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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 12, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: drug crime on the rise in small towns and villages, even as it falls in big city centres. another rival going from manchester, or some other tribe coming into town, and leaning on the business, well, then you are going to start getting fighting between the two gangs. it comes as the prime minister lanches a review into tougher sentences for the most dangerous and violent offenders. missing in malaysia — the parents of teenager nora quoirin could offer a reward to help find her. a tough month on the high street.
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why fewer shoppers and more closures made july an especially tough time for retailers. i'll have the details. a fabulous four and a perfect start to the new premier league season for manchester united, who thump chelsea at old trafford and inflict a first defeat for frank lampard. good morning. today we are looking ata good morning. today we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers. showers in the north and west, have very —— heavier and thundery showers in the south—east, in between some sunshine, and this week's weather remains unsettled. i'll have more in 15 minutes. it's monday, august 12. our top story: drug crime has risen in rural areas but fallen sharply in major city centres. a bbc investigation has found that in some villages in england and wales it has more than quadrupled in five years. the findings highlight concern about the spread of so—called county lines gangs which traffic drugs using children and vulnerable people. dan johnson reports.
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the latest frontier in the fight against drugs. heroin and crack cocaine are pouring into north wales from merseyside and manchester. there is a lot of money to be made in this town. children and young people are running drugs hundreds of miles. they are vulnerable and at risk. someone becomes established here, it is our town, if you like, so here, it is our town, if you like, so another rival gang or someone from manchester or something like that tries coming into town and muscling in on the business, well, and you are going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs. it is a struggle to keep people safe and to get drugs off the street. the minute you get rid of one or two, there is another three
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orfour readily one or two, there is another three or four readily available to come down. here's how the problem is shifting. across the north, look where drug crime is down. big cities like liverpool, manchester, leeds and sheffield. but the pink spots show there are more drug offences in smaller places like chester, huddersfield and lincoln. further south, in westminster in central london, over the last five years, drug crime more than halved. but 20 miles away, offences quadrupled in the tiny village of a stumble. and this is it, a sleepy spot in rural surrey. it is the last place you would expect to have any sort of drug bond. it is a very quiet area. it would be easy for people to come out here and be unobtrusive. yes, i can see how it might happen. how often do you see the police? very infrequently. the figures here are still really low. but the fact there has been the steady increase over the past few years does show that drug dealers are more active in
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places like this, and you can see why. it's quiet, it's rural, the police are very thinly spread in this part of the world. so that is the appeal, and it's also the challenge. and it is police forces like north wales that are dealing with the extended reach of county lines gangs, spreading more drugs and more misery. there is most probably enough of us to just about manage the situation, in terms of making sure no—one's getting seriously hurt. but in terms of seriously hurt. but in terms of seriously disrupting or attempting to stop the supply, there is nowhere near enough of us. you can see more of the bbc investigation into county lines crime, including how children's homes are being exploited and the role of social services, on the 6:00 and 10:00 news this week. we'll also be speaking to the national crime agency shortly after 7:00 this morning. the prime minister borisjohnson is launching a review
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into whether dangerous criminals should spend more time injail before being released. it's the latest in a series of announcements on law and order from the government. critics say there's no evidence that longer sentences prevent crime, and the uk already has the largest prison population in western europe. let's speak with our correspondent helena wilkinson. good morning to you. with all these announcements, is that a touch of electioneering going on? that is the speculation, this all adds to the speculation, this all adds to the speculation that the government is doing the groundwork, if you like, for autumn general election. what we are hearing from the prime minister this morning is another day, another promise, more investment in the criminal justice system. promise, more investment in the criminaljustice system. he is announcing £85 million to go towards the crown prosecution service. now, this is the body which deals with who is prosecuted and for which crime in england and wales. but
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borisjohnson crime in england and wales. but boris johnson wants to crime in england and wales. but borisjohnson wants to talk crime in england and wales. but boris johnson wants to talk today at downing street to those involved in the criminal justice downing street to those involved in the criminaljustice system. judges, police officers and also probation officers, to get an idea from to how they can improve the system, because what he thinks is that there are too many violent criminals who are let out from prison to early, and there are too many criminals, also, he says, who go on to reoffend. we also heard yesterday him announcing 10,000 more prison places and also extending their use for police officers to be able to stop—and—search people. very much speculation that this could all be gearing towards an autumn general election. thank you for that. we will be speaking to thejustice secretary at 7:40am about some of those policy announcements.
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thank you for that. we will be speaking to the justice secretary at 7:40am the family of the 15—year—old school girl with special needs who's gone missing in malaysia, could offer a reward to find her. a liaison officer from the irish police arrived to support nora quoirin‘s family on saturday. 0ur south—east asia correspondent howard johnson is in the town of seremban, near to where was she last seen. howard, what more do we know? iam standing i am standing outside the resort where she went missing eight days ago. what we are hearing from the lucy blackman trust, working alongside the family, they were set up alongside the family, they were set up to help british nationals in crisis abroad, they are telling us the family are considering offering a cash appeal for any information, the family are considering offering a cash appealfor any information, a cash reward, rather, for any information which could lead to the discovery of their daughter. we do know that the family have raised a lot of money on cloud —— with crowdfunding. more than £100,000 has been donated to them by concerned members of the public. today search and rescue teams are continuing to fan out over a four square kilometre area. at the moment they are 350 strong. but as the largest number of
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personnel but have been deployed on the search and rescue effort since the search and rescue effort since the search and rescue effort since the search began more than a week ago. the family are obviously very concerned. the police are continuing to treat this as a missing persons case. the family would also like to explore the angle but she could have been abducted. the police say they are not ruling that outjust yet. thank you. a man charged with the attempted murder of a police officer who was run over with his own patrol car will appear in court today. west midlands police said the 42—year—old traffic officer was attempting to pull over a stolen car in birmingham when he was assaulted. 29—year—old mubashar hussain will appear at birmingham magistrates' court. the authorities in india have reimposed a military clampdown in kashmir ahead of the start of the muslim eid al—adha festival today. the main city, srinagar, is once again under lockdown, and a curfew which had been eased for the past two days is back in place. the lockdown was first imposed last monday, when india revoked kashmir‘s right to greater autonomy.
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the number of gamblers complaining about british betting companies has increased almost 50—fold in the past five years. new figures obtained from the gambling commission by the bbc show that there were a record 8,000 complaints last year. the rise in complaints follows a big increase in gambling over the past decade. the big betting companies say they are working on a plan to reduce gambling—related harm. hundreds of people have been evacuated from their homes on the spanish island of gran canaria due to wildfires. strong winds and temperatures of more than 32 degrees celsius are slowing efforts to put out the flames, which covers 10 square kilometres. a 50—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of starting the fire. dolphins are intelligent ceatures, and often full of surprises — so today we give you dolphins juggling jellyfish. this incredible footage shows a dolphin "juggling" a jellyfish as it swims through a harbour. the footage, which comes from sonderborg harbour, denmark, was captured by two
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friends while out sailing. in the video, the jellyfish can be seen flying in mid—air as the dolphin dips its head back down in order to catch it under the water. my my other favourite video from the weekend, i don't know how old it is, but have you seen the one of the guy rescuing the drone which has rented a battery? yes! did you post that? i put it on there, somebody else posted it. very impressive. i became mildly obsessed with it. and have you seen the dead fish? there is a dead fish lying on the water while he swims out. and the fact he takes his shoes. if you haven't seen it, it isa his shoes. if you haven't seen it, it is a drone running out of battery
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over a lake. and he must know it is running out of battery. he takes his shoes off and swims in unjust catches it as it falls into water. very impressive. good morning, sally. speaking of impressive, manchester united yesterday, my word! it reminded me of watching them several years back. a bit of a swagger at old trafford. nice shoulders. did you like that? i want to do that again, sorry, everyone. and we go back to buckshot? daniel james on his scoring a goal. things obviously not so great for frank lampard's chelsea. manchester united got their season off to the perfect start with a 4—0 win over chelsea. marcus rashford got a couple in what was united's biggest win over chelsea at old trafford in more than 50 years. it was a managerial debut to forget though for frank lampard in his first match in charge of chelsea. defeat too for another manager making his debut. steve bruce's newcastle side beaten 1—0 by arsenal. pierre emerick aubamayang with the only goal of the game at st james' park.
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leicester and wolves drew 0—0 in the day's other game. england name their squad for next month's rugby world cup this afternoon, and there's plenty for head coach eddiejones to think about after a convincing win for his side over wales at twickenham. and britain's jamie chadwick has won the first ever w series championship. it's after she finished fourth at the season ending race at brands hatch. we'll speak to her just after 8:30am this morning. thank you very much. that isjust after 8:40 thank you very much. that isjust after8z40 a.m., thank you very much. that isjust after8z40 am, to thank you very much. that isjust after 8:40 am, to be exact. thank you very much. that isjust after 8:40 a.m., to be exact. lots of gas coming up today, aren't there? a busy day? i'm not ready for it! let's take a look at today's papers. the metro says children are being recruited by drugs gangs who loiter at fast food takeaways. the report comes from evidence given to a parliament—backed inquiry. prime minister boris johnson's plans to reduce crime,
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which emerged on sunday, feature on the front of the times. and there's also a photo of the queen alongside prince andrew, as they travelled to church on sunday. the daily mail leads on the national shortage of hormone replacement therapy, which helps women deal with the symptoms of the menopause. the guardian reports on the methods used to restrain people who are being deported from the uk, saying shackles and belts have been used. and there's a picture taken from the violent protests in hong kong. and the most watched story on the bbc news website this morning is about tourists being scammed in london. undercover filming shows as many as 14 gangs on westminster bridge, trying to scam tourists out of money using an age—old three cup trick. lambeth council is now calling on the police to try and drive the gangs away. the met says it's taking action, with 30 people arrested this year so far.
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those are some of these stories in the paper this morning. and stuff is over there. good morning. lots of analysis going on in the business pages about the power outage over the weekend. 0bviously affecting almost1 million british homes, causing trouble chaos in various parts of the country. and now there isa parts of the country. and now there is a lot of assessment being done by politicians and business analysts, saying, do we need to think about how the national grid is run? just questions raised over how they spend their money and the reliability of renewables. and another story i have spotted this morning, i know it annoys a lot of people. the price you annoys a lot of people. the price y°u pay annoys a lot of people. the price you pay when you are dropping off somebody at an airport. it drives people nuts, this. at 18 british airports, it says in the sun this morning, they have introduced or raised prices for drivers dropping off and picking up passengers this summer. off and picking up passengers this summer. then it has some of the worst places, it says luton understands that you have to pay £8
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for 30 minutes. just drop somebody off? birmingham, £5.50 stop manchester is not great either, £4 50 p. it can be quite pricey now, just dropping somebody for picking somebody up from the airport. it really annoys people. they will not be happy about reading the this morning. they will not. is it to put off people taking their cars to the airport, orjust to make money?” don't know, i suppose it is a bit of both. you still have to get home, so then there is taxis and whatever else. i love the story, this morning. this is in the sun. quite sinister. spy of the tiger, a fan watching hold this weekend was threatened with being ejected from the ground for texting during a match. he was on his phone, to much was being played, it was at halftime, and he was told by an undercover security guard to stop texting. he said if i continued to texting. he said if i continued to text about the game i would be ejected from the ground. he explained he had been watching the game and asked what i had been
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texting. very invasive and uncomfortable. he assumed i was some sort of gamblers' informant when i was actually just texting my girlfriend dumb stuff about tommy's out. i couldn't get my head around it. do we know he was legitimate? he had a security pass. slightly disturbing. really disturbing, because they assumed he was in communication with someone in a betting syndicate may be on the other side of the world and he said i'm sorry but i can't get this information as fast as the club are putting it out. tricky! on that issue, one in four parents say they bribe their children to get them to switch off their screens.” bribe their children to get them to switch off their screens. i thought you were going to say to gamble! bribe them with what? sorry, i can't speak this morning! hold on, children between eight and 15 resort to giving them cash to switch off, a
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survey by halifax says. the un this year has warned dangerous screen time could mean children under two shouldn't be allowed any at all. they claim one minute a day in front ofa tv or they claim one minute a day in front of a tv or smartphone could put young children at greater risk of obesity or impact their young development. unlucky screens weren't available when my children were two so available when my children were two soi available when my children were two so i didn't have to deal with that! hrt has made lots of the newspapers, and we talked about it before on brea kfast, and we talked about it before on breakfast, there seems a shortage of hrt types in the department of health say they are aware of supply issues caused by manufacturing delays but a gp from the royal couege delays but a gp from the royal college of gps says the real reason is not clear. get in touch. we will try to look at it and find out why it's happening and what's going to be done. i know lots of you are having serious issues so thanks for being in touch. did you spot this
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one? wine has overtaken beer as our favourite alcoholic tipple. not surprised! that's true in my house! early revelation there! 81% of adults said they had drunk wine in the past year compared with 71% who enjoyed beer and spirits. the top two wines are? names or colours? it's either red or white! or rose! top two types? southern yon blog? and the other one? chardonnay? pinot grigio! that's the only one i could think of. the third place is malbec and prugh serco. thanks, everybody! i haven't drunk for months! we have been making up for you. so much so that you have forgotten the names of them! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it felt quite chilly this morning?
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yes, it will do so this week and temps down on where they should be at this stage in august. look at this cumulonimbus cloud taken in brighton, in hove, and indeed it's a sign of what is going to happen this morning. heavy and potentially thundery showers in the south—east. looking at the week ahead, further rain at times, further showers, cool and breezy but of course sunshine in between. today we have this weather front, which will eventually clear, that's bringing us heavy showers and the other one, the remnants of yesterday's rain, and another one coming into the north—west will enhance showers. at 7am, moving to 8am, this line of showers in the channel islands to the south—eastern corner and through somerset, bristol, east wales, the west midlands with a lot of dry weather as well. some showers in northern ireland and here's the remnants of
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yesterday's rain in the north—east of england and south—east scotland. showers coming in across the western isles but elsewhere a lot of dry weather and we'll see sunshine today. sunny intervals at worst as cloud develops. as temperatures rise we could see showers elsewhere, but for many it will be a dry and quiet day with temperatures down on where they should be. 13 in the north to 19 in the south. london at this time of year should be around 20, 21, 22. through this evening and overnight, we start with some showers and some will peter out through the night. there will be clear spells around as well and it's going to be a chilly night, even chillier than the night just gone. many parts of the uk in single digits and these temperatures indicate what you can expect in towns and cities. in rural areas, they'll be lower than this. tomorrow, where we've had the clear spells by night will start off with sunshine and a fuchsia dotted
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around. you can see them in parts of eastern england and eastern scotland. later in the day the cloud will thicken out to the west. temperatures up a notch on tuesday, 14 in the north to 21 in the south. the reason the cloud is thickening in the south—west is because our next area of low pressure is coming our way with its attendant weather fronts and that will introduce all this rain with strengthening winds as well moving across england and wales, but we've got another band moving across scotland. northern ireland seeing showers from that. there is the good chance wherever you are on wednesday that you will get wet and temperatures by then will be slipping back down once again. thanks very much, carol. we'll see you for more throughout the morning. hundreds of flights have been cancelled in the past week as a result of everything from threatened strikes, to a computer meltdown, to bad weather. when an airline cancels a flight, it's obliged to quickly find alternative transport on other carriers. but britain's biggest
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budgetairline, easyjet, is operating a completely different policy that can leave customers out of pocket. here's the independent‘s travel editor simon calder to take us through what's been happening. breaking news, more cancellations overnight? a couple of,000 of people affected out of luton and liverpool and belfast. your not where you need to be. if you are and bristol for the 7:05am to edinburgh, it's not going and neither is the flight coming back. a difficult summerfor easyj et, coming back. a difficult summerfor easyjet, they've cancelled dozens of flights over the weekend affecting thousands. is there something else going on, the weather is being blamed? all sorts of things, air traffic control difficulties is normally a favourite. there are some problems with this but i've been monitoring all the airlines and easyj et monitoring all the airlines and easyjet on a normal day is having a not more problems than everybody
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else. that shouldn't be a problem because once your flight is cancelled the airline has to find you an alternative as swiftly as it can. but as you say, easyjet are breaking a completely different policy saying we've got 48 hours. easyjet passenger mike ruddick was told his flight from the south of france to gatwick was cancelled on saturday afternoon and this is what happened next for him. the options they gave us were for a refund, which was totally useless to us, orto refund, which was totally useless to us, or to transfer us to another flight. us, or to transfer us to another flight. we looked at that and the first available flight that easyjet gave us as an option to transfer was for monday late afternoon. so we had to go without. but it's at great expense to us. we've got extra car hire expenses. 0ur expense to us. we've got extra car hire expenses. our own vehicle's stuck in gatwick airport parking, and we've got two dogs in boarding, plus the fact that we are both
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self—employed and need to be back at work on monday morning, not stuck in france, as nice as it is. so what's going on, what are they doing and what should they be doing? with my product, it is straightforward, they cancelled the flight straightforward, they cancelled the flight on saturday afternoon and u nfortu nately flight on saturday afternoon and unfortunately where he was, montpellier, very good train links to paris, so four hours later he could have been there and got a flight could have been there and got a flight or a train back to london and that wouldn't have been a problem. but it would have cost easyjet quite a lot of cash and that's what the european regulations say they must do. you must have someone there as quickly as you can. 0r do. you must have someone there as quickly as you can. or you could have flown on air france. there's many ways. but they said we're going to give you a flight in 48 hours and meanwhile he's got somewhere to stay, so he hasn't got extra expenses, but they are waiting until they can get people on their flight rather than buying tickets on anybody else's. what powers have the
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civil aviation authority got, can they find them or take them off? i've been trying to find this out over the weekend because dozens of people have been in touch —— tick. let's put easyjet's point of view, they say they take the obligations under the european passenger rights rules very seriously and they adhere to them and they're working with the civil aviation authority and its most civil aviation authority and its m ost rece nt civil aviation authority and its most recent guidance but that came out last year and it was a letter saying to all the airlines that you really need to reroute people and book different flights for people and get them where they need to be immediately after you cancel a flight. immediately after you cancel a flight. that took effect at the end ofjune this year but obviously easyj et leaves ofjune this year but obviously easyjet leaves it doesn't have to follow that advice and it's got its own policy which it is content with. some people might be watching from the airport this morning and their flight the airport this morning and their flight is cancelled, what should they do? you have to insist when they do? you have to insist when they say we will get you from
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edinburgh to bristol, that is cancelled as well, in a couple of days you have to say you have to organise something else for me and that might be flying on different airlines, like flybe, and it might involve getting a train with a last—minute ticket, which could be expensive, but that is easyjet's problem, not yours. you can dig your heels in? yes. all the evidence suggests airlines don't respond to that kind of thing, you'll find you might have to pay for it and reclaim the cash. and there's no guarantee? if you get sufficiently legalistic, they know what the rules are and... what you can't do is if they say we will fly you at lunchtime and you say no i want to go now, then you wouldn't get your cash. i'm sure lots of people have questions and you'll back with us later. thanks very much. get in touch with us on that one. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we'll have the headlines in just a few minutes.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. an undercover investigation by bbc london has revealed how tourists are being conned out of thousands of pounds in a gambling scam on westminster bridge. 0ur secret cameras have exposed the illegal activity and show how gangs work together to create the impression that a £50 bet can be doubled when there's absolutely no chance of winning. the met say its officers are using a number of tactics to tackle the problem, including high—visibility patrols and plain—clothes operations, but westminster council say tougher action is needed. there's got to be a concerted effort from scotland yard, because this is organised crimes and i promise you, i will take this up personally with the commissioner. and you can see more on that special investigation on tonight's programme at 6.30pm. property developers will be forced to build fewer millionaire mansions and thousands more affordable homes
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in london's wealthiest borough. kensington and chelsea council has set out plans to build over 700 affordable new homes a year. it's also trying to ban super rich landlords from creating mansions by buying up neighbouring homes and knocking them into one. apologies for that picture there. an investigation's revealed two london airports have the most expensive car parking tariffs in the country. both luton and stansted charge £8 for 30 minutes in the passenger pick up area. the rac found both airports have increased their charges this summer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. no reported problems on the trains either. traffic is building on the north circular in both directions through bounds green at the junction with bounds green road.
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in victoria, buckingham palace road has temporary traffic lights for gas mains work at the junction with eccleston street. let's see what the weather has in store with kate kinsella. good morning. unafraid the rather u nsettled good morning. unafraid the rather unsettled conditions continue into this new week. we start the day on a rather cloudy note with one or two bright spells but also heavy scattered showers. these showers will continue through the morning and into the afternoon and you might hear a rumble and into the afternoon and you might heara rumble or and into the afternoon and you might hear a rumble or two of thunder. it won't be until later this afternoon and into the early evening that we'll see the cloud breaking and we'll see the cloud breaking and we'll get sunny spells with temperatures getting up to 19, so not very warm for august. the showers will continue into the evening but gradually overnight it does dry out, some clearer spells. still the risk of one or two showers associated with that patchy cloud and the minimum temperature touch cooler than last night, 8—10. 0n
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tuesday, looking like a drier affair and more sunshine and therefore temperatures getting up to 20. but then further rain, quite heavy rain, expected as we head through wednesday and temperatures that bit cooler and i'm afraid it stays rather unsettled through much of this week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. until then, goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as people with cystic fibrosis in scotland wait to hear if a life—changing drug will be made more widely available, we'll talk about the difference it could make. that's after eight o'clock. jamie chadwick is a female racing driver used to making history, and now she's set her sights on formula one — find out more about her driving ambition later.
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and we'll hear from the founder of a film festival celebrating the work of women over the age of 50. nuala 0'sullivan will be here to explain why she wants to see a bbc investigation has found drug crime has risen in rural areas but fallen sharply in major city centres. police are fighting the growing threat of so—called county lines gangs, which traffic drugs from cities to smaller towns using children and vulnerable people. data analysed by the bbc shows offences for possession and supply is down in cities like liverpool, manchester and leeds — but smaller towns like chester and huddersfield have seen significant rises in the last five years, with rival gangs battling for control leaving police facing an added challenge. another rival gang, someone from manchester or someone like that, tries coming into town and muscling in on the business, well, then you are going to start getting sort of fighting between the two games. --
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gangs. the crown prosecution service is to receive an extra £85 million pounds over the next two years, to help deal with a rise in violent crime. it comes as borisjohnson launches a review of sentencing for the most prolific offenders and promising to create an extra 10,000 new prison places and expand stop—and—search powers. he said dangerous criminals must be taken off the streets if the public is to have confidence in the justice system. the family of the 15—year—old school girl with special needs who's gone missing in malaysia could offer a reward to find her. a liaison officer from the irish police arrived to support nora quoirin's family on saturday. hundreds of people are looking for her and malaysian police have opened a hotline for any information connected to the disappearance. a man charged with the attempted murder of a police officer who was run over with his own patrol car will appear in court today. west midlands police said the 42—year—old traffic officer was attempting to pull over a stolen car in birmingham when he was assaulted. 29—year—old mubashar hussain will appear at birmingham magistrates' court.
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the authorities in india have reimposed a military clampdown in kashmir ahead of the start of the muslim eid al—adha festival today. the main city, srinagar, is once again under lockdown and a curfew, which had been eased for the past two days, is back in place. the lockdown was first imposed last monday, when india revoked kashmir‘s right to greater autonomy. the number of gamblers complaining about british betting companies has increased almost 50—fold in the past five years. new figures obtained from the gambling commission by the bbc, show that there were a record 8,000 complaints last year. the rise in complaints follows a big increase in gambling over the past decade. the big betting companies say they are working on a plan to reduce gambling—related harm. people with cystic fibrosis in scotland are waiting to hear if a life—changing drug will be made more widely available. a us clinical trial showed that 0rkambi can slow the decline in lung function by more than 40%, the main cause of death
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from the condition. the drug is not currently funded by the nhs in england, wales and northern ireland. hundreds of people have been evacuated from their homes on the spanish island of gran canaria due to wildfires. strong winds and temperatures of more than 32 degrees celsius are slowing efforts to put out the flames, which covers 10 square kilometres. a 50—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of starting the fire. that is pretty much the summary of venues. “— that is pretty much the summary of venues. —— the news. childhood friends rosemarie badaczewski and kriemhild meyer didn't know it would take 58 years to see each other again, when they last said goodbye aged 15. here they are in 1961 — standing next to the berlin wall, which was still under contruction. the two girls, from either side of the wall, were talking whilst it was still low enough. they were known as the "wall girls." rosemarie, on the left, lived in the east of the city. kriemhild, on the right,
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lived in the west. now, nearly 60 years later — almost to the day — the two friends have been reunited. i love those stories, of being reunited many years later. lovely. it is pretty incredible, really, when you think about all that has taken place since that first action. there they are again. lovely. it is 6:35am and sally joins there they are again. lovely. it is 6:35am and sallyjoins us with a look at a dizzy opening weekend for the premier league. yes, it began on friday night and continue apace. the fantastic opening weekend, actually. interesting to watch manchester united yesterday. they did have that old kind of confidence about them. you said swagger earlier. yes, and i did a shoulder wobble, which i'm not going to do again. i will get turned into a going to do again. i will get turned intoa meme going to do again. i will get turned into a meme if i'm not careful. what an opening weekend to the new premier league season it was, and it culminated with a thumping win for manchester united over chelsea,
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on a day that their new boss frank lampard will want to forget pretty quickly. adam wild reports. at old trafford, a new start. here we re at old trafford, a new start. here were fresh faces, manchester united's world record signing harry maguire, and for chelsea, a returning hero in new manager frank lampard. behind it all, a rivalry that brings to mind glorious past. but these are clubs in transition. time and patience required. still, chelsea's tammy abra ham time and patience required. still, chelsea's tammy abraham seemed in little need to wait. in the opening moments, he could have scarcely got closer. but at the other end, this was a chelsea defender getting too close. penalty comedy decision. marcus rashford got united's season started. after the break, they would really find their stride. anthony marciano poking in a second for united, and just seconds later, a third. marcus rashford calm and measured. it has all gone away from chelsea in the space of a minute!
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united's new start never clearer than when danieljames added a debut goal, 4—0, some start. than when danieljames added a debut goal, 4-0, some start. 4-0, you can't really dream of more, or expect more. then again, wejust work on improving as a team. but it is coming. we are improving. newcastle and arsenal, two more clu bs newcastle and arsenal, two more clubs beginning afresh. but amid the movement, there remains a constant. the goals of arsenal's peer erica bum young. he is the difference on their opening day. some things do not change. as well as managerial debuts, there was a big technological debut as var arrived in the premier league for the first time. and it's already annoying some managers. this is wolves scoring what they thought was a winner over leicester yesterday. but it was disallowed after the video assistant referee spotted a hand—ball in the build up to the goal. it finished 0—0, and the wolves boss nuno espirito santo said var is affecting "the spirit of the game." and there was a huge win for rangers
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in the scottish premiership. they were 6—1winners at ibrox over hibernian who also had a man sent off. jermain defoe scored his first hat—trick for rangers, who've made a perfect start to the season. the rugby world cup isjust over five weeks away and england name their 31—man squad to travel to japan at midday today. and eddiejones will have lots of decisions to make after an impressive win over wales yesterday. england got the perfect start at twickenham with billy vunipola crossing the line inside the first four minutes of the match. wales, who were unbeaten in their last 14 matches, would have gone to number one in the world with a win, but they were comfortably beaten 33—19. luke cowan—dickie with england's last try. we had a good team out there today. a good mix of some young guys, some quys a good mix of some young guys, some guys that haven't played for a while, and i knew their attitude would be right. had a lot of
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expectation, and while we didn't speak about it, because we are purposely not spoken about the opposition, we thought that would weigh them down. jamie chadwick has become the first winner of the w series motor racing championship, after a tense final race of the season at brands hatch. the 21—year—old from bath started from pole, but soon slipped back to third and eventually finished fourth behind race winner and fellow briton alice powell. however, that was enough to secure the championship by ten points ahead of dutch rival beitske visser. jamie chadwick is with us on breakfast after 8:30 this morning. there were tears for serena williams as she had to retire from the final of the rogers cup in canada. the 23—time grand slam winner only managed four games before she called a medical time—out for back spasms. she couldn't continue, so the title went to the canadian teenager bianca andreescu.
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a lovely moment between the two of them, when she made that decision, knowing she couldn't continue. there was embarrassment for britain at the athletics championships. this is the start of the man's 4x400m relay. can you spot the gap whether british tea m you spot the gap whether british team was supposed to be? gb accidentally put the name of a reserve shotputter, youcef zatat, down on the start sheet for the men's 4x400m relay, instead of rabah yousif — meaning the team were disqualified and they earned no points towards the total. that is a disaster, isn't it? a com plete that is a disaster, isn't it? a complete and total disaster. and finally, football stars can often inpire unswerving devotion, and in liverpool they start them young. so much so that young fan lewis fowler ran into a map—post whilst he was running after his hero mo salah for an autograph. —— lamppost. salah was leaving the club's training base at the weekend but he later went to louis's home to check on him and take a picture with him and his brother. trying not to cry, while also being really happy! no, that's too much!
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now according to his step—dad, he had a "busted nose," but we're told he was the talk of the children's ward at alder haye hospital later that day. he wasjust he was just chasing him along, not looking where he was going, and bank. because liveable's training areas right in the middle of a housing estate. it is. one of my children, went on the pavement, there was a lamppost coming, she was on her bicycle, and instead of watching out when i yelled at her, she looked back at me. lamp dangerous things. is he all right now? he has the best photo of the weekend. i am sure he is fine. mo salah saw what happened, turned around and went back to jackie was 0k. spoke to his parents. if it was possible for liveable fans to love him even more... value go. thank you. —— him even more... value go. thank you. — — liverpool. over £100,000 has been crowdfunded for the family of a teenager with special needs, who has gone missing in malaysia. the lucie blackman trust, who work to support british
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nationals in crisis abroad, say the family are considering offering a reward for any information. 0ur south—east asia correspondent howard johnson is in the town of seremban, near to where was she last seen. we will get a bit more detail on the search, and we will be speaking to you about the possible reward as well, but give us an idea. we are eight days in, i think, what is the latest on the search? yeah, this is actually day nine of the search and rescue operation. wejoined one of those teams out in the jungle, this four square kilometre area that they are now scouring to see if they can find any trace of nora. just behind me as the resort where she went missing more than a week ago. she had just checked in for a holiday. the following morning herfather went into her bedroom and her bed was empty. a window downstairs was open. they started looking out —— looking around this area for her. we went out today with the search and
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rescue went out today with the search and rescu e tea m went out today with the search and rescue team and the conditions out there are awful. there is lots of vines on the ground, the muddy with moisture, it is a hot and muggy day. we have met search and rescue teams who have worked through the night, camping up there and taking a rest before going again this afternoon. they are working day and night to try to find her. at the moment, we have about 350 personnel fanning out across this area looking for her. we are hoping for more good news, or some good news today. so far no sighting whatsoever. you said it was day nine. as time increases, i imagine the chances of finding her safe and well reduced? yeah, i think thatis safe and well reduced? yeah, i think that is why the family today are considering this cash reward, perhaps it they can ask for more information from the surrounding area here, that they might be able to get some new leads or lines of enquiry that are worth following up. we have been speaking to the lucie blackman trust and they say the
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family are considering this and they will give me more details is the day goes on. every day there is a news conference with the police at about five o'clock. we will be attending but as well, to see if there are any new lines of enquiry. but at the moment this has been a very frustrating case. we have been here since last thursday and every day we have just seen the numbers of search and rescue teams growing, but sadly, no new leads, no information. the police are continuing to treat this asa police are continuing to treat this as a missing persons case. the family would like to explore the angle but it is an abduction case. police say they are not ruling but out at the moment. they will continue to look for her and see if they can find her in this area around here. thank you. a worse nightmare scenario, about. and we will keep you up—to—date with what is going on, the ongoing search for that young girl. it isjust coming up that young girl. it isjust coming up to 6:45am. carol has a look weather. it feels a lot chillier, doesn't it?
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yes, and tomorrow morning will feel even chillier. this week it is going to remain unsettled. further rain at times, cool and breezy, to remain unsettled. further rain at times, cooland breezy, but to remain unsettled. further rain at times, cool and breezy, but we will still see some sunshine. wednesday, at the moment, is looking pretty wet, and next weekend, although it isa wet, and next weekend, although it is a long way off, is also looking pretty wet and windy. but that could change. weather fronts bringing pretty wet and windy. but that could change. weatherfronts bringing in showers and some rain and those in the south—east are likely to be heaviest and a rumble of thunder could be mixed in. there is a rumble not far from the isle of wight, we've just had one. not far from the isle of wight, we'vejust had one. from not far from the isle of wight, we've just had one. from the channel islands to east anglia, we've got showers and a few dotted across south—west england, around bristol, east wales and the west midlands. equally there is a lot of dry weather around. some showers this morning across northern ireland, re m na nts of morning across northern ireland, remnants of rain in north—east england, south—west scotland and some showers coming in across the western isles. for the rest of scotland, much of england and wales
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and northern ireland, dry. as temperatures rise during the day, that could spark off a fuchsia but many will miss them but temperatures a bit disappointing for this stage in august. 13 in the north and 19 in the south. normally at this time in august, 21 or 22 in the london area. through this evening and overnight, we still have showers around and some will peter out with clear skies as well. as a result, it will feel cooler than last night. a lot of us having temperatures falling into single digits. these temperatures indicate what you can expect in towns and cities. if you're in the countryside, temperatures will be a bit lower. it means where we've had clear skies by night we start off with sunshine. still a few showers knocking around in parts of north—west scotland and some into eastern england again as the heat of the day sparks off a few and you might see some elsewhere.
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temperatures on tuesday climbing a bit, back up to 21. but note what's happening in the west. the cloud is thickening and we're starting to showers, and that's because our next area low pressure is coming. during tuesday and into wednesday you can see the track it takes, moving in from the south—west and heading north—east, another system coming in from the north—west of scotla nd coming in from the north—west of scotland will bring in some rain. the rain will be accompanied by strengthening winds across england and wales. northern ireland seeing a bit of that rain pushing across northern and central scotland and if you're stuck under it, not feeling particularly wonderful with highs of 13 in the north and 18 or 19 in the south. lou and dan, the outlook is certainly unsettled. isn't it! thanks very much, see you in half—an—hour! thanks very much, see you in half-an-hour! even chillier tomorrow morning, i thought it was cold today! where has scomo gone? you have to get your big coat out! you
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can't get your big coat out in august! there's more woe for britain's high street retailers with news out today that they suffered their worstjuly on record. steph is taking a look. various statistics have come out about what's been happening injuly, which are quite interesting. i'll run through them and then we'll chat to our guest. total retail sales are going up but very slowly, nor .3% thisjuly going up but very slowly, nor .3% this july compared to going up but very slowly, nor .3% thisjuly compared to lastjuly, that's according to the british retail consortium. 0n that's according to the british retail consortium. on top of this, the number of empty shops in town centres was at its highest rate since january, 2015 and the number of people visiting town centres, foot fall, isn't great, at its worst since 2012. not a great set of numbers. so what's going on? diane wehrle is insights director at springboard. what's going on? there is a long—term trend in foot fall and pa rt long—term trend in foot fall and part of that is the internet. we do a lot of browsing online so we're
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more when we go shopping and it's more when we go shopping and it's more thanjust more when we go shopping and it's more than just retail, more than buying things, it's experiencing things and that impacts on foot fall especially during the day. we've seen foot fall post 5pm rising because people go to coffee shops and because people go to coffee shops a nd restau ra nts because people go to coffee shops and restaurants and the cinema. that's bubbling away underneath and there are seismic changes in the way we shop so that's inevitably going to impact on our high streets, so retailers need fewer stores and the va ca ncy retailers need fewer stores and the vacancy rates retailers need fewer stores and the vacancy rates are retailers need fewer stores and the vacancy rates are rising slowly. what about the fact that the sales are not growing as fast as well? what is that about? surely that's not just about the shops. what is that about? surely that's notjust about the shops. its not. consumers are feeling less confident. we are where we are in terms of our economic and political landscape and that's impacting on consumers, so they're a bit more cautious. they're spending less, which means they shop less and they shop online less. the rate of growth in online spending is slowing, still
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going up but now single digits, whereas two years ago it was double digits every month. it's obvious people are spending less and being cautious. does it matter? it does, retail is massive for the uk, a huge employer. 0ften it does, retail is massive for the uk, a huge employer. often when we've had challenging economic times, retail has got us out with people spending. if we're not spending it back economic growth. people spending. if we're not spending it back economic growthm there a chance that this could be a moment in time? in other words, when we get more certainty with the political climate confidence will pick up again? absolutely. it is a cyclical industry, people feel less confident and you go through peaks and troughs. we need to look at the long—term and that's where we cad decline in foot fall of 1% or 2%, that's held and not changed. we had poor weather last year and hot some this year so people spend. looking
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at the long—term, it will bounce back. it's funny how the weather gets blamed no matter whether it is good or bad. we have become more weather sensitive. people talk about the retailers blaming the weather but it's become more important for retailers. years ago when we had to buy things in stores and that was our only option, we would go out rain orshine our only option, we would go out rain or shine but now if it's raining we can stay—at—home. retailers are finding weather is becoming really important and we are very sensitive to it, so they are becoming very weather sensitive and in the hot a couple of weeks ago foot fall drop by 7% on high streets and shopping centres because people thought it was too hot. the extremes make a big difference! lovely to you and thanks very much. you make a good point, the weather, hot, bad, rain, sunshine, something to blame! thanks very much. 0n instagram at the moment this time
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of year there's plenty of photos or flamingos or unicorns in the water ona flamingos or unicorns in the water on a sunny day and that can make a perfect holiday snap. now the rnli is warning of the dangers of using inflatables in the sea, as they're having to rescue an increasing amount of people being swept away. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at a lifeboat station in blackpool. they have serious concerns about things like that, floating crocodiles. good morning, everybody. how many of you have something like this at home? great fun but the rnli say no where near enough people realise the dangers of using something like this in open water. these are really just something like this in open water. these are reallyjust designed for pools and not to be used at c how many people know that message. there was an incident in real, two children, 17 and 117, they were half a kilometre out at sea before the rnli caught up with them and in
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spain sadly in may this summer a five—year—old girl was swept out to and died. it couldn't be more important. let me introduce ben taylor, one of our guests, good morning. you were on holiday in margate two weeks ago today. what happened? we we re happened? we were strolling through the sea with a seven foot inflatable unicorn and me and my girls strolled into the sea up to knee height. we have the sea up to knee height. we have the picture. let's have a look this. can you see this picture? you can see how shallow the water and how calm the water is and within a matter of seconds, you talked to your wife and what happened? literally seconds. the girls went ten or15 literally seconds. the girls went ten or 15 metres away with me trying to swim to get them and every time i took a stroke they kept doubling and doubling. the panic you must have gone through. it was scary. luckily everything was ok? it was. thanks
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for your time this morning. it's hard to imagine looking at the water this morning that people will find open water tempting, but they do, and that's why the rnli... last night actually launched a campaign in lights at blackpool to respect the water. what are your key m essa 9 es the water. what are your key messages today? absolutely. if you get in difficulty with an inflatable the best thing you can do is keep hold of it but the majority of people never expected to enter the water, so the best advice is to flght water, so the best advice is to fight the instinct to thrash around and panic and float on your back and extend your arms and legs and do as little as possible, keeping your airway clear for the initial period to give you the best chance of staying safe and alive in the cold water. thanks for your time, chris. 0ne water. thanks for your time, chris. one last guest, this is dylan's mum. dyla n was one last guest, this is dylan's mum. dylan was 13 years old when he went into open water and got into
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difficulty. what happened? basically went swimming on a hot summer's day with a couple of friends and sadly lost his life. he was only in the water for 20 minutes and underwater was only in the water for 20 minutes and under water for was only in the water for 20 minutes and underwaterfora was only in the water for 20 minutes and under water for a maximum of three. as you heard from ben's story, his daughters were caught out and it was a really harrowing that didn't involve inflatables but you've made your life out of campaigning to make sure no family goes through what you've gone through. you've been campaigning with supermarkets. what is the message you want to get out there? put adequate warnings on their inflatables to say not to be used in the sea under any circumstances and eventually the ultimate goal would be for them to highlight water safety and put rnli messages in the stores and take a much more proactive approach to water safety and drowning prevention. thanks for chatting to us, really appreciate it. two really important messages today, respect the water and if you've got
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one of these, don't use it at sea, only in the swimming pull. very clear messages. thank you very much, jayne. good fun but use them wisely! loads more to come between now and 9:15am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we all have the national headlines at 7pm. be back with us then. —— we'll have. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. an undercover investigation by bbc london has revealed how tourists are being conned out of thousands of pounds in a gambling scam on westminster bridge. 0ur secret cameras have exposed the illegal activity and show how gangs work together to create the impression that a £50 bet can be doubled when there's absolutely no chance of winning. the met say its officers are using a number of tactics to tackle the problem, including high—visibility patrols and plain—clothes operations,
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but westminster council say tougher action is needed. there's got to be a concerted effort from scotland yard, because this is organised crimes and i promise you, i will take this up personally with the commissioner. and you can see more on that special investigation on tonight's programme at 6.30pm. property developers will be forced to build fewer millionaire mansions and thousands more affordable homes in london's wealthiest borough. kensington and chelsea council has set out plans to build over 700 affordable new homes a year. it's also trying to ban super rich landlords from creating mansions by buying up neighbouring homes and knocking them into one. westminster bridge is closed to westbound traffic for the next three months while barriers are replaced and a new security gates are installed , and a new security gates are installed, but the bridge will still be accessible to bikes, buses and
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licensed taxis. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. no reported problems on the trains either. in on the trains either. dagenham, the usual queues a in dagenham, the usual queues on the a13 in dagenham, the usual queues on the a 13 into town through the goresbrook interchange. in camberwell, temporary traffic lights on packenham road opposite the junction with vestry road. in haringey, temporary traffic lights on green lane due to water mains work. let's see what the weather has in store with kate kinsella. good morning. i'm afraid the rather unsettled conditions continue into this new week. we start the day on a rather cloudy note with one or two bright spells but also heavy scattered showers. these showers will continue through the morning and into the afternoon and you might hear a rumble or two of thunder. it won't be until later this afternoon and into the early evening that we'll see the cloud breaking and we'll get sunny spells with temperatures getting up to 19, so not very warm for august.
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the showers will continue into the evening but gradually overnight it does dry out, some clearer spells. still the risk of one or two showers associated with that patchy cloud and the minimum temperature touch cooler than last night, 8—10. on tuesday, looking likea drieraffair and more sunshine and therefore temperatures getting up to 20. but then further rain, quite heavy rain, expected as we head through wednesday and temperatures that bit cooler and i'm afraid it stays rather unsettled through much of this week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. until then, goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today:
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drug crime on the rise in small towns and villages, even as it falls in big city centres. if another rival gang or someone from manchester or someone like dust tries coming into town and muscling in on the business, well, you are going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs. it comes as the prime minister lanches a review into tougher sentences for the most dangerous and violent offenders. missing in malaysia — the parents of teenager nora quoirin could offer a reward to help find her. thousands of pounds is not being claimed by pensioners. i'll be explaining who is eligible for pension credit and how you get it. a fabulous four and a perfect start to the new premier league season for manchester united, who thump chelsea at old trafford and inflict a first defeat for frank lampard.
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a warning from the rnli as a number of people are swept out to sea on something like this, and inflatable, doubles in less than a year. and as we head through this new working week, the forecast is unsettled, particularly so on wednesday, with heavy rain and stronger winds. today it isa heavy rain and stronger winds. today it is a mixture of sunshine and showers. i'll have more than 15 minutes. it's monday, august 12. our top story: drug crime has risen in rural areas but fallen sharply in major city centres. a bbc investigation has found that in some villages in england and wales it has more than quadrupled in five years. the findings highlight concern about the spread of so—called county lines gangs which traffic drugs using children and vulnerable people. dan johnson reports. the latest frontier in the fight against drugs. heroin and crack cocaine are pouring into north wales from merseyside and manchester.
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there's a lot of money to be made in this town. children and young people are running drugs hundreds of miles. they are vulnerable and at risk. someone becomes established here, it's our town, if you like, so another rival gang or someone from manchester or something like that tries coming into town and muscling in on the business, well, you're going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs. it's a struggle to keep people safe and to get drugs off the street. the minute you get rid of one or two, there's another three orfour readily available to come down. here's how the problem is shifting. across the north, look where drug crime is down. big cities like liverpool, manchester, leeds and sheffield. but the pink spots show there are more drug offences in smaller places like chester, huddersfield and lincoln. further south, in westminster in central london, over the last five years,
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drug crime more than halved. but 20 miles away, offences quadrupled in the tiny village of westhumble. and this is it, a sleepy spot in rural surrey. it ‘s the last place you would expect to have any sort of drug crime. it's a very quiet area. it would be easy for people to come out here and be unobtrusive. yes, i can see how it might happen. how often do you see the police? very infrequently. the figures here are still really low. but the fact there has been the steady increase over the past few years does show that drug dealers are more active in places like this, and you can see why. it's quiet, it's rural. the police are very thinly spread in this part of the world.
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so that is the appeal, and it's also the challenge. and it is police forces like north wales that are dealing with the extended reach of county lines gangs, spreading more drugs and more misery. there's most probably enough of us to just about manage the situation, in terms of making sure no—one's getting seriously hurt. but in terms of seriously disrupting or attempting to stop the supply, there is nowhere near enough of us. you can see more of the bbc investigation into county lines crime, including how children's homes are being exploited and the role of social services — on the 6:00 and 10:00 news this week. we'll also be speaking to the national crime agency shortly after 7:00 this morning. prime minister boris johnson is launching a review into whether dangerous criminals should spend more time injail before being released. it's the latest in a series of announcements on law and order from the government. critics say there's no evidence that longer sentences prevent crime, and the uk already has the largest
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prison population in western europe. let's speak with our correspondent helena wilkinson. we have seen a whole series of announcements. how much of this is about electioneering ? announcements. how much of this is about electioneering? this all adds to the speculation, doesn't it, but downing street are doing the groundwork for an general election. what we are seeing here is a quick succession of pledges and promises by borisjohnson, succession of pledges and promises by boris johnson, and succession of pledges and promises by borisjohnson, and in particular, about the criminal justice by borisjohnson, and in particular, about the criminaljustice system. it appears he wants to position the conservative party is the party who are getting tough on crime. now, as you say, there is going to be a review into sentencing of violent criminals. borisjohnson think some of them are released too early from prison. he also thinks there are others who are released and go on to reoffend as soon as they come out of prison. so later on today the prime minister will be at number ten, around the table talking to those
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within the criminaljustice system, including police officers, judges, and probation officers, and trying to get from them exactly how they can improve the system. but today, the announcement of £85 million for the announcement of £85 million for the cps, but money will go towards the cps, but money will go towards the complex workload, which is what the complex workload, which is what the cps as they are tackling at the moment, with a surge in violent crime. the question, though, is yes, the treasury says this money is available, but we do not know yet where it is going to come from. a man charged with the attempted murder of a police officer who was run over with his own patrol car will appear in court today. west midlands police said the 42—year—old traffic officer was attempting to pull over a stolen car in birmingham when he was assaulted. 29—year—old mubashar hussain will appear at birmingham magistrates' court. the authorities in india have reimposed a military clampdown in kashmir ahead of the start
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of the muslim eid festival today. the main city, srinagar, is once again under lockdown and a curfew, which had been eased for the past two days, is back in place. the lockdown was first imposed last monday, when india revoked kashmir‘s right to greater autonomy. the number of gamblers complaining about british betting companies has the family of the 15—year—old school girl with special needs who's gone missing in malaysia, could offer a reward to find her. a liaison officer from the irish police arrived to support nora quoirin's family on saturday. 0ur south—east asia correspondent howard johnson is in the town of seremban, near to where was she last seen. howard, what more do we know? the number of gamblers complaining about british betting companies has increased almost fifty—fold in the past five years. new figures obtained from the gambling commission by the bbc show that there were a record 8,000 complaints last year. the rise in complaints follows a big increase in gambling over the past decade. the big betting companies say they are working on a plan to reduce gambling—related harm.
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the betting business is booming, and it is punters paying the price. the amount they are losing to the gambling companies has almost doubled in a decade. last year it was £14.5 billion. the biggest rise has been an online gambling. amanda was in her 50s when she started gambling ona was in her 50s when she started gambling on a website called jackpot joy- gambling on a website called jackpot joy. she doesn't want to be identified, but she lost £633,000 before being made bankrupt. identified, but she lost £633,000 before being made bankruptm identified, but she lost £633,000 before being made bankrupt. it is horrific, what i've done to myself, really. everything that i had worked for, everything that my children looked up to in me, now i have blown their inheritance, as such. jackpot choice as it had frequent contact with amanda and encouraged her to use responsible gambling tools. but figures obtained by panorama suggested the industry has a lot of unhappy customers. they show there
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we re unhappy customers. they show there were 8266 complaints last year. compared to just were 8266 complaints last year. compared tojust 169 were 8266 complaints last year. compared to just 169 in 2013. were 8266 complaints last year. compared tojust169 in 2013. the gambling commission says it is a complicated picture. we are pushing the industry to know its customers, and part of this is actually, possibly, a good sign, because it is suggesting consumers are demanding more of the gambling operators. major betting companies have already agreed to provide £60 million a year to help problem gamblers. bbc panorama, addicted to gambling, can be watched tonight. people with cystic fibrosis in scotland are waiting to hear if a life—changing drug will be made more widely available. a us clinical trial showed that 0rkambi can slow the decline in lung function by more than 40%, the main cause of death from the condition. the drug is not currently funded by the nhs in england, wales and northern ireland.
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more on our top story now, the rise of drugs crime in small towns and villages across england and wales. data unearthed by the bbc highlights the growth of so—called county lines gangs, networks of dealers moving illegal drugs from cities to rural areas, often using children as mules. let's speak to nikki holland, the national crime agency's director of investigations. good morning, and thanks very much for talking to us. let's talk about what you have seen change, have you seen this kind of change echoed, that actually villages and small town seem to be the place is now being targeted? yes, we have. they have been some huge successes in the major cities in terms of how they tackle drugs, and of course the cou nty tackle drugs, and of course the county lines model will move to somewhere where there is greater demand and less competition. so the rural areas are primed for the people to move out, the goings, as the cities do well at tackling the
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problem. the estimation is that up to 10,000 children might be involved in this in some way. so give us an idea, but those who do not know much about how the county lines system operates, how you might exploit a young person in that way? children from our records, about 23% of juveniles, the people involved in cou nty juveniles, the people involved in county lines at the moment, from our co—ordination centre point of view. children are brought into the model ina children are brought into the model in a variety of ways. pupil referral units, youth centres, people who are just vulnerable at that moment in their life, they can be targeted and enticed by a game —— going into cou nty enticed by a game —— going into county lines activity. how young have you seen young people being involved? the average age of juvenile involved in county lines is 15-17. we juvenile involved in county lines is 15—17. we have seen one case as young as ten, but thankfully that is rare. 15 to 17 is an age where people need to worry, if the children are acting differently. they are used in the transportation of these drugs? yes. this model uses
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them primarily for runners and street dealers when they are young. but obviously the model involves people committing robberies, shoplifting, serious violence, lots of other crime types involved in cou nty of other crime types involved in county lines. what can be done about it? you say there has been progress in cities. can something be learned from what has been done there? yes, obviously we are looking at a whole system response as to how to deal with this. it is not a problem that law enforcement can arrest their way out of. we need to work with partners in health, in education, identify the people who could be exploited at an early age, working together to deal with the problem. what about the government? what would you expect from them that might makea would you expect from them that might make a difference? we need government to support us in terms of how we work with agencies. 0bviously we are linked into the serious violent crime group, which is run by the government, and we need them to put money towards education and health, to provide opportunities for education, the people to be diverted into other things, rather than cou nty into other things, rather than county lines. so when you hear some
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of the promises from the government in the last few weeks about police numbers increasing and also that of prison sentences, which we will be talking about in about half—an—hour, is that part of the solution, do you think? i think more police officers is not the sole solution to this problem. but obviously resources are stretched across serious and organised crime, so more officers visible on the streets, able to tackle the problem, will clearly help. you talked at the beginning of this interview about perhaps people being targeted in the pupil referral units and youth centres. presumably the point about that is exactly the opposite? you know, at a youth centre, you expect a child to go there and find something to do with their lives? you do, but when you look at the money that is invested in youth centres and diversionary activities at the moment, but is probably what people need more money for, because that isn't someone else for, because that isn't someone else for the children to go, if they've got nothing to do, and they've got
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no money, undergoing... and there would be lots of people working in youth centres who say they doing extremely good work. and they are, and i'm sure they would like to have new youth centres, more youth centres, to give young people different opportunities and to have role models who can take them through a different way of life. one of the other figures which comes out from this research is the use of phone lines. i think there were 2000 phone lines. i think there were 2000 phone lines. i think there were 2000 phone lines being used by drug runners in the uk, which is double what we have seen in the previous 12 months. so how is that activity increasing and being used? the phone lines, they are very flexible in terms of that model. although we have 2000 phone lines that we know about, we do not know how many people are actually attached to those phone lines. and if we use the telephone restriction orders to take a phone line out they can actually get themselves up and running again very quickly. they can use social media, snapchat, instagram, they we re very savvy media, snapchat, instagram, they were very savvy in terms of how they would use technology and they are very adaptable. let's get back to the original question. why is it but they are targeting children,
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essentially, to do this? they are vulnerable, the same with adults, they are targeting them because they are the people they can influence in terms of a new pair of trainers, taking them to a nice location before they realise there into a problem and they're a long way from home and completely out of their depth. i suppose that's the criminal side of things but in terms of those people who live in these rural areas, we saw some in the report, should they be worried about this activity and how can they potentially help? it's concerning for the community because the violence that comes with the county lines model will spill over into the community and you will see gang fighting and people will use violence to enhance their reputation as well as stealing drugs from each other. that impacts the community. what they can do is trust their instincts. if they see and activity they think is out of the ordinary, tell the police and tell a professional and ring crimestoppers
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and let people know, because it might be part of a bigger picture. as you said earlier, children acting differently, that's something to watch out for? absolutely, if your child comes home with gift, hanging out with older people, gone missing, you don't know where they've been, this is what you need to look for as a parent. a big job on your hands. thanks for coming in this morning, nikki holland. you can see more of the bbc investigation into county lines crime, including how children's homes are being exploited and the role of social services, on the 6pm and 10pm news this week. we'll also be speaking to the national crime agency shortly after 7am this morning. actually a justice minister. at 7:40am and we'll get more information on what the prime minister is talking about with more police on the street and tougher prison sentences. have you been out and about this morning? it's a bit chilly! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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you're right, it is chillier and even chillier tomorrow. for some it's a lovely sunny start to the day, as you can see from this weather watchers picture from shropshire this morning. the weather for the week is pretty unsettled. where looking at further rain at times, especially on wednesday when almost anywhere could see some of the rain and on wednesday it will be windy in england and wales and it will remain cool and rather breezy. today what's happening is we've got an array of weather fronts, each of them either producing some rain or showers. the heaviest showers this morning are across the south—eastern quarter of england. some of those showers have got the odd rumble of thunder in them as well and we've heard a lot this morning across the channel islands. we got a few showers dotted across parts of somerset, bristol and east wales but there is a lot of dry weather as well. the second weather front producing rain in north—west england and south—east gotland and showers getting in across western northern
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ireland and western scotland. these will head east through the day and more widespread in scotland. as the rain clears the north—east, finally replaced by showers, and later in the afternoon we lose showers from the afternoon we lose showers from the south—east. in between, a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine. temperatures on the cool side for this stage in august, 13 in the north to 19 in the south and in the north to 19 in the south and in the south—east we'd normally look at 21 or 22 at this stage. through this evening and overnight, we hang onto a few showers and many will peter out. we also see clear skies developing, so that means it's going to feel cooler than the nightjust gone. a lot of single digits on the charts indicating the temperatures in towns and cities... rural areas will be a bit lower. where we have the clear skies is where we start with the sunshine tomorrow. like today, a few showers dotted around and some developing as temperatures
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rise through the day but later, cast your eye to the west. here we have thicker cloud coming our way and some more showers courtesy of our next area of low pressure. now, that's going to be moving in from the south—west through tuesday night and wednesday, pushing north. another system brings in rain in north—west scotland, and eventually the twain shall meet so wherever you are you're likely to see some rain. pretty windy too across england and wales during wednesday. temperature—wise, 13 in the north to highs of 18 or 19 in the south and it won't feel that pleasant in the rain. by the time we get to thursday, things settle down a bit more, so drier conditions. still showery outbreaks crossing scotland, and temperature—wise, a north—westerly breeze and 13 in the north—westerly breeze and 13 in the north to highs of 21 in the south. at this stage it looks like we're going to something unsettled once again coming ourway
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going to something unsettled once again coming our way this weekend as low pressure once again again coming our way this weekend as low pressure once again rears again coming our way this weekend as low pressure once again rears its head. thanks very much, carol. see you later. good morning. let's take a look at today's papers. steph and sally are here to have a look the insides. i think we should get carol involved in the papers. just throwing it out there! carol, come back and pick a story! she's very busy! she's always busy! the metro says children are being recruited by drugs gangs who loiter at fast food takeaways. linked into the story we were talking about earlier. you talked to the mca lady about that and she said she wasn't sure where they got that information from. the report comes from evidence given to a parliament—backed inquiry. prime minister borisjohnson's plans to reduce crime, which emerged on sunday, feature on the front of the times. and there's also a photo of the queen alongside prince andrew, as they travelled to church on sunday. the daily mail leads on the national shortage of hormone replacement therapy,
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which helps women deal with the symptoms of the menopause. the guardian reports on the methods used to restrain people who are being deported from the uk, saying shackles and belts have been used. and there's a picture taken from the violent protests in hong kong. and the most—watched story on the bbc news website this morning is about tourists being scammed in london. undercover filming shows as many as 14 gangs on westminster bridge, trying to scam tourists out of money using an age—old three cup trick. lambeth council is now calling on the police to try and drive the gangs away. the met says it's taking action, with 30 people arrested this year so far. quite a large number of arrests, isn't it? sally nugent! a very busy weekend of sport, where are you taking us? feel like i'm in trouble using both my names! back to yesterday and frank lampard, who took chelsea to old trafford, they we re well
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took chelsea to old trafford, they were well and truly beaten but the back page of the times is the story about jose back page of the times is the story aboutjose mourinho, back page of the times is the story about jose mourinho, who back page of the times is the story aboutjose mourinho, who frank lampard aboutjose mourinho, who frank lampa rd played for aboutjose mourinho, who frank lampard played for for a long time. mourinho was in the studio for sky sports. he has done pundit work before and it was a big deal yesterday because we were hearing about his two former clubs, manchester united and chelsea, and he's one of those people, mourinho, he's one of those people, mourinho, he can't... he's one of those people, mourinho, he can't. .. you he's one of those people, mourinho, he can't... you can't help but watch him. sometimes he says crazy stuff but actually he's eminently watchable. he said about chelsea that he is hugely critical, critical of lampa rd that he is hugely critical, critical of lampard and after the match when a reporter put to him what jose mourinho had said, he said, he didn't like the performance of mason mount? did he say mason mount? he couldn't believe what mourinho had been saying about his chelsea team. he said something interesting about who would win the league, he said it could be manchester city, liverpool
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or manchester city's b team. did he say that? both alan shearer and ian wright went for liverpool on match of the day above manchester city. controversial! what have you got, steph? to stories, first of all how much it costs if you're dropping off or picking someone up from an airport. —— two stories. 18 uk airports have introduced or raised prices for drivers dropping off or picking up and it costs a small fortune. luton and stansted, £8 for 30 minutes. that must be their minimum. birmingham, £5.5. that is adding costs to people's holidays if they have to think about how much it costs to be picked up or dropped off either side of the trip. it alloys a lot of people when you're at the airport and you think, another £5!
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—— annoys. airport and you think, another £5! -- annoys. when you're waiting and waiting and waiting and it goes up! this is a good story about norwich, have you seen this? the boss of a vietnamese airline has hailed it as the irresistible destination for tourists. in their in—flight magazine, he's talked about... we advise passengers to travel the world and don't miss the wild island of komodo dragons in indonesia the serene city of norwich in the united kingdom. then he goes on to say why norwich is so fabulous. does he mention delia he doesn't but i'm sure she will be pleased to hear all about this! he is saying about the serenity and the beauty. norwich is nice! that's the thing, it doesn't often get mention for its lovely qualities, so good to hear. in the telegraph this morning they've listed the top ten things to in and around norwich —— mentioned. expect around norwich —— mentioned. expect
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a lot of the emmys tourists! we talked about the shortages of hrt —— the emmys. 0ne we talked about the shortages of hrt —— the emmys. one example, finally got to the doctors for hrt and can't get a prescription anywhere and waiting three weeks for a plan b. been prescribed the patch since march, got headaches must or stop. can't get a gp appointment to discuss it —— so stop. we'll continue to talk about that. let's look at the barker family from nuneaton. 12 wheelie bins -- so stopped. it's for their neighbours. they encourage their neighbours to recycle various things in various bins and they send it to a specialist firm to get it properly recycled. that is nice but it must stink! they have since... since they
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started they have recycled a ton of plastic from themselves and their neighbours. the real sign of a good neighbour, whether someone will help with your bins. are they going to put it out? the sign of a great neighbour! you are right there must sally! you look shocked! -- you're right there, sally. i'll test that! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. 0ur reporterjayne mccubbin is on the blackpool coast this morning with a warning from the rnli about using inflatables in the sea. they might look fun but they can be really dangerous. morning, jayne. doesn't look terribly enticing this morning but it has been brilliant this summer, and how many people have something like this at home? i'm told this is not a unicorn but a pegasus, a unicorn with wings. huge sellers this year, as has been pizza slices, inflatable doughnuts, dinghies, you name it! people love them, but let me give you some
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statistics right now. the number of incidents involving people arrested after being swept out to see on an inflata ble after being swept out to see on an inflatable stood at 57 last year but this year already, and the summer season isn't over yet, that figure has doubled to 112 and that's why we have this morning today from the rnli. later will have dramatic pictures of a rescue that took place just under the coast —— up the coast in real. kids swept out to see in a matter of minutes. —— rhyll. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. an undercover investigation by bbc london has revealed how tourists are being conned out of thousands of pounds in a gambling scam on westminster bridge. 0ur secret cameras have exposed the illegal activity and show how gangs work together to create the impression that a £50 bet can be doubled when there's absolutely
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no chance of winning. the met say its officers are using a number of tactics to tackle the problem, including high—visibility patrols and plain—clothes operations, but westminster council say tougher action is needed. there's got to be a concerted effort from scotland yard, because this is organised crimes and i promise you, i will take this up personally with the commissioner. and you can see more on that special investigation on tonight's programme at 6.30pm. and investigation has revealed two london airports have the most expensive car parking turrets in the country. both luton and stansted charge £8 for 30 minutes in the passenger pickup area. the rac found both airports have increased their charges this summer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning.
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no reported problems on the trains either. traffic building in both directions across putney bridge. in camberwell, temporary traffic lights on packenham road opposite the junction with vestry road. in haringey, temporary traffic lights on green lane due to water mains work. westminster bridge is also closed to westbound traffic for the next three months. its while barriers are replaced and new security gates are installed. —— its. the bridge will still be accessible to bikes, buses and licensed taxis. let's see what the weather has in store with kate kinsella. good morning. i'm afraid the rather unsettled conditions continue into this new week. we start the day on a rather cloudy note with one or two bright spells but also heavy scattered showers. these showers will continue through the morning and into the afternoon and you might
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hear a rumble or two of thunder. it won't be until later this afternoon and into the early evening that we'll see the cloud breaking and we'll get sunny spells with temperatures getting up to 19, so not very warm for august. the showers will continue into the evening but gradually overnight it does dry out, some clearer spells. still the risk of one or two showers associated with that patchy cloud and the minimum temperature touch cooler than last night, 8—10. on tuesday, looking like a drier affair and more sunshine and therefore temperatures getting up to 20. but then further rain, quite heavy rain, expected as we head through wednesday and temperatures that bit cooler and i'm afraid it stays rather unsettled through much of this week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. until then, goodbye. hello, this is breakfast
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with dan walker and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. a bbc investigation has found drug crime has risen in rural areas but fallen sharply in major city centres. police are fighting the growing threat of so—called county lines gangs, which traffic drugs from cities to smaller towns using children and vulnerable people. data analysed by the bbc shows offences for possession and supply is down in cities like liverpool, manchester and leeds. but smaller towns like chester and huddersfield have seen significant rises in the last five years. earlier on breakfast the national crime agency said: the crown prosecution service is to receive an extra £85 million pounds over the next two years, to help deal with a rise in violent crime. it comes as borisjohnson launches a review of sentencing for the most prolific offenders and promising to create an extra 10,000 new prison places and expand stop—and—search powers. he said dangerous criminals must be taken off the streets if the public it is concerning for the community because the violence with the county
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lines model will spill over into the community, you see gang fighting, people use violence to enhance their reputations as well as dealing drugs off each other. so that has an impact on the community. what they can do is trust their instincts. if they see an activity which they think is out of the ordinary, told the police, tell a professional, ring crimestoppers, let people know, because it might be part of a bigger picture. the crown prosecution service is to receive an extra £85 million pounds over the next two years, to help deal with a rise in violent crime. it comes as borisjohnson launches a review of sentencing for the most prolific offenders and promising to create an extra 10,000 new prison places and expand stop—and—search powers. he said dangerous criminals must be taken off the streets if the public is to have confidence in the justice system. the family of the 15—year—old school girl with special needs who's gone missing in malaysia, could offer a reward to find her. a liaison officer from the irish police arrived to support nora quoirin's family on saturday. hundreds of people are looking for her and malaysian police have opened a hotline for any information connected to the disappearance.
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a man charged with the attempted murder of a police officer who was run over with his own patrol car will appear in court today. west midlands police said the 42—year—old traffic officer was attempting to pull over a stolen car in birmingham when he was assaulted. 29—year—old mubashar hussain will appear at birmingham magistrates' court. 1.5 million in —— people in east china have fled from flooding. the typhoon hit land on saturday. dramatic pictures, aren't they? winds of almost 120 miles an hour we re winds of almost 120 miles an hour were recorded. the storm has moved further up the coast, closer to beijing. at least 16 people are still missing. the number of gamblers complaining about british betting companies has increased almost fifty—fold in the past five years. new figures obtained from the gambling commission by the bbc, show that there were a record 8,000 complaints last year. the rise in complaints follows a big increase in gambling over
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the past decade. the big betting companies say they are working on a plan to reduce gambling—related harm. people with cystic fibrosis in scotland are waiting to hear if a life—changing drug will be made more widely available. a us clinical trial showed that 0rkambi can slow the decline in lung function by more than 40%, the main cause of death from the condition. the drug is not currently funded by the nhs in england, wales and northern ireland. childhood friends rosemarie badaczewski and kriemhild meyer didn't know it would take 58 years to see each other again, when they last said goodbye aged 15. here they are in 1961, standing next to the berlin wall, which was still under contruction. the two girls, from either side of the wall, were talking whilst it was still low enough. they were known as the "wall girls". rosemarie, on the left, lived in the east of the city. kriemhild, on the right,
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lived in the west. now, nearly 60 years later — almost to the day — the two friends have been reunited. i wonder what they chatted about? quite a lot to chat about, after 60 yea rs of quite a lot to chat about, after 60 years of history. that's nice.” quite a lot to chat about, after 60 years of history. that's nice. i do like those stories. the reunification stories? yes, i would love to ea rwig reunification stories? yes, i would love to earwig in on that chat, ask about what they thought about meeting up to 60 years, and what they are up to now. good morning, sally. we can earwig a lot about what is happening over the weekend and sport. so exciting. not even the middle of august yet and already, fantastic, exciting for us to watch. he had a big weekend, too. daniel james, gosh, he is so young, making his debut for manchester united. tragically he lost his dad over the summer, he was only 60 and he died during his negotiations to sign for
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manchester united. and for him to come on ? the way he did wasjust, it was a real fairytale. —— come on and just score the way he did. what an opening weekend to the new premier league season it was, and it culminated with a thumping win for manchester united over chelsea, on a day that their new boss frank lampard will want to forget pretty quickly. adam wild reports. at old trafford, a new start. here were fresh faces: manchester united's world record signing harry maguire, and for chelsea, a returning hero in new manager frank lampard. behind it all, a rivalry that brings to mind the glorious past. but these are clubs in transition — time and patience required. still, chelsea's tammy abraham seemed in little need to wait. in the opening moments, he could have scarcely got closer. commentator: the post is still shaking! but at the other end, this was a chelsea defender getting too close. penalty was the decision. marcus rashford got united's season started. after the break, they would really find their stride. anthony martial poking in a second for united, and just seconds later, a third.
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marcus rashford calm and measured. commentator: it has all gone away from chelsea in the space ofa minute! united's new start never clearer than when danieljames added a debut goal, 4—0, some start. 4—0, you can't really dream of more, or expect more. then again, we just work on improving as a team. but it's coming, we are improving. newcastle and arsenal, two more clubs beginning afresh. but amid the movement, there remains a constant. the goals of arsenal's pierre—emerick aubameyang. he was the difference on their opening day. some things don't change. as well as managerial debuts, there was a big technological debut as var arrived in the premier league for the first time. and it's already
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annoying some managers. this is wolves scoring what they thought was a winner over leicester yesterday. but it was disallowed after the video assistant referee spotted a hand—ball in the build up to the goal. it finished 0—0, and the wolves boss nuno espirito santo said var is affecting "the spirit of the game". and there was a huge win for rangers in the scottish premiership. they were 6—1winners at ibrox over hibernian who also had a man sent off. jermain defoe scored his first hat—trick for rangers, who've made a perfect start to the season. the rugby world cup isjust over five weeks away and england name their 31—man squad to travel to japan at midday today. and eddiejones will have lots of decisions to make after an impressive win over wales yesterday. england got the perfect start at twickenham with billy vunipola crossing the line inside the first four minutes of the match. wales, who were unbeaten in their last 14 matches, would have gone to number one in the world with a win, but they were comfortably beaten 33—19. luke cowan—dickie with
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england's last try. jamie chadwick has become the first winner of the w series motor racing we had a good team out there today, a good mix of some young guys, some quys a good mix of some young guys, some guys that hadn't played for a while, i knew their attitude would be right, and wales had a lot of expectation they came with. while we didn't speak about that, because we we re didn't speak about that, because we were purposely not speaking about the opposition, we felt that would weigh them down. jamie chadwick has become the first winner of the w series motor racing championship, after a tense final race of the season at brands hatch. the 21 —year—old from bath started from pole, but soon slipped back to third and eventually finished fourth behind race winner and fellow briton alice powell. however, that was enough to secure the championship by ten points ahead of dutch rival beitske visser. jamie chadwick is with us on breakfast after 8:30 this morning. and finally, football stars, they
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can really inspire adoration, unswerving devotion. in liverpool they start them young, so much so that young fan lucas fowler ran into a lamppost while he was running after his hero, mo salah, for an autograph. —— louis fowler.” after his hero, mo salah, for an autograph. -- louis fowler. ifeel so sorry for him. he is trying to be happy, but he has really bashed his nose. and his eyes are full of tea rs. nose. and his eyes are full of tears. you can see that in the close—up, he had been sobbing. mo salah spotted what had happened, stopped, made sure he was all right and gota stopped, made sure he was all right and got a picture. i millward, liverpool's training ground, it is quite easy to hang out and wait for the players to come out. some holidays, so it is full of kids. waiting for autographs and pictures. but apparently the children's hospital had a great time that afternoon with tales of what had happened, lamppost the hero stopping. another reason to love mr salah. another, as if we needed another. it is cold out and about this
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morning, and carol has the details. a chilly start today and tomorrow will be chillier still. some of us are off to a fine start. a weather watchers picture sent in from devon this morning. you can see the sun peeking through the clouds. this week is going to be unsettled. we are looking at rain at times, particularly so on wednesday. across england and wales it is going to be windy. and generally, as you alluded to, it is going to be cool and breezy. everyone weather fronts moving across us today. each producing showers or some patchy rain. the heaviest of which is across the south—east quarter at the moment, extending up from the channel islands, in across the south—east of england, and that is where we have got those showers. but there are other showers around as well, dotted across parts of the midlands and parts of the southwest. 0ne midlands and parts of the southwest. one or two midlands and parts of the southwest. 0ne ortwo in midlands and parts of the southwest. one or two in wales. lots of dry weather. some of us starting off on a sunny night. still some cloud and
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light rain across northern england. some showers getting in across western parts of northern ireland and western scotland, clearing the far north—east. but you can see where we've got the dry conditions and where we will also see some sunny spells developing, you do not already have them. as temperatures rise we could see one or two homegrown showers, not all of us will, but we are looking at highs of 13 in the north to 19 in the south. that is below par for the stage in august. in london, for example, at this stage we would normally be looking at 21 or 22. through this evening and overnight, many of the showers, but not all of them, will peter out. we will also see some clear skies developing. under those clear skies developing. under those clear skies, temperatures are going to fall. these other of values you are going to see in towns and cities. many of us falling into single digits. in rural areas you can expect them to be a little bit lower. it does of course mean that where we have a clear skies, we will start off with some sunshine tomorrow. tomorrow will be a drier day than today. it will still be some showers knocking around. many of us will miss them. cast your eye
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out to the west. later in the day, the cloud is going to thicken and we will start to see the arrival of some showers. that is all courtesy of the next area of low pressure. coming our way of the next area of low pressure. coming ourway and of the next area of low pressure. coming our way and moving of the next area of low pressure. coming ourway and moving in of the next area of low pressure. coming our way and moving in from the south—west. pushing north—east, we have got more rain coming across the north—west of scotland. ahead of all of this, it will be a dry start, but the rain will be happy as it comes in across and also wales. here, too, the wind will strengthen. we will have some rain across parts of northern ireland and scotland, with one or two dry interludes. look at those temperatures. 13 in the north, 18 or 19 in the south. a quieter day on thursday as we lose all of that. again, a fair bit of dry weather around. some bright skies are indeed some sunshine, but we also have some rain, just crossing the north of scotland and getting into some central areas as well. temperatures by then will be up well. temperatures by then will be up to 20 or 21. it is looking at this stage like it is going to be u nsettled this stage like it is going to be unsettled once again
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more now on the story that there's to be a review of sentences for violent and sexual offenders. borisjohnson says if the public is to have confidence in the justice system, the punishment "must fit the crime." the liberal democrats say any changes would overcrowd prisons and waste millions of pounds. let's speak to the justice secretary, robert buckland. good morning and thanks forjoining us. we are looking at a whole lot of different things, but let's talk specifically about sentencing. will it mean prisoners will serve their whole sentence? i want to look at this system of 02 matic early release and at the moment for a large number of prisoners to serving fixed terms determinant sentences, they can be released at the halfway point —— automatic. irrespective of progress made in prison. that's been in existence for about 15 years. it's been the focus of much
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justified criticism over that period, and the prime minister has asked me to look carefully at serious and violent offending and the interrelationship of that with the interrelationship of that with the automatic early release system. that's the work i'll carry out over the next few months. you must have a view right now whether or not prisoners should be serving their whole sentence.” whether or not prisoners should be serving their whole sentence. i have a view based on nearly 30 years experience of the system. we need to build a better system of incentives to encourage progress and good behaviour, to reduce reoffending and to ensure when prisoners are eventually released that they are in a position to resume life in the community in a way that doesn't pose a risk to the public. that's my job. you mention reoffending, that's one of the big problems at the moment, many people come out of prison and they reoffend. how exactly would you address that? in various ways. first of all, with
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regard to reoffending, there is a lot of evidence relating to short sentences that because prisoners are not in the system for that long, the work that needs to be done to reduce reoffending isn't possible. therefore, i'm already working on reforms to the probation system to try to make sure we have more effective community sentences where that approach is merited. this review is focused on the other end of the system, serious, violent and sexual offenders, some of humour or eligible for early release at halfway irrespective of their progress. there are types of sentence that allow this type of offender to be detained for two—thirds before parole, but there's a large number of people in there's a large number of people in the system is subject to the automatic early release provisions, and i'll focus on that area in the review. from what you're saying it sounds like you will need extra staff. where will they come from and how
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will you pay for them? well, we've already recruited for thousands of extra prison of over the last few yea rs. extra prison of over the last few years. that work is already yielding fruit in terms of the productive work they're doing with prisoners. we announced yesterday and extra 10,000 prison places. thejob of my review is to look carefully at the potential effects of any further change to the automatic early release system to understand it fully, and to make sure that the public‘s confidence in the sentencing system is as high as possible. very often the public will have concern about automatic early release as an issue that potentially could undermine confidence in the sentencing system in a way i don't think is in anybody‘s interest. looking at some of your figures, you're announcing 10,000 additional prison places. we've had reaction from the prison reform trust, saying prisons need 12,000 more places to
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get rid of overcrowding present now. what would you say to that, sounds like from what they're saying it be enough? i'd say over the years we've ended up i'd say over the years we've ended up in i'd say over the years we've ended upina i'd say over the years we've ended up in a prison system that, as the reform trust, has a large number of people in overcrowded conditions. what i think this programme does is really allow us to move ahead at pace with expanding the number of places, which will reduce overcrowding and also allow more purposeful activity to take place in prisons. i'm a great believer in giving prisoners constructive things to do. it's notjust good for prison management and prison discipline, it's also good for future rehabilitation and reducing reoffending. it's that work i know the prison reform trust and others are very, the prison reform trust and others are very, very committed to and its work i want to happen more and more in our prison system as well. cani in our prison system as well. can i ask you that question i've already asked you, where's the money coming from? the money for the
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prison expansion system, the £2.5 billion has been authorised by the treasury and will be spent over a period of five or six years. we have one potential new prison in the planning system now. therefore, the programme will be rolled out over a period of years rather than being spent in one financial year. can i ask you also, today on the bbc we've been talking about an investigation into county lines and the fact drug offences a re into county lines and the fact drug offences are going down in big cities but moving more to small towns and villages, particularly talking about vulnerable children being targeted. what are you going to do about that? i welcome the work you're doing in highlighting the spread of county lines to smaller towns and settlements in our country. the work in combating county lines has been going on for a number of yea rs has been going on for a number of years and the government strategy is now well over a year old, and we've not just been now well over a year old, and we've notjust been working at a whitehall level with local police forces to make sure there's co—ordination of
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invesco to an regional effort. it's not just about policing invesco to an regional effort. it's notjust about policing but invesco to an regional effort. it's not just about policing but the tell—tale signs of vulnerability —— investigative. 0ften vulnerable children and adults are preyed upon by cou nty children and adults are preyed upon by county line gangs, as you identified in your investigation. that work is already happening and i'm glad to say it's already yielding results in many towns and cities, and in years ahead we will redouble our efforts with the extra police officers where recruiting, which i think will make a huge difference in tackling this worrying scourge. what's your response to lord heseltine, and i'm quoting, you are trashing money around like there's no tomorrow and very specifically at clear electoral targets. this is about electioneering ? look, i reject that. ithink about electioneering ? look, i reject that. i think this is about a new government trying to set out its priorities at a very early—stage. i'm really glad the prime minister has decided to
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emphasise criminaljustice as part of his agenda. very often criminal justice has been, shall we say, a cinderella service, often forgotten about in the hurly—burly debates of other issues stop the it's great to see he's putting it front and centre now and talking notjust see he's putting it front and centre now and talking not just about increasing police numbers but funding other parts of the justice system that will be affected by annie change. increasing funding for prosecutions —— any change. prison places. it's part of a concerted and co—ordinated effort to tackle some of the real problems the criminal justice system has been facing. robert buckland, justice secretary, thank you for your time on breakfast this morning. thank you. let us know what you think about that or anything on the programme today. we are on twitter and facebook and various other forms of social media. couples with one partner above the state pension age
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and the other below it have until just midnight tomorrow to claim pension credit. if they don't they could miss out on thousands of pounds. steph has more on this. there might be a lot of couples who don't realise they are eligible for this, and those are the people where trying to reach with this bit of information this morning. it's about pension credit. pension credit is an income related benefit that tops up retirees' weekly income if it's below a certain level. for couples, that's just over £225 a week. it's estimated some pensioners are missing out on this credit to the tune of about £7,000 per year. daniela silcock is head of policy research at the pensions policy institute. good morning thanks forjoining us. who is missing out and why? pension credit is the main means tested benefit for pensioners and it's meant to top you up to hundred £55 per week, but those who have disabilities or caring or other dependents could get more —— £255.
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previously as long as you were in a couple where one person was over state pension age you could qualify if your income was below a certain level, but after today, if your income was below a certain level, but aftertoday, if if your income was below a certain level, but after today, if you're in a couple where one is below state pension age and one is above, and your income is below the level where your income is below the level where you need to apply for means tested benefits, you'll have to apply for credit instead until you are both over state pension age. there are people who might not realise that they are eligible for this now, and they have until midnight tonight? yeah, there's quite a large proportion of people who don't apply for pension credit or claim it when they're eligible. about 40% eligible aren't claiming it. there's probably quite a few out there in a mixed age couple who might be eligible and might miss out. as you said, £7,000, in our calculations in the most extreme scenarios people could
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actually miss out on £10,000 per year. quite a lot of money. as long as you are eligible on the 14th of may, 2019 then you are still eligible to claim today but after today you will need to apply for universal credit. is it complicated to apply? it shouldn't be terribly complicated and unlike universal credit, there isn't a huge degree of conditionality. as long as your incomes are below a certain level and you have a certain level of savings and you're a certain age, you are eligible and there aren't of the same degree of sanctions and deductions you might find with universal credit. it should be a bit simpler. if you're at home and you think it might be asked, what do you need to do? call the pension credit claim line, run by the pension service, if you google that it will be on the internet, the number for that. do you need to have a lot of information to complete what they need? you will need to know your income, which will be on any benefit
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state m e nts income, which will be on any benefit statements you have or if you have income from earnings, but once you start going through the claim they will tell you what you need to provide them to start the claim. worth doing it if you think you could be eligible. daniela, good fa ct, could be eligible. daniela, good fact, she made her dress, how impressive is that? when sheath walked in i thought it was a lovely dress. thank you! one of her hobbies! —— when she. dress. thank you! one of her hobbies! -- when she. if you've got any questions on the pensions thing then let us know. not on quite the same scale but i did men a hole in my sock. not on the same scale! not even close! better to reuse than throw away! —— mend. they've become a staple of instagram — inflatable flamingos or unicorns in the water on a sunny day can make the perfect holiday snap — but now the rnli is warning of the dangers of using inflatables in the sea. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at a life boat station in blackpool. morning, jayne.
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the wind is howling this morning, but when the sun is nice, what child wouldn't want to go out on the water with something like this? take assess, i'm told, an inflatable unicorn —— take a look this, pegasus. this is real well, on the weekend, a rescue, a seven—year—old girland a weekend, a rescue, a seven—year—old girl and a 17—year—old girl when their lie was swept out to sea in seconds —— real real. —— lie. you can see the. . the men from the rnli approach and rescue them. last year there were 57 incidents like this. this year, and the summer season isn't over, that figure is 112. i wa nt to isn't over, that figure is 112. i want to introduce the taylor family. you got caught in difficulty in calm
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scene, no win, what happened? —— calm sea. we had an inflatable not too dissimilar to that one, only up to knee height. me and the girls went out, i grabbed them wants to bring them back in and within seconds i spoke to my wife, turned around and they had gone. that was it, just like that. more on this later but i wa nted like that. more on this later but i wanted to get that across. calm water, no win and the current was enough to take your girls away. fortu nately enough to take your girls away. fortunately there was a happy ending —— no wind. we'll talk about that more later but first the news, travel and weather where you're waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. an undercover investigation by bbc london has revealed how tourists are being conned out of thousands of pounds in a gambling scam on westminster bridge. 0ur secret cameras have exposed the illegal activity and show how gangs work together to create
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the impression that a £50 bet can be doubled when there's absolutely no chance of winning. the met say its officers are using a number of tactics to tackle the problem, including high—visibility patrols and plain—clothes operations, but westminster council say tougher action is needed. there's got to be a concerted effort from scotland yard, because this is organised crimes and i promise you, i will take this up personally with the commissioner. and you can see more on that special investigation on tonight's programme at 6.30pm. property developers will be forced to build fewer millionaire mansions and thousands more affordable homes in london's wealthiest borough. kensington and chelsea council has set out plans to build over 700 affordable new homes a year. it's also trying to ban super rich landlords from creating mansions by buying up neighbouring homes and knocking them into one.
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an investigation has revealed two london airports have the most expensive car parking tarrifs in the country. both luton and stansted charge £8 for 30 minutes in the passenger pickup area. the rac found both airports have increased their charges this summer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the trains, southeastern services are disrupted between new cross and cannon street due to a safety inspection of the track. disruption on east midlands trains services between st pancras and luton due to a points failure. looking at the tube, a good service on all lines at the moment. 0n the roads, westminster bridge is closed to westbound traffic for the next three months and for the installation of new security gates. the woolwich ferry remains suspended due to technical issues. let's see what the weather has in store with kate kinsella. good morning. i'm afraid the rather unsettled conditions continue into this new week. we start the day on a rather cloudy note with one or two bright spells
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but also heavy scattered showers. these showers will continue through the morning and into the afternoon and you might hear a rumble or two of thunder. it won't be until later this afternoon and into the early evening that we'll see the cloud breaking and we'll get sunny spells with temperatures getting up to 19, so not very warm for august. the showers will continue into the evening but gradually lilo is overnight it does dry out, some clearer spells. and the minimum temperature touch cooler than last night, 8—10. on tuesday, looking like a drier affair and more sunshine and therefore temperatures getting up to 20. but then further rain, quite heavy rain, expected as we head through wednesday and temperatures that bit cooler and i'm afraid it stays rather unsettled through much of this week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. until then, goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: drug crime on the rise in small towns and villages — even as it falls in big city centres. our exclusive investigation reveals how gangs are tightening their grip in new areas of the country. it comes as the prime minister launches a review into tougher sentences for the most dangerous and violent offenders. a tough month on the high street — why fewer shoppers and more closures made july an especially tough time for retailers. i'll have the details. a fabulous four and a perfect start to the new premier league season for manchester united, who thump chelsea at old trafford and inflict a first defeat for frank lampard. this week is looking unsettled, particularly on wednesday, when we will see heavy rain and quite gusty
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winds. but today it's a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. more later. it's monday 12th august. our top story. drug crime has risen in rural areas, but fallen sharply in major city centres. a bbc investigation has found that in some villages in england and wales, it has more than quadrupled in five years. the findings highlight concern about the spread of so—called county lines gangs which traffic drugs using children and vulnerable people. dan johnson reports. the latest frontier in the fight against drugs. heroin and crack cocaine are pouring into north wales from merseyside and manchester. there's a lot of money to be made in this town. children and young people are running drugs hundreds of miles. they are vulnerable and at risk.
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if someone becomes established here, then llandudno is their town, if you like, so if another rival gang or someone from manchester or something like that tries coming into town and muscling in on the business, well, you're going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs. it's a struggle to keep people safe and to get drugs off the street. the minute you get rid of one or two, there's another three orfour readily available to come down. here's how the problem is shifting. across the north, look where drug crime is down — big cities like liverpool, manchester, leeds and sheffield. but the pink spots show there are more drug offences in smaller places like chester, huddersfield and lincoln. further south, in westminster in central london, over the last five years, drug crime more than halved. but 20 miles away, offences quadrupled in the tiny village of westhumble.
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and this is it, a sleepy spot in rural surrey. it's the last place you would expect to have any sort of drug crime. it's a very quiet area. it would be easy for people to come out here and be unobtrusive. so yes, i can see how it might happen. how often do you see the police? very infrequently. the figures here are still really low. but the fact that there has been the steady increase over the last few years does show that drug dealers are more active in places like this, and you can see why. it's quiet, it's rural. the police are very thinly spread in this part of the world. so that is the appeal, and it's also the challenge. and it is police forces like north wales that are dealing with the extended reach of county lines gangs, spreading more drugs and more misery. there's most probably enough of us to just about manage the situation, in terms of making sure no—one's getting seriously hurt.
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but in terms of seriously disrupting or attempting to stop the supply, there's nowhere near enough of us. you can see more of the bbc investigation into county lines crime — including how children's homes are being exploited and the role of social services — on the 6 and 10 o'clock news this week. the prime minister borisjohnson is launching a review into whether dangerous criminals should spend more time injail before being released. it's the latest in a series of announcements on law and order from the government. critics say there's no evidence that longer sentences prevent crime, and the uk already has the largest prison population in western europe. let's speak with our correspondent helena wilkinson. we spoke to thejustice secretary earlier about this. this is about a review, but how much of it is about electioneering? this all adds to the
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speculation that downing street is doing the groundwork for a possible general election in the autumn. this is borisjohnson trying to position the conservatives and rebuild them asa the conservatives and rebuild them as a party who are tough on crime. borisjohnson will be meeting those within the common justice system later today, police officers, probation officers and judges, to see how they can improve the system. today he is announcing £85 million going to the crown prosecution service to help what he and they say will tackle a surge in violent crime. in the last half hour, we heard from thejustice secretary, robert buckland, who said he was pleased that the prime minister was supporting him in his role so early on. it's great to see that he is putting it front and centre now, talking not just about putting it front and centre now, talking notjust about increasing police numbers, but funding of the criminal justice police numbers, but funding of the criminaljustice system police numbers, but funding of the criminal justice system that police numbers, but funding of the criminaljustice system that will also be affected by any change, the
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increase in funding for prosecutions, an increase in funding for prison places. all this is part ofa for prison places. all this is part of a concerted effort to tackle some of a concerted effort to tackle some of the problem is the criminal justice system has been facing. the opposition say there is a lack of evidence that some of these pledges will make any difference, and the treasury yesterday said the money is there, but we still don't know exactly where it will come from. thank you. the family of the 15—year—old school girl with special needs who's gone missing in malaysia could offer a reward to find her. a liaison officer from the irish police arrived to support nora quoirin's family on saturday. earlier, we spoke to our south—east asia correspondent howard johnson, who is in the town of seremban. i'm standing outside the resort where she went missing eight days ago. what we're hearing from the lucie blackman trust, the charity that are working alongside the family, they were set up to help british nationals in crisis abroad. they're telling us the family
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are considering offering a cash appeal for any information, a cash reward, rather, for any information that could lead to the discovery of their daughter. we do know that the family have raised a lot of money on some crowdfunding appeal websites. they currently have more than 100,000 that had been donated to them by concerned members of the public. today, search and rescue teams are continuing to fan out around a four square kilometre area. at the moment, they are 350—strong. that's the largest number of personnel that have been deployed on this search and rescue effort since this search began more than a week ago. the family are obviously very concerned. the police are continuing to treat this as a missing persons case. the family would also like to explore the angle that she could have been abducted. the police say they are not ruling that outjust yet. a man charged with the attempted murder of a police officer who was run over with his own patrol car will appear
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in court today. west midlands police said the 42—year—old traffic officer was attempting to pull over a stolen car in birmingham when he was assaulted. 29—year—old mubashar hussain will appear at birmingham magistrates' court. the authorities in india have reimposed a military clampdown in kashmir ahead of the start of the muslim eid festival today. the main city, srinagar, is once again under lockdown and a curfew — which had been eased for the past two days — is back in place. the lockdown was first imposed last monday, when india revoked kashmir‘s right to greater autonomy. one million people in east china have fled from floods which have killed 44 people. fields and streets were flooded by muddy water as a typhoon hit land on saturday. winds of almost 120 miles per hour were recorded and the storm has moved further up the coast, near beijing. at least 16 people are still missing. hundreds of people have been evacuated from their homes
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on the spanish island of gran canaria due to wildfires. strong winds and temperatures of more than 32 degrees celsius are slowing efforts to put out the flames, which cover ten square kilometres. a 50—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of starting the fire. would you like to see a dolphin tossing a jellyfish in the air?” have seen it. i am sure many people would like to see it. this was popular over the weekend, a bit of monday motivation for you. this comes from denmark. in the video, the jellyfish can be seen flying in mid—air as the dolphin dips its head back down in order to catch it under the water. we are going to talk about one of the stories we are covering this morning about cystic fibrosis.
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people with cystic fibrosis in scotland will learn later today whether a potentially life—changing drug will made widely available. there are almost 10,500 people in the uk with cystic fibrosis — a genetic condition that this new drug, called 0rkambi, could be effective for up to 50% of them. but it costs £100,000 per yearfor each patient and it's not currently funded by the nhs in england, wales and northern ireland. joining us from the cystic fibrosis trust is nick medhurst and from glasgow is doreen maceachen, whose son benefitted from a similar drug. doreen, we will hear how your son hugo was affected and how it helped him out, but nick, tell us how this decision, if it goes through, could change the lives of cystic fibrosis sufferers. as louise mentioned, this decision will mean these drugs will become widely available. if it's a
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possible decision, it will allow doctors to prescribe this life—saving drug. there are two drugs on the table today. as you have stated, they could treat the root cause of the condition in cystic fibrosis for the first time for 50% of people with the condition. let's talk to doreen. your son has access to a drug similarto your son has access to a drug similar to these. tell us about his life and how it affected him and used before he was able to have this drug. i would say that hugo had repeated chest infections. he had several hospital admissions, especially over the winter months. for month after month, he had repeated chest infections at home. and it was hard. it's very intense because you have to up your daily treatment to combat the infections. since the medication, we have had
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very few chest infections and if he does have one, he recovers much quicker. we have had one hospital admission in the last three years. compared to may be the seven that we had before. which really makes a difference. and trying to treat a child as well, it is notjust about drugs, it is very intense for you as a parent. yes, because he has an older sibling as well. you have to put in two hours of daily treatment to keep him well. and if you add that to your other daily tasks and just living your life as a normal family. let's come back to nick on that. you can hear about the impact that. you can hear about the impact that this drug has had on doreen's son hugo and the family more widely. but cost is a huge issue, because one of the drug is being looked at today, 0rkambi, was licensed over three years ago, and yet it is not available on the nhs. is that down toa available on the nhs. is that down to a discussion about how much the
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nhs has to pay for the drug? absolutely. what is tragic in this case is that nobody is disagreeing that these are life—changing, life saving drugs which can keep thousands of people out of hospital and stop the progression of this genetic condition. so the cystic fibrosis trust has been campaigning for three and a half years since it has been licensed for it to be available routinely. what has been discussed is just about scotland. what about the rest of the uk? the whole of the country is looking toward scotland and scotland has the opportunity to lead the way in making these drugs routinely available. there have been talks ongoing in all the different nations of the uk as this crisis drags on. it must be frustrating for patients and parents that some people will have access to drugs, and they don't. listening to doreen and hugo,
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you can hear the change that that drug has made in their lives to stabilise the condition and make their lives so much less unpredictable, allowing them to plan and get back to work and go on holiday, and stop the progression of this disease. there are people watching who know that they could have access to that drug, 0rkambi, and they could be slowing down the progression of their disease. and it is just sitting progression of their disease. and it isjust sitting on progression of their disease. and it is just sitting on shelves. progression of their disease. and it isjust sitting on shelves. are there more drugs in the pipeline that could target these precision areas and make a big difference to people suffering with cystic fibrosis? this is part of the story. we hope that next year or the year after, a drug which has been proven in clinical trials to treat 90% of people transformational you will be able to sell to the nhs. we are in a race against time to keep people well enough to access that treatment and benefit from game changing
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therapies that treat the root cause of this condition. doreen, it must be an extraordinary situation to be in where you are one of the lucky families that get access to this drug. what would you say?” families that get access to this drug. what would you say? i do feel incredibly lucky, and i also feel guilty that i have something that other people are desperately trying to get access to. it has made a huge difference to our lives. and how is hugo doing? very well. he is full of life and getting on with school and making friends and spending less time in hospital and more time at home. nick, the drugs are one thing, but this has a huge impact on
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people's lives, trying to deal with cystic fibrosis. absolutely. from day one as a genetic condition, pa rents a re day one as a genetic condition, parents are told to put in up to three hours a dayjust to keep their child well. and this is physio? physio and treatments for digestion. but as people get older, there are more than half the people living with cf in the uk who are adults, and they stuck to deal with compression such as cf —related diabetes or arthritis or osteoporosis. it is a horrible disease and we need to stop it in its tracks. when we hear about doreen and the impact this drug can have, there are similar drugs out there. how can this be resolved? if they are setting the price at £100,000 for the treatment for a year and the £100,000 for the treatment for a yearand the nhs £100,000 for the treatment for a year and the nhs can't afford that, is there some way that they can meet in the middle or is it going to go
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on for much longer? that price point, £100,000, is effectively the starting position. we know the offers of a lower price have been put on the table and the nhs has moved towards those offers. it's a negotiating dynamic which has been going on for too long. so of course people are going to look at alternative options to get life—saving drugs to their children, theirfamilies life—saving drugs to their children, their families and themselves. thank you both for your time. just a little response from one of the drug manufacturers was that they say they have a deep commitment to ensuring that all eligible patients living with cystic fibrosis can access our life—saving medicines. we remain in discussions with nhs england to secure a ccess discussions with nhs england to secure access to these medicines and continue to review the offers both parties have proposed. they say all parties have proposed. they say all parties agree these discussions need to remain confidential at this time. thank you to doreen and all the best to hugo.
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if you haven't been outside, we can tell you it's a bit chilly. yes, it is. some are off to a sunny start, but others have heavy showers. the forecast for this week remains u nsettled. forecast for this week remains unsettled. the rain is particularly heavy on wednesday, and with it across england and wales, it will be windy, cool and breezy. today we have three different weather fronts, each of them bringing rain or showers. the heaviest showers at the moment are across the channel islands, extending steadily to the south—eastern corner. in between, there will be some brighter skies. we have also got showers in south—west england, but a lot of dry
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weather and a fair bit of sunshine. in north—west england, we have the remnant of a weather front producing rain. and in northern ireland and the hebrides, we have got showers. the showers will move eastwards during the day and become more widespread across scotland. the rain provide showers across the north of england and it will not be until the evening that we see the showers fade away. at this stage in august in the south—east and london, we would be expecting 21 or 22 degrees. this evening, many showers will peter out. we were hang on to a few and we will also have clear skies. it is going to be cold. this is what you can expect in towns and cities, many of us in single digits. in rural areas, the temperature will be
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lower. tomorrow, we start off with sunshine. there will be a few scattered showers here and there, but many of us are staying dry, temperatures up a degree or so and what we are looking today. but draw your eyes over to the west, because here the cloud will thicken and we will start to see showers come our way, courtesy of an area of low pressure. that will move across us as we go through tuesday night and wednesday, bringing rain. and in the north—west of scotland, we will also have rain. so eventually, the twain shall meet. under all this rain, it is not going to feel particularly special. by thursday, something drier and brighter comes our way, except for across the north of scotland, where we will have showery outbreaks of rain and temperatures picking up a touch by then. but it
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looks at the moment like we could have more low pressure coming our way for the weekend. thank you, i think! it is a bit weird, the weather. it is all over the shop. there's more woe for britain's high street retailers. steph is taking a look. and the weather is often to blame. if it's too hot, we don't want to go to the shops. if it is raining, we don't want to go to the shops. the retailers often talk about that. various statistics are out which don't make for good reading. total retail sales are still going up, but very slowly, byjust 0.3% thisjuly compared to lastjuly, that's according to the british retail consortium. on top of this, the number of empty shops in our town centres was at its highest rate since january 2015. and one in ten shops in our town
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centres is empty, which is not a surprise when we have talked about retailers having problems with rent and business taxes and everything else. and the number of people visiting town centres, what we call footfall, isn't great either — its worst since 2012. so there are lots of issues about whether it is the weather, but it's also the obvious reason we have talked about for many years now, which is that we don't go and browse as much as we used to. we do more of that on the internet, so that makes a big difference. but it doesn't mean we are not spending in the shops. i always want to add a bit of caution, because we can be dead gloomy. we are still spending more than we were, so it has gone up a bit. but it is not as fast as it has beenin bit. but it is not as fast as it has been in the past. it is slowing down, and that is what worries retailers. is it going to get to a point where they are not making as much money as they did? 0r point where they are not making as much money as they did? or the big high street names like debenhams and mothercare and new look have had
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various issues in the last couple of yea rs. various issues in the last couple of years. they worry about these issues. you get a sense of change. and it has been coming for a long time, but in these town centres where they are losing shops and they have got empty ones, there is concern over whether that could mean even fewer people going because they think, well, half of it is empty. you also get more people going in for entertainment, so footfall after five in the evening has been going up five in the evening has been going up with people going to the cinema or whatever. i am going to keep going. me too! i could do with a haircut. that was quite a segue. make sure you spend some money in
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the shops as well. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come... 0ur reporterjayne mccubbin is on the coast with a warning from the rnli about using inflatables in the sea. morning, jayne. yes, they look like great fun, whether you have bought a giant unicorn inflatable or a pizza slice ora unicorn inflatable or a pizza slice or a doughnut ring. there are so many out there and they are on sale in every single one of the shops that sells buckets and spades here in blackpool, for sure. but already this year, there have been 112 incidents of people who have been swept out to sea and have had to be rescued by the rnli, which is why we are here today, talking about their campaign to respect the water and be safe. these look like fun, but they come with a risk. let me introduce chris cousins from the rnli. talk us
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through some pictures of a rescue that happened on friday. yes, we had an incident involving an inflatable on friday where two girls, seven—year—old and 17—year—old, were swe pt seven—year—old and 17—year—old, were swept more than 500 metres offshore in an inflatable dinghy. it shows how dangerous thingies can be on the coast. we would always advise that they are used in a controlled environment like a swimming pool. people are always going to buy them, though, aren't they? so parents need to know this message. if you are using an inflatable on the coast, make sure you do so at a lifeguarding beach between red and yellow flags. don't do so if the wind is blowing offshore, because thatis wind is blowing offshore, because that is when you can get swept out to sea. and make sure your children are supervised at all times. thank you. let me show you this image of a holiday snap ta ken you. let me show you this image of a holiday snap taken in margate. this is the taylor family. the water is very calm. the conditions are nice. it is sunny, and yet seconds after
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this picture was taken, the children we re this picture was taken, the children were swept out to sea. more later, but first the news, travel and weather where you are. the weather remains unsettled and there is more rain in the forecast. temperature is below average for the time of yearand temperature is below average for the time of year and also quite windy weather to come. to date should be dry for many but some rain in the north east of england which will break up into showers this afternoon. showers for northern ireland and the west of scotland and down into the south east of england.
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temperatures below the average at around 16, 19 degrees. further showers this evening dotted around and some could be quite heavy as we go into tuesday morning. temperatures down to around 10 degrees overnight so quite chilly first thing tomorrow morning. throughout tuesday it should be dry with sunshine for most of us and highs of 17, 20 degrees.
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this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. feeling the pressure — hong kong's economy has taken a hit after 10 weeks of protests — we'll assess the impact. live from london, that's our top story on monday the 12th of august. hong kong's national carrier cathay pacific sacked staff members who took part in the protests — and the compa ny‘s shares have fallen. 0ne one example of the impact the processor having in hong kong. also in the programme — the road to electric in india is getting a boost — but the switch to the cleaner car

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