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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 24, 2019 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at nine. the prime minister warns she won't allow the brexit vote to be frustrated as she prepares for further talks with eu leaders at a summit in egypt. violence in venezuela — good morning. at least two people are killed welcome to breakfast as security forces fire tear gas with sally nugent and rachel burden. and rubber bullets to stop our headlines today... opposition protesters bringing foreign aid into the country the prime minister warns brexit almost half of police forces must not be frustrated across england are increasing amid mounting divisions the numbers of officers trained within the conservative party. to use tasers violence in venezuela — trucks are set alight the duke and duchess of sussex and activists attacked trying to get aid into the country. arrive in morocco for their first now the us vows to step in. official visit to north africa. a bbc investigation finds products high in salt and saturated fats are being marketed as healthy a bbc investigation finds products by leading supermarkets. high in salt and saturated fats are being marketed as healthy in sport wales 12th win in a row is the sweetest of the lot by leading supermarkets as they fight back to beat england in the six nations and with 2a hours to go before the oscars, which film will be the favourite?
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good morning. we are looking at a great start to the day for some of us, dense patches of fog but this will clear for most areas plenty of afternoon sunshine, another mild day. a full forecast coming up a little bit later. it's sunday 24th february. our top story. the prime minister has told a gathering of grassroots conservative party activists that she won't allow the result of the brexit referendum to be frustrated. theresa may travels to the egyptian resort of sharm—el—sheikh today for an eu summit with the arab league. brexit is expected to be discussed on the sidelines. we're joined now by our political correspondent jonathan blake. i don't think the prime minister is expecting anything particularly concrete to come out of this, jonathan, but where do things stand as we head into next week? you're right, we've been guided not to expect any kind of deal in the desert but theresa may will be
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meeting some of her eu counterparts and the chairman of the european council donald tusk at the summit in sharm el—sheikh and she will press upon them for the need to changes to the brexit deal if it is to be passed through the house of commons. there will be a vote in parliament this week, it may be unable if i brexit deal, that looks unlikely at this stage but what is more likely is that mps will vote on a series of possible ways forward and as we get towards that vote and the brexit deadline looming at the end of march, mines are being focused as to what that might mean. yesterday the prime minister told a meeting of grassroots tory activists that in her eyes the government should not lose focus and she said the government would not frustrate the brexit process. she was preaching to the converted, that convention of tory activists passed a non—binding motion saying they should be no delay to brexit and the option of a new deal should not be taken off the table but we know some of the
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cabinet feel differently. three senior ministers saying yesterday they would prefer a delay to the brexit process rather than leaving without a deal. edsel coming to a head this week and the option of a new deal should not be taken off the table but we know some of the cabinet feel differently. three senior ministers saying yesterday they would prefer a delay to the brexit process rather than leaving without a deal. edsel coming to a head this week andmps jonathan, many thanks, talking to us from london. an operation to bring humanitarian aid into venezuela has descended into chaos after president maduro's security forces opened fire on demonstrators and aid trucks were set alight. two people, including a 14—year—old boy, were killed and more than 300 people were wounded. us vice president mike pence has vowed to take action. our international correspondent orla guerin reports. holding the line, president maduro's troops on the border between colombia and venezuela. from early morning, face to face with their own countrymen, desperate for aid to get through. a short distance away, the opposition leaderjuan guaido giving the aid convoy a personal sendoff. he said it would travel peacefully
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to venezuela, to save lives. but when his supporters converged on the bridge... crowd chanting ..they found it wasn't going to be that easy. as we filmed, we were engulfed in tear gas. soon, demonstrators were being hit with rubber bullets. a few tried to fight back. but as violence erupted at the border, this was the scene in the venezuelan capital, caracas. the embattled president, nicolas maduro, playing to the crowd, rallying his supporters, but his isolation is growing.
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he has broken off relations with neighbouring colombia because of its support for the opposition. on the bridge, the trucks ground to a halt, blocked by troops and clouds of tear gas. organisers intend to keep trying, here and at other crossing points. president maduro claims the aid convoy is just a coverfor a us invasion. orla guerin, bbc news, at the colombia—venezuela border. products high in salt and saturated fats are being marketed as healthy by leading supermarkets, bbc radio 5 live investigates has found. sainsbury s and tesco have promised to change their labelling and say they are committed to "promoting healthy eating". adrian goldberg from 5 live investigates joins us now. what have you found? we are trying to be healthy and it might not be working. we had a little nose around some of the
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healthier eating sections of the top supermarkets and found that three of them, sainsbury, tesco and morrison we re them, sainsbury, tesco and morrison were selling foods in those sections that have the red traffic light labelling which indicated they were either high in salt, fat or saturated fat. very often these were made substitute products or ready meals in the chiller cabinets ready for or designed for vegetarians or vegans, stretching the point of healthy, i think it has to be said. could this be said to be misleading customers? it could and there is a provision in the food safety act which says it's illegal to misrepresent in terms of food labelling but the question is when we talk about healthier healthier it's a bit of a grey area, certainly the world society for public health says we need a clearer definition of what healthy is in relation to food labelling and said that perhaps it's time to consider the introduction of a supermarket regulator. time to consider the introduction of a supermarket regulatori time to consider the introduction of a supermarket regulator. i wonder what the supermarkets might say
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about that. in terms of the particular allegations we raised this morning tesco and sainsbury have said they will change the labelling around these products, morrisons say something is in their healthy sections such as cheese for example, even if it has the red traffic light labelling showing high fat it will still have less fat than in other sections of the supermarket and they are standing by their healthier section claim. healthier, is the word there. that is the moot point. but if you want a bit more clarity and detail you can hear more on that story on five live investigates at 11am on that story on five live investigates at ”am this morning. votes are being counted in nigeria's closely fought presidential election. the electoral commission is deciding whether to allow voting to continue into a second day after logistical problems and violence meant some people have still not had the opportunity to cast their ballots. the vote is the biggest in african history. pope francis is preparing to close an unprecedented vatican summit — called to discuss sexual abuse
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in the catholic church. last night, he spoke of the need for honesty in confronting the crisis. a cardinalfrom germany said the rights of victims had been trampled underfoot when files on abuse were deliberately destroyed. bbc scotland launches tonight, it will run seven days a week and feature a range of documentary, comedy, news and sport. the bbc director—general said it will better reflect modern scotland for millions of viewers. the oscars is being held in hollywood this evening. the favourite — starring olivia colman — is up for ten awards, jointly leading the nominations with roma, a mexican film produced by netflix. there 5 hope for greater diversity amongst the winners this year after a shake—up in membership of the academy, following criticism that hollywood 5 focus has been too white and too male. from los angeles, dan johnson reports.
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black panther‘s a marvel comic action film that's set box office records, as well as breaking cultural boundaries. it's the first superhero movie nominated for best picture, and it's the highest grossing film by a black director. costumes from the fictional kingdom of wakanda were designed by a hollywood trailblazer, who has her own oscar nomination. there have been too many misconceptions about africans and where we come from and that connection between african—america ns and africa, so culturally, it — it really gave, i feel, african—americans and africans a bridge. i've never had fried chicken in my life. multiple nominations for films like green book, roma and if beale street could talk are being held up as evidence that the oscars, and the movies, are more embracing. because you can do better, mr vallelonga.
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we keep hope alive, the expectation of something good, our hope stories will continue to be told that embrace the fullness of humanity, and that includes absolutely, at the forefront, the life of the black empowered female. blachklansman has earned director spike lee his first oscar nomination after 35 years in the business. and lots of people think it's well overdue. well, they‘ re right. a lot more people are in front and behind the camera but, if you look at the numbers overall, it's still small, so a lot more work to do. the red carpet and the nominations list may feel more diverse but, of course, the real test is whether that's reflected in who and what actually wins. and there are other voices cautioning that deeper change is still needed. while we have some really great things that we can celebrate, projects that make us incredibly proud, creatives that are breaking through, on the whole, we have not seen the type of real
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change to the way that hollywood does its business, to its business model. you look like a badger. there are strong female stories too — the favourite is nominated ten times. the best director list is stubbornly all male, showing there's still a challenge behind the scenes, as well as on screen. danjohnson, bbc news, los angeles. brilliant film. this time tomorrow we will be talking about the winners. with just over a month to go until the uk leaves the eu and fractures within parliament continue to widen. three prominent cabinet members have openly said they will defy the government and vote to delay brexit, if a revised deal isn't agreed this week. so, where does this leave theresa may? we can talk to david wooding, political editor at the sun on sunday, whojoins us from our london newsroom. david, good morning and lovely to see you on this sunday morning. i
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came into work this morning hoping for a big sun on sunday front page with your name on it, the brexit story keeps on giving but it hasn't quite given is that today. where are we up to? we are on page two today, ple nty we up to? we are on page two today, plenty to read, newly made to page one. brexit is never far from the front pages, it's dominated the agenda for the last two years, we are on agenda for the last two years, we are on the home straight, just barely 30 odd days to go until march the 29th but there's a lot of pot hurdles and booby—traps between now and the day when we are supposed to break our ties with the european union and this is all complicated by these three cabinet ministers, amber rudd, david cork and greg clark, all announcing that they would vote to extend article 50 unless the prime minister takes no deal of the table. this comes at a very bad time for her because as you reported a few
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moments ago, she flies to sharm el—sheikh to meet european union leaders at the fringes of an arab eu summit which gives her a chance to strike that deal in the desert to bring that back to parliament on wednesday. the pressure is on her i'iow wednesday. the pressure is on her now to get something out of that that she can bring to parliament, it's unlikely that'll happen. because three cabinet ministers have given the european union something to cling on to that britain might extend article 50 if she does not get a deal. what are the pinch point this week? we talk about these three cabinet ministers, what needs to happen this week for them to either go back in line or say to theresa may we have had enough?m go back in line or say to theresa may we have had enough? if theresa may we have had enough? if theresa may can come back and say, hold your nerve, she has said that if you time already, we are close to getting a deal, there is a european council coming up, the european union always strikes deal when the clock is
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ticking, remember when greece was in trouble, it all happened at the last minute, when the euro nearly collapsed, they did a deal 15 minutes before the markets opened, right in the middle of the night. they always take it to the wire. theresa may has to persuade her people to stay calm and hope that she can bring that deal along because she believes that keeping no deal on the table focuses minds, it focuses minds of the remain camped who want to stop brexit because they fear of crashing out, it focuses the minds of the eu who do not want a no deal either and it focuses the minds of those who do not want to record bracketing the brexit might be lost or it might run into chaos. let's talk about the brexiteer is, how will they react? there is a ramp at them, maybe ten or 15, who believe whatever happens they will die in a ditch to have a no—deal brexit. they
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are prepared to sit there but vote down the deal, whatever the causes of problems, whatever the problems that will cause. and she is trying to win them over and that is very difficult. if she starts moving to the labour party to try and say, we will look at your customs union proposals, all that will do is alienate the conservatives who do not want the deal. all she needs to do is keep persuading her own people that they need to back this deal or brexit could be lost. it could be seen that these three rebel cabinet ministers have actually done her a favour because they may focus the minds of the hardline brexiteer is who want a new deal brexit to think well, we might end up losing the whole project completely if we extend article 50 because the european union may say, we will extended but for two years and if it's extended for two years, that gives the second referendum brigade
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the chance to keep working to try and overturn the result. david, i know sunday is a big day for people injobs like you know sunday is a big day for people in jobs like you but how will you manage to focus when liverpool play manchester united later? i'm hoping we will stay in europe ourselves but it's a big game today. all i can say is whatever the result, better be the liverpool fan than a manchester united fan watching manchester city and liverpool battle it out for the topjob. lovely to talk to you. thank you. a huge game later on today. more about that in a minute with holly and the sports news. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. yes, we are going to do that magic trick where we have the fog and cloud around this morning, but it just tends to clear, and we get some sunshine coming through later on today with clear blue skies. in many cases it becomes mild as well. the
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fog is extensive this morning, a few patches towards south—west england, murky around the midlands area and towards the north—west, particularly around merseyside. problems affecting the solway firth, the vale of york and the north—east. and in the fife area as well. visibility down to a hundred metres, even lower than that in a few spots, very thick fog. so there is the risk of some transport disruption, might be worth taking a bit of extra time for your journey if you are setting off over the next couple of hours. the fog will clear away from most areas, and there will be plenty of sunshine for scotland, england and wales, is clear skies through the afternoon. a breezy afternoon, but not cold, temperature is 11 degrees in belfast, but in the sun, temperatures could reach 16 or 17 degrees. and if we compare that to the average at this time of year, we can see that it is about eight or 9
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degrees warmer than it should be, and they are the kind of temperatures we would normally expect in late may rather than late february. england and wales keeping clear weather overnight tonight, but northern ireland and scotland have a little more cloud. across southern england and the countryside, temperatures could go down as low as —4 temperatures could go down as low as “4 celsius. on into monday's forecast, notice the wind is coming more round from the atlantic across the north and west, and there is a good reason for that. we have a weather front threatening rain for the hebrides, perhaps the highlands, but as well as orkney and shetland later in the day. away from northern scotland, after a cold and locally
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frosty start to the day, missed an fog clearing, most of the uk having plenty of sunshine, and much sunnier skies working into northern ireland. temperature is mild for the time of year, a little bit higher even. and for much of the week ahead, that high pressure is going to stay with us. high pressure is going to stay with us. but later in the week, we will start to see some subtle changes, more cloud coming in off the atlantic, threatening a few spots of rain, but you have to get to the end of the week to see that. for most of the week ahead it is dry with sunny spells, temperatures easing back a little in london, the average 9 degrees at this time of year in the capital, still very mild even into next weekend. positively tropical! it is 19 minutes past eight. almost half of police forces in england are increasing the number of staff trained to use a taser, a bbc investigation has found. tasers use electricity to stun a person's muscles and prevent them from moving during dangerous situations. police chiefs say the move comes as attacks on officers have increased by 10% over the last year, asjo taylor reports. wayne mcdonald's brother adrian died following an incident in which he was tasered by police in 2014.
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officers were called to a party where he'd taken drugs and barricaded himself in a room. adrian died from a cardiac arrest caused by cocaine and stress despite police trying to calm him, and his mum germaine thinks this stress could have been avoided. i'm not against the officers having tasers. what i'm against is the officers using a taser on somebody that's vulnerable, barricaded himself ina room. bbc research has found it's notjust adults being tasered. at least 1,000 children in england had a taser pointed at them last year, doubling in two years according to 36 police forces. 169 under—18s were actually fired at in the last three years. but police say the use of tasers can be necessary. a 16— or 17—year—old person carrying a knife is still a person carrying a knife.
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do i think children should be tasered? it's always an option. i do trust the cops out there to make the right decision at the time. you're under arrest for criminal damage... the home office says tasers provide officers an important option when facing potentially violent situations, though any use of force must be lawful and proportionate. but a recent study by cambridge university suggests tasers could actually be escalating situations. once they see a weapon, they become more aggressive and they get into a situation of fight versus flight. and then for them, the appropriate response is to assault the officer, which is why we're seeing a doubling of the assaults against officers when they have the tasers compared to when they don't have the tasers. at least another 3,500 officers will be tasered trained in the next two years, like these officers at bedfordshire police. taser, taser, taser! was that the only way
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to deal with the scenario? there is a moment where the individual's going to go from holding the knife to cutting their wrists. despite the risks, as knife crime rises, more officers will be equipped with tasers to keep them and the public safe. jo taylor, bbc news, cambridgeshire. you can watch more on that story on inside out east tomorrow night at 7.30pm and on bbc iplayer nationwide. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's 8:22. time now for a look at the newspapers. entertainment journalist emma bullimore is here to tell us what's caught her eye. what have you got for us today? first off, there is a thing about metoo, and apparently the latest trend in start—ups for apps, is a
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trend in start—ups for apps, is a trend in start—ups for apps, is a trend in apps to help you spot harassment. if you work in a huge company where you might not have a direct line manager you can feel you can trust on something like this, it is an easy way to report, so this is something we are going to see more of, lots of apps and development. how does the app work, then?” of, lots of apps and development. how does the app work, then? i think the idea is you will be able to go oi'i the idea is you will be able to go on that issue a complaint, it is a specific place where you can say, this is happening to me and i want to say this in a confidential way, please take me seriously. so they will be like internal mechanisms?” think that is the idea. and the next you have picked is about special co nsta bles. you have picked is about special constables. yes, not as many as we perhaps need. this was supposed to bea perhaps need. this was supposed to be a great measure for getting office rs be a great measure for getting officers into the police without paying them, but it hasn't worked. there are about 20,000 of them, and i'iow there are about 20,000 of them, and now we are down to about 11,000. it
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isa now we are down to about 11,000. it is a big ask to say to people, go and be a police officer and put yourself in these dangerous situations without any money, on a volunteer basis. these are police and community support officers. yes, as they were renamed, i don't know if they are still called that now. i think a lot of people still call them special constables. a labour mp he is saying it is because of tory cuts and morale is low, but it seems a bit mad that we are relying on volunteers for our police force, and people who went into it with good intentions are perhaps now thinking it is not for me. you would have to be community minded to volunteer, wouldn't you ? be community minded to volunteer, wouldn't you? and they are the people that we want to do that sort of stuff, and it needs to be encouraged, but something in the scheme isn't quite working in the way that it seemed attractive to start with. but more men are becoming midwives. yes, this is very exciting. a 9% increase in men specifically applying to be midwives
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and nurses, and this was on the back ofa campaign and nurses, and this was on the back of a campaign from the nhs to try and make it clear that this is not a female profession, it is for everyone , female profession, it is for everyone, and everyone should apply. applicants to be midwives are very high anyway on the back of call the midwife, there has been a big spike, but in the same way that women can be firefighters, men can be midwives. we have done coverage over the years trying to encourage women to go into industries traditionally seen to go into industries traditionally seen as to go into industries traditionally seen as male, and perhaps we don't talk as much about encouraging young men to go into industries traditionally seem to be female. yes exactly, and just because it is traditionally seem to be a caring role, doesn't mean men can't do it. some people might say they are more co mforta ble some people might say they are more comfortable with just women in the room. but are there everjust women in the room? society is changing, i think. and once you get to a critical point, you don't even care who is in the room! whoever has got
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the pain relief. now this is interesting, the michaeljackson documentary. this is going to be out in early march on channel 4, it is a four hour film, leaving neverland. four hours? yes, and it contains detailed accusations of abuse by michaeljackson. fans are outraged it is going to be broadcast, and talking about how it is going to go down. there is the obvious comparison to be made here with the r kelly documentary, and that has had a massive impact on his/her life and careerand had a massive impact on his/her life and career and legacy, and will happen to michael jackson? and career and legacy, and will happen to michaeljackson? the difficulty is r kelly is facing justice now and will be able to defend himself, and michaeljackson isn't in a position to do so, and a lot of his fans feel it is unfair. and his estate are suing hbo for
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their involvement in this documentary. they are furious this is taking place. i haven't seen it yet, but when it comes out, it will cause massive controversy. let's talk about cute dogs, why not? sale these are scottie dogs, and nobody is getting them any more. fewer than 500 of them were registered this year. they are so cute! they are a popular british breed, but they are declining because everyone is buying cockerpoos in french bulldogs, so scotties are now in the at risk group. they don't have any famous celebrity owners. there is an opportunity for you, sally!” celebrity owners. there is an opportunity for you, sally! i am just wondering where his legs are. he is so cute. one dog is enough for
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me. yes. emma, thank you very much indeed, lovely to talk to. the andrew marr show is on bbc one at 10 o'clock. andrew what's on the programme today? good morning. these feel like earthquake days in british politics, and i'm joined by two members of the independent group, the so—called diggers, heidi allen, who used to be a tory mp, luciana who used to be a labourmp a tory mp, luciana who used to be a labour mp sitting on the sofa together, and the deputy director tom watson of the labour party, who feels his party should make a different direction, and a key cabinet minister, one of the leaders of the leave campaign, michael gove. all of that at ten o'clock. quite rightly, ten o'clock, not immediately offer this programme. still to come on breakfast, 24—year—old amy—claire davies was born with an incurable genetic condition which means she doesn't know how long she has to live. amy—claire has such a positive outlook that she's been dubbed the "incurable optimist" — we'll hear from a documentary maker who has filmed her story, since she was 15.
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stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning. welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and rachel burden. it is 8:29am exactly. here's a summary of this morning's main news. the prime minister has told a gathering of grassroots conservative party activists that she won't allow the result of the brexit referendum to be frustrated. the comments were made after three cabinet ministers defied the government line to argue for a delay rather than a no—deal exit. theresa may will travel to the egyption resort
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of sharm—el—sheikh today, for an eu summit with the arab league, where brexit is expected to be discussed on the sidelines. an operation to bring humanitarian aid into venezuela has descended into chaos during a day of violence. president maduro's security forces fired tear gas and rubber bullets on opposition activists, as clashes across the country's borders left two people dead and more than 300 injured. two lorries carrying food and medicine from colombia were set on fire. us vice president mike pence has vowed to take action. north korea's leader, kim jong—un, has left pyongyang to travel to vietnam to meet with president trump. mr kim is travelling by train to hanoi for the meeting next week. it's the second time the two leaders have met and the issue of denuclearisation and lifting the sanctions on north korea are expected to be discussed. three people have been injured in an explosion at a house in bristol. part of the property was destroyed in the incident, which happened yesterday evening. several roads were closed off and emergency services were at the scene but the cause is still unknown.
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saudi arabia has for the first time appointed a woman as its ambassador to the united states. princess reema bin bandar takes over at a sensitive time, with relations between the two countries strained following the murder of the saudi journalist, jamal khashoggi. a court in chicago has set bail for american musician, r kelly, at one—million dollars. the r and b star has been charged with ten counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse. thejudge asked him not to have any contact with anyone under the age of 18 and and to surrender his passport. the singer, whose real name is robert sylvester kelly, denies all the charges. the duke and duchess of sussex are to visit a school for girls in the atlas mountains on the first full day of their trip to morocco. they were greeted at casablanca airport by soldiers, and were offered the traditional welcome of dates and milk. kensington palace says the couple are pleased to be meeting so many young moroccans
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while they are in the country. prince harry they're possibly escaping the rugby results. what a result. as a rugby fan he would have appreciated that focus by wales. so interesting, the reaction on social media, either as interesting, the reaction on social media, eitherasa interesting, the reaction on social media, eitheras a neutral or some england fans saying it was a sensational performance. on such a run, 12 test wins on the bounce. you said they don't know how to lose anymore which is great considering it as anymore which is great considering itasa anymore which is great considering it as a world cup year, for wealth, maybe not so for england. england had been leading before half time as warren gatland's side produced a late fight back to win 21—13 at the principality stadium, and they're now the only side in this year's tournament with three wins from three. joe wilson was in cardiff.
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welcome, said cardiff. crowds mixing together on the streets, that is the six nations tradition. look at the young man, front row, every little helps. wales relied on their home advantage to shake and in plasma composure. but in the melee tone curry sensed a gap. to get to the line. england led by seven at half—time. wales still behind deep in the second half tried to build. running, passing, crashing, recycling the ball until there was corey hill. in the 68th minute, wales squeezing into the lead. now the welsh stadium and the welsh players were truly united. louder, higher, stronger. the ball in the airand the higher, stronger. the ball in the air and the brilliance of this to turnit air and the brilliance of this to turn it into another try. 21—13 in
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2019. this years revival of a great rivalry was a classic. and who can stop wales now? when a team is able to win 12 matches in a row as these wales players had done you no they have an instinct for victory. so powerful. we felt it here in cardiff! in paris scotland in blue we re cardiff! in paris scotland in blue were missing some key players out injured. france rediscovered some of their spirit. scoring four tries in total for a their spirit. scoring four tries in totalfor a 27—10 their spirit. scoring four tries in total for a 27—10 victory. rugby is tough enough when you win, it is exhausting to lose. so wales keep their grand slam hopes alive by winning their 12th match in a row — it's their longest winning streak since 1910 — this is what the coaches made of that result in cardiff. look, it is a pretty special group of boys at the moment.
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they, you know, rob evans said to me the other day there is not one person in this squad that i would not want to, you know, do something for in terms of how tight they are. they are a great group at the moment. it was one of those nip and tuck games, and it is a game of small margins and we let ourselves down in a couple of areas, they beat us in the area, the penalty count was strongly against us, it ended up 9—3, and that gives the opposition field position and the chance to score points, and that is what happened. and there was plenty of action in the women's six nations... france had a 41—10 victory over scotland. gabrielle vernier helped seal a win with a hattrick try. scotland have now lost their opening three fixtures in the tournament. and italy secured their first six nations victory over ireland with a 29—27 win. giada franco scored the winning try — her second of the game. wales meet england this afternoon football now and some rather heated scenes at burnley
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as tottenham manager mauricio pochettino confronted the referee following his side's 2—1 defeat at burnley. ashley barnes got the winner seven minutes from time to leave spurs stuck five points behind manchester city and liverpool in the race for the premier league title, but at the final whistle pochettino had a heated exchange with mike dean and appeared to be upset by something the referee said to him. the spurs boss says he may apologise for his behaviour. now that we are all relaxed its difficult to explain but i think what happened on the pitch happened on the pitch, we cannot blame no one, we need to blame ourselves. i am the first, i need to blame myself when the defeat happened. it was in oui’ when the defeat happened. it was in our hands to win but we should be the better and on the end, we need to blame ourselves. crystal palace enjoyed a big win at leicester. wilfried zaha scored twice,
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his second coming in added time, as the visitors secured a 4—1win. a great way for roy hodgson to mark becoming the oldest manager to take charge of a premier league match at 71 years and 198 days old... stoke city's championship home match with aston villa was their first opportunity to pay tribute to their goalkeeping icon gordon banks who died earlier this month. the england world cup winner spent six years at stoke and spent much of his later life in the city. the team's current goalkeeper jack butland wore a commemorative greenjersey in banks' honour. looking ahead to this afternoon then and liverpool could go back to the top of the premier league table, but they'll need to get a result against rivals manchester united at old trafford. last time these sides met it proved to be jose mourinho's final game as united manager, but liverpool will face a very different united side now.
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they were all good before but now they kind of, are full of confidence and the use of their potential. that makes a big difference, of course. and yes, sometimes you need some changes and in football it's very often the manager and that helps always, but sometimes it helps in this case. that match gets underway at five past two and after that.. it's the final of the league cup. manchester city face chelsea at wembley. .. vying for the first piece of silverware in the men's game this season. maurizio sarri has been under pressure following some poor results recently, but guardiola says chelsea are a quality side. they are able to take your ball away in 30 seconds or 35 seconds. normally that does not happen, and they are able to do that consistently defensively, and the space to attack is minor. especially, it helps a lot with the transitions, they run forwards and backwards
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really well, and of course, the quality of the players they have. manchester city yesterday picked up the first silverware of the women's domestic season — the continental cup — beating holders arsenal on penalties. the match finished 0—0 after extra time. karen bardsley proved key in the shootout, saving twice. and that allowed janine beckie to secure victory — as city won 4—2 on penalties. it's the third time they've won the trophy. britain's jonny brownlee looks back to his best — winning the men's eliminator on the final round of the super league triathlon in singapore. the olympic silver medallist saw off the favourites in a dramatic final round. he'll be hoping to end the season on a high in the last eliminator today. there's live coverage on the red button at 8.55. chris eubank junior scored the biggest victory of his career with a unanimous points win over former world champion james degale. eubankjunior put degale down twice during the super—middleweight contest in london — and afterwards he described the win as "a statement".
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meanwhile 2008 olympic gold medallist degale says he'll now talk to his family about his future after a glittering career at the top level. rory mcllroy is in second place going into today's final day of the wgc mexico championship. the northern irishman had a mixed round yesterday of seven birdies with four bogeys to lie 4 shots off the pace on 12 under par. the american dustin johnson leads on 16 under. before i go we've just got time for perhaps the worst — or best — shot of the year at last night's shoot out event in watford... between andy hicks and michael holt. take a look.. this is the competition where players are up against the clock in frames that only last ten minutes... so here's michael holt really feeling the pressure. in the end he actually won the frame despite the penalty — but i think we'll see that miss
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for years to come. it is the pressure, isn't it. it looks brilliant in slow motion. if he was meant to do that, it would look really good. but he did go on to win. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we have to be patient. some dense patches of fog. this will clear. in many cases this afternoon, we will be left with is guys like this. it will become mild. patchy fog first of all, across south—west england, quite grey around the midlands, certainly through merseyside, greater manchester, dense fog already. the vale of york, the solway firth and across the border into scotland, dumfries and galloway and towards fife some fog as well, visibility down to below
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100 metres in places. we are looking at the risk of transport disruption, might be worth allowing an extra bit of time for yourjourney might be worth allowing an extra bit of time for your journey if you might be worth allowing an extra bit of time for yourjourney if you are setting off over the next hour but the good news is the focal clear. scotland, england, wales, for the first part looking fine and sunny. northern ireland missing out on sunshine for most of the day, cloudy and breezy but not cold. temperatures around 11 degrees in belfast, where we see sunshine it will be one for the time of year. highs today of 16—17d. around eight 01’ highs today of 16—17d. around eight or9 highs today of 16—17d. around eight or 9 degrees warmer than it should be at this time of year. these temperatures we see are more like those we would normally get in the late pa rt of those we would normally get in the late part of may. overnight tonight we keep clear weather for england and wales, mr fog we keep clear weather for england and wales, mrfog patches we keep clear weather for england and wales, mr fog patches forming, further north and west, cloudy weather for scotland and northern ireland. given the cloudy weather it's not so cold in the north—west, the coldest further south across
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southern england in the countryside temperatures as low as —4. some frost around to start monday. monday sees high pressure in charge, more ofan sees high pressure in charge, more of an influence coming from the atla ntic of an influence coming from the atlantic into the we have a weather front bringing some cloud and rain. the wet weather limited to the hebrides, the highlands at times, later in the day shetland. away from northern scotland some sunshine once early morning mist has cleared, some sunny weather in the forecast for northern ireland. temperatures are still way above where they should be, if anything, a little bit warmer, temperatures around 17—18d in the warmest spots through monday. in the week ahead, little overall change for the next few days, more sunny weather and the way. towards the end of the week changes on the way as the atlantic as more of an influence, cloud and showers coming in. that's towards the end of the week, for most of the time it will be dry with sunshine, temperatures are slowly easing. that's your
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latest weather, sally and rachel, back to you. lovely to hear some good weather news on a sunday morning. we are here on the bbc news channel until nine o'clock, coming up before then. 100 years ago the royal army chaplains were recognised for their outstanding service and sacrifice during the first world war and awarded the prefix royal by king george v. we will explore how they support men and women serving in the military. and it's an incredible story, this 24—year—old woman was born with an incurable genetic condition which means she does not know how long she has to live. amy claire has such a positive outlook she has been cold the incurable optimist. we'll hear from a documentary maker who filmed her story since she was 15. cannot wait for that. all of that to come.
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all that to come on the bbc news channel. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. if you are still with us, and i hope you are, we will continue with our programme. 100 years ago, the royal army chaplains' were recognised for their outstanding service and sacrifice during the first world war and awarded the prefix royal by king george v. on friday, her majesty the queen attended a service at wellington barracks to mark the centenary. we'rejoined now by padre tom hiney, a chaplain of five years who was at the commemoration. thank you for being with us here this morning. what was the format on friday? it was standard, a professional choir at the chapel, so that sounded beautiful. there were some tourists crowded outside to see the queen. it was amazing, 500 people, some of whom were trained and built up to go to war, and then the queen arrives, the tiniest and
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old est the queen arrives, the tiniest and oldest person among us, but everybody was in awe of her. and tell us about the role of army chaplain. you are not there simply isa chaplain. you are not there simply is a spiritual guide. you are known asa padre, is a spiritual guide. you are known as a padre, which is a portuguese word for father, so as a padre, which is a portuguese word forfather, so it as a padre, which is a portuguese word for father, so it is a pastoral role and you do play father or mother to them. the army is a cross—section society, they have all the relationship and financial problems that anybody else get themselves into, and some of the time you're simply helping them deal with that. back in world war i it would have been slightly different, a lot more burials and services, and doing some quite gruesome things like padres would often spend the night with someone who was going to get hanged or shot for desertion.
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gruelling, but it must also be gruelling now but in a very different way? you are built for those awkward moments, you know? in accident and emergency, or on the sofa with a family going through a bereavement, so we are often quite awkward people in normal situations, but in intense moments we come into our own. and what about the actual forces training as well? because presumably you are going out to combat areas, so you need a certain level of physical training, as any member of the armed forces? there will be some older soldiers watching who will be smirking, because they have been some quite chubby padres. these days there have been more of an emphasis on that side, being ready and fit and strong, while trying not to become too military, because you want to have that separation. this job is in your family? yes, my dad was a padre, and
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i grew family? yes, my dad was a padre, and igrew up, family? yes, my dad was a padre, and i grew up, i never thought that i would go to... you can see the resemblance! wow. great picture. there he is. he ended up as chaplain to the chelsea pensioners, so i grew up to the chelsea pensioners, so i grew up with that, but i never thought i would end up in the church, let alone in the army, but here we are. how did you? i was a journalist, actually, and worked in london, and then was in south africa for nine yea rs, then was in south africa for nine years, and the gorgeous township gospel music melted me, i used to go and do stories about it and ijust stayed. do you find that men and women come to you even if they don't have any firm religious belief? yes. soldiers are very intuitive creatures. they might not have stacks of a—levels and degrees, but they know who they trust and they
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know who they like, but yes, regardless of where they are at, if they think that you care and you won'tjudge them and will help them, they come towards you. you often as a chaplain spend the first two or three months in a regiment building up three months in a regiment building up trust before you can be effective. and it's notjust men and women you are looking at, also people with many different faiths or even no faith at all. indeed, and thatis even no faith at all. indeed, and that is part of it, there is a national conversation about our relationship with god, our christian heritage, and that conversation is ongoing. i'm not ashamed to be a christian, but i wouldn't have much to do if! christian, but i wouldn't have much to do if ijust restricted myself to churchgoing soldiers, yes. and where do you think the future lies for the role of chaplain? you see less active service perhaps with british armed forces being less engaged overseas? that's true. the army itself is asking what the future of wa rfa re itself is asking what the future of warfare looks like at the same time,
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so warfare looks like at the same time, so the role of chaplaincy is is running parallel to that. there will be changes. some things don't change. and also i imagine some people who leave the army probably need you more at that point than they ever have before. in america, they ever have before. in america, the veterans have their own padre, we don't have that set up here but it could be a development. that seems to make sense, thank you very much for coming and talking to us this morning. my pleasure. you are watching bbc breakfast. it is ten to nine. the headlines: violent clashes in venezuela continue as volunteers try to bring aid into the country. the prime minister has said she will not allow the result of the brexit referendum to be frustrated by the threat of rebellion from within her cabinet. it is exactly ten to nine on sunday morning.
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24—year—old amy—claire davies was born with an unknown genetic condition, which means she doesn't know how long she has to live. she has to take 41 pills every day, as well as experiencing agonising spasms and doctors didn t expect her to live past childhood. despite all this amy—claire tries to live a normal life. now her story has been made into a documentary called the incurable optimist. let's take a look. i'm 24 years old and i'm from swansea, and my world is full of love. i love mammy and daddy, and i love our dogs. i love my friends and family, and i love bright clothes, films and books and music. i love unicorns, coffee and of course i love my new boyfriend, blue. i'vejust been going round fattening everybody. i have hopes and dreams for an incredible future. all the normal stuff, a house, job, family and above all else, happiness and love. joining us now is mei
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williams, the director of that documentary who has followed and filmed amy—claire's story for nearly 10 years. iimagine i imagine that is a longer duration than you are expecting. yes, i eventually met her in a children's hospice, and we didn't expect her to be with us too much longer, and here we are ten years later. what was it about her that caught your eye? when amy is in the room, there is no getting away from her. she just fills the place. she is bonkers. so obviously we were attracted to her, but she has also got this kind of mature philosophy, because she deals with the serious issues of life every day, she is constantly worried about if the end is coming, so she has got a lot to say. we shouldn't underplay the gravity of her
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situation. i don't know if you can simply explain for us what it is that she has and the impact it has on her life physically. it is a complex condition. the simple way of explaining it is her brain doesn't communicate with her body very well. and the effect of that is she has these terrible spasms. they are agonising. she lives her life at seven out of ten on the pain scale every day, so she has patches constantly, and these spasms can lead to, it can stop her from breathing, basically. we are seeing images of her now, obviously with a zest for life. that shines out of her. that is the amazing thing. the story is tragic in so many ways, and she can break your heart to one minute and make your day the next. she hasjust got this minute and make your day the next. she has just got this zest for life, and being in her situation has given
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hera and being in her situation has given her a different perspective on life. we all live every day saying every day could be your last, but with her, it actually could be. what i thought was interesting was that in her teenage years, she made a bucket list for herself with all those big, key moments that she wanted to achieve, but for now in her life, in her later years, it is about normality and almost celebrating normality and almost celebrating normality in everyday things? yes, it is interesting, you kind of make the most of every day when you are told that you haven't got long left. and then i think she has kinda figured out what life really is about, it's not about these big goals where you get to driving a ferrari or whatever, it is the small everyday things that cheer you up. she says it's about kindness and love, really, filling your life with that. so in terms of the normal things she wants to do, what do she like to do? anything she can get her
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hands on, really! she is having guitar lessons, doing yoga, that sort of thing. but her condition don't stop her from doing a lot of things. and going on holiday is a big thing for her, she can't go on holiday, normally. and in the film, she goes with that great charity to amsterdam, and she has a whale of a time. it sounds like an amazing story, and thank you very much for bringing it to us. i don't know if amy—claire is watching, but thank you to you as well for bringing your story to us. how can we see it? monday night, 10:40pm, bbc one wales. and also on the iplayer. thank you. the oscars is on in hollywood this evening. there is
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hope for greater diversity amongst the winners this year after a shake—up in membership of the academy following criticism that hollywood's focus has been too white and male. here is danjohnson from los angeles. black panther‘s a marvel comic action film that's set box office records, as well as breaking cultural boundaries. it's the first superhero movie nominated for best picture, and it's the highest—grossing film by a black director. costumes from the fictional kingdom of wakanda were designed by a hollywood trailblazer, who has her own oscar nomination. there have been too many misconceptions about africans and where we come from and that connection between african—america ns and africa, so culturally, it — it really gave, i feel, african—americans and africans a bridge. i've never had fried chicken in my life. multiple nominations
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for films like green book, roma and if beale street could talk are being held up as evidence that the oscars, and the movies, are more embracing. because you can do better, mr vallelonga. we keep hope alive, the expectation of something good, i hope stories will continue to be told that embrace the fullness of humanity, and that includes absolutely, at the forefront, the life of the black empowered female. blachklansman has earned director spike lee his first oscar nomination after 35 years in the business. and lots of people think it's well overdue. well, they‘ re right. a lot more people are in front and behind the camera but, if you look at the numbers overall, it's still small, so a lot more work to do. the red carpet and the nominations list may feel more diverse but, of course, the real test is whether that's reflected in who and what actually wins. and there are other voices cautioning that deeper change is still needed.
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while we have some really great things that we can celebrate, projects that make us incredibly proud, creatives that are breaking through, on the whole, we have not seen the type of real change to the way that hollywood does its business, to its business model. you look like a badger. there are strong female stories too — the favourite is nominated ten times. the best director list is stubbornly all male, showing there's still a challenge behind the scenes, as well as on screen. danjohnson, bbc news, los angeles. i've got to persuade you to go and see that. i will go, may be thursday. i loved it a lot. we will see how it gets on tomorrow. charlie and louise will be back here on the sofa with six o'clock with all the coverage from the oscars, and we will probably talk about the favourite to a little bit more. i
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will be here as well. enjoy the rest of your weekend. goodbye.
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