Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 24, 2019 9:00am-9:31am GMT

9:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at nine. the prime minister warns she won't allow the brexit vote to be frustrated as she prepares for further talks with eu leaders at a summit in egypt. violence in venezuela — at least two people are killed as security forces fire tear gas and rubber bullets to stop opposition protesters bringing foreign aid into the country almost half of police forces across england are increasing the numbers of officers trained to use tasers the duke and duchess of sussex arrive in morocco for their first official visit to north africa. a bbc investigation finds products high in salt and saturated fats are being marketed as healthy by leading supermarkets and our sunday morning
9:01 am
edition of the papers is at 9.35 — this mornings reviewers are the sunday times journalist rosamund urwin and political commentatorjames millar. hello and a very good morning to you. the prime minister has told a gathering of grassroots conservative party activists that she won't allow the result of the brexit referendum to be frustrated. it came after three cabinet ministers defied the government line to argue for a delay to brexit — rather than a no—deal departure from the eu. today theresa may will travel to the egyptian resort of sharm—el—sheikh, for an eu summit with the arab league, where brexit is expected to be discussed on the sidelines. our politcal correspondent
9:02 am
jonathan blake is here. let's first of all talk about that meeting in sharm el—sheikh. some people have been talking about the possibility of a deal in the desert on brexit but how likely is that? very unlikely, i think the guidance we are getting is that there will be or it is very unlikely there will be a breakthrough. brexit is not the focus of the eu leaders, it is more the situation in the middle east but theresa may will take the opportunity to speak to some of her eu counterparts and we can assume to impress upon them furthered the need for changes to the withdrawal agreement, the brexit deal she agreed with the european union. and it comes down to the issue of the backstop, the part of the deal they are too insular and it comes down to theissue are too insular and it comes down to the issue of the backstop, the part of the deal there to ensure an open border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland if a trade deal cannot be done. not all eu leaders are at the summit, it will not be something at which brexit is
9:03 am
formally discussed nevertheless theresa may is taking the opportunity to meet her eu cou nterpa rts opportunity to meet her eu counterparts and the head of the european council donald tusk, to talk about brexit and see what progress can be achieved. what else has theresa may been saying in the message to tory party activists? very interesting speech she gave to conservative grassroots members yesterday saying the worst thing the government could do will be to lose focus at this stage in the process and she said the brexit process would not be frustrated, obviously in stark contrast to the message we heard from some of her most senior ministers, three members of the cabinet yesterday coming out and saying in public what they had been making clear in private for some time. that is they would prefer a delay to the brexit process rather than leaving the european union without a deal in place come the end of march. it's worth noting that conservative activists at that conference yesterday passed a
9:04 am
symbolic motion but important nevertheless, because it said as far as they are concerned no deal should be kept on the table and nothing should happen to delay the brexit process adult. the tory grassroots membership very much in favour of getting on with brexit. another important week in the commons, what can we expect? one of two things will happen, theresa may set yourself a deadline of the end of debris to allow parliament to debate and vote again on the way forward for brexit. if she gets a revised deal with the european union in time mps will vote on that, that looks incredibly unlikely at this stage but what we are most likely to see come tuesday and wednesday is a series of votes when mps are allowed to have their say on the way forward for the brexit process. one plan which could attract a lot of attention in ruling out a no deal or extending article 50, if that happens it will have a big impact on the timetable from here on. still a
9:05 am
lot of f and may be. jonathan, thank you. an operation to bring humanitarian aid into venezuela has descended into chaos after president maduro's security forces opened fire on demonstrators and aid trucks were set alight. at least two people, including a 14—year—old boy, were killed, and more than 300 people were wounded. the venezuelan opposition leader, juan guaido, has said all options must remain open to free the country from its president, nicolas maduro. our international correspondent orla guerin reports. holding the line, president maduro's troops on the border between colombia and venezuela. from early morning, face to face with their own countrymen, desperate for aid to get through. a short distance away, the opposition leaderjuan guaido giving the aid convoy a personal sendoff. he said it would travel peacefully to venezuela, to save lives.
9:06 am
but when his supporters converged on the bridge... crowd chanting ..they found it wasn't going to be that easy. as we filmed, we were engulfed in tear gas. soon, demonstrators were being hit with rubber bullets. a few tried to fight back. but as violence erupted at the border, this was the scene in the venezuelan capital, caracas. the embattled president, nicolas maduro, playing to the crowd, rallying his supporters, but his isolation is growing. he has broken off relations
9:07 am
with neighbouring colombia because of its support for the opposition. on the bridge, the trucks ground to a halt, blocked by troops and clouds of tear gas. organisers intend to keep trying, here and at other crossing points. president maduro claims the aid convoy is just a coverfor a us invasion. orla guerin, bbc news, at the colombia—venezuela border. votes are being counted in nigeria's closely fought presidential election. the electoral commission is deciding whether to allow voting to continue into a second day after logistical problems and violence meant some people haven't been able to cast their ballots. the vote is the biggest in african history. our correspondent mayenijones is in yola. what do you expect to happen in the
9:08 am
next 24—hour is? is voting expected to continue? the electoral commission hasn't yet come down one—way at the other but we expect results to come in within the next 48 hours roughly. at the moment the unofficial figures that have been coming through by various media platforms, local media platforms as well as civil society groups, the electoral commission has not made any formal results known. what they are doing is counting the results from yesterday around the country, only a small number of polling stations were affected by delays and violence that they are waiting to see what the results like before deciding whether it's safe enough for staff to go back in. what is at sta ke for staff to go back in. what is at stake in this election? outline for the selection is all about. nigeria is africa's most populous nation, it's also the largest economy and its been at the centre of the fight
9:09 am
in the region against the islamist militant group book o'hara. it's dry to get some of its neighbours to help in defeating the group and the displacement of millions of people, nigeria to remain a strong and secure country is incredibly important for the stability of the region. it suffered a lot in terms of the economy, falling oil prices leading to massive unemployment, many young people leaving the country looking for greener pastures elsewhere so whoever winds this election has a lot on their hands. they have to try and find employment for a very young population and try and defeat an islamist militant group that has been active for more than ten years. we were hearing some people were not able to cast their ballots, people generally in nigeria anxious to vote, keen to have a say in the election? yes. nigeria has only returned to democracy, a democratic country for 20 years now for them people, for them, democracy
9:10 am
is so important. the last elections we re is so important. the last elections were largely considered free and fair, people i spoke to yesterday said they were incredibly proud of that achievement and they wanted it to continue for some time. they are eager to vote, they want their voices to be heard but the problem is the logistical difficulties of voting in nigeria, having to stand in long lines under the hot sun make it difficult for people to show up. turn out here hasn't been very high in the past, roughly below 40%. thank you very much for bringing us up—to—date. the duke and duchess of sussex have arrived in morocco, for their first official visit to north africa. the couple were greeted at casablanca airport by the british ambassador to morocco, thomas reilly, and his wife. harry and meghan will meet girls at a school house in the atlas mountains, as well as attending an equestrian event in the capital rabat, which offers horse therapy for children with special needs.
9:11 am
almost half of the police forces in england are increasing the number of staff trained to use a taser, according to a bbc investigation. tasers use electricity to stun a person's muscles and prevent them from moving — during dangerous confrontations. police chiefs say the increase comes as attacks on officers have gone up by 10 percent over the last year, asjo taylor reports. wayne mcdonald's brother adrian died following an incident in which he was tasered by police in 2014. officers were called to a party where he'd taken drugs and barricaded himself in a room. adrian died from a cardiac arrest caused by cocaine and stress despite police trying to calm him, and his mum germaine thinks this stress could have been avoided. i'm not against the officers having tasers. what i'm against is the officers using a taser on somebody that's vulnerable, barricaded himself
9:12 am
ina room. bbc research has found it's notjust adults being tasered. at least 1,000 children in england had a taser pointed at them last year, doubling in two years according to 36 police forces. 169 under 18s were actually fired at in the last three years. but police say the use of tasers can be necessary. a 16— or 17—year—old person carrying a knife is still a person carrying a knife. do i think children should be tasered? it's always an option. i do trust the cops out there to make the right decision at the time. you're under arrest for criminal damage... the home office says tasers provide officers an important option when facing potentially violent situations, though any use of force must be lawful and proportionate. but a recent study by cambridge university suggests tasers could actually be escalating situations.
9:13 am
once they see a weapon, they become more aggressive and they get into a situation of fight versus flight. and then for them, the appropriate response is to assault the officer, which is why we're seeing a doubling of the assaults against officers when they have the tasers compared to when they don't have the tasers. at least another 3,500 officers will be tasered trained in the next two years, like these officers at bedfordshire police. taser, taser, taser! was that the only way to deal with the scenario? there is a moment where the individual‘s going to go from holding the knife to cutting their wrists. despite the risks, as knife crime rises, more officers will be equipped with tasers to keep them and the public safe. jo taylor, bbc news, cambridgeshire. you can watch more on that story on inside out in the east tomorrow night at 7.30pm and on bbc iplayer nationwide.
9:14 am
the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister warns she won't allow the brexit to be frustrated as she prepares forfurther talks with eu leaders at a summit in egypt. violence in venezuela — at least two people are killed as security forces fire tear gas and rubber bullets to stop opposition protesters bringing foreign aid into the country almost half of police forces across england are increasing the numbers of officers trained to use tasers products high in salt and saturated fats are being marketed as healthy by leading supermarkets — according to an investigation by bbc radio 5 live. sainsbury s and tesco have promised to change their labelling and say they are committed to "promoting healthy eating". the royal society for public health says its time to consider whether a supermarket
9:15 am
regulator is needed. adrian goldberg is from bbc radio 5 live investigates and joins us live from our salford newsroom. adrian, tell us some more about what you found. good morning to you. we had a nosy around some of the supermarket shelves and some of britain ‘s supermarkets, in the cases of sainsbury, tesco is and morrison, goods for sale in the healthier healthier sections, were either high in salt, fat or saturated fat, sometimes a combination of those with products having the red traffic light symbol to suggest they were offering more than your recommended daily intake. we were particularly looking at foods around the chilled and freezer cabinets, ready meals, often vegan or vegetarian meals, often neat substitutes as well but certainly, pushing the boundaries of what most
9:16 am
people might consider to be healthy or healthier. what had the supermarkets themselves had to say about this? both tesco and sainsbury said sorry, they've agreed to update their labelling around these products. morrisons, the other supermarket, said where something is in their healthy section, even if it has a red traffic light symbol against it, for example if it has a relatively high level of fat, they say that will still have a lower level of fat than alternative products found within their stores. healthier, yes, healthy? that's a moot pound. adrian, thank you. you can hear more on this story on bbc radio 5 live investigates at 11am. three people have been injured in an explosion at a house in bristol. part of the property was destroyed in the incident, which happened yesterday evening. several roads were closed off and emergency services were at the scene but the cause
9:17 am
is still unknown. pope francis will close a four—day conference at the vatican this morning, called to discuss sexual abuse in the roman catholic church. last night — speaking at a special service for some 200 bishops and cardinals taking part in the meeting — the pope said senior figures in the church had to be honest and confront the reality of abuse. bishops from around the world were told yesterday that official files on priests, who had sexually abused children, were destroyed or never even drawn up. our correspondentjames reynolds is in rome. james, four days, 200 cardinals and bishops, a lot of soul—searching but has anything been decided, will anything change? we wait to hear from the pope himself. in his closing speech he is expected to point the way forward to talk about
9:18 am
what kind of concrete and effective measures and those are his words, he wa nts to measures and those are his words, he wants to put in place. he did circulate a number of suggested points at the start of this meeting. they involved the civil authorities, in cases of abuse and victims say it really should be very simple, if a priest is accused of abuse, the church should not hide, should not shelter that priest but it should involve the civil authorities in a criminal investigation. this has been a sort of summit, really, i suppose, on abuse. and it's been very emotional at times. i think in one of your reports we saw one of the church leaders almost crying. yes, a cardinalfrom the philippines broke down on the opening session and we had the testimony of several fellow cardinals expressing their repentance for what has gone on. it is worth saying, this is defining pope francis del mag pulled francis
9:19 am
as papacy, it is a problem he has inherited from previous popes, benedict and john paul ii, it is not a problem that has emerged with this particular pope but he clearly now feels he has to fix it. do you think ina feels he has to fix it. do you think in a sense he has been forced into this or he wants to take the lead on this or he wants to take the lead on this and to define his papacy?” think it's a bit of both. i think it's fair to say if the reports had not been out there, of what was going on, if people had not come forward and given their testimony, particularly victims and survivors, this summit would not be taking place. it may have been forced upon the pub in the vatican by the average of a number of victims and survivors who feel they were not taken seriously over many years. james, thank you. north korea's leader, kim jong—un, has left pyongyang to travel to vietnam for his meeting with president trump. mr kim is travelling by train
9:20 am
to the vietnamese capital, hanoi, for the talks next week. it's the second time the two leaders have met. they'll be discussing denuclearisation and the possible lifting of sanctions on north korea. let's speak now to dr sojin lim, a senior lecturer in north korean studies at the universty of the central lancashire. thank you very much for being with us. how important do you think this summit will be and what do you expect the results to be? if we think about what happened during the first summit, i must say we were all kind of very disappointed with what they actually achieved. because of that, i believe both leaders are under pressure for the second summit. at the same time, they really wa nted summit. at the same time, they really wanted to see what they can have intangible format because of that, i can say they are not expecting something big but at least
9:21 am
they can have a step—by—step achievement of which means both the us and north korea can agree a point of destroying weapons of mass destruction in north korea and in time the us can agree to normalise diplomatic relations between north korea and the us which can give kim jong and more power in terms of the security of his country and giving the handshake to the leader of the united states and that could be one of the achievements we can expect from this second summit in vietnam. i suppose in a sense, after such a long stand—off between these countries, a dangerous stand—off, it is important that the sides are talking. yes. if we think about before what happened between the us and north korea, the format was based on the six party talks, north
9:22 am
korea did not have such bargaining power but now it is so obvious that the young north korean leader has bargaining power and he can talk directly to the president of the us and givea directly to the president of the us and give a huge commission del mike message to north korean people. think about how he is portrayed in the north korea newspapers, he has tried to do nuclear the country but at the same time people think about what happened in the past, we thought the us was the enemy and we need to secure the country but now the leader is talking, what should we expect. in that sense the north korean leader needs to show his people they have the upper hand and the chance for economic development and the us is helping us and we have
9:23 am
strong diplomatic relations. because of that reason this is so important for him. thank you so much. a court in chicago has set a one—million dollar bailfor the musician, r kelly, who's been charged with ten counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse. the singer handed himself to police on friday, and was asked to surrender his passport. for decades, he's faced claims of sexual abuse from women and teenagers, but has always denied the allegations. kim gittleson reports. in a chicago court room, prosecutors laid out the accusations against the r&b singer r kelly, who turned himself in on friday. they painted a dark portrait of a superstar who manipulated young women into sexual relationships, enabled by a coterie of accomplices. in 2001, a witness had conversations with robert kelly and robert kelly's associates, where the witness was asked to retrieve video tapes showing robert kelly having sexual intercourse with the victim in this case when she was only 14 years old. after the hearing, a judge set bail for mr kelly at $1 million. he ordered him to surrender his passport and to avoid contact with anyone below the age of 18. on behalf of mr kelly, his lawyer strenuously denied the charges.
9:24 am
he did not force anyone to have sex. he doesn't have — he's a — he's a — he's a rock star. he doesn't have to have non—consensual sex. r kelly, whose real name is robert sylvester kelly, has faced decades of claims that he abused women and teenagers, but the accusations gained renewed prominence after a documentary called surviving r kelly aired on us networks, which led to boycotts of mr kelly's music, with activists using the hashtag #muterkelly. and now, these charges, which some have said should have come years ago. kim gittleson, bbc news. in a chicago court room, prosecutors laid out the accusations against the r&b singer r kelly, who turned himself in on friday. they painted a dark portrait of a superstar who manipulated young women into sexual relationships, enabled by a coterie of accomplices. in 2001, a witness had conversations with robert kelly and robert kelly's associates, where the witness was asked to retrieve video tapes showing robert kelly having sexual intercourse with the victim in this case when she was only 14 years old. r kelly, whose real name is robert sylvester kelly, has faced decades of claims
9:25 am
that he abused women and teenagers, but the accusations gained renewed prominence after a documentary called surviving r kelly aired on us networks, which led to boycotts of mr kelly's music, with activists using the hashtag #muterkelly. and now, these charges, which some have said should have come years ago. at least three people have been killed in avalanches in austria and germany. austrian police say a skier died after being swept down the mountainside in the popular ski resort of tyrol and another person died on the german border after being buried by snow. an avalanche in bavaria has also killed one person and another is still missing. saudi arabia has for the first time appointed a woman as its ambassador to the united states. princess reema bint bandar takes over at a sensitive time, with relations between the two countries strained following the murder of the saudi journalist, jamal khashoggi. princess reema follows in the footsteps of her father, bandar bin sultan, who held the us ambassador post from 1983 until 2005. the oscars is being held
9:26 am
in hollywood this evening. the favourite — starring olivia colman — is up for ten awards, jointly leading the nominations with roma, a mexican film produced by netflix. there s hope for greater diversity amongst the winners this year after a shakeup in the membership of the academy, following criticism that hollywood s focus has been too white and too male. from los angeles, dan johnson reports. black panther‘s a marvel comic action film that's set box office records, as well as breaking cultural boundaries. it's the first superhero movie nominated for best picture, and it's the highest grossing film by a black director. costumes from the fictional kingdom of wakanda were designed by a hollywood trailblazer, who has her own oscar nomination. there have been too many misconceptions about africans and where we come from and that
9:27 am
connection between african—america ns and africa, so culturally, it — it really gave, i feel, african—americans and africans a bridge. i've never had fried chicken in my life. multiple nominations for films like green book, roma and if beale street could talk are being held up as evidence that the oscars, and the movies, are more embracing. because you can do better, mr vallelonga. we keep hope alive, the expectation of something good, our hope stories will continue to be told that embrace the fullness of humanity, and that includes absolutely, at the forefront, the life of the black empowered female. blachklansman has earned director spike lee his first oscar nomination after 35 years in the business. and lots of people think it's well overdue. well, they‘ re right. a lot more people are in front and behind the camera but, if you look at the numbers overall,
9:28 am
it's still small, so a lot more work to do. the red carpet and the nominations list may feel more diverse but, of course, the real test is whether that's reflected in who and what actually wins. and there are other voices cautioning that deeper change is still needed. while we have some really great things that we can celebrate, projects that make us incredibly proud, creatives that are breaking through, on the whole, we have not seen the type of real change to the way that hollywood does its business, to its business model. you look like a badger. there are strong female stories too — the favourite is nominated ten times. the best director list is stubbornly all male, showing there's still a challenge behind the scenes, as well as on screen. danjohnson, bbc news, los angeles. and for all the best bits of the acceptance speeches and the drama from the red carpet,
9:29 am
join us on bbc news for an oscars special, tomorrow morning at 9.30 the american film director stanley donen has died at the age of 94. his works included musicals such as ‘singin‘ in the rain‘, ‘funny face' and ‘seven brides for seven brothers'. donen also worked as a dancer and choreographer. he received an honorary lifetime achievement oscar in 1998. now it's time for a look at the weather. chris has the details. hello. quite a bit of fog to start the day. that is expected to clear for a minibus across scotland, england and wales, lots of sunshine, feeling springlike in the sunshine, becoming mild again. northern ireland staying cloudy but not cold, 11 degrees. the
9:30 am
top temperature at 16 degrees, not like the temperatures we would see at this time of year, more like temperatures we would see at the end of may. across england and wales clad patches forming, more cloud in the north and west, not quite so cold here. in england, rural parts of the south we could see temperatures reach —4, cold started the day on monday, plenty of sunshine, early morning mist and fog clearing, sunnier weather for northern ireland, across the hebrides, the highlands, orkney and shetland that could be rain at times especially in shetland. mild again, temperatures of 17—18d.

56 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on