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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 22, 2018 8:00am-10:00am GMT

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we have one more present to you, if you went in the audience for our recent click live show next week you can it on tv. from ask you. from all us, merry clickmas! —— from us to you. good morning welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and chris mason. our headlines today: a man and a woman are arrested by police investigating the drone disruption at gatwick. today more delays are expected but flights have resumed in the past few hours. we'll be live at the airport with the latest. also this morning: the defence secretary, gavin williamson, tells the bbc the arrival of a royal navy warship in ukraine sends a strong message to president putin.
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natasha ednan—laperouse was just 15 when she was killed by an allergic reaction to a pret a manger sandwich. as they fight to change food labelling laws, her parents tell us how she'll never be forgotten. christmas for us isn'tjust christmas, it's also her birthday. it'lljust never be the same really because we find it too difficult to be here on christmas day because she's missing. liverpool, top of the tree jurgen klopp‘s team will be top of the premier league for christmas after beating wolves 2—0. good morning. some sunshine on the way today. more cloud and some rain tomorrow and we'll be taking a closer look at what the weather has in store of course as we move into christmas. good morning to you. it's saturday, 22nd of december.
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our top story. police have arrested two people on suspicion of illegally flying drones over gatwick airport. flights were halted for more than a day after the first sighting on wednesday night. thousands of people have had their christmas travel plans disrupted. sussex police released this statement overnight. our reporter munaza rafiq has more. after hundreds of cancelled flights, this was the reaction when passengers heard they were up and running again. cheering and applause it came after the airport was closed forjust over an hour after the sighting of another drone. they told us that the flight was cancelled and that we had to collect our luggage.
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after unprecedented disruption, flights had resumed just after 6:00 on friday morning. many woke up after a night on the airport's floor. virginia goncalves from cornwall is seriously ill and spent the night in an airport chair. it's horrible. it's...it goes against your human rights, isn't it? i have stage four cancer, widespread to the bones, for god's sake. last night, sussex police said they had arrested two people suspected of involvement in the illegal use of drones. meanwhile, flights have continued throughout the night at the country's second busiest airport as it attempts to deal with the severe backlog of passengers. munaza rafiq, bbc news. we can speak now to our reporter ben schofield, who's at gatwick for us this morning. the main issue is over, but so many
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people still being disrupted? good morning. welcome to the south terminal at gatwick airport on the first day of what is predicted to be the busiest weekend of the year for departures. the airport are doing a brave face on things. they are hoping to operate a full schedule of flights, 750 into and out of the airport, ferrying 120,000 passengers or airport, ferrying 120,000 passengers 01’ so. airport, ferrying 120,000 passengers or so. but the advice is to check whether your flight is cancelled or delayed as the knock—on effects continue. norwegian flight from singapore is cancelled, easyjet from milan was also cancelled. there will be some reassurance for passengers that the police and military operation at gatwick will continue to keep the runway open. we will keep everybody up—to—date here. also
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in the news this morning... four stowaways found on a cargo ship in the thames estuary have been detained under the immigration act, after the vessel's crew was threatened. the grande tema left nigeria 11 days ago. the group are thought to have armed themselves with iron bars, forcing crew members to retreat to the bridge of the ship. no one was injured. hundreds of thousands of federal workers in the us are facing christmas without pay because of a partial government shutdown. it's because democrats refuse to sign off on funding for president trump's mexican border wall. roughly a quarter of federal agencies are affected, including the departments of homeland security, transportation and national parks. donald trump has warned that it will last for "a very long time" if the funding isn't granted. a british warship has arrived in the black sea in response to russia's seizure of three ukrainian navy vessels and their crew last month. the defence secretary, gavin williamson, says the presence of the royal navy will send a strong message to moscow. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale has more. these are the increasingly volatile and contested
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waters of the black sea. and navigating his way through them, britain's defence secretary steering a ukrainian gunboat. just a month ago, russia seized three sister boats nearby off the coast of crimea, land now also occupied by russia. but he's here to visit a royal navy warship docked in ukraine's port of odessa — hms echo, a lightly armed service vessel, or what moscow calls a spy ship. it's meant to send a clear message. what we are saying to russia, what we are saying to president putin, they cannot continue to act with no regard or care for international laws or international norms. this is why he's intervened. in november, a ukrainian tug boat was rammed by a russian vessel. shots were fired at the accompanying flotilla, blocked from entering
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the narrow kerch straight. to do what we can do, working with you to ensure your loved ones are back home with you. 2a ukrainian sailors are still being held, these their anxious relatives waiting for news. the uk's defence secretary listened to their pleas for help — they even sent a letter to the queen. viktor has not seen his wounded son, vassil, since he was captured. he says, "i feel pain, i feel helpless. we are looking for the support of britain to get them released." the presence of this royal navy warship here in odessa is to provide ukraine with reassurance in the face of what they see as russian aggression but britain is not looking for a confrontation with russia, and this warship is not expected to sail through the kerch strait.
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does anyone else want one? the defence secretary says this is not a provocation, but a show of solidarity. the crew of hms echo will be here for christmas. it's quite a long stint, isn't it? and other british warships will be returning next year. jonathan beale, bbc news, 0dessa. while for some last night may have been a chance to get merry and celebrate finishing work for christmas, it's the health service that often pays the price for the over—indulgence. this year nhs england has invested £300—thousand pounds to fund dozens £300,000 to fund dozens of so—called "drunk tanks", with the sole aim of taking the pressure off hospitals and emergency services during the festive season. chi chi izundu has been out with one of them. and little too much christmas spirit, a hangover for the
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and little too much christmas spirit, a hangoverfor the nhs. and little too much christmas spirit, a hangoverforthe nhs. 0n and little too much christmas spirit, a hangoverfor the nhs. on a friday and saturday night, 70% of visits to a&e are alcohol—related. the solution could be drunk tanks on the streets helping those in need. nhs england has invested £300,000 in drunk tanks in a bid to ease the pressure on hospitals and emergency services over the festive period. this one in central london's soho is bolstered by angels, volunteer to make sure those who have had a little too much get the help they need. kitted out with water, fli p—flo ps need. kitted out with water, flip—flops and sick bags, they have set upa flip—flops and sick bags, they have set up a triage area to treat the most serious cases, like matthew's partner. people do have too much christmas spirit and end up needing some help. whether it is alcohol or just getting too carried away and maybe having a fight and getting hurt. so having somebody look after
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people and get them home safely is invaluable. drunk tanks are already being used in problem areas across england. a report into whether they are genuinely easing pressure on front—line staff is not expected until next year. and, whilst emergency staff want partygoers to have a good time, they want the festive cheer to be less of a stumble home. a rare albino orangutan has been released into the wild in indonesia, nearly two years after it was rescued from captivity. alba, the world's only albino orangutan, was rescued in borneo in april last year when she was five years old — suffering from stress, dehydration and a parasite infection. during her recovery she's shown excellent climbing and social skills. a conservation team will keep an eye on herfor the next six months to ensure she remains safe and healthy. being a parent of a child with allergies is scary
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at the best of times, but with temptations all around, christmas can be terrifying. this autumn an inquest into the death of teenager natasha ednan—laperouse, who suffered a reaction after eating a baguette from pret a manger, thrust the issue into the spotlight. bbc breakfast‘s matt taylor, who has two little girls with severe allergies, went to meet natasha's parents. you like this, do you? yeah, ido. like all families, we are looking forward to christmas, the kids especially excited as well. they've got santa coming, there's the presents, also the food, to a certain extent, but with us as a family that comes with huge, huge challenges. i have loads of allergies. i'm allergic to dairy, egg, legumes, lentils, and peas. i also have some allergies, i'm allergic to peanuts. # it's beginning to look a lot like christmas... brilliant.
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look at all that! daddy, what are those? you are constantly thinking about what you are feeding them, what they are eating and up comes even more of a challenge at christmas time, especially when there's parties involved, they go out to other places, to other friends. gosh, that's got everything in it, nope. it is just one mistake that could be the difference between life and basically death. hello, lovely to see you. thank you for meeting me. i am meeting the parents of natasha ednan—laperouse. natasha was just 15 when she died in 2016, after having an allergic reaction after eating a baguette from pret a manger. christmas for us isn'tjust christmas, it's also her birthday, and we will be celebrating that without her and then christmas day... it'lljust never be the same, really, because we find it too difficult to be here on christmas day because she's missing. it is just so palpable that she's not here. natasha's parents are trying to change the labelling of food
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in restaurants and take—aways. it'll be called natasha's law. do you think natasha's law would help to change things out there and to make us more confident to eat out as a family in future? most definitely. it has to, that's the whole point. companies who have not had to take allergies seriously or allergens and food seriously will now be required to and if they don't, then they will be in trouble. we will not stop until it is done, basically, because i think that is the legacy we would like for natasha. now, more importantly for those that are living, to protect those that are living so they do not come into that terrible situation that we had as a family. i was incredibly humbled to meet natasha's parents, they have been through a huge, a huge amount of distress and heartache but yet are turning that to try and help other families in the future, to stop them going to the same heartache and loss that they have.
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# sure it's christmas...# right, here we go. what do you reckon to them? it has been quite a challenge so far, bringing two daughters up with allergies but i hope that things will change top a certain extent, that they can go out, enjoy christmas, just like any other family. they are allergen—free, let's see, are they tasty? all: merry christmas, everyone! let's discuss this with gp, dr fari ahmad, whojoins us now. we can see the immense difficulties families have when children and adults have these allergies. 0n families have when children and adults have these allergies. on a general thing, are we getting more, are more people having allergies now? yes, it looks like the number of allergies people have and the
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number of people who are getting them is going up. all over the world, not just them is going up. all over the world, notjust in the uk. certainly asa world, notjust in the uk. certainly as a doctor, a patient with an adrenaline pen, you would remember who it was because it wasn't usual. now we have more and more people being prescribed these. why is that? good question. there are a few theories. a theory about the hygiene hypothesis, the environment we live in are so clean that our immune system hasn't got a chance to get used to different pathogens, different bacteria. when it meets things that are not harmful to us, things that are not harmful to us, things that are not harmful to us, things that shouldn't be causing us any trouble, the immune system overrea cts any trouble, the immune system overreacts and you get an allergic reaction which can sometimes be life—threatening. reaction which can sometimes be life-threatening. is it obvious when someone is having an allergic
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reaction, it is an allergic reaction and what it is an allergic reaction is? the quick answer is no, not always. most people have the anaphylaxis reaction. i would hope most people can spot that and you need to seek urgent help. not being able to breathe, presumably? their airway starts to be affected and their tongue and lips can be swollen. they can have a rash and feel like they are getting dizzy and going unconscious. that is an emergency, give them an epipen if you have one, call an ambulance. there are other allergies that are less severe. a lot of people get hay fever which is an allergy to different types of pollen. then there is an intolerance along the spectrum. tends to be stomach related, gastric related to foods and things people cannot tolerate.
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is there any pattern to who is susceptible? sometimes it does run in families. there are families that have hay fever, eczema running in them and they tend to have allergies as well. we haven't understood what it is. a combination of genetics and the environment at play. but it's still not been worked out what is going on. there are tests, if your children have allergies, you can get to the bottom of what it is normally? most of the time, yes. a lot of it is taking the story and finding out what it was, what circumstances, what have they taken, what have they been exposed to. they can narrow down where you are going and there are specific tests. there are some people who we don't actually ever find out what it is they are allergic to. but the management of it, we can still do. thank you very much, happy christmas
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to you as well. happy christmas to you all. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. imad bassou of people finishing or maybe even starting their christmas shopping? the weather has been reasonable, especially today. if you are out and about we have a lot of sunshine under way. tomorrow, rain and cloud so it might be an idea to hunker down with your christmas film. but once the sun gets a bit will be a bright story. showers throughout the day affecting western scotland and in wales, the morning will be wet and showers will be scattered in the afternoon. a few isolated showers drifting further east and a few showers for northern ireland. of the two days, saturday
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is the dryers. temperatures struggling to recover in the north—east after a frosty start against scotland. mild in the south. a fine evening, showers across northern and western scotland and turning chilly through the small hours of sunday. further south, temperatures picked up as the wind picks up and the cloud arrives and so does the rain for sunday morning. frosty start with patchy fog across scotland, but for sunday, scotland will be the place to be to get the best of the dry and bright weather. further south these weather fronts will sit in for the day, uncertainty as to how far north the rain will push on to northern ireland and northern england. this is a pessimistic picture, we could see it a little bit further south. for england and wales, rain and cloud on and off for much of the date on sunday. northern ireland, hopefully brightening up as the day goes on. scotland, highs of around 506, to
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the south, still mild but a great picture. next week, christmas week. monday, it will be christmas eve and weather fronts around in the south first thing bringing brazilian rainbow high pressure is building for christmas week and that really is going to settle things down. it will block things coming in from the atla ntic will block things coming in from the atlantic and kill off any weather fronts. a little bit of rain first thing on monday but fizzling away as the day goes on. the cloud lingering and mistand the day goes on. the cloud lingering and mist and fog in a few spots. brightness in the east. temperatures down on the weekend. it will feel cooler as we move into the week by day and also by night, we will perhaps have a frosty start to christmas day. that is as close to white we will get. we could get stuck with patches of fog, but grey is likely to be the theme on christmas day. fine weather, but for some, lingering cloud. thank you very much.
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eight small energy suppliers have gone bust in 2018 and analysts expect another half a dozen to go this winter. so if you're planning to switch supplier, how can you avoid firms that might get into financial trouble? paul lewis of radio 4's money box programme has been looking this. he joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning. it is tricky, we are hearing advice about shopping around and going beyond the big firms, and now this news? the small suppliers have real problems. they don't have the scale of the big one, so they cannot buy energy in advance and even out the ups and downs. they often don't have their customer service lines with enough people to deal with any unforeseen problems. of course, the only way they can compete against the big one, whose names we all know like british gas and scottishpower is on price. they had to cut their prices to the bone
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to get to the top of those best buy ta bles to get to the top of those best buy tables and they often cannot sustain those prices. so it is a very difficult market for the 60, there are more than 60 small energy suppliers. one of them has had to go to the extent of setting out on their website in capital letters, they are in financially decent shape? yes, there have been a lot of customer complaints and we spoke to one man who said he called them to complain aboutan one man who said he called them to complain about an issue and he was 37th in the queue. he said life is too short and he couldn't cope with it. they put question and answers on their website and one question was, are you going bust? and they said, no we're not. it is extraordinary, we have never seen anything like this in 20 years in the industry. but it is having problems with customer complaints because it has
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changed the pricing structure. people are finding it hard to get back credits they are owed when they have paid a bit too much over the summer. so all of these smaller companies 0utfox the market are keeping problems keeping up with the big guys. the ultimate question from paying punter‘s perspective, is it worth switching? i keep asking myself that. switching, if you have never switched, i think half of the population never has, then switching will save you money, no question. 0nce will save you money, no question. once you have switched, switching again saves less, perhaps nothing, perhaps very little. don'tjust look at the price, the consumer's association has a useful table of customer service and give star ratings for customer service. you will notice when you look at that the big ones are in the top half, not all that high, but in the top
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half and the bottom are all the smaller ones. of the bottom five, two have gone bust in the last few months. it is worth looking, not just up the price butter customer services and go with a firm that can cope with its customers as well as cutting prices to the bone. thank you, merry christmas and three cheers for your tie. it is fantastic. you have noticed. cheers for your tie. it is fantastic. you have noticedlj cheers for your tie. it is fantastic. you have noticed. i think we have all noticed. i am feeling tie envy. i have my mediocre purple number on. there is more on that story on money box and radio 4 at midday. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's 8.20am. time now for a look at the newspapers.
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historian and author tessa dunlop is here to tell us what's caught her eye. good morning. i have escaped tie—gate. good morning. i have escaped tie-gate. is easier for us? i don't think so. and to add to the controversy i think it is burgundy and not purple. happy to be corrected, i think. and not purple. happy to be corrected, ithink. you have and not purple. happy to be corrected, i think. you have had a look inside the papers, starting with amber rudd? i am wary about moving away from the front pages, but this did begin on the front page. talking to tory heartlands at christmas time when people have time to invest in a profile piece. this picture says to me, amber rudd for prime minister. that was the first thing that struck me, image is important and thing that struck me, image is importantandi thing that struck me, image is important and i know we talked about it briefly, but there is something in that. i thought exactly the same
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as you. when you come to terms with this article, she is some woman, she is not only the comeback kid, bagging and other key role having lost herjob as home secretary, she is heading up the department for work and pensions, this is her six senior role in government since she was elected as an mp in 2010. she is a very clever operator. she was a staunch remain on brexit and she is convincing tory land and brexit that she is with them but she doesn't wa nt to she is with them but she doesn't want to go again her own grain. she has used the doha over recent weeks with regards to the gender war. the telegraph focus on her attitude towardsjean—claude telegraph focus on her attitude towards jean—claude juncker. his spat with theresa may, i noticed he was overfamiliar on the elbow. the body language said calm down, dear.
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she absolutely nails him on this and thatis she absolutely nails him on this and that is why the paper refers to him as gasly. —— gasly. she started jeremy corbyn saying this isn't appropriate, he goes on about equality, but calling the prime minister a stupid woman, is it appropriate from a future prime minister? there was a tiff between her and andrea leadsome where she said you couldn't have a second referendum but amber rudd didn't rule it out. i know you are not here asa rule it out. i know you are not here as a political correspondent, but the timing of this, what is it saying to you? i agree about the photo, it is is that sense of a
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potential vacancies that might arise at some stage in the new year. she saysin at some stage in the new year. she says in the interview, we have a prime minister. but theresa may has said she will not be there for ever. exactly. this one is about the us and the shutdown, parts of government have effectively shut down and people have not been paid over this christmas? donald trump literally throwing all his toys out of the pram and it is because of the wall. he has held onto his hard right base, who have stuck with him through thick and thin, no matter what he said. the one thing that might break their loyalty is the issue of this wall. he once the budget to be passed with an extra, wait for it, $5.7 billion to build the wall. he cannot get it passed the wall. he cannot get it passed the senate where he needs 60 of the hundred so he needs some democrats to vote with him. on a personal
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level, trump will be furious. it means he has got to stay behind in the white house and he had planned his longest ever holiday away in his palm beach resort the 16 days. it was going to catch the nation a fortune, security there for 16 days but his wife and son have gone without him. he has got to stay and manned the sinking ship. if they don't pay people they don't have to work so this is american parks, statue of liberty, museums, secret service and federal workers who could just upped sticks and leave. if you get a take off from gatwick to arrive in america you might not find there is anything to visit. let's look inside the daily mail. the seasonal warning about people potentially overdoing it in the next day or two? two stories to do with health, one is in the guardian, far right populism gives boost to
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vaccine doubters where people in countries have a popular wave from the far right. in italy there is a huge outbreak of measles because people are not having their vaccinations. it is about undermining the expert, do we believe in establishment and what we are told? i think this headline in the mail exemplifies the problem, in italy they have had 4000 people with measles. measles is very nearly killed my father, it is very nasty and we have forgotten how fatal some of these illnesses can be. we refer to the chief medical officer in the nhs as chief nanny. she is a professor and a dame. we are always calling her a nanny and she has been asked about it in an interview and she says it is the season of mary poppins. do we need to give respect when we
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are talking about health and health warnings? it is question more than a suggestion. more and more we want to ta ke suggestion. more and more we want to take things into our own hands but at the same time there are people who know better. so, chris, not too much sherry, please. iwill take it easy. thank you. the headlines are coming up shortly. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and chris mason. a summary of this morning's main news. police have arrested two people on suspicion of illegally flying drones over gatwick airport. flights were halted for more than a day after the first sighting on wednesday night. thousands of people have had their christmas travel plans disrupted. sussex police released this statement overnight. they say...
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we can get more from our reporter at gatwick. some 150,000 affected, however things today? it is fair to say that passengers are flowing reasonably well through south terminal. certainly when it comes to departures, the airport saying they are hoping to see off a full schedule of flights from here. coming in through arrivals, a different story, you are still see people talking about delays in many hours. a family just
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people talking about delays in many hours. a familyjust came off a bus from paris, a flight that should have been an hour and a half a length turned into a 12 hourjourney by road and fairy, no mean feat with a seven and three—year—old. the scale of the destruction, we have totted up more than 1000 flights we re totted up more than 1000 flights were either cancelled or diverted over the 36 hours and then the extra 90 minute closure yesterday but there will be reassurance that the police and military operation will continue to try to keep the skies drone free. thank you. four stowaways found on a cargo ship in the thames estuary have been detained under the immigration act, after the vessel's crew was threatened. the grande tema left nigeria 11 days ago. the group are thought to have armed themselves with iron bars, forcing crew members to retreat to the bridge of the ship. no one was injured. hundreds of thousands of federal workers in the us are facing christmas without pay because of a partial government shutdown.
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democrats refused to sign off on funding for president trump's mexican border wall. roughly a quarter of federal agencies are affected — including the departments of homeland security, transportation and national parks. donald trump has warned that it will last for "a very long time" if the funding isn't granted. a british warship has arrived in the black sea in response to russia's seizure of three ukrainian navy vessels and their crew last month. the defence secretary, gavin williamson, says the presence of the royal navy showed support for ukraine in the face of increased russian aggression. a builder who has claimed a £76 million euro millions jackpot says he found the winning ticket tucked under the visor of his van, six weeks after the draw. pootling around! it shows there has not been much
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sunshine! andrew clark had a stockpile of tickets in his van and discovered the winning one in the stash after being asked to check by his partner. the 51—year—old says he will still be having a quiet christmas, he has bought presents already, so no upgrades if you are a friend or family! but he will go out for a meal. at a restaurant in skegness on new year's eve. those are the main stories this morning. lizzie is here. i am flabbergasted, what would you do with all that money? you could give it away. liverpool had a christmas present. they are guaranteed the number—one spot in the premier league for christmas after they beat wolves 2—nil at molineux. they're 4 points clear of manchester city, who play today. nick parrott reports.
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liverpool haven't had a happy christmas for five years. nowjurgen klopp and his men have delivered an early present to theirfans. this wasn't as comfortable a victory at the scoreline suggests, though — playing at molineux isn't easy. manchester city could only draw here. chelsea lost. and liverpool rode their luck at times. they could easily have slipped up with the rain lashing down. but the difference between the good and the great comes down to making the most of your chances. that is just what mo saleh did. the egyptian's goal took him to the top of the league scoring charts and he was on song with an assist, too, ta ken brilliantly by virgil van dijk. with more prolific strikers, wolves might have got something. but liverpool could have scored more, too. the team that's top of the table christmas usually ends up as champions. the pressure is now on manchester city. nick parrott, bbc news. dan's here to talk through the football. sporting possibly the worst christmas jumper i have seen!
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seriously, look at this, everybody. hello. so bad it is good, as steve wright would say. i wore a sophisticated one last week but now i have gone all out. is there any such thing as a sophisticated christmas jumper? when you see this, you realise there is! 0n football focus we will talk about the liverpool game and where that leaves manchester city. you cannot ta ke leaves manchester city. you cannot take anything i say seriously. we will also talk about manchester united, the big topic. we have 0le gunnar solskjaer and will hear from him on the programme and talk to ashley young who has been speaking to dion dublin. we have two former
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manchester united players and this isa manchester united players and this is a piece of the ashley young interview. why do you think it has not ticked? there is so much talent. lam not not ticked? there is so much talent. i am not sure, it is about building confidence. the talent in the squad, is unbelievable. you need the discipline and character, the heart and desire and the winning mentality. when you work at a club like this, that comes in abundance. for me, at my age, i like this, that comes in abundance. for me, at my age, lam like this, that comes in abundance. for me, at my age, i am still a winnerand want to for me, at my age, i am still a winner and want to win all the time. a lot of people will tell you when i come off the training pitch, if i have lost in training, it hurts, i am not nice to be around! interesting to see how manchester united players react. three managers have not had the support of the board fully even though he was given 400 million to spend on still left thejob. less 400 million to spend on still left the job. less than 1000 400 million to spend on still left thejob. less than 1000 days in the
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job. we will also get some fans on to talk about it. what do you think sir alex said to 0le gunnar solskjaer when he phoned him? that isa solskjaer when he phoned him? that is a good one. they have a brilliant relationship and sir alex has always said, because 0le gunnar solskjaer spent a lot of time on the bench. he thought he was one of the best readers of the game because when he came on as substitute he got straight into the tempo of the game. some substitutes were say i cannot believe i'm not playing and took time to get into it when they came on but 0le gunnar solskjaer always scored many goals coming on a substitute. i think sir alex said manager in the way you used to play. bea manager in the way you used to play. be a great reader of the game. it is just a change at manchester united. the tone at the press conference was different. i thinkjose mourinho got fed up with the job and interesting to see how his replacement is settled in. it is a weird job share
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arrangement with the norwegian team. i also have kieran trippier and alex scott. alex scott spoke to him about their big week, beating arsenal, dele alli getting hit on the head. and also rumours about him going to 0ld and also rumours about him going to old trafford. portsmouth, matt clarke bakes the rest of the players ca kes. clarke bakes the rest of the players cakes. gareth southgate will be on the programme and we have kids from rosehilljuniors who are raising money by making their own sticker book and we have whyte doing predictions, i know you have frank warren coming on. we have not seen each other for warren coming on. we have not seen each otherfor a while. warren coming on. we have not seen each other for a while. it is christmas. here is your present. where is my? i bought you an orange. it's the lovely floor managers, care —— kevin. it's the lovely floor managers, care -- kevin. you could open it but it
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might be advertising. wine gums. my absolute favourite! mime —— mine also. we will be back together soon on breakfast. 31st of... soon. football focus is on at midday on bbc one. 0nto rugby union and northampton thrashed worcester 32—6. this interception from cobus reinach earned saints their opening try, running almost the entire length of the pitch. they then added another from luther burrell as well as six penalties to make it a miserable night for worcester — who are just two points off the bottom of the table. there was a dramatic finish at the arms park where cardiff blues needed this late penalty to beat local rivals newport gwent dragons, but gareth anscombe held his nerve to seal the points for a 19—16 win. elsewhere ulster beat munster. every christmas, the world's top showjumpers travel to the centre of london
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for the 0lympia international horse show. it's a week—long event and this afternoon is the one they all want to win — the world cup qualifier. britain's ben maher is one of the big names competing — not only for the huge prize money but also for the points which count towards a place in the world cup final next year. the olympic gold medallist in 2012 has had a great year and a win at olympia would be a nice christmas present. it is 0lympia, it is one of the best horse road shows in the world. for many reasons — riders like riding here. london is a great city. i jumped many shows this year and you still don't get the atmosphere like you do in this building. the final show of the year for everybody, and it is the big one of the year. of the week. it's a big night of boxing tonight with high—profile bouts taking place in london and manchester. josh warrington makes his first world title defence against carl frampton at the manchester arena, while it's an all english heavyweight rematch at the 02
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in the capital as dillian whyte and dereck chisora meet in the ring. we're joined now by frank warren, who's the promoter of the warrington—frampton fight. i want to talk first about the timing because both fights are on the same night on pay—per—view, why? i heard you call it sabotage. from ourend, we i heard you call it sabotage. from our end, we announced our date in august for the 22nd. i think it was six, seven weeks ago the other side, being matchroom and sky announced their date. it is crazy. boxing for me feels like it is riding the crest ofa me feels like it is riding the crest of a wave and people are listening and watching really into it, why did ludik? it is disrespectful to the sport and to the fans. it is the time of year when people maybe cannot afford to pay for two events. it is ridiculous, there is no sense
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to it and it is a moment when boxing hurts itself. can you make it better for the fans? well one of your team be watching their fight to make sure yours comes out first or after? we announced a date... timing wise, can you make your guys come out of the ring, i don't know? it is warring tv channels. it is stupid. is that not the nature of competition? i have no problem with competition? i have no problem with competition but it is stupid competition. you will not put on manchester city manchester united, they will not play 3pm on a saturday afternoon on the same date. it does not happen in the same town. they spit up the teams to make it work to make sure you have a maximum audience and you need a maximum audience and you need a maximum audience for your sport because you wa nt to audience for your sport because you want to grow the sport. both of these fights could be really close? mine is going to be good, i know
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that. it is the best domestic fight for a number of years. two guys, warrington and frampton, at the top. world —class warrington and frampton, at the top. world—class fighters, they are not recycled, they are winners and the winner will go on to fight in a unification fight. they have respect for each other, unlike dillian whyte and dereck chisora, where there was and dereck chisora, where there was a nasty stuff. should boxing move on from that? these guys, josh and carl frampton, they are professionals. they are edgy because they are fighting each other but they have great respect for each other. the other stuff, the previous dillian whyte and dereck chisora fight, i think it was eddie hearn who gave him a watch for throwing over the table. it is all pantomime. whoever wins from the dillian whyte dereck chisora fight, will they get to
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fight anthonyjoshua? chisora fight, will they get to fight anthony joshua? it is their intention. he has beaten dillian whyte in seven rounds, a couple of yea rs whyte in seven rounds, a couple of years ago so that is a pointless fight and as for dereck chisora, i do not think that is an attraction. we spoke about the renaissance of boxing. why is that? it is competitive. heavyweight division, the standard—bearer of the sport, anthonyjoshua did the standard—bearer of the sport, anthony joshua did well the standard—bearer of the sport, anthonyjoshua did well in the 0lympics anthonyjoshua did well in the olympics and is a professional. tyson fury has come back and that has been great. and we have another crop of youngsters coming through. britain is probably the best nation for heavyweights at the moment. it used to be america and eastern europe, but we are now leading the way with great heavyweight fighters. frank warren, thank you and good luck tonight. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. weather watchers are
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getting up and about and sending some lovely scenes of sunrise. scenes like these are fairly widespread at the moment. today the sunniest of the weekend, thanks to high pressure creeping in. sunday, looking at this set of whether froms, more grey and wet stop showers at the moment across the north—west of england and scotland and there will be some for northern ireland in the day, maybe drifting into the midlands and south west but generally a lot of dry weather and brightness. the sunshine hazy in the south with high cloud but mild. 12 in london. we will struggle to catch up in london. we will struggle to catch up with temperatures in northern scotla nd up with temperatures in northern scotland after a frosty start. showers in western scotland in the evening but elsewhere fine. if you stop out quite late, heading home in
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the small hours, the rain will arrive into the south—west of england and wales and northern ireland. it will also mean temperatures here start to pick up at the end of the night whereas scotla nd at the end of the night whereas scotland will get off to a clear and frosty start on sunday but scotland does well on sunday, poking out of the north of this weather feature and it looks like northern ireland, northern england and southwards gets the wettest of the weather. uncertainty about the northern line about rain. it might settle further south. 0verall, about rain. it might settle further south. overall, the south of the uk grey and wet on sunday and the further north you are, the better the chance of seeing sunshine. a frosty start. and patches of lingering fog in scotland. into next week, christmas week, high pressure is set to build. the weather picture looks like it will become
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increasingly settled, killing off whether from sparing increasingly settled, killing off whetherfrom sparing rain. the settled scene can bring complications with lingering fog so something to bear in mind. rain around to the south on christmas eve but lessening as the day goes on. cooler on christmas eve. christmas day, a widespread frost. christmas starting cold but temperatures rising to around average. some areas getting stuck with lingering fog but most facing the prospect of getting stuck with boring cloud, so let's hope the presents are bright and sparkling! at christmas, we all like to relax, have fun and indulge and if you have dogs, there's no doubt they'll be keen to enjoy some presents as well. however, the festive period can be a dangerous time for our pets.
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the yorkshire vet, peter wright, is here to tell us how we can keep them safe. thinking about dogs in particular, what can they and cannot eat? what we have to keep away from them? one thing is chocolate. it can be a problem. there is a stimulant in chocolate that we can break down and get rid of, dog struggle with it. if you have the odd chocolate, that is fine, especially a milk chocolate that dark chocolate is more of a risk and any quantity of chocolate will cause problems. if we see dogs who have eaten chocolate, we like to see them as soon as possible and get them to be sick. i think we have a clip of you dealing with a dog that has eaten chocolate. what has he been up to? he has eaten half a bowl of quality street. you naughty child! i will listen to his heart.
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you are a naughty boy. he has had the wrappers and everything. chocolate do not do dogs any good. it canjust chocolate do not do dogs any good. it can just cause gastro and intestine problems but it can also cause heart problems because there isa cause heart problems because there is a cardiac stimulant in chocolate thatis is a cardiac stimulant in chocolate that is toxic to dogs and we have to try to get rid of it before it is absorbed into his stomach and can cause more systemic reactions. can you give us an update, how was that dog? rocket is absolutely fine. he looked so innocent. if for examples someone realises that has happened. their dog has eaten chocolate ‘s. what you do? it is a major concern. the odd chocolate is not a problem but that sort of quantity, they need to make the dog sick which is
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difficult to achieve at home. how might you do that? you could try to put some soapy water down the throat to make them sick, but it is not easy to do and they are better contacting the veterinary surgeon because time is important because the longer the chocolate is in the stomach the more likely the ingredients will be absorbed so better to contact the veterinary practice. looking at the christmas tree, baubles, christmas presents, lighting. in the past, i have had animals who have been electrocuted by chewing through cables to the lights on the tree. we had a cat burning their tongue badly. but there are many hazards for pets at christmas. is it a time when you get a lot of emergency calls? we do, we get a lot of foreign bodies around christmas time and we mean by that dogs who have eaten things that cannot be digested, like bones,
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children's toys, decorations, which can cause problems. we often end up having to fish them out of the stomach. this couple is up with homes at christmas being chaotic with family coming and going and if people are for christmas and are potentially novices with a cat or dog, heaped on top of the extra risk, the chances of getting a call goes up further? absolutely. we do not like people to get a new pet at christmas. we feel that pets acquired at christmas, sometimes there is a tendency to lose interest in them. we feel it is something that needs to be given an awful lot of thought, rather than an impulse christmas. so plan a christmas day walk, as well. and you are working christmas day? working christmas time. the yorkshire vet is on channel 5 at 8.30pm on christmas eve. no saturday morning is complete
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without one of mike's wacky sports. and this is one. ballet on skis — sounds like an idea sports from the ‘80s and ‘90s will know how big it was back then. there hasn't been an official international competition since 2000, but one man is determined to bring it back. we sent mike bushell to the chill factor not so much dancing on ice, this is strictly on snow. ski ballet was popular around the world when resorts were opening up. even if the commentators were confused. if only he would make up his mind which way he is going. in britain, the routines flourished on the new dry slopes. and, for a time, there was ambition of glory of medals with it becoming a demonstration sport in the 1998 and 1992 olympic games. but then came the snowboard and freestyle skiing,
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and ballet was history. by 2000 all competition was stopped. until now, when the saviour has arrived. a former british champion determined to give it a new lease on life. it's a little bit of gymnastics, perhaps a little bit of acrobatics, a little bit of dance, and a little bit like ice skating. it's like all sports — they go through phases. and along came snowboarding which took the enthusiasm, perhaps, away from ballet, which is a great sport and we love, but there's room for ballet as well, we hope. what could be more festive than christmas tunes and the art of ski ballet performed here? the pirouettes, the spins, and, indeed, the dramatic flips. wow! but, you know, seeing this these days is so rare.
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even rarer than spotting someone dressed as a moose. a chris—oose. back in the day, it's a sport that came from america in the hot—dogging times, it came to britain and it was suddenly found we could do short artificial slopes in the uk. flipping round, perfect. all the way around. well done. look at me, look at me. beautiful. nearly two decades on, how relevant and accessible is it to the modern skier and snowboarder? that was great, mike. the kick turn, however, was a real slippery slope. take your downhill ski and lift it up high and with the other ski by the tip. beautiful. spin around and stand up. and that's your first freestyle move. and again. all the way around. big backwards. and together. superb. you are a natural. that's almost a while ballet routine you've got already. i'm far from that, but it did add a bit of variety to coming down the piste. it looks very complicated. but a lot of fun. the fact that it's died out and been replaced by snowboarding and stuff.
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snowboarding is cool. it is an opportunity to express yourself artistically but also a way of getting really super fit. it's unlikely ski ballet will ever grace the olympics again, but at least it's alive and kicking once more. mike bushell for bbc news, in manchester. he looked very elegant. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we'll be back with the headlines in a few moments. stay with us. sure we have a look at brainteaser, an author and mathematician has created 12 puzzles for us and for you and we will put them on facebook everyday starting from christmas day but to whet your appetite we can reveal the first question now. listen carefully. you put up the
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words partridge in a pear tree on a banner with one a four card for each letter. pants... —— and... so that you got it within moments. bobby seagull willjoin as in half an hourto bobby seagull willjoin as in half an hour to talk through the answer. headlines on the way next. good morning welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and chris mason. 0ur headlines today: a man and a woman are arrested by police investigating the drone disruption at gatwick. today more delays are expected but flights have
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resumed in the past few hours. we'll be live at the airport with the latest. also this morning: the defence secretary, gavin williamson, tells the bbc the arrival of a royal navy warship in ukraine sends a strong message to president putin. natasha ednan—laperouse was just 15 when she killed by an allergic reaction to a pret a manger sandwich. as they fight to change food labelling laws, her parents tell us how she'll never be forgotten. christmas for us isn'tjust christmas, it's also her birthday. it'lljust never be the same really because we find it too difficult to be here on christmas day because she's missing. liverpool are top of the tree jurgen klopp's team will be top of the premier league for christmas after beating wolves 2—0. good morning. some sunshine on the way today. more cloud and some rain tomorrow and we'll be taking a closer look at what the weather has in store of course as we move into christmas. it's saturday the 22nd of december.
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our top story: police have arrested two people on suspicion of illegally flying drones over gatwick airport. flights were halted for more than a day after the first sighting on wednesday night. thousands of people have had their christmas travel plans disrupted. sussex police released this statement overnight. 0ur reporter munaza rafiq has more. after hundreds of cancelled flights, this was the reaction when passengers heard they were up and running again. cheering and applause. it came after the airport was closed forjust over an hour
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after the sighting of another drone. they told us that the flight was cancelled and that we had to collect our luggage. after unprecedented disruption, flights had resumed just after 6:00 on friday morning. many woke up after a night on the airport's floor. virginia goncalves from cornwall is seriously ill and spent the night in an airport chair. it's horrible. it's...it goes against your human rights, isn't it? i have stage four cancer, widespread to the bones, for god's sake. last night, sussex police said they had arrested two people suspected of involvement in the illegal use of drones. meanwhile, flights have continued throughout the night at the country's second busiest airport as it attempts to deal with the severe backlog of passengers. munaza rafiq, bbc news.
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we can speak now to our reporter ben schofield, who's at gatwick for us this morning — what's the latest ben? 150,000 people affected, are things getting back to normal? the anticipation is things will be back to normal over the weekend but this is the busiest weekend for departures for gatwick airport. the last weekend before christmas is the getaway. the airport have said when it comes to risk assessing the threat from drones, they said the risk is at the highest possible level and they will continue to work with government agencies, the police and the military to make sure their airspace remains open. they hope to see off and see in 750 flights today
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for 120,000 passengers. but passengers are being warned to check theirflight passengers are being warned to check their flight isn't cancelled or delayed before travelling here. good luck to everybody trying to travel today. also in the news this morning... four stowaways found on a cargo ship in the thames estuary have been detained under the immigration act, after the vessel's crew was threatened. the grande tema left nigeria 11 days ago. the group are thought to have armed themselves with iron bars, forcing crew members to retreat to the bridge of the ship. no one was injured. hundreds of thousands of federal workers in the us are facing christmas without pay because of a partial government shutdown. it's because democrats refuse to sign off on funding for president trump's mexican border wall. roughly a quarter of federal agencies are affected, including the departments of homeland security, transportation and national parks. donald trump has warned that it will last for "a very long time" if the funding isn't granted. a british warship has arrived in the black sea in response to russia's seizure of three ukrainian navy vessels and their crew last month. the defence secretary, gavin williamson, says the presence
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of the royal navy will send a strong message to moscow. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale has more. these are the increasingly volatile and contested waters of the black sea. and navigating his way through them, britain's defence secretary steering a ukrainian gunboat. just a month ago, russia seized three sister boats nearby off the coast of crimea, land now also occupied by russia. but he's here to visit a royal navy warship docked in ukraine's port of odessa — hms echo, a lightly armed service vessel, or what moscow calls a spy ship. it's meant to send a clear message. what we are saying to russia, what we are saying to president putin, they cannot continue to act with no regard or care for international laws or international norms. this is why he's intervened.
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in november, a ukrainian tug boat was rammed by a russian vessel. shots were fired at the accompanying flotilla, blocked from entering the narrow kerch straight. to do what we can do, working with you to ensure your loved ones are back home with you. 24 ukrainian sailors are still being held, these their anxious relatives waiting for news. the uk's defence secretary listened to their pleas for help — they even sent a letter to the queen. viktor has not seen his wounded son, vassil, since he was captured. he says, "i feel pain, i feel helpless. we are looking for the support of britain to get them released." the presence of this royal navy warship here in odessa is to provide ukraine with reassurance in the face of what they see as russian
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aggression but britain is not looking for a confrontation with russia, and this warship is not expected to sail through the kerch strait. does anyone else want one? the defence secretary says this is not a provocation, but a show of solidarity. the crew of hms echo will be here for christmas. it's quite a long stint, isn't it? and other british warships will be returning next year. jonathan beale, bbc news, 0dessa. a rare albino orangutan has been released into the wild in indonesia, nearly two years after it was rescued from captivity. alba, the world's only albino orangutan, was rescued in borneo in april last year when she was five years old — suffering from stress, dehydration and a parasite infection. during her recovery she's shown excellent climbing and social skills.
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a conservation team will keep an eye on herfor the next six months to ensure she remains safe and healthy. let's return to our top story now. police say they've arrested two people, a man and a woman, on suspicion of being behind the distruption at gatwick airport, caused by drones flying over the runway. at the peak of the chaos, gatwick‘s chief operating officer said that 150,000 passengers had been affected. so where do they stand when it comes to compensation? we can speak now to travel expert, simon calder. good morning, simon. 0nce good morning, simon. once people have got over the irritation of what has happened, what should they do in terms of potentially getting some money back? well, it's quite
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straightforward what the rules are under the european passenger rights legislation. anybody who's flights had been cancelled, 150,000 people flying to and from gatwick, the well‘s busiest single runway airport, are in that position. anybody who's flight is cancelled is entitled to a full refund, but since most people will want to continue with their travel plans, the airline has an immediate must do list. it must book your flight as soon as possible to get you to your destination. if it means spending money on a rival airline, then they have to do that. they have to provide hotel if it is necessary and all of your meals. those are the in terms of cash compensation, you will not get any of that because it is beyond the airline's responsibility. people might be flying in on cathay
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pacific, emirates or china eastern. if you are in a foreign airline and you are stuck in dubai, hong kong the airline will not necessarily pick up your hotel bill. but the vast majority of those 150,000 people, they are entitled to that duty of care. let's switch modes of transport from planes to trains and a rough time for some people using the trains this weekend? it certainly will be. we have northern rail, the 29th saturday strike and there will be another next saturday. the train company says it is going to run about 30% of its services and very little will be running after five or six o'clock this evening. waterloo have a strike and they will
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be operating 30%, but check before you travel and tomorrow, is when the festive engineering works start. if you are travelling on the west coast mainline, there is work in the north—west of england, london paddington, london liverpool street. they will be disrupted as is the gatwick express and most of those engineering works will continue right through to the start of january. if you are planning to travel by train or biplane, check before you set off for the station or the airport. nothing says christmas like engineering works! simon, we appreciate it. merry christmas. let's talk about the drone issue. flying drones close to any airport in the uk is illegal, and carries a five yearjail term, but some pilot's unions and aviation bodies have called for tougher measures. so will more legislation stop similar situations happening again? 0wen mcaree is an expert in drones at liverpooljohn moores
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university and joins us now. good morning. the airport brought to a standstill, thousands of people affected. are you surprised they didn't have something in place to stop this? a little, yes. we see often issues around drones near airports reported by pilots quite often. very often that is someone with a hobby, bought a drone to have a bit of fun, do some photography. they are not too sure of the rules, we talk about not too close to airports, but how close is close? gatwick has measures in place to detect these occurrences. that enables them to temporarily ground the aeroplanes, wait for this person who has made a bit of a mistake, stop doing what they are doing and then get flights going again. but this is a deliberate attempt to
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disrupt the flights. they ground the aeroplanes for a bit, the drone goes away. they are just about to get ready and up and running again and the drone is back. having the ability to detect there is a drone is not enough, as we are seeing in this kind of incident. you need to know exactly where it is, where it has come from, where the operator is so you can prevent it from being an ongoing problem. how does the technology work with this, is this someone lying in a ditch with the control and anorak on. or is it more sophisticated than that? it could be. if it was somebody close to the boundary, i think they would have been picked up quickly. more likely they are some distance away. the drone is likely to be quite large so it could have quite a range in order of the calamitous. somebody could be farand of the calamitous. somebody could be far and even though it is a legal
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requirement to fly a drone in the uk to fly it and looking at it. so this person is breaking the law. they will preprogrammed the aircraft and send it some distance without necessarily being within their visual range. we have heard reports, all sorts of things in the papers, but there are reports it was buzzing the control tower? yes. what kind of legislation might make a difference? it is clear at the moment we have legislation in place and that means you cannot fly near airports, it has a lwa ys you cannot fly near airports, it has always been an illegal to fly drones near airports. that has been clarified. it used to be if you are endangering aircraft or too close to persons or property, that was breaking the law. anywhere within a kilometre of an airport, it is
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illegal. the pilot's union said it might not be a big enough area. within a kilometre of a larger airport, the aircraft can be low enough and the drone at 400 feet could still be in conflict. so even drone pilots who are obeying the rules could be causing problems. it is not necessarily about more legislation, because this flight is very illegal, it is a question of enforcement. it is a question of how do you stop somebody doing this? or, if they are doing it, how do you quickly bring a stop to it. if somebody was misusing and manned aircraft, there was a story of some of flying too low over peter borough. they were prosecuted for that. you can call up the civil aviation authority and said they are doing something wrong and they can find out who it is. same as if you are dangerous driving on the roads, get your registration number and they know who you are. but the drones, hard to see and we need more
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technology and also forcing people down the route of using the right systems. very interesting talking to, i imagine we might talk to you again about this subject. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. 0n the day i might suspect people will be panic christmas shopping, what kind of weather will accompany that. good morning. the weather is looking pretty fair. this is a gorgeous picture from hornsea in east yorkshire. i am getting lots of sunrise images coming through. those clearer skies are thanks to this ridge of high pressure building, but tomorrow this is waiting in the wings. low pressure and grey and wet for many. showers will be frequent across western scotland. in northern
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england, the north west and north wales, petering out in the afternoon. a few than northern ireland and a few stray further south. but most of the uk, a lot of fine weather, sunshine as well and hazy in the south as high cloud d rifts hazy in the south as high cloud drifts in through the afternoon. mild in the south. chilly after frosty start to the north of scotla nd frosty start to the north of scotland and the frost will return here overnight. chilly through the evening in the south of clear skies but if you are heading out it will be dry. rain not arriving into northern ireland and the west of england and wales until we get into the small hours of sunday. chilly night for scotland, temperatures below freezing in the shelter glens. scotla nd below freezing in the shelter glens. scotland will benefit from those clearer skies throughout the day on sunday. elsewhere, weather fronts piling in with grey skies and persistent rain. uncertainty as to how far north this rain will sit. the bit pessimistic but this picture
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over northern ireland and northern england. further south, gloomy looking skies with rain at some stage for the remainder of england and wales. 12 or 13 to the south, six or seven for the north across scotland, but here we have the sunshine. 0n we go into next week, whether it is a working week for you or not, it is christmas week and high pressure will be building. it will get rid of a lot of the activity we will see in association with this weather front to the south and stop anything else coming in from the atlantic. anything in wales and the south—west for first thing monday, but that will die out as the day goes on. fine weather around for christmas eve. could be patches of freezing fog which could persist in a few areas. something showing up around 2 degrees around edinboro, the southern uplands & full lowlands could be a favoured spot for seeing lingering patches of freezing fog.
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christmas day, grey rather than white. widespread frost, not as severe one. then if anything, lingering cloud and stubborn patches of mist and fog to take us into the big day itself. it will still be christmas. thank you very much, susan. we're about to speak to a man who's beaten the likes of ariana grande and the x—factor to the christmas number one spot with a parody song about sausage rolls. it's had the nation in hysterics, but there's a more serious side to the single, it's raising funds for the food bank charity ‘the trussell trust. we'll be joined by mark, otherwise known as ladbaby, in just a moment, but first let's take a look — this is ‘we built this city on sausage rolls'. # shove it in yourface.
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# listen to your belly go. # don't you remember? # we built this city. # we built this city on sausage rolls. # we built this city. # we built this city on sausage rolls. # we built this city. # we built this city on sausage rolls. # christenings or birthdays. # 0r uncle johnny's wake. you did it, congratulations.
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you did it, congratulationsm you did it, congratulations. it has been amat 24 hours. roxanne, how do you feel? extremely happy, it is amazing. the charity as well so we are over the moon, thank you to everyone who got us there.|j are over the moon, thank you to everyone who got us there. i have seen your previous interview and it started as a joke? what was that, sorry? it all started as kind of a bit of a joke? yes, somebody tweeted about six months ago saying i should do this because they know i love sausage rolls. somehow it snowballed into a christmas number one. thank you to the uk who got behind me. when did the penny dropped that sausage rolls would fit into that song,it sausage rolls would fit into that song, it works somehow?” sausage rolls would fit into that song, it works somehow? i have been singing it for years. it was just
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the rest of the lyrics that needed working out. it is absolutely brilliant. roxanne, ilove working out. it is absolutely brilliant. roxanne, i love the video of you all, you enjoyed the whole journey and the recording of it? of you all, you enjoyed the whole journey and the recording of mm was amazing, we had such a great time. recording and doing everything... sorry. come back in a minute. one of the babies is absurd. we had such a great time filming it. we had such a great time filming it. we did it over the weekend, i still work in the week. we had such good fun and we all got involved. hello, mate. it has been amazing, it really has. it has been lovely to meet you and follow your journey. has. it has been lovely to meet you and follow yourjourney. what has. it has been lovely to meet you and follow your journey. what are you having fun christmas dinner, is it sausage rolls? i think it most certainly will be. i don't think there is anything else we could ever eat again. it is brilliant,
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congratulations all our view, we will all be singing that over christmas. merry christmas. merry christmas. merry christmas. merry christmas. i want a sausage roll for brea kfast, christmas. i want a sausage roll for breakfast, is it allowed? i love sausage rolls. you cannot take away the anticipation of the taste. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. historian and author tessa dunlop is here to tell us what's caught their eye. what have you got, good morning? after sausage roll mayhem, back to earth. excellent coverage in the times on america. the us pull—out is huge boost for beaten isis fighters. and then the next bit of this double page spread, the defence secretary
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resigning after the president refused to listen. it is a big deal. it implicates great britain. it implicates the whole world, this is the global defence system as we have known it for the last, since post—war world war ii. based on the military might of america, democracy. trump is fulfilling his campaign promise, bring the boys back home. it will ring well in the american heartland where they voted trump. but the bottom line is, isis not beaten. those routes are hard to pull out and we know the americans we re pull out and we know the americans were fighting alongside the kurds and this has been triggered by a phone call. the turkish president basically, he doesn't trick him but gets him onside. suddenly the kurds are gets him onside. suddenly the kurds a re left gets him onside. suddenly the kurds are left high and dry. no way to
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treat your ally. to quote one turkish politician, they want to see the kurds in the ditch. the interesting thing, we are getting used to impulsive decisions coming out of the white house. but if you put together the tweeted about withdrawing the troops and then the resignation of the defence secretary, it is significant with a knock—on effect around the world. wonderful quote in america, is trump is often wrong but never in doubt. this is a big blow in terms of that kind of auld alliance and nato. problems are stacking up now for 2019. this morning has almost been brexit free in terms of the news, but no longer? the last couple of days since mps went off on their recess for christmas. looking at the guardian, this thing ofjeremy
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corbyn, brexit and a snap election and labour talking about how they wa nt and labour talking about how they wantan and labour talking about how they want an election whether they talk about if they are in favour of another referendum ? about if they are in favour of another referendum? you will know the inner stitching better than me. jeremy corbyn is a curveball for the majority of labour voters. this article makes it clear, 60% of labour voters voted remain. he is not with the majority of those who back his party. we think why is he so inflexible, he is a bit of an old cockroach, come on, corbyn. he is a eurosceptic, he is a long—term eurosceptic, he is a long—term eurosceptic and it says in the small print, if you dig about he has struck a eurosceptic noted by highlighting labour's concerns about the state aid rules that form part of the architecture of the single market. we know the single market is the central prop in this european
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debate. no, you will not push for a second referendum. he is planning on winning a general election and then going off to brussels and renegotiating a better deal all by the end of march. there were a decent show of labour voters who voted to leave. yes, 40%. it is a balance. it has been shrouded in mystery but if you dig about, you get the truth and you can make your own decisions while you eat your christmas sausage roll. there is anger in the commons when he a p pa re ntly anger in the commons when he apparently may have said, "stupid woman". he said we should be focusing on the £4 billion the government has drummed up to pay for brexit, almost the cost of trump's wall. he said that should be the focus and that is why he lost his temper. he wanted to draw attention to the number of homeless people which has doubled since 2010. let's talk about this... some people have
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been fighting for the homeless all their lives. she is 98 years old. she has been doing this for 82 yea rs. she has been doing this for 82 years. i know and 96-year-old who has been working in a shelter in northampton. i do a lot of work and write about old women and people go, what is the secret to longevity? a lot of it is good luck, but another key is staying relevant. that is lovely. merry christmas. this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until 10:00 this morning, when andi 0liver takes over in the saturday kitchen. are you partial to a sausage roll? of course, i am from suffolk and it is what we live on. special guest today was going to be professor green, but he is poorly. get well soon. but fortunately, bbc radio one has a saturday kitchen super fan and
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it is chris stark. this is ridiculous. the best morning of my life. apart from the fact your friends came round, it is a good day? my friend is getting married later and i got a call about this la st later and i got a call about this last night. obviously, it was 100% i will be there. i would be watching this now if i wasn't sat here doing this. ready, in your christmas jumper? it is going to be so much fun. what is heavenly for you? as everyone does, they will be in the local pub talking about what they will do with heaven or hell and i was thinking pork belly with some sort of asian vegetables. delicious. what about help? turkey everything, you do turkey and christmas day not every day leading up to it. turkey and anchovies. it is the stuff of life. i have never given it a chance. we will help you. two great
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chefs, we have the italian stallion. festive past the ditch billy mcbryde dish. pancetta, it is christmas. we have the prince of birmingham, what are you cooking up? really simple but show stopping desert. festive baked alaska and i will set it on fire but it will be so easy to make. it sounds delicious, not sure how simple? stay tuned. olly smith, what have you got? we might have some wine, some beer, we have bubbly. some sweet. you guys
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at home in charge later. go to the website for the details. it's christmas! brilliant. thank you. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and louise minchin. first, a summary of this morning's main news. police have arrested two people on suspicion of illegally flying drones over gatwick airport. flights were halted for more than a day after the first sighting on wednesday night. thousands of people have had their christmas travel plans disrupted. sussex police released this statement overnight. "as part of our ongoing investigations into the criminal use of drones which has severely disrupted flights in and out of gatwick airport, sussex police made two arrests just after 10pm on the 21st of december. and... let's take a look at
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the live departure board for gatwick airport. there is movement today. the first flights left just after half past five this morning. the airport says that it is expecting to run a full schedule today, but it warns passengers to expect some delays and cancellations. as has been the case over the past three days, the advice is to check with your airline before travelling to gatwick. and coverage throughout the day on the bbc news channel on that story. four stowaways found on a cargo ship in the thames estuary have been detained under the immigration act, after the vessel's crew was threatened. the grande tema left nigeria 11 days ago. the group are thought to have armed themselves with iron bars, forcing crew members to retreat to the bridge of the ship. no one was injured. hundreds of thousands of federal workers in the us are facing christmas without pay
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because of a partial government shutdown. it's because democrats refuse to sign off on funding for president trump's mexican border wall. roughly a quarter of federal agencies are affected — including the departments of homeland security, transportation and national parks. donald trump has warned that it will last for "a very long time" if the funding isn't granted. a british warship has arrived in the black sea in response to russia's seizure of three ukrainian navy vessels and their crew last month. the defence secretary gavin williamson says the presence of the royal navy showed support for ukraine in the face of increased russian aggression. a builder who has claimed a £76 million euro millions jackpot says he found the winning ticket tucked under the visor of his van, six weeks after the draw. andrew clark had a stockpile of tickets in his van and discovered
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the winning one in the stash after being asked to check by his partner. the 51—year—old says he will still be having a quiet christmas, he has bought his presence so no one is getting an upgrade. but plans to celebrate the win with a meal at a restaurant in skegness on new year's eve. does not say whether he will continue with hisjob. surprising how many people end up saying they will. but you wonder, a couple of months in, they decide, maybe not. i love myjob. why would you leave? you would be here at 6am, seven days a week! you might think about a different job, maybe, if you had all that cash. maybe few hours. lizzie is here. liverpool have an early christmas
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present. top of the premier league for christmas after they beat wolves 2—nil at molineux. they're four points clear of manchester city, who play today. nick parrott reports. liverpool haven't had a happy christmas for five years. nowjurgen klopp and his men have delivered an early present to their fans. this wasn't as comfortable a victory as the scoreline suggests, though — playing at molineux isn't easy. manchester city could only draw here. chelsea lost. and liverpool rode their luck at times. they could easily have slipped up with the rain lashing down. but the difference between the good and the great comes down to making the most of your chances. that is just what mo saleh did. the egyptian's goal took him to the top of the league scoring charts and he was on song with an assist, too, taken brilliantly by virgil van dijk. with more prolific strikers, wolves might have got something. but liverpool could have scored more, too. the team that's top of the table at christmas usually ends up as champions.
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the pressure is now on manchester city. nick parrott, bbc news. so the attention now turns to manchester city, who are four points behind liverpool — so a win today will reduce that gap to just a point. city are playing crystal palace, who they beat 5—0 last time they came to the etihad. and despite christmas being a really busy time for football, city's manager pep guardiola says that can actually help him to keep his squad happy with more match time. everybody plays a lot of minutes. it is the only way to sustain the locker room and of course to get the people fresh, we needed to do that. everybody is involved, especially in that period. until the end of january, it is incredible the amount of games we have earned in fabry in march, we will breathe a little bit. manchester united's ole gunnar solskjaer era starts at cardiff city this evening.
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the new manager has been speaking about the influence of sir alex ferguson on his management style, and solskjaer says he isn't afraid to bring out the hairdryer treatment on players himself. maybe i should get the hairdryer out of my pocket, because i have a hairdryer! so you know, when my hair needs a lift, i use it myself, but i am also not afraid of laying down the law. you know, your kids, when they disappoint you, you tell them off, you don't give them some chocolate then, do you? you treat players similar to how you treat your kids, really, because you want the best for them and you want to guide them, you want to help them. if i get disappointed, once in a while, you really have do tell them the standards we have got. there was an angry confrontation between dillian whyte and dereck chisora as they weighed in ahead of their heavyweight fight in london tonight. both fighters weighed in just over 17 and a half stone, but after the face—off, there were verbal disagreements between them, which continued back stage. the winner of the rematch at the 02 could set up a potential title bout
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with anthonyjoshua next year. and there's also a big fight in manchester tonight, where carl frampton faces josh warrington for the ibf featherweight title. warrington, who's from leeds, is unbeaten in his 27 professionalfights. northern irishman frampton is looking to win back a world title. so a great night of boxing in store, but clearly there's an clash of timings and both fights are only available on pay—per—view tv which has irritated many boxing fans and in particular the warrington frampton promoter frank warren. it is disrespectful to the sport and disrespectful to the fans. it is the time of year when people maybe cannot afford to pay for two events. it is ridiculous. there is no sense to it. i have no problem with competition but it is stupid competition. you will not put on manchester city manchester united, playing 3pm, saturday, on the same day. it does not happen, in the same
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town. they split the team is up to make it work to make sure you have a maximum audience. you need a maximum audience for your sport because he wa nt to audience for your sport because he want to grow your sport. not a happy man and! want to grow your sport. not a happy man and i cannot blame him. happy christmas to you all. lovely to see you. earlier this year we set our presenters naga, tim and jayne... how did you get out of it? just say no. i have a daughter who hasjust been through it and i know how much ha rd been through it and i know how much hard work you need to put in. they took on the challenge of retaking their maths gcse as part of our special series about the subject. they were guided through the process by maths teacher and author bobby seagull, who was with them right through to the day they got their results. here's a quick reminder of how they got on. # up in the morning and out to school...
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we're going back to school. # american history and practical maths... good morning, my name is mr seagull and i'm going to be a maths teacher throughout your gcse course. in four months' time, you are going to be sitting the maths gcse. for real. i love maths, genuinely love maths, and i've really enjoyed studying. i think i'm not enjoying the pressure of having to show everything i've learned. even if i don't make the grade — and i'm not confident i will, i'm really glad i did it. what i didn't realise is how much more is in the gcse exam now. this is reminding me of how tough it is, how stressful it can be to be in that exam room. there's ten minutes to go. you haven't finished the paper. oh, my goodness. oh, my goodness, that was an experience. i actually have a bit of a headache.
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well done, no more we're all over. yes! the last time i got a gcse result, rick astley was number one. 0k. ok, go for it. ok, yeah, i got seven, so i'm pleased with that. i passed! i am going to give you a hug. what did you get? a four. brilliant. that's brilliant. i was genuinely worried. and i got a... i got a five. huge congratulations to them but to bobby seagull, well done. jayne was over the moon. ecstatic. when she
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did it the first time round she got great indeed. she said she wanted to tackle this and help her children with maths and change your attitude —— she got a d. with maths and change your attitude -- she got a d. you have written a book about maths and numbers. when we talk about maths, it seems to stick as a problem. it seems acceptable, and i have been guilty of doing this, saying maths is not for me, almost giving up before you try and it seems to be acceptable to do that about maths in a way perhaps you would not about other subjects. in my book, it is like a chess piece move. my big game is to change attitudes in the uk and people think negatively about the subject. it is almost seen as a badge of honour to say you're not good at maths. if i go to say you're not good at maths. if i gotoa say you're not good at maths. if i go to a christmas party in the next few days, people often say, i cannot do maths. people do not say that
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about english reading. in this day when we have technology at our fingertips. we have tools that can do maths, why is it still important? a great question because the tools are there that they only work if you understand how they work. an example is we worked out the average height of kids in my class and a student saidi of kids in my class and a student said i have worked it out and he said i have worked it out and he said three metres ten, something ridiculous. he made a mistake putting in numbers in the calculator but because he did not have a number sense, it did not strike him. three metres would be a giant! you need numbers sense. shall we look at the challenges set earlier... if you do not want to know the a nswer if you do not want to know the answer you might want to look away now, go and make a cup of tea and be backin now, go and make a cup of tea and be back ina now, go and make a cup of tea and be back in a moment. this is the question...
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i guess the essence of this switch has been blowing my mind is how do you go about trying to work this out? this is a probability question. trying to work out the likelihood. we have four letters. number one, listen to the question? exactly, a nswer listen to the question? exactly, answer the question.|j listen to the question? exactly, answer the question. i spent 15 minutes trying to count up the total number. that is a red herring. four letters so the chance of picking up tfirst, letters so the chance of picking up t first, what are the chances? one in four. and picking letter r. e is the same. remember your fractions.
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you multiply the numerator is. one times one is one. and for times three equals 12. so you have a one in12 three equals 12. so you have a one in 12 chance. i should just ignore the partridge. we have 12 apostles. starting with that on christmas day. do you always write a red herring into the question? occasionally. it is not to trick people. sometimes you put in something to make people understand the essence of the question. how much difference does it make when you turn up at school wearing a jumper like that? the kids love it. how many outings a year does the jumper get? this time of year, quite a few. i wash it every time! my mathsjust extends to
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realising there are six colourful buttons. quite something. thank you for working with us this year. bobby's new book is called the life—changing magic of numbers and you can take part in our 12 days of christmas maths puzzle on our bbc breakfast facebook page. we'll be posting a puzzle and a solution each day from christmas day onwards. are they all as hard as that? varying difficulties. and pythagoras theorem. is that new year's day? it might actually! thank you. clear your brain for the year ahead with a bit of pythagoras! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines. two arrests have been made in connection to the "criminal use of drones" which caused major disruption to hundreds of flights at gatwick airport. defence secretary gavin williamson visits ukraine where a royal navy ship has been sent to demonstrate britain's solidarity with kiev after recent
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russian aggression int he black sea. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. what a lovely rainbow. good morning, this is a recent image taken in north wales, where we have showers around. but showers are the minority today. most will be set fair. tomorrow, perhaps not so lucky. these weather fronts will mean more cloud and persistent outbreaks of rain. showers clearing from north wales in the afternoon. some in england and wales. most frequent will be showers to western scotland. the north—east, sunshine but always cold after a frosty start and
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further south, 11—12, very much on the mild side. this evening, a fine evening. western scotland will continue to see showers and also to the north across orkney and shetland. in the small hours, the rain will come across these south—west of england, wales and northern ireland. to the north, a frost developing across scotland. scotla nd frost developing across scotland. scotland does well on sunday, sticking out to the north of the weather system. here the driest and brightest weather tomorrow. if anything drier than today because we will lose showers in the west but we could get stuck with stubborn patches are fog. in the south, cloud and rain. uncertainty about how far north the rain will sit. i am hopeful northern ireland and northern england will improve during the day. further south, northern england will improve during the day. furthersouth, rain northern england will improve during the day. further south, rain heavy at times but very mild. in the
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north, colder after the frosty start in scotland. and into next week, it will all be about high—pressure building. it will try to settle the weather down. quite dry weather to come but high—pressure can lock into place low cloud or any mist and fog. not much of the breeze, it does not get things moving. rain on monday in the south. elsewhere, stubborn fog. the vale of york always favoured one. and in scotland where we get it, it could stick around making things cold. christmas day, a lot of fine weather thanks to high pressure. hopefully some brightness, but some areas could get stuck with fog. and hello cloud. looking rather grey rather than white at the moment. they've got over 80 years of musical
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experience between them and a string of hit records. but despite having toured together over the last 10 years, marc almond and jools holland have only now released their first collaborative album. we'll speak to them in a moment, but first let's take a listen — this is big black mercedes 600. # i'll sing out loud my bad old song with military precision # but keep your hands on the steering wheel # while you're tappingout the rhythm. # the rhythm! right! yeah, right, jools. jools holland and marc almond join us now. good morning. you work togetherfor
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yea rs. good morning. you work togetherfor years. i guess you thought it is about time you did an album, is that how it came about? we have toured together for a long how it came about? we have toured togetherfor a long time. we have sung a lot of songs over that time and written song. it is the opportunity arose this year to get in the studio. we actually made a record together, a lot of fun to do and a great record to make. record together, a lot of fun to do and a great record to makem record together, a lot of fun to do and a great record to make. it is based a lot on our experience of playing when marc comes in as a guest with the orchestra and writing songs that suit that purpose. he is great at being in front of the orchestra, in front of the big crowd. we have collected these things and at last can gather them ona things and at last can gather them on a record. how do you choose what goes on the record and who chooses? we choose by figuring out in front
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of the audience what works. last night we played in manchester. there are certain things that will get people lifted up and drive them along. if you improve the songs, as well. can tainted love be improved? it has a different slant on this record because it works as a big band sound so very different to the original version that i found audiences have taken to the version ido audiences have taken to the version i do withjules. it has become the other version that i do. —— joolsholland. does the assembly work sitting it at the piano? it first started with marc being a guest with the orchestra. he is there is a
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special guest. it was realising we needed more things to play live and instead of looking out, we thought let's write some things. when we sit at the piano and the two of us are in the room together which is unusual. he is the only person i can to that width. the only person to be ina room to that width. the only person to be in a room with you! i write a different way, i have a collaborator who sends an idea and i work at home. but this, standing around the piano and developing a tune, i found it easy to do with him because we clicked into the same sounds and we have the same references with blues records, rhythm and blues. ifind that i worked with him in a different way than with other people and it is an enjoyable way. on this album we have half a dozen songs we have written together. he started with the band after you had an
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accident, is that right? by toured with jools before accident, is that right? by toured withjools before them but after the bike accident it was hard for me to get back on stage, i had to get my confidence to overcome a lot of things and jools was wonderful because he said white not come back and just do a couple of songs that are easy to do. —— why not? the first big thing i did was tour with jools after the accident and it got my confidence back being in front of a big audience. it made it very easy. it was thanks to jools a a big audience. it made it very easy. it was thanks tojools a lot for that. are you back to where you were? i know the accident was some yea rs were? i know the accident was some years ago. better than before! i cannot help but talk to you about new year's eve. one my favourite on new year's eve. one my favourite on new year's eve. i am delighted to say marc will be on it and we hope
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michael buble will join say marc will be on it and we hope michael buble willjoin us. george ezra. nile rodgers. a lot of great great things. and some surprises in the guests and audience. it has now become part of the psyche. in my mind, that is where i am every new year's eve. at what point in the year do you start to think, oh, there is another hootenanny coming up, thinking who you might want on it? part of it is who is around that the other thing, some people come on the other thing, some people come on the later programme and you think they would be good on new year's eve. not everybody... not all the artists are the right thing for new year's eve but some people are. marc is one. and ruby turner. it is that new year's eve, you go out looking for but never find. exactly. i know
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where it is now. you might as well stay at home, stick on the telly and put on hootenanny. no point going out looking for something... and you can never get a taxi home! very expensive, so it is the best way. get some drinks in, in front of the telly. i'm glad you cannot hear me singing along, as well. i am envious of the way you play the piano, it is a wonderful gift. i am very lucky. also it is the key to everything. when i first found the keys, so to speak, you realise your hands are not big enough to stretch the distance, but it is the key to everything, the key to the kingdom. once you get it. once you start playing. also i am always discovering something new. you never get to a point where you know everything there is always another layer. as a singer, the piano is the
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most wonderful accompaniment because with the piano you have almost an orchestra. it is there and contained in that one instrument and the perfect accommodation is voice and piano. take everything else away, arrangements, you can take it down to voice and piano and it is the perfect combination. it is lovely to see you both. very nice to see you. you can still get it for your christmas stocking! last day of the tour today. enjoy. we will have a knees up. jools and marc's album is called a lovely life to live. that's all from us for today. roger and victoria will be back tomorrow morning from six. have a lovely weekend — goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines at 10:00: two people are arrested in connection with the drone sightings which brought gatwick airport to a standstill. passengers are still suffering
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delays and cancellations — but the airport aims to run a full schedule of flights today. a row over the money for donald trump's border wall results in a partial shutdown of the us government. a british warship arrives in the black sea in response to russia's seizure last month of three ukrainian navy vessels and their crew. also coming up this hour... transforming the lives of hundreds of babies while still in the womb. surgery for unborn babies with spinal defects is to be made made routinely available on the nhs in england. and in half an hour, there's a festive feel
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