city may want to know about their young fan's amazing story of survival thousands of miles away. so we got in touch. and it turns out riyad mahrez wants to send a personal message. now, rizki doesn't know anything about this. hi, rizki. somebody wants to say hello to you. hi, rizki. how are you? i hope you're getting better. i heard that you are a big city fan. so ijust want to wish you a good recovery. i hope you get better and we will give you the best wishes from man city. he also said that he'd like to send you a signed shirt as well. "i can't wait to get better and wear it", he says.
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in the city of sorrow, where they have lost so much... thank you. a smile goes a long way. the artist banksy has pulled off another dramatic stunt — a painting which was shredded — moments after being sold at auction for more than £1 million. the girl with balloon — one of the artist's best known works — was being sold by sotheby‘s in london. however, just after it went under the hammer, the canvas passed through a shredder hidden inside the frame. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at 10:10pm. now on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. hello let's bring you up—to—date
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with the latest sports news. manchester united has just picked up against newcastle. the bbc understands that he still has the backing of the board. he will be there win was next hour. when you managers should club like manchester united, it is about winning in style. and when you watch some of the work —— performances recently, it is not good enough for the standard of man united fans. at the end of the day the club can have millions of pounds but that was when you keep happy are the supporters. so if i'm just a mourinho, he needs to get this out playwright. that game hasjust to get this out playwright. that game has just kicked to get this out playwright. that game hasjust kicked off 0—0 to get this out playwright. that game has just kicked off 0—0 after just starting. the ball dropped to
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the six yard box and he got to go there. spurs had plenty of chances specially after they had ten men after 58 mrs. tottenham are now in third place. wofford and foremost had excellent stresses seasoned but it was bournemouth. they won with a 4-0 it was bournemouth. they won with a 4—0 win. a quick look at the other results today. huddersfield town still looking for first win of the season. wolves of the seventh place. alice yet to score at home in the league. keep an eye on the match of the day to night. city down to ten men. morgan was sent off to the second time in three weekends. aberdeen
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have been struggling but they managed for goals. —— four goals. the bottom of the table, dundee lost. there was a 1—1 draw. englandthat when it beat brazil 1—0. and prepare for next year's world cup. damon manager... —— the england manager. . . cup. damon manager... —— the england manager... they prove that they really are contenders for france 2019 asjoe kelly reports on england! inman in brazil match is attract the fans. but today there was only one player on everybody ‘s lips. she is a massive player for them, wasn't she? herface is lips. she is a massive player for them, wasn't she? her face is always there at the front of it. she has something that everyone else is god. something special really. the brazilian is the six—time fifa world
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cup layer of the year. but england made today about them. this is what a perfect start looks like. she opened her reign of terror done the right. england's number ten outshining her brazilian counterpart. lucy show that words mean nothing on the pitch as england's defence stayed strong. five minutes later the game is over before it had gotten really going. brazil's loss was england's gain as they dominated the first half. came close to doubling the lead and fire offa close to doubling the lead and fire off a shot that perhaps she should pass. they should've been a further head of the brave —— break. the second half of brazil's almost gifted an equaliser. but she rescued the situation for england. they nearly ended with a flourish. rachel daley‘s incentive shot tested the goal—tender. but they had to settle for a goal—tender. but they had to settle fora 1—0 goal—tender. but they had to settle
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for a 1—0 when. the score may not reflect england's dominance in the match but a win against one of the world's top teams eight points of the world cup is a great start. hgppy the world cup is a great start. happy to have won the game. but to have only gotten one goal is something we need to work on. but we just ended informed and then improve on the fact that we beat brazil and the fact we were disappointed we didn't score more goals is a good thing. england conquered. next up is australia. lewis hamilton will start on pole position for tomorrow's japanese grand pre—. lewis hamilton took pole position for the japanese grand prix with title rival sebastian vettel starting just eighth after yet another ferrari mix—up in the rain in suzuka. hamilton set his pole lap in the first part of the final qualifying session as ben croucher reports. formula 1 is a team game. right now mercedes lead. they and lewis
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hamilton time qualifying to perfection while sebastian vettel was trailing water. they had spins early on for the firm or read driver but his crashes nothing appear to marcus eriksen said as he drives back —— driven to the pits daniel ricardo need more help after technical issues. he will start well done the field. with rain, hamilton was sent out at the right time. one shot to get right and for the 80th time in his career, hamilton was in a class of one at the front by team—mate valtteri bottas. he slipped back to the top ten in what could be another season defining day that again went hamilton's way. ben crouch, bbc news. they were beaten at twickenham. they start with the try and they'd respond with two tries in two minutes. the first from ben young.
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and then over fellow added a second. —— lester move up to six place with that win. the day's of the games. wasps lost 21 points to 35 the gloucester. starlets beat all spirits at 20—17. missal the whole times —— the home side won. dragons are playing cardiff blues at the moment. 20 minutes gone and the dragons have a ten ml. —— 10— 08. —— 10-0 dragons have a ten ml. —— 10— 08. —— 10—0 lead. inman plaza the england coach at simon middleton happy to establish the professional playing careers. it has been a stressful
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period for them because they have great ambitions to be professional by great ambitions to be professional rugby players. and that's their dream. and they‘ re rugby players. and that's their dream. and they're holding out for that. we have all been trying to juggle that. we have all been trying to jugglejobs with their that. we have all been trying to juggle jobs with their current playing with the clubs and also i think people have also been waiting to see what the situation will be like in terms of getting jobs. but we are doing the process right and we're taking the time to make sure when the contracts came in that they are sustainable and done the right way. it is usually for the girls. fantastic for us all in terms of now we can get to the players. it is huge for women's rugby and women's sport. i anticipate the league having... that is the catalyst for us asa having... that is the catalyst for us as a squad. at this particular point and going for. with the quality that goes up, the quality, the players will grow, and that will help england. google finance for who
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will bejoining the rugby help england. google finance for who will be joining the rugby super help england. google finance for who will bejoining the rugby super duke —— italy. as broncos will be on the toronto team. there'll be taking place for the 2019 season. dave was has been speaking to wolfpack owner. they're excited. this is a wonderful moment for the toronto wolfpack and toronto broncos and all of rugby to be playing in the million pound game here. you're only two years old is the club and yet here you are on super late. the club and yet here you are on superlate. —— the club and yet here you are on super late. —— on the cusp of super lee, how you surprised at how quick it is come? we have great support for our players and coaches on the field. and importantly ourfront office has delivered the infrastructure for our team to do as well. we are surprised that in the five—year plan it's nice to get there earlier. we hope the rugby
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gods smile at us on sunday because because... day at our team will determine if we achieve the goal. the logistics, what happens when you get into league next year because the club let the flight up to play games and you'll had to fly here. so how will that work? it depends on us having a successful result on sunday. super league will dry up a schedule and we will play obviously in some blocks of home games and away games. yet to be determined of course. at the beginning of the season, because the weather here, we will be playing some home games and hopefully in other cities in europe. which will be exciting for the growth of the game and the awareness of the game and in other places. the third edition of the youth olympics gets underneath —— in this evening.
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43 tea m gets underneath —— in this evening. 43 team gb athletes are hoping to follow in the footsteps of tj jones and todd dailey who... bbc sport's nick opens in argentina force. when is our ace, a breathtaking city. steeped in history and traditions of tango, stea k history and traditions of tango, steak and football. but for the next 12 days, the city is embracing the new for the third edition of the summer youth olympics. the inaugural eventin summer youth olympics. the inaugural event in 2010 and watchedj summer youth olympics. the inaugural event in 2010 and watched j jones's of her as she followed up her su ccesses of her as she followed up her successes in singapore with senior golds at london 2012 and rio 2016. now 15—year—old fighter hossa follow in her footsteps and those of world champion team—mate bianco waterton. it strained because when i was younger, seeing them on tv you just turn around and you sit next to them in the gym. so i definitely do look up in the gym. so i definitely do look up to them and hopefully i can come
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back with a metal. powell is one of 43 gigabytes at these competing here. at the youth olympics are about more than just metals. —— 43 youth athletes. for the next 12 days, we will be given the close of what the future lipids could look like. break dancing, rollerspeed skating even for soccer could all be additions to senior games at the debuts here. we will monitor the performance of these new disciplines and sports. then when it comes to the programme for paris 2024, the results of this will play an important role. bmx rider rocks call and will hope to write in paris in 2024. but his versus rays will beat -- his 2024. but his versus rays will beat —— his first role be as gb team if i bear. it is so great to be on the open. this is a big stepping for myself. . few whole cities will
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rival the setting but athletes aren't here for the attractions. the been the only mementos that matter are metals. that is all from us. just to update you on the evening primarily game. if you're a manchester united fan you don't want to hear this. they are to have an zero down in old trafford to newcastle. manchester united 2—0 down to nasco —— newcastle. we will update you on that at 6:30pm is worth say. —— in sportsday. hello and a warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. as ever it is another good and interesting week. we have 22july which opens next wednesday, paul greengrass on a real—life tragedy. venom, tom hardy and a parasite from outer space. and columbus, life,
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love and architecture. we are going to talk about a star is born. we will have a bit of a round—up. it couldn't be a more difficult topic. 22july, the new greengrass movie, which opens in some theatres and netflix. this is a drama about the atrocity committed by anders breivik but more importantly how a civilised country responds to that atrocity so although we do see the bombings and we see the outrage on utoya, it's about how the country, the legal system, the survivors and politicians react to the atrocity. here is a clip. we've got the final number. eight dead in oslo, 69 in utoya.
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wounded? at least 200. thank you. we are all shocked. this was an attack on our government and on our children. we are a long way from understanding why. but what is clear is that our nation has been attacked by someone who would see it changed. who would see our democracy become tyranny. see our humanity fold. we must not give in to this terror. we must fight. and what the drama than really becomes about is how you deal with that kind of atrocity and there is a debate about whether the perpetrator should be able to speak in court because what he is saying is hateful and vile but more importantly, the survivors being heard and it's
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about the rise of the far right and extremism, it's shocking to see some extremist ideas which have passed into mainstream politics, not tactics but ideas and ideologies and i thought what paul greengrass managed to do was make a serious film about how it is that in a civilised, ordered society, you try and make sense of something like this and it's about the response being very measured and very deliberate and it's about issues and freedom of speech and it deals in an unsensational fashion, just how potentially sensationalist the subject matter is. it's very disturbing obviously and it's very moving and harrowing but in the end, i think it is also defined because it's about the voice of young people standing up to this as an ideology.
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-- it is —— it is defiant. it's a very tough and testing film, as it should be, but it's serious. terribly difficult because there will be people who save you are going to talk about something so horrific and really not that long ago, shouldn't one just make a documentary? —— who say... paul greengrass has a background in documentaries and a brilliantly blended documentary in 1993. if anyone is going to do it, i think he is the guy to do it and he is serious. he does have a background in documentary and news. yes, yes. on two very different matters. the second film of the week. this is a total mess. tom hardy is a former vlogger whose body is taken over by an extra terrestrial who likes to bite people's heads. it's outside of the standard marvel cinematic universe. it looks like a downbeat character
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study about a guy who loses his job and his girl and his life falls apart and then it turns silly and into a rubbery special effects movie with lots of motorbike chases and it turns into all of me meets the fly, and i've never seen a movie so catastrophically all over the place. i said to my son, "at least it was never boring." well it was boring in the beginning, then it became silly and entertaining in the last 30 minutes. tom hardy and the director do good work at it is an absolute mess of the movie. what was tom hardy doing in this? he was doing his best to hold it together and make some sense and the superhero movies, there are a million reasons for doing them. one adverb will thing about this is —— admirable thing about this is it doesn't look like any other
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superhero movie you've seen recently, it's all over the place and not without interest, but it is a total mess. i love the way you can still try to pick a glimmer. i enjoyed the last third of it but it's not good. columbus, i am really intrigued by. a us indie film, the debut for the director. john cho is a korean american man has collapsed, hayley richardson is a young woman who lives there. she is very interested in architecture. he claims he isn't but evidently here's an true talking about buildings, they start to talk about other things. here is a clip. during that time, banks were designed to be imposing fortresslike, tellers behind bars. the idea here was that you walk in at street level, you don't have to climb any stairs, it is inviting. sorry, what? what are you doing?
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what? who are you? shut up, i'm just trying to tell you about this building. step out of tour guide mode. you said this is one of your favourite buildings. why? it's one of the first modernist banks in the united states. that can't be it. do you like this building intellectually? no. i'm also moved by it. yes, yes. tell me about that. what moves you? what i like about this, firstly i am interested in architecture, but it's about psychogeography. by talking about buildings, they are talking about the rhone lives, he is trapped, and has a problematic relationship with his father. —— talking about their own lives. how she has a hard relationship with her mother. all this comes out while discussing
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architecture and the film is beautiful, just to look it and see it on the big screen. it has this kind of lovely ambient sound to it and it reminded me tonally, marjorie prime. it's really a movie about growing old and alienation. i thought this was really impressive. i'm intrigued but am wondering if you had a fascination on the film. i think you are saying that it is bigger than that. i must confess there was part of me that thought, i love looking at those buildings and the fact that the director loves looking in those buildings. maybe it's a little niche but that said, it's got rave reviews wherever it is opened. i would be very interested to know what you think about it. if you are an architecture fan. it sounds intriguing and beautiful. let's talk about another film. people have probably noticed. this is the best.
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a star is born. written and directed by bradley cooper is he is the grizzled rocker with his career on the way down. she is the uncredited songwriter on her way up. it's a story that's been told before, each different incarnation has its own merits. i thought this was great, bradley cooper did a great directing job, the onstage stuff, he is convincing as a rock star, very impressive. what's more impressive is lady gaga convincing you that she isn't a rock star. in the scenes before she gets famous. you are slightly more reserved. i loved the first power and i was really enjoying the meeting and the buildup in her showing off her talent and it is 15 minutes too long, i'm afraid. nigel floyd who i respect above all film critics thinks exactly the same thing you do and i disagree with him and you, it's just the right length and you should give it another go. ok, you see, i looked at my watch once or twice.
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did you cry? no, was i meant to do? you cry at everything. i cried. the first time they sang together come the last time they sang. oh, dear. i don't know, that's the thing. we were watching a different film. bradley cooper was extraordinarily good, i am neutral on him and he was tiptop. i was sceptical on him and he did a brilliant directorialjob. he believed the concert sequences. i obviously need to see it again. it's a star is born, how can you not cry? there is a dvd and i guarantee you are going to hate this. revenge, a film which turns the rape revenge convention on its head. it is a feminist film but it's also very gory and very violent and i'm not recommending it to you but if anyone is a horror fan, it's interesting but it's not
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as radical as it thinks it is but it is a very interesting film but you and i can have a very serious discussion about a star is born. iam in so i am in so much trouble! lovely to see you apart from that. all our other programmes, if you can bear it, are on the iplayer and all the news and reviews are on the website or the is by now. we've got the conversation. enjoy your weekend. thanks for watching, see you next time. hello. for many of you, a different set of weather day on the way tomorrow. which will be good news for some of had a grey, wet day like our weather watcher here in kingston on the outskirts of london. whereas it if you are in belfast, they had sunshine today, expect more cloud to come your way. that is gathering behind me at the moment because you can see the clear skies in the south this afternoon, slowly pushing south and east, but at most it is still under the zone of cloud.
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east anglia, southeast channel islands, wet evening, windy and cool. cooler into the day elsewhere, but at least with light winds sunshine will head be overhead and probably felt a good deal more pleasant. we will pay the price of those cool conditions and clear skies to take us into the night. but eventually arriving towards the hebrides. it is in between with a clear sky, greens on a temperature profile here not only an indication that we will see temperatures widely down into single figures, but in the countryside, many will wake up to a touch of frost as we start sunday morning. lovely crisp, but autmnal start to sunday, but again it will be a day of two halves. let's split the country into two. scotland and northern ireland first of all, today's sunshine, a lot more cloud, still some hazy sunshine in the south east, but elsewhere the cloud will bring occasional rain, most persistent across the west and a windy day
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with winds touching 40, 50, maybe 60 miles an hour in one of two spots. other spots of the country, england, wales, and channel islands, a vastly improved day. still a bit breezy towards the southeast corner but most light winds, blue skies, sunshine, giving way a bit more cloud than an isolated chance of a shower but most will be dried. for all, even after the frosty start, temperatures up a little bit on today's values. it remains windy in the north till monday. also, we will see this weather front straddling parts of scotland and northern ireland with further outbreaks of rain. we could see minor flooding across western scotland for the day, or 100 millimetres of rain over the next few days here. some rain in northern ireland in the morning, same too in northern england, that will push this way northwards. scotland stays dry through monday. much of it stays dry as well and pleasant enough with hazy sunshine towards the south and east and temperatures back into the high teens and for all, next week will feel a lot warmer than it has done this weekend. bye for now. this is bbc news.
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i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at six. chanting: hey, hey! ho, ho! kavanaugh has got to go! division and protests across america, but senators are expected to approve president trump's supreme court nomination later, despite sexual assault allegations. a government review reveals that toxic air pollution is much worse in eight areas of england than previously thought. the doctor will see you all now. gps trial a scheme where some patients share their appointments. one of the fathers of british sitcom, ray galton, has died at the age of 88. if we was to kill off all the dirty old blokes like you, we wouldn't have any diseases any more. with his co—writer alan simpson he created classics — steptoe and son and hancock's half hour. going, going, actually gone, an original banksy self—destructs, moments after selling for more than a million pounds at auction.
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