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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 12, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's ham and these are the main stories this morning. all flights in and out of hong kong are cancelled for the rest of the day as thousands of anti—government protesters occupy the airport. this is the scene at hong kong international airport, both levels are completely full. black clad pro—democracy demonstrators have occupied every inch of this terminal. it's currently 6pm at hong kong, this is the live scene and demonstrators showing no sign of moving. drug crime increases in many small towns and villages despite falling in city centres. another rival gang or someone from manchester or something like that tried coming to town, and muscling in on the business, then you're going to start getting sort of fighting
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between the two gangs. the government begins a review of sentencing policy for the most dangerous offenders. women going through the menopause face a national shortage of hormone replacement therapy. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. hong kong has suspended all flights in and out of the territory as a sit—in with thousands of anti—government protesters at the international airport enters its fourth day. mass demonstrations and unrest show no sign of abating, more than two months after they were sparked by a controversial extradition bill. many of those protesting are critical of the actions of police, who on sunday were caught on film firing tear gas at close range. our correspondent stephen mcdonell sent this update from hong kong airport.
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this is the scene at hong kong international airport. both levels are completely full, black clad pro—democracy demonstrators have occupied every inch of this terminal. if we come over here, we can even see down at the bottom how many thousands of chanting protesters there are. they are calling for an inquiry into the police, following clashes over the weekend. people will have seen that footage of riot police charging into an underground train station, hitting protesters and firing at point blank range with some sort of non—lethal rounds. it is really enraged people and they have come to the airport tojoin enraged people and they have come to the airport to join the protest that was already here. but this airport is now effectively shut down. if you haven't checked in, we have people still coming in with bags, what they
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are going to find is they cannot check—in because all of the counters have been closed. any flights from now on that don't have passengers already cleared security, have been cancelled for the rest of the day. police have arrived with tear gas warning signs, airport officials have said that people should not come to the airport and it looks like there will be a major showdown between these thousands of protesters and riot police sometime today as authorities try and clear the pro—democracy movement out of the pro—democracy movement out of the airport. the assistant commissioner of police operations in hong kong responded to the criticism. let's hear what he had to say. there are very stringent requirements on our officers when using force. and, and the decision to use force is there and then. our officers determine there and then what level of force should be used, in that, on that occasion. they should use the minimum
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level of force to achieve the operational objective. we will keep you updated on what is happening in hong kong, seven hours ahead so it's currently 6pm and the protests are continuing. a bbc investigation has found that drug crime in some villages in england and wales has more than quadrupled in five years. that's as drug crime as a whole has risen in rural areas and smaller towns, but fallen sharply in major city centres. the findings highlight concern about the spread of so—called county lines gangs which traffic drugs using children and vulnerable people. dan johnson reports. the latest frontier in the fight against drugs. heroin and crack cocaine are pouring into north wales from merseyside and manchester. there's a lot of money to be made in this town. children and young people
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are running drugs hundreds of miles. they are vulnerable and at risk. if someone becomes established here, then llandudno is their town, if you like, so if another rival gang or someone from manchester or something like that tries coming into town and muscling in on the business, well, you're going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs. it's a struggle to keep people safe and to get drugs off the street. the minute you get rid of one or two, there's another three or four readily available to come down. here's how the problem is shifting. across the north, look where drug crime is down — big cities like liverpool, manchester, leeds and sheffield. but the pink spots show there are more drug offences in smaller places like chester, huddersfield and lincoln. further south, in westminster in central london, over the last five years,
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drug crime more than halved. but 20 miles away, offences quadrupled in the tiny village of westhumble. and this is it, a sleepy spot in rural surrey. it's the last place you would expect to have any sort of drug problem. it's a very quiet area. it would be easy for people to come out here and be unobtrusive. so yes, i can see how it might happen. how often do you see the police? very infrequently. the figures here are still really low. but the fact that there has been the steady increase over the last few years does show that drug dealers are more active in places like this, and you can see why. it's quiet, it's rural. the police are very thinly spread in this part of the world. so that is the appeal, and it's also the challenge. and it is police forces like north wales that are dealing with the extended reach of county lines gangs, spreading more drugs and more misery.
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there's most probably enough of us to just about manage the situation, in terms of making sure no—one‘s getting seriously hurt. but in terms of seriously disrupting or attempting to stop the supply, there's nowhere near enough of us. and you can find out more about the bbc‘s investigation into drug crime in england and wales, including seeing what it is like in your area, at bbc.co.uk/news. the prime minister has ordered a review into the sentencing of dangerous criminals, and whether they should spend more time injail before they are released. critics say there's no evidence that longer sentences prevent crime, and the uk already has the largest prison population of any country in western europe. the review is the latest in a series of recent announcements on law and order, heightening speculation about an autumn general election. our political correspondent
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helena willkinson is at westminster. so there are lots of ideas being thrown about, bring us up to date. that meeting with the prime minister is taking place at downing street, not far from where we are. he has invited some of the most senior people within the criminaljustice system to sit down with him and talk through, and get ideas from them as to how they can improve the criminal justice system. one of those there, said brian everson, used to be until recently the most senior —— sir brian levinson. he used to be the most seniorjudge in england and wales, he will have a lot to say because before he retired injune, he said that the criminaljustice system needed investment otherwise it was at risk of collapsing. as you mentioned, borisjohnson it was at risk of collapsing. as you mentioned, boris johnson wants it was at risk of collapsing. as you mentioned, borisjohnson wants to review sentencing for the most violent offenders. in his view, he
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says that too many of these offenders have been let out of prison too early. and we heard earlierfrom prison too early. and we heard earlier from the justice minister robert buckland who said that a review sentencing is needed. this is all about making sure that we use the justice system in as savvy a way as possible. i think the question of automatic release, irrespective of behaviour of a particular offender, is something that has been of particular concern for a number of years. it is right that we focus upon the need to protect the public and also to reduce reoffending, and that's why this particular review will be so useful in making sure that our system works as sensibly as possible to punish offenders and to protect the public. now, the opposition say that there is not much evidence to suggest what borisjohnson is is not much evidence to suggest what boris johnson is planning is not much evidence to suggest what borisjohnson is planning in terms of the criminal justice borisjohnson is planning in terms of the criminaljustice system, that any of his promises or pledges will any of his promises or pledges will a chilly work. we heard from the shadow home secretary —— the shadow
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home affairs minister diane abbott earlier on who said she was dubious about boris johnson's earlier on who said she was dubious about borisjohnson's plans. we know, well, society knows that we have record levels of violent crime under this tory government. and as a party, we are committed to what works. and if you take stop and search, all of the research, even the home office's own research, demonstrates that stop and search, random stop and search, in and of itself, does not bring down violent crime and knife crime. it's about what works. the shadow home secretary diane abbott there. dubious about boris johnson's plan. that meeting is taking place at the moment. we know the treasury has approved the money to go into the criminaljustice system but we don't know yet where this money is going to come from and this money is going to come from and this all adds to the speculation that number ten is planning for an
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awesome general election. downing street very much as gearing us away from that. —— steering us away from that. with me is the barrister mark fenhalls qc, a former chair of the criminal bar association. good morning. do you think a review of sentencing is needed? this review isa of sentencing is needed? this review is a tiny part of the problem of the criminal justice system. is a tiny part of the problem of the criminaljustice system. if the prime minister means what he says about criminals getting the sentences they deserve, what we actually need is for them to be prosecuted in the first place. the cps and the police have had a 45% drop in all the crimes they have investigated and prosecuted over the last eight years, and that is the real problem. not this review. to £85 million is being put into the cps, to try to help deal with those issues, will that make a difference? it will be a good thing and help, but the real problem comes with the police investigations. because the police investigations. because the police have to investigate the burglary and assault and fraud allegations first so they can
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present cases to the crown prosecution service. we then have to have cps lawyers available to do the work and they have suffered 30% cuts over the last decade and i do not have the lawyers left to do the work of the public wants. we hope this money will the first step in the right direction. you are talking about getting people prosecuted in the first place, what about when people are prosecuted and whether sentencing is generally getting it right or not and does not need to be looked at? is there evidence that there is a lack of public faith in there is a lack of public faith in the system? the short answer is no. over the last decade, sentences have gone up significantly, they have become more significant and we have come across no evidence in a lack of confidence in the system that sentencing. from anybody who knows what they are talking about. the reality is when you have got long prison sentences, you have to work out for yourself, do we want those people to reoffend when they are released? and people to reoffend when they are released ? and the people to reoffend when they are
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released? and the important thing about the government announcement today is, what can be done about rehabilitation of people whilst they are in prison? otherwise whenever they get out, whether it is in months or years, theyjust reoffend. reoffending rates are at 47%, 46% of aduu reoffending rates are at 47%, 46% of adult prisoners in england and wales, will reoffend within a year of being let out ofjail. if you look at able sentenced less than one year, it is 60%. what is your view when you work as a criminal barrister in seeing coming in and out of the system? none of us think that short—term prison sentences have any real effect or improve the situation for the wider public. short term sentences do not give the prison staff enough time to do anything. that's less than a year? yes. longer term prison sentences, we are concerned there are not the resources within the prison service. people are locked up in their cells and they are not being educated or rehabilitated, they are not getting exercise. so they're not getting the
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training in any way that they need to reduce reoffending rates. studies show regularly that the more you rehabilitate in prison, the more likely it is that people do not reoffend and surely that is what we all want at the end of the day. you we re all want at the end of the day. you were previously the chair of the criminal bar association, the current chair says the criminal justice system is severely underfunded as a result of the cuts over the last ten years and if there isa over the last ten years and if there is a change to the direction of travel, it's to be welcomed. what is your view, having worked in the system over a long period, of how things have changed? the current chair is quite right, there has been a decade of cuts because justice has not been be a protective ministry. many other ministries have been protected over the last decade justice has not. it is what the public deserves, we want to be protected from people breaking into our homes, attacking us in the street and so on. and it's time for investment to begin again to reduce
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and reverse the 30% of cuts that the justice ministry has faced over the last decade. to reduce offending, when the government makes the link at the end point which is the sentencing, and priti patel for insta nce sentencing, and priti patel for instance saying she wants criminals to literally feel terror when they think about the prospect of what might happen when they are caught and sentenced, do you think that is the correct way to stop things happening in the first place?|j don't happening in the first place?” don't think you will find a criminal lawyer in the country who believes that any of their clients ever think about the end sentence when they commita about the end sentence when they commit a crime. the only thing that actually works is the fear of being caught, and that's being caught by the police at the beginning. at the moment because police investigations lose so many cases or don't exist in so many different parts of crime, that fear that the home secretary claims she wants does not exist. if the logicians really care about improving the situation, they will sort out police investigation in
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relation to these crimes, putting on the resources so police can prosecute properly and the cps can prosecute properly and the cps can prosecute those who should be prosecuted. the family of the 15—year—old school girl with special needs who's gone missing in malaysia, have offered a reward of around £10,000, or 50,000 malaysian ringgit, to find her. hundreds of people are looking for nora quoirin and malaysian police have opened a hotline for any information connected to the disappearance. a liaison officer from the irish police arrived to support the family. the reward money has been donated by an anonymous belfast based business. nora's family issued a new statement this morning, saying: "nora is ourfirst child. she has been vulnerable since the day she was born. she is so precious to us and our hearts are breaking.‘ our correspondent howard johnson sent this update from the scene this morning. i'm standing outside the resort where she went missing eight days ago. we're hearing from the lucie blackman trust, the charity are working alongside the family, they were set up to help british nationals in crisis abroad. they're telling us that the family
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are considering offering a cash appeal for any information, a cash reward, rather, for any information that can lead to the discovery of their daughter. now, we do know that the family have raised a lot of money on some crowdfunding appeal websites, they've currently got more than £100,000, has been donated to them by concerned members of the public. today search and rescue teams are continuing to fan out around four square kilometre area. at the moment, they are 350 strong, that's the largest number of personnel that have been deployed on this search and rescue effort since this search began more than a week ago. the family obviously very concerned, the police are continuing to treat this as a missing persons case. the family would also like to explore the angle that she could have been abducted. the police say they are not ruling that outjust yet. the headlines on bbc news. all flights in and out of hong kong are cancelled for the rest
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of the day as thousands of anti—government protesters occupy the airport. drug crime increases in many small towns and villages — despite falling in city centres. the government begins a review of sentencing policy for the most dangerous offenders. manchester united thump chelsea in the premier league. and arsenal their opponents. england name a squad for the rugby world cup this afternoon and there is plenty for head coach eddiejones to think about after a convincing win for his side over wales at twickenham. and britten's jamie chadwick has won the first ever w series championship after she finished fourth in the season—ending race at brands hatch. more on those stories later.
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the number of gamblers complaining about british betting companies has increased almost fifty—fold in the past five years. new figures obtained from the gambling commission by the bbc, show that there were a record 8,000 complaints in the last year. the rise in complaints follows a big increase in gambling over the past decade, as bronagh munro reports. the betting business is booming, and it's punters who are paying the price. the amount they're losing to the gambling companies has almost doubled in the decade. last year, it was £14.5 billion. the biggest rise has been in online gambling. amanda was in herfifties when she started gambling on a site called jackpotjoy. she doesn't want to be identified, but she lost £633,000 before being made bankrupt. it's horrific, what i've done to myself, really.
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everything that i'd worked for, everything that my children were...looked up to me. now i've blown their inheritance, as such. jackpotjoy said it had frequent contact with amanda and encouraged her to use responsible gambling tools, but figures obtained by panorama suggest the industry has a lot of unhappy customers. they show there were 8,266 complaints last year compared tojust 169 in 2013. the gambling commission says it's a complicated picture. we are pushing the industry to know its customers and part of this is actually possibly a good sign because it's suggesting that consumers are demanding more of gambling operators. major betting companies have already agreed to provide £60 million a year to help problem gamblers. bronagh munro, bbc news.
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and "bbc panorama: addicted to gambling" can be watched tonight at 8.30pm on bbc one and on the bbc iplayer afterwards. caroline lucas is calling on 10 cross—party female politicians tojoin her in forming an "emergency cabinet" in a bid to stop a no—deal brexit. the green party mp said the all—women cabinet could "bring a different perspective". she said the aim would be to force a no—confidence vote in prime minister borisjohnson and form a "national unity government". i'm talking about my own experience and i appreciate it's a generalisation, but in my experience i've found that women have generally been more able to put aside tribal concerns to build trust more quickly and there are times in history where we've seen that happen. for example, there's been two women there
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who were instrumental in bringing around the peace process. if you look at the climate change talks, two women, segolene royal and christiana figueres who were instrumental in breaking the logjam at the paris climate talks. now, i'm not saying that all women are automatically more able to do this any more that i'm saying that all men are not but i am saying that at a time of crisis, i think it's worth exploring whether we could develop a different kind of dynamic, if you like, by getting women in the role. and i've approached women, basically the women who are in the most senior positions in their political parties across westminster to see if at this time of emergency we can bring some fresh thinking. stringent security measures are in place in indian—administered kashmir as the mainly muslim population prepare to celebrate the festival of eid al adha. several thousand indian soldiers are on alert in the province and are patrolling the streets. the security clamp—down follows protests over delhi's decision to revoke the region's special status. our correspondent rahul tandon sent this report from delhi. normally on a day like this in indian administered kashmir, we'd see the street extremely busy,
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people greeting family, friends marking the eid occasion. the pictures that were beginning to see this morning are of deserted streets, huge blockades. there are some photos which are coming in from the indian government showing some muslims going to local mosques, but our understanding is that the main mosques in the area, the places where people would gather in large numbers, have been completely shut down. on sunday morning, the restrictions were lifted so people could go shopping but then around midday, we believe that the police officers in the area took to their vehicles and started telling people using loudspeakers to go back into their homes. and all the shops were shut down. that's because there were further protests in the area against the indian government's decision to remove the autonomous powers that the indian state of kashmir had. indian administered kashmir had. so the situation this morning very, very tense, even though the indian government continues to insist that the area remains largely
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peaceful and most people support its actions. floods have killed almost a hundred and 50 people in southern india. nearly half the deaths were in the southern state of kerala, where continuing heavy rain and landslides forced more than 100,000 people to take shelter in relief camps. ramzan karmali reports. the monsoon season has hit india hard, again. this year's heavy rainfall, like so many before, has caused death and destruction. vast areas in the south and west of the country have found themselves submerged by water. more than 165,000 have been evacuated from kerala, and scores have died. officials have admitted that there are places where monsoon rains have triggered mudslides which they cannot reach. they urge those cut off to try to seek shelter on higher ground.
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the ones fortunate to have been rescued could not believe the havoc that has been caused. translation: it has been at least five to six days. everybody is stuck there. animals are all stuck there. people are facing lots of problems. water has come from all directions and entered all the houses. officials believe that at least 50 have died in this landslide in one district in kerala alone. last year, over 200 people were killed in kerala, and over 5 million infected in one of the worst floods in 100 years. emergency relief camps have been set up and food is being prepared for the army to airlift to stranded villages. but with more rain predicted in the coming days, any chance of a quick recovery and return to normality look bleak. at least 44 people have been killed by raging floods in eastern china. super typhoon lekima made landfall in zhejiang province at the weekend, and torrential downpours with winds
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of up to 120 miles an hour caused a landslide that blocked a river. the barrier lake burst and flooded waters swept people away. more than a million people have been moved out of their homes, and a total of five million people have been affected, according to local authorities. the political row and conspiracy theories continue after the death of the multimillionaire sex offender jeffrey epstein. he was found in his prison cell in new york over the weekend, a p pa re ntly having taken his own life, while awaiting trial. he'd been accused of child sex trafficking. we're going to talk to cbs news' laura podesta now. bring us up to date with the latest on the investigation. the fbi and department ofjustice are continuing to invest get the death ofjeffrey epstein, the millionaire financier was found dead in his jail cell on saturday. though an autopsy has been
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completed on his body, new york city's medical examiner says she is withholding the findings pending additional information. this is the associated press reports that understaffing at the jail where the finance year was found dead saturday isa finance year was found dead saturday is a big problem. the metropolitan correctional centre in manhattan is so short—staffed that correctional officers are being offered a $10,000 bonus to transfer to there from other federal lock—ups. bonus to transfer to there from otherfederal lock—ups. it bonus to transfer to there from other federal lock—ups. it should also be noted that epstein's apparent suicide and the criminal case, however prosecutors say they will keep investigating the alleged sex trafficking operation. us attorney jeffrey berman said sex trafficking operation. us attorneyjeffrey berman said in a statement over the weekend the indictment against s epstein includes a conspiracy charge which suggest other people could face charges in the future. lots of conspiracy theories are swelling around over the death, fuelled by the president tweeting something
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which implicated the clintons. to remind you, president trump retweeted video of someone speculating if epstein actually died by suicide as he had information on bill clinton. that has been retweeted 66,000 times and viewed 4 million times so there is a significant reaction to that. there is also no evidence to support that conspiracy that the president is supposedly promoting. some calling what mr trump supposedly promoting. some calling what mrtrump did supposedly promoting. some calling what mr trump did by retweeting it reckless and dangerous and there is now evidence that russian bots are pushing this conspiracy online to further divide americans. nowjust before we go to the weather, take a look at this. these pictures were taken in australia and they show kangaroos in the snow!
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they were filmed in goulburn in new south wales. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. no snow here in the uk but it will be cooler than the average for august. temperature is only 16 to 19 degrees. some sunny spells, i love this picture from our weather watcher in london, a great view from above. towards the south—east, some heavy and thundery showers in the south—east of england which could impact the london area. for more showers to come across western scotland, northern ireland, part of northern england this afternoon. for most of us, drive it some sunshine but as i mentioned, it will feel quite cool for the time of year. this evening and tonight, heavier showers moving into north wales, in the north—west, that will have an impact. elsewhere clear skies, the north—west, that will have an impact. elsewhere clearskies, quite chilly tonight. tippett is into single figures for many of us. ——
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temperatures into single figures. tuesday should be a dry and bright day, one or two showers in eastern areas, sunny spells and dry for most. turning wet and windy on wednesday.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines: all flights in and out of hong kong are cancelled for the rest of the day as thousands of anti—government protesters occupy the airport. this is the scene at hong kong international airport, both levels are completely full. black clad pro—democracy demonstrators have occupied every inch of this terminal. new bbc analysis shows an increase in drug crime in many small towns and villages — despite a fall in city centres. another rival gang or someone from manchester or something like that tried coming to town, and muscling in on the business, then you're going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs.
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the government announces a review of sentencing policy for the most dangerous and prolific offenders. the family of a british schoolgirl missing in malaysia offer a £10,000 reward for information leading to her return. and women going through the menopause face a national shortage of hormone replacement therapy. sport now. good morning. ole gunner solskjaer says his manchester united side remain a ‘work in progress' despite a thumping win over chelsea in their first match of the season. united won 4—0, their biggest win over chelsea at old trafford in more than 50 years. marcus rashford got a couple, and danieljames scored on his debut. it was though a day to forget for the new chelsea boss, frank lampard. we had the majority of chances.
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full 60 minutes, we were playing well, we were playing well. and then other than the final third, where we could have been more clinical, we hit the post, we hit the bar, ourfinal decision was probably off slightly but we controlled the game. and then 2, 3—0, sucker punch, our mistakes, and the game changes completely, so that was the story of the game. arsenal also got their season off to a good start — with a win at newcastle. pierre—emerick aubameyang with the only goal of the game. that clean sheet away from home for arsenal already matches their record for the whole of last season. there were plenty of managerial debuts this weekend — and there was a big technological debut too. as var arrived in the premier league for the first time. and it's already annoying some managers. this is wolves scoring what they thought was a winner over leicester yesterday. but it was disallowed, after the video assistant referee spotted a hand—ball in the build up to the goal. it finished 0—0, and the wolves boss nuno espirito santo said var is affecting "the spirit
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of the game". there were tears for serena williams as she had to retire from the final of the rogers cup in canada. the 23—time grand slam winner only managed four games before she called a medical time—out for back spasms. she couldn't continue, so the title went to the canadian teenager bianca andreescu. andy murray makes his long—awaited return to singles action later today. he thought his career may be over 8 months ago, but a second hip operation has been a success, he's playing without pain, and has enjoyed some sucess on the doubles circuit. first up is the frenchman richard gasquet. sometimes the thing that is difficult in tennis in comparison to other sports is when you are coming back from an injury, if you look at football or basketball, is that you don't play 90 minutes straightaway. you might come into a football match
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and play 15—20 minutes then 30 then 60 minutes but with tennis, once you step back on the court you have to be ready to compete and play three sets. jamie chadwick says she hopes more women will get into motorsport after she became the first winner of the all—female w series motor racing championship. the 21—year—old from bath finished fourth in the last race of the season at brands hatch. that was enough to secure the championship. we really should be seeing women racing at the top level but sadly there is not enough of us out there racing so as number games go the odds are not in our favour. hopefully now with this series are more initiatives around we can start seeing more girls getting involved in the sport did they see women at the top, maybe we could see more of us the top, maybe we could see more of us lining for it. the pga tour is reviewing its policy on slow play after the american golfer bryson duchambeau was criticised over the weekend. here he is in the flat cap in the middle
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of your picture talking to brooks koepka, one of the biggest critics of slow play in the game. duchambeau took two minutes for a chip and a similar amount of time for a putt at the northern trust tournament in newjersey. it lead to english golfer eddie pepperall calling him a "single—minded twit" on social media, something he's since apologised for. and before we go, we absolutely love this from social media. this is liverpool fan lewis fowler who was so desparate to catch a glimpse of mohammed salah, that he ran into a lamp post and broke his nose. it was him chasing his car after he saw him near where he lives. tha nkfully saw him near where he lives. thankfully he is all right and he got a selfie with him. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's bring you up to date with what is happening at hong kong. we can show you the live pictures seven hours ahead of us, 7pm in the
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evening now. it is looking peaceful but there protests have now grounded flights in and out of one of the world's busiest airports. the airport authorities have said the flights are unable to go with the disruption that initially started on friday as a pretty peaceful protest but the protest escalated after a night in which police fired tear gas ina night in which police fired tear gas in a subway station and charged at passengers on an escalator in another station. it is a question now of what is going to be done and what is going to happen in terms of trying to disperse these protesters because flights are grounded and the authorities are not ruling out the use of tear gas to try and disperse the protest but as the situation is at the moment, it is peaceful but it is causing a lot of problems for
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anyone wanting to fight in or out of hong kong that will have a knock on effect in and out of the region so we will keep you up—to—date on that. breaking news to bring you from france. we are hearing the sole surviving, actually this is coming from brussels, the sought surviving suspect from the attacks has been formally charged in connection with suicide bombings in brusselsjust months later. federal prosecutors have said it has had confirmation from the federal prosecutors office that has been charged with participating in activities with a terrorist group and no details of his alleged role in the suicide bombings at brussels airport and a metro station in brussels in 2016 which killed 32 people and wounded 340 others. afp are saying they have
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confirmation he has been formally charged over those suicide bombings in brussels. as we've been reporting, the prime minister has ordered a review into the sentencing of dangerous criminals, and whether they should spend more time injail before they are released. critics say there's no evidence that longer sentences prevent crime, and the uk already has the largest prison population of any country in western europe. earlier i spoke to the conservative mp bob neill, who's chairman of the justice select committee, and i asked him whether sending more people to jail, for longer, would reduce crime. it depends how you use the time in prison and who you send to prison so i actually welcome the review. it is very sensible that the prime minister is talking to serious practitioners, people with hands—on knowledge in the field, and i very much welcome the extra money both for the crown prosecution service and for the prisons. our committee has been calling for that for a number of years. so that is good. it is not as simplistic as to say that if you lock up more people, you reduce crime. evidence suggests to the contrary.
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but there is a problem where our prisons are currently so overcrowded and there are so many difficulties that the staff face there with drugs, new psychoactive substances and so on, real problems of violence, that we are not able to do the rehabilitation work and turned arund the lives of those prisoners who do want to reform, and many do. so there is a problem and it is right that it is addressed. borisjohnson is saying 10,000 new prison places, costing 37 thousand pounds per prisoner per year. that would be £370 million. that is quite a pledge. where will the money come from? i hope we will have clarity as to that. our committee will want to know that. i trust that it is new money. and i hope it is dedicated money for the prison service which is not being taken from other bits of the justice system. sorry, you have said you trust it is new money, he has not even promised the money, he has just said he wants new prison places. is that sensible politics
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to put something out without having costed it? i used the word trust in the sense that we often do. i hope it is going to be new money and i think it is necessary to have a look at it. i am not negative about the extra money. wherever it comes from, it is necessary. the important point is then how we use it. a house in watford is inspiring families, local authorities and care home staff across the country to change their homes to help people with dementia. scientific research shows that by adjusting things like carpet and paint colours, more people could live independently for longer and therefore save families and local authorities money in care fees. laura foster reports. it may look like any other show home, but everything in this two—bedroom house has been deliberately chosen to help people with dementia. those windows can automatically open. steve is visiting with his wifejenny. his dementia means he forgets the meaning of words.
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can you tell us about when you first met? don't ask me! i would ask him to perhaps pop to a shop for me to buy some tomatoes and cucumbers, which he'd always been able to do, and he didn't know what i was talking about. there are lots of incidents like that. there are many types of dementia, and people experience symptoms in many different ways. this house looks at the big structural changes you can make, but it also looks at the smaller, more affordable things that can be done to help the ones you love. things like having a lighter carpet, as dark ones can be seen as holes in the ground. plug points are higher up, so you can't forget where they are. the paints help people with their perception. windows automatically open when it gets too hot, and taps are coloured in case people forget what hot and cold labels mean. and pictures of familiar faces and places help remind people of who they are. if people have to go
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into a care home, it can be £1,500 to £3,000 a month, maybe £30,000 to £40,000 a year. it is important to maintain people in their homes but in a relaxed atmosphere, and not to create a sort of hospitalised, institutionalised environment. this house is visited by families, care home owners and council workers from across the country. no one lives here, as it's still being used for research. but it's hoped that more and more homes in the future will look a bit like this, all to help cope with the problem that is becoming more and more prevalent around the world. the number of migrants arriving in italy from north africa has plummeted, yet feelings about migration are running higher than ever. the mediterranean island of lampedusa has seen hundreds of thousands of migrants disembark at its port. but the far right lega party came first in the european elections there, as emma jane kirby reports.
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a pretty picture in lampedusa, but the view here is changing. nearer to africa than the italian mainland, this mediterranean island has long played host to thousands of migrants arriving from libya. now it's welcoming thousands of tourists from europe. that means good business for the local taxi drivers, whose tours taking the best beaches, bars and boats on offer. but the footprints of the migrants, like their shipwrecked vessels, are still visible all over this island, and it's prompted a hard swing right. "salvini is number one," laughs this taxi driver. he showing his support for italy's populist deputy prime minister, matteo salvini, who was elected on an anti—immigration platform.
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he's banned ngo—operated ships carrying rescued migrants from docking at any italian port. injune, this german charity boat broke that rule and disembarked on lampedusa. the captain was arrested as an outlaw. turnout was low in the european elections here, but salvini's right wing lega party came first. translation: i say salvini's policy should be even more hardline than it is now, because let's not forget that behind this problem are the traffickers of human flesh. we should blockade the ports with ships to stop these traffickers. it's the height of the summer season in lampedusa and, as you can see, the beaches are packed with tourists flocking to the island now the number of migrant arrivals has dropped so dramatically here. this beautiful cobalt sea
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is perfect for holiday—makers, but in fact the mediterranean has now become the world's deadliest sea crossing. aid agencies fear the hardline policy is costing lives. last month, as many as 150 people drowned off the coast of libya when their boat capsized. as europe argues over who should take responsibility for the migrants, the perilous sea crossings continue. lampedusa's memorial to the missing — a poignant reminder. emma—jane kirby, bbc news, lampedusa. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... all flights in and out of hong kong are cancelled for the rest of the day as thousands of anti—government protesters occupy the airport. drug crime increases in many small towns and villages — despite falling in city centres. the government begins a review of sentencing policy for the most dangerous offenders.
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in the business news: the number of empty shops in town centres is at its highest for four years, according to new figures. the vacancy rate hit 10.3% in july, its highest level since january 2015. the numbers, from the british retail consortium and springboard also show that footfall — that's the number of people out shopping — also fell by 1.9% injuly, the worst july performance for seven years. the number of gamblers complaining about british betting firms has risen almost 5,000% in the past five years. there were a record 8,266 complaints last year according to the gambling commission. that compares to just 169 in 2013. most of them were about firms refusing to pay out on winning bets orfailing to operate in a socially responsible way. cathay pacific has warned staff they could be fired if they "support
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or participate in illegal protests" in hong kong, as pressure from beijing intensifies. the warning was emailed to staff by the airline's chief executive. several staff members have already been fired. on friday, china ordered the airline to suspend workers who support pro—democracy protests in the territory. more on that soaring vacancy rate on our high streets, with the number of premises lying empty at its highest level in four years. the decline illustrates the challenge for shopping centres and high streets rather than larger out of town stores. so is this decline reversible — and how should our high streets adapt? i asked diane wherle from springboard — the firm behind the latest figures. in context it is actually not that bad. we have been tracking football
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and that is the volume of activity in retail destinations for the past decade and more and publishing this data. we are seeing a long—term trend for decline in football because of changing shopping habits due to the internet. a drop of 1—2% we see all the time. what we are seeing at the moment is also a decline in the upper left in online spends, it is increasing but increasing less. there is some caution around consumers, their confidence is pretty low because of the uncertainty of what is happening economically and politically in the uk. they are reeling back on what they are spending and that is impacting on football and online stand will stop because retailers don't need as many stories, the va ca ncy don't need as many stories, the vacancy rate which is the percentage of units vacant, is increasing gradually as time goes by.
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problems finding staff with the right skills has been easing, thanks to a rise in the number of workers coming to the uk from non—eu countries. the chartered institute of personnel and development says firms are still able to get the staff they need, despite worries over the jobs market after brexit. but it says, for low skilled jobs, applications were down by a fifth, suggesting that some employers may face challenges hiring staff in the coming months. let's speak to gerwyn davies, senior labour market adviser at the cipd. let's start with these changes in where people are coming from because as an employer you need to look at getting the right people and your report says there are changes in where people are coming from to the uk. there are two key factors at play. the labour market is continuing to tighten despite the political uncertainty and the other factor is we are continuing to see a file in the rate of net migration from the eu which is forcing
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employers to look further afield for candidates and their efforts have been helped by the government's decision to exempt doctors and nurses from the cap which has led to an unlimited supply of nursing and doctor posts. it is clearly affecting their ability to hire. doctor posts. it is clearly affecting their ability to hirem is those jobs that are the most at risk, the ones that are specific and people need employees with those skills, if they can get them it has an effect on their business. indeed, we will see a reduction in migration restrictions and these pressures hit employers. this report points to the need for a government to be more flexible in the setting of a thoroughly threshold —— in the setting of a salary threshold. we
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know there are a shortage of social workers and psychologists. there is a administrative burden which will bea a administrative burden which will be a key concern to many for those looking ahead. brexit will figure in that debate. many people would say they do not have a problem with migration as long as it means people coming here are going to work and contribute but how would you solve that problem. on one hand wanting to limit migration but making sure we have the right skills. i know there have the right skills. i know there have been some calls for an office of migration responsibility to look at what we need and who we let in. indeed, we need a government policy thatis indeed, we need a government policy that is fine tuned to the needs of the economy. what we have at the moment is a situation where unemployment is at a record low, recruitment pressures are rising across the board and as a result, employers need to be able to look overseas and fill the vacancies with
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skilled staff that are in short supply. at the same time there is a need for rights and responsibilities for a employer to accept there is a need for some restrictions but to ensure employers are doing their bit for development skills for schools and colleges, avoid the need to hire from overseas. thank you for now, we will talk about this again. shares in thomas cook tumbled by 25% to 7.3p after it admitted that its increased capital raising plan will dilute existing shareholders' stakes. they have got a bit angry about that, they have gone down 15%. the
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ftse100 is down by half a percent, keep an eye on those currencies and the pound is now worth a dollar 20. that's all the business news. now, you may have seen this story going viral online. it's the 11 —year—old liverpool fan louus fowler who in his efforts to get the attention of his hero mo salah — ran into a lampost and injured his nose. he was trying to get the striker to waive at him from his car as he left the liverpool training ground on saturday. to his surprise the striker turned his car around and came to see if louis was ok. earlier, victoria derbyshire spoke to eleven year old louis, his 10 year old brother isaac and their step—dad, joe cooper. she started by asking louis whether it was all worth to meet his idol mo salah? the hospital said i might have to get it reset any couple of weeks. 0h really? it looks all right. you want it reset or are you happy with it?” don't know but whatever happens i think it was worth meeting mo salah.
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did it knock you out when you hit the lamp post? briefly. were you watching it? i was behind him. i saw him fall into the lamp post and i ran over to him fall into the lamp post and i ran overto mo him fall into the lamp post and i ran over to mo salah's car to tell him what happened when i figured out he couldn't stand up i was dead scared so mo salah came back around the corner a couple of minutes later and then he came to louis and asked why he was running like that because he could have hurt himself. was this at the liverpool training ground? you see mo salah coming out in his car. he comes out of his car and sometimes they stop when you ran after them so i ran with my brother.
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in my excitement i wasn't focusing on what was in front of me, i was looking to the left where the current was and i ran into a lamp post. i think mo salah felt bad and he pulled over. i think he was worried about me then my brother and someone else told him that i could have injured myself and i was hurt so he carried me back to my house. we called an ambulance and we were not expecting mo salah at all. does he not on the door? he came driving in his carto he not on the door? he came driving in his car to our close and we walked out of our garden and he checked i was ok, he was worried about me and we got pictures, it was great but also not the best because of my nose. what do you think of mo salah? what he drive? a bentley.
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what do you think of the fact that he came back, got out of his car, checked on you and took pictures?” think that is really kind of him. i love him very much because he is amazing. do you love him isaac? yeah. do you love him joel? he is a top guy to be fair. i was so shocked he came back, it might not be a big deal to some people who don't understand with these football players. they have cameras watching him, all ofa players. they have cameras watching him, all of a sudden he has disappeared, they were probably panicking. he was really caring and compassionate towards the boys, he made their days. a big thank you to him. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. we have got sunny spells from many parts of the united kingdom, this is
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in london. look at the cloud. we have similar cloud across the south—east of england but thicker cloud, thunderstorms in the south—east of england, a little bit more cloud in the north—east of england. that is bringing us a couple of showers, a couple of showers into western scotland and northern ireland and in the south—east we will have thundery downforce this afternoon. could be quite a bit of rain in a short space of time. elsewhere dry with sunshine, it will feel quite cool for this time of year. through tonight heavy showers moving into north wales, parts of north—west england, that could bring impact. elsewhere a couple of showers that mostly dry, clear skies, tuesday morning is quite chilly, temperatures for many of us down into single figures. tuesday, we will start with a couple of showers in central and eastern areas, mostly starting to clear away and by the afternoon, for many of us it is
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going to be dry and bright with sunshine, fairly light winds and maximum temperatures up to 17 or 21. a little bit warmer with some sunshine. which tuesday night and wednesday, we are going to see some wet and windy weather moving in. look at this complex by the system moving in from the south—west, spreading its way further north and east words. some uncertainty as to how far north this area of rainbow travel. for england and wales, really quite wet and windy weather and some rain for the far north—west of scotland. drier elsewhere. maximum temperatures 16—18d. thursday, drier and brighter, temperatures 17—21 but by friday we are going to see wet weather move its way in. by the end of the week, its way in. by the end of the week, it isa its way in. by the end of the week, it is a long way off, there will be some changes. look at this area of
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the pressure moving in, wet and windy weather so if you have any plans, it is well worth staying tuned the forecast. you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's midday and these are the main stories this morning. all flights in and out of hong kong are cancelled for the rest of the day after thousands of anti—government protesters occupied the airport. word came out that the police were going to conduct mass arrests, and so, just like that, in their thousands they are leaving. drug crime increases in many small towns and villages despite falling in city centres. another rival gang or someone from manchester or something like that tried coming to town, and muscling in on the business, then you're going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs. the government begins a review of sentencing policy for the most dangerous offenders. the family of the teenager missing in malaysia offer a £10,000 reward for information
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leading to her return. and women going through the menopause face a national shortage of hormone replacement therapy. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. hong kong has suspended all flights in and out of the territory as a sit—in with thousands of anti—government protesters at the international airport enters its fourth day. mass demonstrations and unrest show no sign of abating, more than two months after they were sparked by a controversial extradition bill. many of those protesting are critical of the actions of police, who on sunday were caught on film firing tear gas at close range. our correspondent stephen mcdonell sent this update from hong kong airport as some protestors were starting to leave. here we have the protesters' "be like water" strategy on display.
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it's an expression they borrowed from martial arts figure bruce lee. and it means in their mind, when the time comes, you've got to move. word came out that the police were going to conduct mass arrests, and so, just like that, in their thousands, they are leaving. we turn around, you can get an idea of how far the crowd is going, down here. and because the transport system has been locked down, they're just walking out. some people are queueing for those buses that exist. there are still some buses, but it's going to take a long time to get out of here by public transport. for this reason, they're just walking away. now, one of the reasons they might be concerned about getting arrested is that we had a press conference today from the central government. the key expression that came out of that was that this pro—democracy movement had laid the groundwork for terrorism in hong kong.
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now, what that could potentially mean is that the government in beijing, it really they thought there was a threat of terrorism here, would be well within its rights according to them to come down very hard on this movement. it could make for a tougher response, it could involve the army. it could also involve arresting people on terrorism charges. that means no lawyers, that means all of these young students could be held for quite a long time, without charge, on suspicion of terrorism. so you can imagine why there might be some concern. you can imagine why people under such circumstances would not want to be arrested. we don't know if everybody will leave the airport tonight, but i think once the numbers get small enough, that's when officials will go in there and potentially clear out the remaining demonstrators.
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in the meantime, though, all flights of the rest of the day have been cancelled. check—in counters are closed down and effectively hong kong airport, for now, has been completely shut down in order for the authorities to deal with this crisis. the assistant commissioner of police operations in hong kong responded to the criticism of his officers. there are very stringent requirements on our officers when using force. and, and the decision to use force is there and then. our officers determine there and then what level of force should be used, in that, on that occasion. they should use the minimum level of force to achieve the operational objective. these are the live pictures from the airport, you can see the protesters remain out in force in the airport and no sign at all of any
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confrontation with the authorities. the question is, will they use the tear gas that they have threatened to use to disperse the protesters? it was the use of tear gas in a protest in a subway which led to the escalation of these protests which have now totally grounded flights in and out of hong kong airport. obviously causing considerable disruption at what is one of the worlds busiest airports. it all relates back to controversial extradition laws which were introduced by the government. protests against those laws which would have made it easierfor authorities to extradite suspected criminals to the chinese mainland lead to the protests. the government has since said that they will not make use of those laws but the protesters are make use of those laws but the protesters a re not make use of those laws but the protesters are not happy with that. they say that is not enough, they wa nt they say that is not enough, they want the law completely taken off the statute books. the stand—off continues and has been going on now for more than two months. we will
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keep you updated on the latest situation at the hong kong airport. a bbc investigation has found that drug crime in some villages in england and wales has more than quadrupled in five years. that's as drug crime as a whole has risen in rural areas and smaller towns, but fallen sharply in major city centres. the findings highlight concern about the spread of so—called county lines gangs which traffic drugs using children and vulnerable people. dan johnson reports. the latest frontier in the fight against drugs. heroin and crack cocaine are pouring into north wales from merseyside and manchester. there's a lot of money to be made in this town. children and young people are running drugs hundreds of miles. they are vulnerable and at risk. if someone becomes established here, then llandudno is their town, if you like, so if another rival gang or someone from manchester
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or something like that tries coming into town and muscling in on the business, well, you're going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs. it's a struggle to keep people safe and to get drugs off the street. the minute you get rid of one or two, there's another three or four readily available to come down. here's how the problem is shifting. across the north, look where drug crime is down — big cities like liverpool, manchester, leeds and sheffield. but the pink spots show there are more drug offences in smaller places like chester, huddersfield and lincoln. further south, in westminster in central london, over the last five years, drug crime more than halved. but 20 miles away, offences quadrupled in the tiny village of westhumble. and this is it, a sleepy spot in rural surrey. it's the last place you would expect to have any sort of drug problem. it's a very quiet area.
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it would be easy for people to come out here and be unobtrusive. so yes, i can see how it might happen. how often do you see the police? very infrequently. the figures here are still really low. but the fact that there has been the steady increase over the last few years does show that drug dealers are more active in places like this, and you can see why. it's quiet, it's rural. the police are very thinly spread in this part of the world. so that is the appeal, and it's also the challenge. and it is police forces like north wales that are dealing with the extended reach of county lines gangs, spreading more drugs and more misery. there's most probably enough of us to just about manage the situation, in terms of making sure no—one's getting seriously hurt. but in terms of seriously disrupting or attempting to stop the supply,
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there's nowhere near enough of us. and you can find out more about the bbc‘s investigation into drug crime in england and wales, including seeing what it is like in your area at bbc.co.uk/news. the prime minister has ordered a review into the sentencing of dangerous criminals, and whether they should spend more time injail before they are released. critics say there's no evidence that longer sentences prevent crime, and the uk already has the largest prison population of any country in western europe. the review is the latest in a series of recent announcements on law and order heightening speculation about an autumn general election. thejustice secretary robert buckland has been explaining why a review on sentencing is long overdue. this is all about making sure that we use the justice system in as savvy a way as possible. i think the question
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of automatic release, irrespective of behaviour of a particular offender, is something that has been of particular concern for a number of years. it is right that we focus upon the need to protect the public and also to reduce reoffending, and that's why this particular review will be so useful in making sure that our system works as sensibly as possible to punish offenders and to protect the public. the shadow home secretary, labour's diane abbott says she is sceptical about whether boris johnson's plans for law and order will work. we know, well, society knows that we have record levels of violent crime under this tory government. and as a party, we are committed to what works. and if you take stop and search, all of the research, even the home office's own research, demonstrates that stop and search, random stop and search, in and of itself, does not bring down violent crime and knife crime. it's about what works. let's discuss this further with frances cook,
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chief executive of the howard league for penal reform. she is in our central london studio. thank you very much forjoining us. what do you think? it's now ce ntresta g e what do you think? it's now centrestage on the political agenda, are they getting it right? no, but i think this is quite a lot of hot air, actually. we seem to be announcing lots more prisons that don't actually exist, they are cardboard prisons, imaginary prisons. and the sentencing review i think is a bit of a muddle as well. i think the prime minister is slightly confused about what the law is. most people who commit serious and violent crimes, when they are released will be supervised in the community so they will still be in a sense in bondage to the criminal justice system. we want when people have served a large prison sentence, we wa nt have served a large prison sentence, we want them eased back into the community with support and help, we wa nt to community with support and help, we want to know where they are, where they live and that they get support
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and help. if you just extend to sentences, it means people will not get that kind of help and that will put the public in more danger. i think the prime minister is a little muddled. is he in tune with public opinion? he says we have all seen exa m ples of opinion? he says we have all seen examples of rapists and murderers let out too soon or people offending again as soon as they are released. well, the trouble is that people are very complicated and you cannot a lwa ys very complicated and you cannot always predict what they're going to do. when people are given day release from prison, for example, overwhelmingly it helps them to find somewhere to live, and something to do all day, and a job. and that's a good thing. now, we cannot ever guarantee that no one is ever going to commit another crime. that's just not possible. we could look up... sorry to interrupt, but obviously, it's unpredictable how people will act, but the figures are predictable
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because they have remained unchanged, more than 40%, just under 50% of prisoners will reoffend within a year and if you look at people serving a sentence less than a year, it's 60%, it's not acceptable. well, one part of the prison system works very well, one place has a reoffending rate of 15%, what is different without prison to the others which are really failing the others which are really failing the public, failing staff, failing victims unveiling the taxpayer? we know that short prison sentences don't work. the government's own research shows that a community sentence is much better at turning lives around. there is a real life out there. we can learn from real life and we can do things properly. u nfortu nately, life and we can do things properly. unfortunately, i think that the gimmicks coming out of number ten are not based on real life, they are based on imaginary phantoms, which will actually put people at risk much more and i think it's very
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dangerous. we are seeing pictures of the round table meeting that has been held at downing street this morning, borisjohnsonjoined been held at downing street this morning, boris johnson joined by leaders from the police probation and prison sectors. you mentioned the example of grindon, which has a reoffending rate of 12%, what are they doing differently? it deals with some of the most difficult men in the country who have sick committed serious sometimes sexual offences. it is a democratic therapeutic community, so people have a chance to take responsibility for their lives, take decisions and it gives them therapy. it does work, it gives them therapy. it does work, it has been working for decades but it has been working for decades but it has been working for decades but it has not been replicated in other prisons. let's look at what works, and deal with real life. prisons. let's look at what works, and dealwith real life. so prisons. let's look at what works, and deal with real life. so the costs of that are presumably, i don't know if you know the cost per head of treating, having inmates there, at other prisons the average
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is £37,000 per prisoner per year. it's an expensive business. boris johnson has said about £85 million over two years for the cps, in order to roll out expanding the prison service which is what he is talking about. but also doing it in a way that would stop reoffending rates. do you envisage the money being there? no, it's not possible. not only is the capital expenditure billions in order to build new prisons, it's tying us into revenue expenditure, that's the cost the staff of running prisons for decades and possibly centuries. the money is not there. it's nonsense to pretend it is. we can make prisons work for the few who need to be there, but we need to invest in community sentences and sort that out and i am pleased that the government has said they are going to end the disastrous privatisation and split in the probation service which has created
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more crime and more victims. that's being sorted out, that's good. but we should not be building more prisons because they create crime, they don't solve it. thank you very much forjoining us. the family of the 15—year—old school girl with special needs who's gone missing in malaysia, have offered a reward of around £10,000, or 50—thousand malaysian ringgit, to find her. hundreds of people are looking for nora quoirin and malaysian police have opened a hotline for information. nora‘s family issued a new statement saying: "our hearts are breaking.‘ our correspondent howard johnson sent this update from the scene this morning. i‘m standing outside the resort where she went missing eight days ago. we‘re hearing from the lucie blackman trust, the charity are working alongside the family, they were set up to help british nationals in crisis abroad. they‘re telling us that the family are considering offering a cash appeal for any information, a cash reward, rather, for any information that can lead to the discovery of their daughter. now, we do know that the family have raised a lot of money on some
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crowdfunding appeal websites, they‘ve currently got more than £100,000, has been donated to them by concerned members of the public. today search and rescue teams are continuing to fan out around four square kilometre area. at the moment, they are 350 strong, that‘s the largest number of personnel that have been deployed on this search and rescue effort since this search began more than a week ago. the family obviously very concerned, the police are continuing to treat this as a missing persons case. the family would also like to explore the angle that she could have been abducted. the police say they are not ruling that outjust yet. the headlines on bbc news. all flights in and out of hong kong are cancelled for the rest of the day as thousands of anti—government protesters occupy the airport. of anti—government protesters the prime minister hosts a roundtable meeting at number 10 to discuss sentencing policy for the most dangerous offenders. drug crime increases in many small towns and villages
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despite falling in city centres. sport now, here‘s gavin ramjaun. in the next hour england name their 31—man squad for the rugby world cup, and head coach eddiejones will have some big decisions to make after an impressive win over wales yesterday. england got the perfect start at twickenham with billy vunipola crossing the line inside the first 4 minutes of the match. wales, who were unbeaten in their last 14 matches, would have gone to number one in the world with a win, but they were comfortably beaten 33—19. luke cowan—dickie with england‘s last try. we had a good team out there today. a good mix of some young guys, some quys a good mix of some young guys, some guys that have not played for a while, and i knew the attitude would be right, and wales had a lot of expectation to cope with and whilst we didn‘t speak about that because we didn‘t speak about that because
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we purposely have not spoken about the opposition, we felt that would weigh them down. andy murray makes his long—awaited return to singles action later today. he thought his career may be over eight months ago, but a second hip operation has been a success. he‘s playing without pain, and has enjoyed some sucess on the doubles circuit. first up is the frenchman richard gasquet. sometimes the thing that is difficult was tennis in comparison to other sports, when you come back from an injury, if you look at football or basketball, you don‘t play 90 minutes straightaway. you might come into football and play 15 or 20 minutes of the match and then 30 minutes and then 60 minutes. in tennis, once you step back on the court, you have to be ready to compete and play three sets. britain‘s jamie chadwick says she hopes to inspire more women to get into motorsport after winning the first ever w series — motorsport‘s all—female championship. the 21—year—old finished fourth in the final race of the season at brands hatch,
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enough for her to secure the title. we really should be seeing, i think, racing at the top level. sadly there arejust racing at the top level. sadly there are just not enough of us out there racing. as numbers games go, the odds aren‘t really stacked in our favour. i think hopefully, now with the w series and more initiatives like that around, we can start to see more girls getting involved in the sport and if they go through to the sport and if they go through to the top, maybe we can see some of us are lining up on the f1 grid one day. more after the 1pm news. today is the so—called ‘glorious twelfth‘, the day that the four—month grouse shooting season begins. but as shooters head to moors in scotland and northern england, labour is calling for a review of the activity, saying it damages important natural habitats. the party says there are viable alternatives, like simulated shooting. let‘s talk about this more, and i‘m joined by martin harper,
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director of conservation at the rspb. and duncan thomas, who‘s the regional director of the british association of shooting and conservation north. thank you forjoining us. do you festival martin, tell us more about grouse shooting. people —— we will come to you first of all martin. that is meant to be directed at duncan, i think? sorry, that is meant to be directed at duncan, ithink? sorry, i did mean to direct it at duncan! of course, thank you, martin. today is the glorious 12th, the start of the grouse shooting season. superb day, loads of people out on the moors. young and old, male and female, who will have a fantastic day out in the open air, kids away from their ipad and they will be harvesting a sustainable surplus of red grouse which are going to be celebrated in the restaurants and pubs of the north of england to scotland over
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the next few days. it's a cracking day, the start of the shooting season. how do you see it, martin? clearly i see it a bit differently. one of the reasons why we were really pleased that labour has decided to do a review on grouse shooting is because grouse shooting has become more and more intensive. the management practices are causing real environ mental problems, ranging from illegal killing of birds of prey to banning of peat which is releasing climate dioxide —— dioxide into the climate, and it is destroying habitats. our view is clear, in orderfor shooting to have a future, we believe it needs to be regulated to ensure that the environment in the hills is improved and we call upon both government and the shooting industry to clear up their act. your response to those claims of illegal killing of birds
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of prey and destruction of the heather? we would be interested to see that, nothing to hide at all. in terms of illegal activity, there is a very small number of birds that are taken illegally and we are absolutely clear on that, in that we will stamp out that from our own community. there is a zero tolerance for any illegal activity. in terms of the contribution, the grouse moors are providing nesting habitats for a vast range of species, curlew, lapwing etc, and the gamekeepers are doing a cracking job up there. in terms of the burning of the peat, that creates a good regeneration of the moor, and creating fire breaks. we have all seen the horrendous scenes, for example, at saddleworth this year, where we have seen great swathes of the uplands taken out by wildfire. many of them illegally
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started. small, controlled burns prevent wildfires spreading, and they also create this incredibly mosaic habitat for the vast range of many species. i'm sure martin would appreciate the value of grouse moor management. do you, martin? one of the reasons why it‘s important to have a review is we can have all of these views onto the table and people can objectively look at which version of the truth you believe. i have a different version of the truth than duncan. particularly i am concerned about the fact that we have an industry which i think needs to evolve massively if it‘s going to respond appropriately to the climate and ecological emergency. in any business is dependent on environmental harm, it has to change its business model, that applies to grassroot income housing, agriculture, and anything in the economy. the review will flush out these issues, and we want these uplands teeming with wildlife, with birds of prey flying free from harm
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so people can enjoy the hills for generations. you say you want to review, martin, but there is already a review under way in scotland, being led by professor alan were and expected to report soon. why do you think there needs to be another review? two separate countries and to separate regulatory systems, it isa to separate regulatory systems, it is a devolved issue. the rspb has long called for a licensing for grouse shooting but others are calling for a ban. the likes of duncan are looking for self—regulation in the status quo, we think reform is necessary. and if what it takes in order to break the logjam to have a review so that the way can be decided, so be it. we hope for a good outcome in scotland, and we have not got such a good focus in england which we think is necessary. if there were to be changes, we are a long way off even having a review south of the border,
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but at this stage there is the pressure for it. if a review were to recommend ultimately licensing or a ban, what do you think the impact would be? i think we have to be very careful what people may wish for. grouse shooting and the communities that it supports provides real lifelines of socio economic benefit, in isolated rural communities. if it wasn't for grouse shooting and the whole lot of industries that it supports, these places would be quite bleak areas. i could take you tomorrow to schools which kept open by gamekeepers's children, i could ta ke by gamekeepers's children, i could take you to a more today and take you to an incredible day where a sustainable harvest of grass are taken. and many moors have not shot this year or last year because they have not got the sustainable amounts. they are still paid vast
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amounts. they are still paid vast amount of money into those areas to enhance the habitat. regardless of the fact that they have not been able to shoot. any review of grouse shooting i have no doubt, we have no doubt nothing to fear. we think it will flush out quality information regarding the benefits of it, we have nothing to hide. thank you very much, both of you. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with matt. a bit more sunshine around for quite a few over the weekend, —— than the weekend, but the downpours will continue for some people. some rumbles of thunder in some areas. for it in scotland and northern england, more bright compared to the
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weekend. it is a cool day with temperatures in the teens, cool night north—west england and midlands, wales focusing the continued showers which could cause some surface water issues. cool night with temperatures down into single figures. we haven‘t seen that for some time. early showers tomorrow across parts of north—west england, the midlands and east anglia, a few elsewhere in northern england and particularly for scotland. it will be one of the drier days of the week for tuesday, get out and enjoy the sunshine and what form it does provide before wednesday comes around, another area of low pressure comes in and more wet and windy weather for england and wales.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines: all flights in and out of hong kong are cancelled for the rest of the day as thousands of anti—government protesters occupy the airport.
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this is the scene at hong kong international airport, both levels are completely full. black clad pro—democracy demonstrators have occupied every inch of this terminal. drug crime increases in many small towns and villages — despite falling in city centres. another rival gang or someone from manchester or something like that tried coming to town, and muscling in on the business, then you‘re going to start getting sort of fighting between the two gangs. the prime minister hosts a roundtable meeting at number 10 to discuss prison sentencing policy for the most dangerous offenders. the family of a british schoolgirl missing in malaysia offer a 10,000 pound reward for information leading to her return. and women going through the menopause face a national shortage of hormone replacement therapy. the green party mp, caroline lucas
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is calling on 10 cross—party female politicians to join her in forming an "emergency cabinet" to try to stop a no—deal brexit. she said the all—women cabinet could "bring a different perspective", and that the aim would be to force a no—confidence vote in prime minister borisjohnson and form a "national unity government". i‘m talking about my own experience and i appreciate it‘s a generalisation, but in my experience i‘ve found that women have generally been more able to put aside tribal concerns to build trust more quickly and there are times in history where we‘ve seen that happen. for example, there‘s been two women there who were instrumental in bringing around the peace process. in the northern ireland troubles. if you look at the climate change talks, two women, segolene royal and christiana figueres who were instrumental in breaking the logjam at the paris climate talks. now, i‘m not saying that all women are automatically more able to do this any more than i‘m saying that all men are not but i am saying
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that at a time of crisis, i think it‘s worth exploring whether we could develop a different kind of dynamic, if you like, by getting women in the role. and i‘ve approached women, basically the women who are in the most senior positions in their political parties across westminster to see if at this time of emergency we can bring some fresh thinking. the political row and conspiracy theories continue after the death of the multimillionaire sex offender jeffrey epstein. he was found in his prison cell in new york over the weekend, apparently having taken his own life, while awaiting trial. he‘d been accused of child sex trafficking. cbs news‘ laura podesta told me the latest. the fbi and department ofjustice are continuing to investigate the death ofjeffrey epstein, the millionaire financier was found dead in his jail cell on saturday. though an autopsy has been completed on his body, new york city‘s medical examiner says she is withholding the findings pending additional information. this as the associated press reports
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that understaffing at the jail where the financier was found dead saturday is a big problem. the metropolitan correctional centre in manhattan is so short—staffed that correctional officers are being offered a $10,000 bonus to transfer to there from other federal lock—ups. it should also be noted that epstein‘s apparent suicide ends the criminal case, however prosecutors say they will keep investigating the alleged sex trafficking operation. us attorneyjeffrey berman said in a statement over the weekend the indictment against epstein includes a conspiracy charge which may suggest other people could face charges in the future. to remind you, president trump retweeted a video of someone speculating if epstein had actually died by suicide given he may have had information on bill clinton. that has been retweeted 66,000 times and viewed 4 million times
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so there is a significant reaction to that. there is also no evidence to support that conspiracy that the president is supposedly promoting. some are calling what mr trump did by retweeting it reckless and dangerous and there is now evidence that russian bots are pushing this conspiracy online to further divide americans. women going through the menopause are currently facing a national shortage of hormone replacement therapy. many forms of hrt are currently out of stock in some pharmacies. the department for health and social care have said it is aware of the ongoing supply issues, and alternative hrt products are available. with me in the studio is the gp — dr rosemary leonard. also i‘m joined on the phone by louise who‘s from liverpool. she had a hysterectomy led to an early menopause, and she says it has been more and more difficult to get an hrt prescription. thank you both forjoining us. how widespread are these shortages?
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there are quite widespread, it started last year with some of the most common patches becoming unavailable. in that case it was due to equality issue with the adhesive that keeps the patch attached to the skin but now there has been a knock—on demand with other types of patches. a lot of the pills also. we do not know why, the manufacturer is not saying, it is saying it is a supply issue, we do not know why there is this problem. that is really strange. has anything like this happened before? there have been increasing numbers of drugs becoming unavailable and supply issues. we had some information earlier this year that some of the most common oral contraceptive pills we re most common oral contraceptive pills were going to be unavailable so there does seem to be an issue with there does seem to be an issue with the production of oestrogen and progesterone. let's talk to louise. i know you are a hrt user, are you struggling to get hold of supplies?
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i started to have some difficulties getting hold of patches last year but it was usuallyjust a case of the pharmacist saying we can get them in tomorrow. it was almost as if they were not used to having them on the shelves. recently, my most re ce nt on the shelves. recently, my most recent prescription, i went in they looked quite embarrassed and said i'm afraid we do not have any at all and i'm afraid we do not know when we are going to get any in. i asked why and they said, it could be a manufacturing problem and they gave me little note and said go and try other chemists. if you cannot find anything you will have to go back to yourgp and ask anything you will have to go back to your gp and ask for an alternative. in about two weeks they contacted me and said they have got some in, if you want to come in quickly and get them, was saying before they go again. were you worried about it? very worried, and i know a number of my friends of all sorts of different
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ages, i have a friend going through very early menopause in her 305 and lots of other women going through menopause, and it would literally cau5e menopause, and it would literally cause me and them so much extra anxiety every felt we couldn't get the hrt. what difference has it made to you? for me personally it means i can go and do myjob. and so many level5, can go and do myjob. and so many levels, increased anxiety, exhaustion, lack of sleep, hrt take5 the edge of all of these things for me. but lack of sleep and brain fog are the main things which it has had are the main things which it has had a positive impact on for me. the government said alternative hrt products are available, is it simple just to switch? no, one of the problems are women often have to try lots of different types of hrt until
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they find one that suits them. they need to take two sorts of hormones, oestrogen and progesterone and getting that balance right can be difficult. it is distressing for women who have tried five different types, found one that really suits them and then it is gone. there are some types still available, jailed for instance appears to be available without a problem. —— gel. women could also consider having a coil fitted which gives the progesterone where it is needed directly into the womb. it can make life easierfor a finding oestrogen they require. it is the combined products either in a patch or a pill that seem to have been affected. without knowing the reason for the shortage, there can be no idea as to how long this could go on for and it could lead to some people being tempted to stockpile supplies. is there evidence people
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are doing that? we are saying to people come in early, don‘t leave it until the last minute when it is about to run out. on the british menopause society website they have a list of the products that are currently unavailable. also rather sadly, there is a list of when they are expecting other products to go unavailable because of the knock—on effect. you can look there and see if your product is affected and if so, go and see your gp and sort out a suitable alternative. louise, what are you doing? are you doing anything to try and protect future supplies, have you been stockpiling? not personally, no, partly because i feel bad about doing that personally. if i am stockpiling it means somebody else also isn't getting it. but i would just like to say the patch which i use is actually just say the patch which i use is actuallyjust an say the patch which i use is actually just an oestrogen say the patch which i use is actuallyjust an oestrogen only patch and those issues of supply are
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affecting the oestrogen only patches, and if you do not have a womb for whatever reasons, it is only oestrogen that he would be needing to take rather than progesterone as well. that coil option would not help. but if you do, good, go for it. it is good to talk to you both and do stay in touch. we will see what happens and if you are watching at home and affected, to get in touch with us because it may well be a story we will continue to cover. the number of gamblers complaining about british betting companies has increased almost fifty—fold in the past five years. new figures obtained from the gambling commission by the bbc, show that there were a record 8,000 complaints in the last year. the rise in complaints follows a big increase in gambling over the past decade, as bronagh munro reports. the betting business is booming, and it‘s punters who are paying the price. the amount they‘re losing
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to the gambling companies has almost doubled in a decade. last year, it was £14.5 billion. the biggest rise has been in online gambling. amanda was in herfifties when she started gambling on a site called jackpotjoy. she doesn‘t want to be identified, but she lost £633,000 before being made bankrupt. it‘s horrific, what i‘ve done to myself, really. everything that i‘d worked for, everything that my children were...looked up to me. now i‘ve blown their inheritance, as such. jackpotjoy said it had frequent contact with amanda and encouraged her to use responsible gambling tools, but figures obtained by panorama suggest the industry has a lot of unhappy customers. they show there were 8,266 complaints last year compared
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tojust169 in 2013. the gambling commission says it‘s a complicated picture. we are pushing the industry to know its customers and part of this is actually possibly a good sign because it‘s suggesting that consumers are demanding more of gambling operators. major betting companies have already agreed to provide £60 million a year to help problem gamblers. bronagh munro, bbc news. and "bbc panorama: addicted to gambling" can be watched tonight at 8.30pm on bbc one and on the bbc iplayer afterwards. at least 44 people have been killed by raging floods in eastern china. floods have killed almost 150 people in southern india. nearly half the deaths were in the southern state of kerala, where continuing heavy rain and landslides forced more than 100—thousand people to take
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shelter in relief camps. ramzan karmali reports. the monsoon season has hit india hard, again. this year‘s heavy rainfall, like so many before, has caused death and destruction. vast areas in the south and west of the country have found themselves submerged by water. more than 165,000 have been evacuated from kerala, and scores have died. officials have admitted that there are places where monsoon rains have triggered mudslides which they cannot reach. they urge those cut off to try to seek shelter on higher ground. the monsoon season has hit india hard, again. the ones fortunate to have been rescued could not believe the havoc that has been caused. translation: it has been at least five to six days. everybody is stuck there. animals are all stuck there. people are facing lots of problems. water has come from all directions and entered all the houses. officials believe that at least 50 have died in this landslide in one district in kerala alone. last year, over 200 people were killed in kerala,
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and over 5 million infected in one of the worst floods in 100 years. emergency relief camps have been set up and food is being prepared for the army to airlift to stranded villages. but with more rain predicted in the coming days, any chance of a quick recovery and return to normality look bleak. at least 44 people have been killed by raging floods in eastern china. super typhoon lekima made landfall in zhejiang province at the weekend, and torrential downpours with winds of up to 120 miles an hour caused a landslide that blocked a river. the barrier lake burst and flooded waters swept people away. more than a million people have been moved out of their homes, and a total of five million people have been affected, according to local authorities.
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a british explorer has claimed to be the first person to complete a 4,000—mile expedition on foot along the length of china‘s yangtze river. ash dykes from north wales, finished the year—long expedition on monday. during the course of his journey he said he experienced altitudes of ober 17,000 feet, and temperatures as low as minus 20c. and i‘m very happy to say ash joins us now from shanghai. that sounds like miserable conditions, what was it like? yes, it was high altitude, —20 and harsh weather. snow blizzards, landslides, floods, typhoon lekima as you mentioned. it is finally over. the challenge is below, what was the moments that stand out in terms of the biggest challenges? the challenge was probably getting
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access to the source of the river and finding it. we had different film crews, it took as a long time to get there and then for the first couple of months, the 16 different people joined couple of months, the 16 different peoplejoined me, ten were couple of months, the 16 different people joined me, ten were evacuated due to altitude sickness, injury or fear of wildlife so many challenges. did you ever feel your safety was at risk? yeah, there were times for sure that i was like, i need to assess my situation and work out how to get myself any more comfortable and safer environment. fortunately eve ryo ne and safer environment. fortunately everyone made it back home safe and sound who joined me and that is the main thing. we're looking at some pictures you have sent through and it looks stunning. we have been talking about the what about the highs? what were the best bets? what
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surprised me about china is the sheer diversity. it has a little bit of every country in one. the locals have been majorly hospitable, incredibly welcoming and warming. they have been the highlight but also raising awareness about the environment with different organisations like wwf and the british consul in general. it has been amazing to share the journey on my instagram. it has made it very interactive, it has been amazing to share the journey with people. what do you do after you finish something like that when you have just come back from a holiday and normal life resumes, it is always a bit of a come—down. what is next? resumes, it is always a bit of a come-down. what is next? that is it but we are very busy. i have and asia wide theatre tour, we are
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creating a documentary, yeah, i am busy. i would get time to reflect really but i will hold all of the experiences in my mind and my heart for sure. thank you forjoining us. but first the headlines on bbc news... all flights in and out of hong kong are cancelled for the rest of the day as thousands of anti—government protesters occupy the airport. drug crime increases in many small towns and villages — despite falling in city centres. the prime minister hosts a roundtable meeting at number 10 to discuss prison sentencing policy for the most dangerous offenders. a house in watford is inspiring families, local authorities and care home staff across the country to change their homes to help people with dementia. scientific research shows that by adjusting things like carpet and paint colours, more people could live independently for longer and therefore save families and local authorities money in care fees.
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laura foster reports. it may look like any other show home, but everything in this two—bedroom house has been deliberately chosen to help people with dementia. those windows can automatically open. steve is visiting with his wifejenny. his dementia means he forgets the meaning of words. can you tell us about when you first met? don't ask me! i would ask him to perhaps pop to a shop for me to buy some tomatoes and cucumbers, and he didn‘t know what to do, and he didn‘t know what i was talking about. there are lots of incidents like that. there are many types of dementia, and people experience symptoms in many different ways. this house looks at the big structural changes you can make, but it also looks at the smaller, more affordable things that can be done to help the ones you love. things like having a lighter carpet, as dark ones can be seen as holes in the ground.
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plug points are higher up, so you can‘t forget where they are. the paints help people with their perception. windows automatically open when it gets too hot, and taps are coloured in case people forget what hot and cold labels mean. and pictures of familiar faces and places help remind people of who they are. if people have to go into a care home, it can be £1,500 to £3,000 a month, maybe £30,000 to £40,000 a year. it is important to maintain people in their homes but in a relaxed atmosphere, and not to create a sort of hospitalised, institutionalised environment. this house is visited by families, care home owners and council workers from across the country. no one lives here, as it‘s still being used for research. but it‘s hoped that more and more homes in the future will look a bit like this, all to help cope with the problem that is becoming more and more prevalent around the world.
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he may have seen the story going viral online. it‘s the 11—year—old liverpool fan louis fowler who in his efforts to get the attention of his hero mo salah — ran into a lampost and injured his nose. earlier, victoria derbyshire spoke to 11—year—old louis, his 10—year—old brother isaac and their step—dad, joe cooper. she started by asking louis whether it was all worth to meet his idol mo salah. the hospital said i might have to get it reset in a couple of weeks. oh really? yeah. it looks all right. you want it reset or are you happy with it? um, i don‘t know but whatever happens i think it was worth meeting mo salah. was it? yes. did it knock you out when you hit the lamp post? briefly. were you there, isaac? i was watching it. i was behind him. so what happened, describe it? i saw him fall over on the lamp post and i ran over to mo salah's car to tell him what had happened, when i figured out he couldn't stand up i was dead scared so mo salah
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came back around the corner a couple of minutes later and then he came to louis and was like, "why was you was running like that, you could have really hurt yourself dead bad." louis, from your point of view... was this at the liverpool training ground? you see mo salah coming out in his car. take the story on. he comes out of his car and sometimes they stop when you run after them so i ran with my brother. in my excitement i wasn‘t focusing on what was in front of me, i was looking to the left where the car was and i ran into a lamp post. i think mo salah felt bad and he pulled over. i think he was worried about me then my brother and someone else that i met, a friend called jose, they both told him that i could have injured
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myself and i‘m hurt on the floor so thenjose carried me back to my house. we called an ambulance and we were not expecting mo salah at all. does he knock on the door or what? he came driving in his car to our close and we walked out of our garden and he checked i was ok, he was really worried about me and we got pictures, it was great but also not the best because of my nose. wow. what do you think of mo salah? what he drive? a bentley. what do you think of the fact that he came back, got out of his car, checked on you and took pictures? i think that is really kindhearted of him. i love him very much because he is amazing. do you love him isaac? yeah. do you love him joe? he is a top guy to be fair.
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i was so shocked he came back, it might not be a big deal to some people who don't understand with these football players. they have cameras watching him, and security, all of a sudden he has disappeared, they were probably panicking. he was really caring and compassionate towards the boys, he made their days. a big thank you to him. and everyone at liverpool, they are so great with the kids when they go and wait outside which is most days. dolphins are intelligent ceatu res, and often full of surprises — so today we give you — dolphins juggling jellyfish. this incredible footage shows a dolphin ‘juggling‘ a jellyfish as it swims through a harbour. the footage, which comes from sonderborg harbour, denmark, was captured by two friends while out sailing. in the video, the jellyfish can be seen flying in mid—air
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as the dolphin dips its head back down in order to catch it under the water. i‘m not sure if it isjuggling but throwing it up and down. now just before we go to the weather — take a look at this — these pictures were taken in australia — and they show kangaroos in the snow! they were filmed in goulburn in new south wales. not something you see every day. let‘s go back to hong kong and situation there because there protests in the airport by demonstrators angry at the controversial new extradition laws that were introduced in hong kong more than two months ago and have led to protests ever since, continue and it has led to a shutdown effectively of the airport. no flights in and out of hong kong international airport, one of the
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worlds busiest airports, for the rest of the day at least. these are pictures from outside the airport. i am not entirely sure whether that is protesters leaving the airport. certainly the pictures we have had it throughout the morning have shown the protesters not budging. you can see is still massed inside the airport as they caused a lot of difficulties on the question is, what might the authorities do now to try and disperse those testers? the latest coming up on the one o‘clock news with simon. for now ever say goodbye and handy to a update. —— and utility weather update. i have some wet weather plans on standby just in case, i have some wet weather plans on standbyjust in case, it will be one of those weeks. there will be sunshine at times to enjoy but overall, fairly cool and there will be further rain. the heaviest rain is to assist south—east corner, with
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strums across the english channel. elsewhere, one or two showers dotted around, west of scotland and northern ireland could have a rumble of thunder but a lot of dry weather in between for the east of scotland and parts of northern england where we saw huge amounts of rain for the weekend. it is a lot brighter and much drier. temperatures are down on where they have been and though it than they should be for the stage in the year, most places staying in the teams. into tonight the show is clear but parts of north—west england, north—west midlands and wales have showers that could cause problems for tomorrow night. a cool night for all. a couple of showers to begin with through parts of north england and east anglia, a couple of showers in west scotland but to stay overall will be one of the drier and brighter days of the week with the best amount of sunshine. that will temper the fact that for most,
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temperatures are in the teams. cloud increases towards the south—west and wales by the end of the day because of another approaching weather system, a developing area of low pressure. this is the day to take out the wet weather plans if you are in parts of england and wales. gusty winds to go with it. rain across the northern half of scotland but some of the dry spots could be southern scotla nd of the dry spots could be southern scotland and northern england, the far north of england on wednesday. again, temperatures in the teens. upping those temperatures into thursday, predominantly dry weather with a couple of showers around. patchy rain moves in from the north and that is ahead of a weekend forecast because if you do have plans, look away now. another deepening area of low pressure set to come in. the position of rain open to change but wet and windy
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weather is certainly possible.
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all flights at hong kong international airport, one of the busiest in the world, are cancelled, as pro—democracy protests spread. as cathay pacific warns its staff they could be fired if they "support or participate in illegal protests" in the former british colony, thousands of others are told to leave the airport. word came out that the police were going to conduct mass arrests, and so, just like that, in their thousands, they‘re leaving. we‘ll have the latest from our correspondent in hong kong. also this lunchtime... borisjohnson announces a review of sentencing policy for violent and sexual offenders, as speculation increases he‘s planning a general election. a bbc investigation finds drugs crime in inner cities is down, but at the expense of rural communities, where figures are going up. the parents of missing british teenager nora quoirin offer

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