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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 2, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two: back me — or i'll sack you. borisjohnson‘s warning to conservative rebels over brexit they are almost goading people into voting against the government because i think thier strategy, to be honest, is to lose this week and then seek a general election. we expect conservative mps to support the prime minister and the conservative agenda and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and hand it to the leader of the opposition. labour leaderjeremy corbyn says he wants a general election, and that his party will do everything it can to stop a no—deal brexit.
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it is the people, not an unelected prime minister, who should determine our country's future. an election is the democratic way forward. it's shaping up to be another dramatic week in westminster, send in your questions on brexit and we'll try and answer them atjust after 2.30. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began — hurricane dorian smashes in with winds of up to 180 miles an hour, causing huge damage and severe flooding. coming up on afternoon live all the sport: changes within the england camp, ahead of the crucial 4th ashes test against australia. and, the former premier league star hitting out against racism in football. the weather making news, susan, and that hurricane is not moving. that's just about the worst thing a major hurricane can do. we will look at why that's happening and how it can have knock—on effects of how we
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forecast where it goes next. i will see you in half an hour. thanks, susan. also coming up — as commercial whaling gets undeway once again injapan — younger generations say they want to watch whales — not eat them. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. there's mounting speculation that boris johnson could be about to announce plans for a snap election, with confirmation in the last hour that ministers have been called to a cabinet meeting later this afternoon. the bbc understands "live discussions" are going on in number 10 about asking parliament to approve an election — possibly as soon as this wednesday. the prime minister is under pressure, after rebel conservative mps braced for a showdown with the government over brexit. the formerjustice secretary david gauke today accused boris johnson of taking
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the tories "in the direction of the brexit party", after government plans emerged to expel any conservative mps who vote this week to block a no—deal brexit. for labour, jeremy corbyn called for action to stop no—deal, and for a general election. with the latest from westminster, here's our political correspondent ben wright. good morning, how lovely to see you on this sunny morning. behind the bonhomie, cabinet ministers are threatening a purge of tory mps who join opposition efforts to block a no—deal brexit in the commons tomorrow. so, will that stop the tory rebels? what rebels? are there rebels? there certainly are, including conservative mps who sat in cabinet until borisjohnson took over. it seems to me like they are almost goading people into voting against the government, because i think their strategy, to be honest, is to lose this week and then seek a general election, having removed those of us who are not against brexit, not against leaving the european union, but believe we should do so with a deal.
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there are just days before parliament is suspended for mps to try to pass a law that will aim to stop borisjohnson taking the uk out of the eu without a deal. number 10 has warned conservative mps they will be kicked out of the party if they join that effort. but rebel resolve seems strong. borisjohnson will find if he purges moderate, sensible conservatives, conservatives like me who are willing to leave with a deal, who voted for it three times, unlike him, he will pay a penalty, i think, at the ballot box. westminster is reassembling for a seismic week, a showdown between the government and parliament that could determine how or even if brexit happens at the end of next month. and this morning, cabinet ministers said it was right to demand loyalty from conservative mps. what the prime minister quite understandably wants to do is to ensure he delivers on his promise to britain to leave the european union on the 31st
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of october with a deal. and what we want to see is all conservative mps rallying behind him this week, making sure he has the best opportunity to deliver on that commitment. but complaints of hypocrisy add to the tension here. earlier this year, several tory mps now in the cabinet defied the party whip and voted against theresa may's brexit deal. the numbers could be very tight in tomorrow's vote, and if the prime minister carries out his threat to withdraw the whip from rebel tory mps, this week he would immediately wipe out his minuscule commons majority of one. and that makes an autumn general election even more likely. sources have told the bbc there is a live discussion under way in government about possibly asking mps to approve an election as early as this week, if the law is changed to force a brexit delay. but that would need labour to vote in favour of having an election,
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and at the momentjeremy corbyn‘s focus seems to be on blocking a no—deal brexit. we must come together to stop no—deal. this week could be our last chance. we are working with other parties to do everything necessary to pull our country back from the brink. then we need a general election. on today, the former labour prime minister tony blair warned jeremy corbyn not to fall into the elephant trap of agreeing to an election before brexit was resolved. there was another new arrival in downing street this morning, boris johnson has a loyal new friend. but his willingness to take britain out of the eu without a deal is fracturing the tory party and pitting the government against mps. let's discuss this further with vicki young who's at westminster this afternoon. new need to brace yourself but what for? anything could happen, simon.
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what's happening here is the rebel mps on the conservative side feel they do have the numbers, the first step to change the law to force a borisjohnson or try step to change the law to force a boris johnson or try to force step to change the law to force a borisjohnson or try to force him, to ask for a delay to brexit if he does not have a deal in place. it looks like they've got the numbers. i spoke to one earlier and they said ifi i spoke to one earlier and they said if i thought he was serious about getting a deal and seriously negotiating, i would getting a deal and seriously negotiating, iwould not getting a deal and seriously negotiating, i would not do this but he said he was not convinced that was the case. maybe at the beginning but not anymore. it looks maybe early as tomorrow the law could be changed. they used a similar strategy with theresa may who then went to the eu and got the extension to article 50 and eli brexit but borisjohnson is pretty much saying i will not do that. he feels he cannot do that, given everything you said about delivering brexit on october the 31st. he is threatening tory mps to say we will treat this
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asa tory mps to say we will treat this as a confidence vote tomorrow or the next day and if you cannot back the government then you will have the whip taken away and you are no longer a member of the parliamentary party and you cannot stand in any general election. that's quite a threat and this is what the chairman of the party had to say about it. what the prime minister has made clear in the whips have made clear, and this is the standard relationship mps have with their party of government, we expect them to support the conservative prime ministerand to support the conservative prime minister and the conservative agenda. and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and hand it to the leader of the opposition. the other thing that has emerged this morning as a government sources saying there is live discussions going on about the possibility of trying to call a general election if mps succeed in changing the law. of course, the law changed a few years
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ago so not as course, the law changed a few years ago so not as easy course, the law changed a few years ago so not as easy as it used to be where prime ministers could call an election, it cannot happen that easily anymore. are ways it could be done but it sounds as if that's been discussed and cabinet ministers will be meeting later on this afternoon and we will have to see what emerges after that. there are lots of things on twitter and reaction to this, one of which is the thought that call a snap election may wait for october the 17th, the date been mentioned, the day the eu meeting is held, he could change that dates and this would be a trap that ensures there is a no—deal brexit. that's because of the way that boris johnson has to go about getting an election. he cannot just johnson has to go about getting an election. he cannotjust call one, he has to have two thirds of mps backing it. that means he needs labour mps. jeremy corbyn, who spent the last year or longer saying we need an election, will he vote for that or will he see it as a trap and
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not vote for it? very hard for a labour not to back a general election given everything they've said over the past few years. they wa nt to said over the past few years. they want to be in government, in any normal circumstances they would be expected to back that. there is another way boris johnson expected to back that. there is another way borisjohnson could go about this. you could even bring in about this. you could even bring in a new bill that says, forget the fixed term parliament act, the election will be on this date. that would have to get through the house of lords, easier than the house of commons, so it's not that easy for him to get a general election and i think he is putting labour in a difficult position because they are not agreed on this. many labour mps say the priority is about stopping no deal and not an election. so it will not be easy but you can see from the strategy that downing street have adopted ever since boris johnson became prime minister, they are constantly trying to wrong—foot the opposition and the opposition a
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meaning also some of their own mps and trying to keep them guessing by producing new elements, suddenly talking about a general election, talking about a general election, talking about a general election, talking about the selection of mps, all to keep them on their toes and keep them guessing. how it ends up, we may no more by the end of today, or tomorrow or the end of the week. how is this all being seen in brussels? our correspondent, adam fleming, is there. aren't they watching what's going on here with irritation, confusion, what? they try not to do emotions, these eu types, and they tried to stick to the facts which i think is why they are waiting for a settled position to emerge about what they will be dealing with. they thought they would be dealing with was a boris johnson's negotiator, a senior civil servant, david frost, coming out on wednesday and possibly friday to talk about what they have been speaking about for a few weeks,
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alternatives to the backstop. they are still waiting here for the uk to table some concrete proposals about how they feel they could get around this stalemate about the backstop. that's what they've been crying out for. i imagine if we are seeing an election being called today or this week, that process will go out the window and people here will switch their attention to dealing with that. in the short term, the first reaction will be does this mean an extension to the article 50 process? it's already been extended twice, the uk could request another extension and it would have to be approved by the 27 eu leaders, probably at a summit. in the longer term they would have their eye on the potential permutations of a new government. i had lunch with somebody last week and that's what we did and it speculated about what flavour of government you could end up flavour of government you could end up with if there was an election and what it would mean for a negotiating process or getting a deal through parliament. from the eu side, they
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try to keep out of it, the trite not to have a view but their dream scenario would be a party with a big majority that could get a deal similarto majority that could get a deal similar to this one through west minister —— they try not to have a view. on the basis there would have to be a change to the backstop? if there was a party with that strength they would perhaps renegotiate that small pa rt would perhaps renegotiate that small part of the deal. asi part of the deal. as i was saying that i realised i was getting so far ahead of ourselves, i was hoping i could rewind back to the real world with my next answer and you give me an opportunity. the eu set out its position yesterday in quite a long article in the sunday telegraph and it was basically a defence of the backstop. he fought back against the idea that the eu backstop agreed with theresa may was somehow anti—democratic because it did not give the people of northern ireland a say if it ever came into force.
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michel barnier said the backstop had been quite a tough ask to get the eu to agree to when he proposed it to them when it emerged from negotiations. he said that was as flexible as the eu was prepared to be. the message from that being they are not prepared to be any more flexible so anything that's a bit more relaxed on the backstop permits more relaxed on the backstop permits more risks to the single market or is sketchy, they would accept that and also any alternative to the backstop would have to do precisely what the existing backstop does which is keep open the irish border and also be ready to go the second it was needed, be fully operational. he was really showing what a challenge the current government would have if they wanted to find an alternative to the backstop and also what any future government would be up what any future government would be up against because the cast of characters and the make—up of the government in westminster and the
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might change after a general election, the eu's red lines and interests it wants to protect on its side will not change. there was another message in michel barnier‘s pc yesterday when he said it's time to stop kicking the can down the road. that was aimed at the opponents of no—deal brexit who want an extension and he was saying to them and extension for what? his patients for extending and extending, hopefully something will happen, i think his patience for that has run out. i'm sorry to get ahead of ourselves but all we seem to do is speculate. was it a good once you had last week? it was very good. very sunny, i got a bit sunburnt. adam, thank you very much. we'll be answering your questions about what could happen this week — and over tht next few months in a bbc ask this.
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annita mcveigh will be joined by alex de ruyter from the centre for brexit studies — live from birmingham at 2:30. so please do get in touch with whatever questions you might have. the contact details are on your screen now. when i said over the next couple of months, that is nonsense, over the next couple of hours. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began has caused severe damage and flooding. hurricane dorian is pounding the low lying abaco islands and grand bahama with winds nearing 200 miles an hour. power and communications have been cut, and forecasters are also warning of a life—threatening storm surge of up to seven metres. dorian is expected to move close to the coast of florida tonight. richard galpin has the latest. these, the northern islands of the bahamas, have been feeling the full force of hurricane dorian. we need help.
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everything's down, everything's down. look, my roof is off my house. i've still got life. the damage to homes in this area, caused by winds of up to 200 mph, has been described as catastrophic. on top of this, a storm surge has left many houses and other buildings here underwater. as many as 13,000 houses could have been destroyed. there might no longer be any clean water readily availabl because of storm surges flooding wells. so we are really anticipating, as the storm passes, that might take time, as you said, that the humanitarian needs will be quite severe. and hurricane dorian is currently moving atjust one mile per hour, which means the islands will continue to be battered. this is probably the most sad and worst day of my life, to address the bahamian people. i just want to say that,
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as a physician, i've been trained to withstand many things. but never anything like this. hurricane experts who've been flying through the eye of the storm, collecting data, believe it will gradually track close to the coast of east florida. then, over the next few days, while weakening, it is expected to move along the coast towards south and north carolina. people here in florida are preparing for the worst. in some coastal areas, the authorities have ordered residents to move out, something the white house is also calling for. the effects will be felt hundreds of miles or more from the eye of the storm. and long before it potentially makes landfall. it's going to go for hundreds of miles. we expect that much of the eastern seaboard will be ultimately impacted, and some of it very, very severely. it's not yet clear if hurricane dorian will make landfall on the east coast of the united states.
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but this massive storm is too dangerous to take any chances. back in the north bahamas, the destruction continues. it will be some time before the scale of this disaster is known. but hurricane dorian is the worst the region has ever witnessed. richard galpin, bbc news. florida is one of those states on alert. from there, cbs news correspondent hilary lane sent us this update. the biggest thing is that officials are warning people in low—lying areas to get out. nine counties in florida, including us here in daytona beach, and coastal communities in the carolinas and in georgia are under mandatory evacuation orders. that means people should leave because they are in danger if the storm hits the area. people, though, do not always heed those warnings. some people say they have weathered multiple hurricanes and they want to stay put. in those cases, people are stocking up. lots of supermarkets in the area are out of water and bread. people waited hundreds of cars deep
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for miles and miles to get gas. some gas stations have run out throughout florida. for people, the biggest thing if they live in low—lying areas, is to evacuate, go to higher ground and for people hunkering down, it's to make sure they have the supplies they need. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: back me — or i'll sack you. borisjohnson's warning to conservative rebels over brexit. the cabinet is summoned as speculation mounts that a snap election could be called. labour leaderjeremy corbyn says he wants a general election, and that his party will do everything it can to stop a no—deal brexit. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began — hurricane dorian smashes in with winds of up to 180 miles an hour — causing huge damage and severe flooding. in sport, england make changes, joe will open the batting as they look
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to wrestle back control from australia. the millets look ako —— romelu lu ka ku says australia. the millets look ako —— romelu lukaku says a social media platforms more to tackle racial abuse. the defending champion is booed off, novak djokovic is forced to retire hurt at the us open, leaving fans unhappy. i will be back with more on the stories at half past. a fleet of five japanese ships has put to sea to resume the first commercial whale hunt carried out by the country in over 30 years. in june, tokyo officially withdrew from the international whaling commission and said the fleet could catch 227 minkie whales this season. but there's a growing number of people who say hunting whales is becoming outdated and there's a new way to make money from whales, as rupert wingfield—hayes reports. a few hours ago, this ten—metre long whale was harpooned off the pacific coast of japan. now it is being hauled ashore on the little whaling town of wada. immediately a team gets to work
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butchering the six—tonne animal. the whalers here are delighted that, after 33 yea rs, they‘ re finally free to hunt again. it is our food, we have the need for this food, natural resources like fish. whaling is a hugely emotive issue. but here injapan, many people genuinely do not understand the outside world's obsession with them catching whales. they say they've been doing this for centuries. they do so to eat the meat, and they do so sustainably, and that this is a traditional part of japanese culture. but it's also true that these people lining up to buy the whale meat are a tiny, ageing minority. this year, japanese whalers will catch just 227 animals.
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even the most ardent whaling supporters say the industry can't make money. no, definitely not. how they can make money from 227? and sooner or later, maybe within five years or ten years, my best guess would be, you know, no more whaling. but there are other ways to make money from whales. 1,000 kilometres south of tokyo lie the remote 0gasawara islands. this is where the humpbacks come to breed and give birth, and this is where whale—watching injapan began. she's gonna put the hydrophone down into the water here, we're going to see if we can hear the whales calling. whales calling.
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oh, wow. so that's the sound of whales calling to each other. they're a little far away but what an amazing sound! for the yamamoto family, this has been a life—changing experience. translation: when i saw the whales today, i thought, "they're so beautiful," so it is very hard for me to even think about catching and eating them. far to the north, japan's whaling fleet is setting sail. but, here, the whales are safe and the tourists can marvel at these graceful giants of the deep. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in 0gasawara. thousands of secondary school and university students in hong kong have boycotted classes, in the latest pro—democracy protests there. organisers say 10,000 pupils from 200 secondary schools did not
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turn up for the first day for the new school year — while thousands more students joined a rally at the chinese university of hong kong. protests over the weekend saw some of the worst violence in weeks between demonstrators and police. 0ur south east asia correspondent, stephen mcdonell has been giving us the latest. strong winds and heavy driving rain battering the city have made it difficult to gauge the participation level after activists called for a widespread strike action in hong kong. there doesn't seem to have been less impact this time than a similar action around one month ago. corporations have successfully pressured their employees into not striking, cafe pacific, for example, said there would be a zero tolerance approach to any aircrews taking part in any illegal activities and that
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they expected all of their staff to turn upfor they expected all of their staff to turn up for work throughout this period. however, students from universities and high school is a boycott classes today and instead join rallies and this came despite warnings from the government at the risk punishment. the authorities are taking a much tougher stance when it comes to this movement. we are now up comes to this movement. we are now up to over 1100 people have been arrested since the crisis began in earlyjune, at arrested since the crisis began in early june, at least 60 arrested since the crisis began in earlyjune, at least 60 of them have been charged with rioting. this is a crime that carries potentially very serious jail time, up to ten years in prison. despite this there are still many thousands of activists who are prepared to turn out risk punishment to our —— to risk going to jail or being injured tojointly —— what they see as he struggled to risk their freedom
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susanis susan is here. we need to talk about this record breaker. the worry is it's not moving. it has done some things that are only peculiar to a very large storms. this is the satellite sequence from yesterday. this is the visible satellite image so we cannot get the infrared in such detail, the visible is a powerful tool to see what happens around the eye of the hurricane. if you canjust what happens around the eye of the hurricane. if you can just about make out that there is some concentric circles forming around the eye and you get this only in very major storms, where the speed at the core is rotating get so strong it almost cannot sustain itself and this core begins to colla pse itself and this core begins to collapse in upon itself. that is what's happening now, it's actually causing the storm to weaken a little
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bit but then what happens is its regenerates, you will not get as strong a core but you will get a larger course. you've got a bigger radius of damaging winds and that in itself, that stalling is helping make the uncertainty of the weather system make the uncertainty of the weather syste m — — make the uncertainty of the weather system —— of where it will track more uncertain. it's getting bigger but losing its strength a little bit. yet it is staying over water and this is how they maintain their power. it is. the other thing, i will show you this tracker, the biggest headache, or even following this for the past week, this at one point was going across like this and into the panhandle, then it was tracking all the way up the length of florida, now it looks like it's offshore. when you see as using these, it's easy to think about these circles at the size of the hurricane, that is the size of the hurricane, that is the degree of uncertainty so it could steal all the way over here, there is the possibility that the
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storm system could make landfall in florida. the biggest consensus is probably keeping it offshore but it could make landfall, none it could even graze a georgia and the carolinas. still here a category three major hurricane and even if it does not make landfall you will see storm surges of up to 20 foot onto these low—lying beach communities and we are yet to know the full amount of devastation for the bahamas but we think big problems are white here as well. quite unusual, even at this stage that we don't know where it's headed. this is the science bit. we look at the weather from the ground where we are but what drives our weather is the upper atmosphere and there is a pattern up there as well and it's not always the same as what is on the ground. this is what we had last week as it was moving in and we had, there is dorian there on this line
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marks the subtropical ridge and it forms a nice road for the storm to track along, like ourjet stream. this was giving us a reasonable consensus as to where we thought it might move. this system is so powerful, pulling so much what they are through its core it is warming higher levels of the atmosphere and starting to erode is part of this ridge. this has shifted eastwards now and now, i cannot show you the pattern for today but we are in this are bits which is technically no man's land which is why nothing is driving its and why it has stalled. you will have the leanings of the model. fingers crossed we are hoping for this dip to start coming down and there are signs on the model that will happen, pick up this and puts it into the atlantic. until now, still a struggle for those
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models to place exactly what will happen. the other thing is because, i was talking about the eye expanding, normally the eye of a storm is quite compact, you had the devastating wins for a couple of hours, many areas have seen those for 2h hours, relentlessly and with the storm surge. quieter closer to home. contrast is to laois in recent weeks when we had all that heat. technically speaking the 1st of september as a meteorological autumn. lots of sunshine across dorset currently. we have our own area of low pressure. clearly not so dramatic, but it is causing disparity in the weather across the uk, pushing a lot of cloud into scotland, northern ireland, some rain into northern england and north wales. we continue with that on and off through the
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evening. some of the cloud will trickle south overnight. it was quite chilly first thing this morning. we had patchy frost in aberdeenshire and rural parts of the south—east down to three or four. much milder with all that cloud around. tomorrow is starting grey and murky. sunshine for central and eastern areas. like today, as it progresses, more fronts pushing to the north—west. rain for northern ireland, northern scotland, showers in parts of wales too. a warmer day for the north of scotland. we move into this pocket under the weather front cold a warm sector. tuesday into wednesday, the cold front goes through and there will be chilly air. some rain around for the south—east first thing. sun will come out but it will feel than tuesday. the temperatures most greatly affected as we look to the northern isles and stornoway, ten or
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11 after the mid—teens. some showers are possible across the northern half of the uk. we continue with low pressures through the latter part of the week. a little bit of warmer air on thursday into the north of scotla nd on thursday into the north of scotland and northern ireland. quite a bit of cloud around and the chance of some rain. further south, it is chillier, with highs of 18—19. a shift towards a more autumnal feel. and towards the weekend, distinctly average temperatures for all of us. hopefully something more in the way ofa hopefully something more in the way of a sustained dry spell.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: as speculation mounts that a snap election could be called, the cabinet is summoned to a meeting. it comes as downing street warns potential tory rebels to back boris johnson on brexit, or face the sack. they or face the sack. are almost goading people into voting they are almost goading people into voting against the government. because their strategy to be honest is to lose this week, and then seek a general election. we expect conservative mps to support the conservative mps to support the conservative prime minister, the conservative prime minister, the conservative agenda, and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and hand it to the leader of the opposition. labour leaderjeremy corbyn says
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that his party will do everything it can to stop a no—deal brexit — and that he is ready for a general election. it is the people, not an unelected prime minister, who should determine our country's future. an election is the democratic way forward. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began — hurricane dorian smashes in with winds of up to 180 miles an hour, causing huge damage and severe flooding. and, are you fed up of late mail? we'll be finding out an extreme delivery service, using a jet engine—powered suit. q1 joe denly sport now on afternoon live with gavin ra mjuan. delhi will open the batting this week, some reward for a half—century in that unforgettable innings where england one to level the ashes.
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denly opened the batting against west indies in his debut, but moved to number three and then to number four. he will swap places with jason roy, who has struggled so far. denly has said it is great for england cricket that roy will keep his place for the fourth test. i got a call after a bit of time off, just said he would like me to go the top of the order and try to get us off to a good start. obviously jason the order and try to get us off to a good start. obviouslyjason will that four, it is great for england cricket. with jason roy that four, it is great for england cricket. withjason roy and that four, it is great for england cricket. with jason roy and the team, we are a better team, that is for sure. with him coming in at four, hopefully the new ball worn off, and myself and roy doing our jobs at the top, it enables him to come in and play his way. and he is a dangerous player, so it is great to have him. ijust really need to
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make changes. mainly because the batsmen dropped to make way for steve smith needs to be announced. smith is their top run scorer. he has recovered from a concussion that saw him miss the third test. let's talk romilly lukaku, only been in italy a few weeks and already issues of racial abuse. yes, he says authorities need to do more to tackle racism in the game. the former manchester united striker romelu lukaku says football authorities need to do more to tackle racism in the game. he was subjected to racist abuse yesterday playing for his new club inter milan. he scored what turned out to be the winner against cagliari, but was targetted with monkey chants from sections of the crowd before and after his penalty kick. in a post on instagram, lukaku also said football federations, and social media platforms need to work harder to stamp out online abuse. it's the transfer deadline for scotland and leagues one and two today — plus the clubs in europe. roma have reached an agreement with arsenal to sign midfielder henrikh mkhitaryan
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on a season—long loan deal. the italian club will pay a loan fee and the players wages, and the player's wages, but there is no option or obligation to buy the armenia international. liverpool defender virgil van dijk is in line to pick up another awardafter beating lionel messi and cristiano ronaldo to the uefa player of the year honour, he's up against them again for fifa's best player award. van dijk‘s managerjurgen klopp is among the nominees for best men's coach. and england's lucy bronze is nominated for the best women's player award, alongside the americans alex morgan and megan rapinoe. england manager phil neville is on the shortlist for best coach in the women's game. the women's super league, that starts next weekend, will be broadcast overseas for the first time. they've signed a three—year rights deal with sky mexico and a scandinavian broadcaster, which means the matches will be screened to viewers across central america, norway, sweden, finland and denmark. the fa will also stream highlights from some england and club cup matches.
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big news in the men's draw of the us open. the withdrawal of the defending champion and world number one novak djokovic. he was two sets down in his fourth round match against stan wawrinka when he had to call it a day because of a shoulder injury that had been troubling him all week in new york. he was booed off court, he later apologised to the crowd but explained that he just couldn't carry on. look, i'm not being offended by it, you know, mistreated by anybody. i don't really pay to much attention. you know, i like to respect others, andi you know, i like to respect others, and i hope that others can respect me and my decision. i'm sorry for the crowd, obviously they came to see a full match, and itjust wasn't to be. that opens up roger federer‘s path to the final, he would have expected to meet djokovic in the semis.
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he completely outcalssed david goffin to reach the quarters — he only dropped four games. that's all the sport for now. now time for ‘ask this‘ with anita mcvay. welcome back to birmingham. we have been talking to market traders, business organisations and business owners to get their thoughts on where we are with the political situation, what kind of impact brexit, in whatever shape it will eventually take, is currently having on their work, and what difference it might mean for market traders to the price of food that ends up on our plates, the availability of that food, and so on. now it is time to hear your questions. joining me to answer your questions is alex de ruyter from the centre
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for brexit studies. ijust want i just want to address the speculation it is around about a general election possibly being announced. do you think that is likely? i think the ultimate general election being announced by boris johnson, quite likely. boris has shown himself to be a high—stakes gambler with unlimited self belief, and with the distinct thread of a no—confidence motion being placed against his government byjeremy corbyn, particularly now that johnson has prorogued parliament, he may try to seize the initiative and upped the ante on his opponents. and to control of setting the pace on the agenda and the direction of travel, he helps. yes, if you want to use that phrase, to control. that has been the tenor of this government so far. first question from the viewers.
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what is the likelihood of a vote of no confidence against borisjohnson before the prorogation of parliament? if we discount the prospect of a question being announced, the prospect of a vote of no confidence i think is very high. simply for the reason that i don't think parliamentary motions to mandate him to ask for an extension will carry much water. because as michael gove seems to imply or make clear only yesterday, the government could well ignore such actions by parliament. given their slant so far in being quite gung ho about delivering brexit come what may, it wouldn't surprise me if they did that. therefore i think the only sure way for parliament would be a no—confidence motion. i think it is more likely now. if the rebels are successful in getting an extension to article 50, what will stop us being in exactly the same position as now as we approach the date its extended to?
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that's a good question. some kind of eternal motion, heading towards a brexit date that never arrives. eternal motion, heading towards a brexit date that never arrivesm isafair brexit date that never arrivesm is a fair question, and for the simple reason that eu leaders made clear, any further extension to article 50 would only be for a clearly defined purpose, for example to call another election or another referendum. going through the motions for the sake of trying to put off the inevitable, if the uk continues to want to leave europe, isn't enough. for that reason we could find ourselves hypothetically at new year or march next year in the same situation. but i don't think that you would grant another extension unless it was for something specific like a general election or another referendum. that is that important phrase, a clearly defined purpose. we don't know if an election was to be called this afternoon whether that would affect the brexit date, as borisjohnson currently sees it, the 31st of october. we don't. because as many
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commentators have said, it is a deliberate strategy to have the date fall during the middle of an election cycle. if an election was announced, we would look at a minimum of six weeks to go through the motions and get to a polling day. that would take us into the last week of october at the bare minimum before parliament could reconvene. which coincidentally enough is about the same length as this current prorogation. what would happen if the speaker refused to prorogue parliament? does the speaker have is paris?m is my understanding of the prime minister has the power to determine when parliament sits force of the speaker can determine motions and amendments, but the government controls the order of the legislative agenda. if a vote of no confidence succeeds, how does that affect the prorogation? does it go ahead
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or does it automatically stop? ifa if a vote of no confidence was successful the queen would invite jeremy corbyn to try to form an alternative government and he would have two weeks to try to do that. if that did not work we would face a general election. to all practical purposes we would still be looking at roughly the same timetable. the normal business of parliament would be suspended. in terms of proroguing, that would disappear in parliament would be annulled anyway for reasons of being an old foreign election, so it wouldn't have any practical difference to my mind. viewers will know that the issue of the backstop, the efforts to avoid a ha rd the backstop, the efforts to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland, that is one of the thorniest issues that politicians have been tackling. the good friday agreement is a treaty that is lodged with the united nations. if a no—deal brexit breaks the terms of the good friday agreement, what are the possible consequences forthe uk?
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is an interesting aside, the first possible consequence would be that the us congress would refuse to ratify any us— uk trade agreement, because the irish lobby is very strong in the us. nancy pelosi has already said as much, the leader of the democrats in the house, yes. the second one would be the increased prospect of the break—up of the uk. because a northern ireland 58% voted remain, and the all ireland economic travel area is very important, and peace in northern ireland is very important. in the event of a border being re—established, that could lead to a potential re—emergence of, i don't want to see the trouble is, but it could have destabilising consequences. a further knock—on effect would make scottish independence more likely, the event ofa independence more likely, the event of a new deal, and the collapse of the good friday agreement. of a new deal, and the collapse of the good friday agreementm of a new deal, and the collapse of the good friday agreement. if there isa plan, the good friday agreement. if there is a plan, a concrete proposalfrom the uk for is a plan, a concrete proposalfrom the ukforan is a plan, a concrete proposalfrom the uk for an alternative to the backstop, we haven't seen that,
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heavily? now, we have a three years to come up with alternatives to the backstop. even my brexiteerfriends who are interested in technological solutions tell me that things like drones are artificial intelligence are at best partial solutions, and a lot of it would have to be taken on trust. and the eu simply does not trust. and the eu simply does not trust the uk government to deliver on things like trusted traders schemes are complex it delivery project. from what i can see, there is no practical alternative in the offing, therefore we haven't seen it. let's get a couple more viewers' questions. if during prorogation mps decide to meet up anyway to scrutinise the government would that be legal? labour mps like clive years have already said we will chain ourselves to the house of commons, you will have to drag us out. that's a statement that has no legal standing, as faras statement that has no legal standing, as far as i know. the government determines the order. and they could meet somewhere else, it wouldn't have to be westminster. yes, they could have an alternative
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parliament, a pupil's parliament. it would be a symbolic act in terms of saying, you might prorogue us, but we will still meet an convenient scrutinise what you are doing. the key point that the mps are trying to say is that they believe mrjohnson is acting in an unconstitutional manner. that is something you could envisage happening. manner. that is something you could envisage happeninglj manner. that is something you could envisage happening. i could, i don't know what the likelihood would be, but i could. how does one take action in the high court to counteract the efforts of miller and major to prevent a no—deal exit from the eu? that case is being held on thursday. the scottish case comes back tomorrow, there is a case before the courts in northern ireland. but how does one take action in the high court to counteract the efforts of miller and major to prevent a new deal exit. my understanding is that
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it is the government who is the defendant, they have their own teams of lawyers to fight this. i'm not a lawyer, so i have no claim to understand the nitty—gritty of the legal process, but all of these things would be subject to an appeal, in my estimation, even if they were successful. the other point about the legal process is that it point about the legal process is thatitis point about the legal process is that it is time consuming. and for opponents of a no till departure, the eu, time is the one thing they don't have. we talking a of weeks. something someone asked me, if say a judge in the scottish court, the highest civil court in scotland who is hearing the court there, if they found in favour of government, effectively, but the court in london found in favour of gina miller and sirjohn major, if there were two different decisions in the courts, could the government accept the decision it likes and ignore the one it doesn't? quite possibly, yes. i
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think so. don't quote me on that. there may be an element of, who is the highest court in the land? the key point is that court cases can be contested and appealed and just drag on for months. that's what i think is the key point. the legal route is an uncertain one. and a lengthy one. yes, which would run well over 0ctober yes, which would run well over october 31. for opponents of no deal, that route, time—consuming, not likely to guarantee them what they want. and then there's the matter of, parliament can ask for an extension to article 50, but the only people in the uk who can go to brussels and ask for an extension to article 50 are the queen the prime minister. alex, thank you so much for taking the time to take us through those questions. and thank you for sending in your questions. alex from the centre for brexit studies at birmingham university.
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lots more coming up from here this afternoon. we will talk to are presented from the polish community, to business owners, to an expert on the car industry which is so important not only for the region but for the uk, and later on we talk to the mayor of the west midlands. lots more coming up from birmingham. now it is back to the studio. some news coming from california. we are having reports of fatalities in are having reports of fatalities in a boat fire off the coast of santa cruz island. 0ne a boat fire off the coast of santa cruz island. one of the sources with photographs of that operation. you can see a major disaster at sea with the us coast guard scrambled to rescue more than 30 people described as being in distress after the boat caught fire off the coast. the vessel was reported as being on
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fire. a number of rescue assets, in their terms, had been assisting the fire brigade in dealing with it. there are reports of fatalities with initial reports suggesting 30 people are so were on board. the coast guard said some crew members had been rescued and efforts were continuing to say the remaining passengers on the vessel on fire near santa cruz. this is a breaking story off the coast of california. we will bring you more details. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the steel giant tata is closing its 0rb electrical steels factory in newport, wales. up to 380 jobs could go from the plant, which makes electrical steel used in power transmission. the company has been for sale since may 2018 as tata had decided to concentrate on its core steel production business.
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uk manufacturing output fell in july to the lowest level since records began 7 years ago. the drop was sharper than most economists had been expecting. the reasons — political uncertainty and global trade tensions. a deal that saved debenhams from administration is to be challenged in the high court this week. the rescue deal meant debenhams had to shut 50 stores and cut rents. the challenge comes from one of debenham's landlords. he's been backed by mike ashley's sports direct group which used to own 30% of the company. if successful, the challenge could mean debenhams goes back into administration. steel losses in wales — why is this happening? up to 380 jobs could go from the plant, which makes electrical steel used in power transmission for vehicles. the company employs about 6000
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people. 0rb electrical is more of a specialist business. but tata steel has said they plan to re—employ from elsewhere. the company has been up for sale for some time. there has been restructuring, they want to get rid of some referee businesses. it has been up for sale for over a year. it is now likely to be closed down. tony brady is the unite union's national officer for steel. 0nce once your initial reaction, bearing in mind that tata steel said they will probably be able to redeploy these people? it still a devastating blow for south wales, and the newport area. tartare have said they will redeploy these people, and we will redeploy these people, and we will hold their feet to the fire to make sure they hold good on that promise and that each of these people will be redeployed. 380 people. in the context of welsh
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employment, at a time when employment, at a time when employment prospects are pretty good, i'm surprised that you say thatis good, i'm surprised that you say that is devastating. i say it is devastating because these are skilled, highly paid jobs. this economy cannot afford to lose highly paid, skilled jobs. some people were talking about industrial action. what we'll do is make sure we are therefore every single one of our members, and make sure that the company argued on their promise that no one will be redundant. can you expand how this promise came about of nobody being made redundant, and exactly what tata said? this has been a memorandum of understanding we have had for the last 2—3 years, with the closure of the pension, there was a restriction putting that we would not have any compulsory redundancies. and we will make sure that the company hold good on that. and you don't believe that them saying they will re—employ these people if they possibly can, you don't think that is a mitigating
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circumstance? a mitigation of the effect? keeping people within work, within the south wales steel plants, where they have good well—paid jobs. and the prospects for the other 6000 people employed by tata? again, it is challenging times as we know. it is challenging times as we know. it is challenging times for the whole of the uk steel industry. we have to make sure we invest in the steel industry, and this westminster government has to stand up and put money into the steel industry in this country. tony, thanks. what's happening in the markets? the pound is a big sufferer. if i can get it up. the pound against the euro... against the dollar... that is very low, almost the lowest it has been for 30 years. 145 is the
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lowest for 30 years. it hasn't got there yet, but that is where the weaknesses. the ftse 100 there yet, but that is where the weaknesses. the ftse100 and the other hand up strongly, but that is because of the weak pound. just want to go to downing street, the former eastenders actress has called for more to be done for alzheimer's sufferers. she has avoided the limelight since she was diagnosed with alzheimer's since 2014. a rare public viewing of barbara windsor. she had earlier recorded a thank you video to eve ryo ne recorded a thank you video to everyone had supported the campaign. there she is meeting the prime minister. now it's time for a look at the weather. plenty of cloud piling into the north of the uk at the moment thanks to this area of low pressure. to the
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south, some sunny spells to come, but the cloud will increase through the evening for a time. the rain will fizzle out through the evening and overnight, but cloud will linger on. also moving into some milder air. it was a chilly start today. overnight lows taking us into tuesday, 11, 12, 13 degrees. in a few spots even in the south—east we got down to 4—5. the best of our sunshine to come on tuesday for central and eastern parts of england. elsewhere come up against more cloud. as the day progresses, some rain approaching for northern ireland and scotland. some showers for more are going north wales. some brightness for parts of ink and. in the north, up to 16 in stornoway.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3: the cabinet is summoned to downing street this afternoon as speculation mounts that a snap election could be called. it comes as downing street warns potential tory rebels to back boris johnson on brexit, or face the sack. they are almost goading people into voting against the government because i think thier strategy, to be honest, is to lose this week and then seek a general election. we expect conservative mps to support the prime minister and the conservative agenda and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and hand it to the leader of the opposition. labour leaderjeremy corbyn says that his party will do
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everything it can to stop a no—deal brexit — and that he is ready for a general election. it is the people, not an unelected prime minister, who should determine our country's future. an election is the democratic way forward. what is a birmingham thinks of brexit. i'm alive away from westminster and i will be hearing from an expert on the car industry, a business owner and the representative of the polish community. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began — hurricane dorian smashes in with winds of up to 180 miles an hour, causing huge damage and severe flooding. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. england make changes for their upcoming ashes test against australia. and the former premier league star, calling out social media platforms over racial abuse.
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we are looking at and whiteley powerful storm has stalled across the bahamas, enhancing the amount of damage it has done and why forecasting where it is going to go next is so difficult. i will see you half past. also coming up — as commercial whaling begins again injapan — younger generations say they want to watch whales — not eat them. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the ministers have been summoned to a cabinet meeting this afternoon as speculation mounts that boris johnson could be about to announce plans for a snap election the bbc understands "live discussions" are going on in no ten about asking parliament to approve an election — possibly as soon as this wednesday. the prime minister is under pressure after rebel conservative mps braced for a showdown with the government over brexit. the formerjustice secretary david
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gauke today accused boris johnson of taking the tories "in the direction of the brexit party", after government plans emerged to expel any conservative mps who vote this week to block a no—deal brexit. for labour, jeremy corbyn called for action to stop no—deal and for a general election. with the latest from westminster, here's our political correspondent ben wright. good morning, how lovely to see you on this sunny morning. behind the bonhomie, cabinet ministers are threatening a purge of tory mps who join opposition efforts to block a no—deal brexit in the commons tomorrow. so, will that stop the tory rebels? what rebels? are there rebels? there certainly are, including conservative mps who sat in cabinet until borisjohnson took over. it seems to me like they are almost goading people into voting against the government, because i think their strategy, to be honest, is to lose this week and then seek a general election, having removed those of us
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who are not against brexit, not against leaving the european union, but believe we should do so with a deal. there are just days before parliament is suspended for mps to try to pass a law that will aim to stop borisjohnson taking the uk out of the eu without a deal. number 10 has warned conservative mps they will be kicked out of the party if they join that effort. but rebel resolve seems strong. borisjohnson will find if he purges moderate, sensible conservatives, conservatives like me who are willing to leave with a deal, who voted for it three times, unlike him, he will pay a penalty, i think, at the ballot box. westminster is reassembling for a seismic week, a showdown between the government and parliament that could determine how or even if brexit happens at the end of next month. and this morning, cabinet ministers said it was right to demand loyalty from conservative mps.
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this is the standard relationship mps have with the government. we expect conservative mps to support the conservative prime minister and the conservative prime minister and the conservative prime minister and the conservative agenda and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and handed to the leader of the opposition. but complaints of hypocrisy adds to the tension here. earlier this year, several tory mps now in the cabinet defied the party whip and voted against theresa may's brexit deal. the numbers could be very tight in tomorrow's vote, and if the prime minister carries out his threat to withdraw the whip from rebel tory mps, this week he would immediately wipe out his minuscule commons majority of one. and that makes an autumn general election even more likely. sources have told the bbc there is a live discussion under way in government about possibly asking mps to approve an election as early as this week, if the law is changed to force a brexit delay. but that would need labour to vote in favour of having an election,
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and at the momentjeremy corbyn's focus seems to be unblocking a no—deal brexit. we must come together to stop no—deal. this week could be our last chance. we are working with other parties to do everything necessary to pull our country back from the brink. then we need a general election. and today, the former labour prime minister tony blair warned jeremy corbyn not to fall into the elephant trap of agreeing to an election before brexit was resolved. there was another new arrival in downing street this morning, boris johnson has a loyal new friend. but his willingness to take britain out of the eu without a deal is fracturing the tory party and pitting the government against mps. 0ur chief political correspondent, vicki young is at westminster.
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tomorrow looks to be quite a day in the political calendar. we thought what would happen tomorrow is mps from the liberal democrat, labour and the rebel conservatives would ask for an emergency debate on the following day they would take control of what's going on in the house of commons and try to change the law. we think it's possible they may try to do all that tomorrow. the first question is do they have the numbers to do so? it looks as though they do partly because lots of people have left government, but what like david gauke and philip hammond who are no longer in the cabinets and they are very much against no—deal brexit so they would be willing to vote that way. what is interesting is the government has totally upped the a nte government has totally upped the ante on this, really threatening conservative mps and saying we will treat this as if it is a confidence vote, whether you have confidence in the government because it is our main policy and if you do not back as we will not let you stand as a
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conservative candidate at the next election. that's the plan, it is saying to tory mps you either back me brexit or you are risking jeremy corbyn as prime minister. that leads us corbyn as prime minister. that leads us to the possibility of a general election. that is not as easy as it used to be. in the old days prime ministers could just say they want an election and get one but it does not happen like that anymore due to fixed term parliaments so you have to wait five years. if borisjohnson wa nts to wait five years. if borisjohnson wants an election he will have to get two thirds of mps to back him and so he will need labour mps to get behind him. jeremy corbyn clearly believes he can win an election so he might be willing to go for that but others in his party say an general election might not solve this because if you do not win a borisjohnson solve this because if you do not win a boris johnson comes solve this because if you do not win a borisjohnson comes back and we still potentially get a no—deal brexit. they want to concentrate on changing the law and stopping no deal. all sorts of things happening it looks like downing street is
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really trying to keep their opponents on their toes, coming up with surprising moves to wrong—foot them. the other way around your parliamentary experts on the other side trying to go through what the options are, trying to make sure they can stop a no—deal brexit. we have seen our political editor has been told the bill mps will try to put through tomorrow or the day afterwards make borisjohnson seek from the eu a three month delay to brexit, an extension of article 50, another one, three months, until the end of january, if another one, three months, until the end ofjanuary, if no deal has been passed by parliament by the 19th of october. the trying to force boris johnson's hand. he has made so much of the fact we are going to leave the eu at the end of october, he would not be able to accept that and that point he would say he has been forced into an election. so many things could happen this
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week, let's look at the possibility ofa week, let's look at the possibility of a general election being called for mid—october. then borisjohnson, it's within his capability to change that dates nearer the time, isn't it? it turns out it is. there are different ways of getting to a general election, one is the government could put down the motion once mps have changed the low or no deal, perhaps and say he cannot accept that and he wants an election in the middle of october, will you vote for it? he needs two thirds of mps. at that point, jeremy corbyn has spent two years saying he wants an election, he would probably feel he must vote for it but others in his party do not agree. there are other options for boris johnson his party do not agree. there are other options for borisjohnson if he cannot get the two thirds, he could bring in a new bill to change the law, election will be on a certain date. in the first scenario it's possible he then changes the date to be after the 31st of october
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when we will have left with no deal. people like tony blair see that as a trap and they don't want opposition mps to fall into it. we will have to see where we get to by the end of the week on whether there is an election or not. it's high risk for the prime minister. you cannot be sure he would win the election, of course, but he wants to go into the election saying i will deliver brexit do or die, if it is before 0ctober brexit do or die, if it is before october the 31st and he hopes he scoops up all those people who moved to the brexit party. if he has had to the brexit party. if he has had to ask for a delay to brexit he would get taken to the cleaners bite nigel farage's party at an election so that is why he cannot countenance that. thank you very much for now. now, as we look ahead to westminster returning to action tomorrow, today the news channel is in birmingham where we're gauging the mood of the city which narrowly voted for the uk to leave
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the eu in 2016. thank you. throughout the day we've been putting the question about the brexit, finding out whether industries and businesses are being proactive, reactive, waiting to see what happens and asking them what they think of the political situation and whether they are able to make the decisions they would like to be able to make. the automotive industry is a really huge dealfor this region, tens of thousands of jobs either directly dealfor this region, tens of thousands ofjobs either directly or indirectly in the car industry and with me to talk about that is professor david bailey, professor of industrial strategy at birmingham university and a senior fellow at the uk in a changing europe. give me more detail and context about the importance of the car industry to the west midlands and within the wider uk context. in the west midlands tens of thousands of jobs linked
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in the west midlands tens of thousands ofjobs linked to the industry, something like 5% of the regional economy in terms of output and employment. up to 40% of the investment into the region is in the industry. not only an assembly but also the supply chains, but also much of the research and development is in this region come up to 80%. jaguar land rover, universities, down into motorsport valley. usually important for activity and good qualityjobs. to what extent, what evidence do you have about decision making process being affected by brexit, investment decisions and so on? brexit so far has had a negative impact already, lots of investment has been stalled. 0ver impact already, lots of investment has been stalled. over the last three years investment down by 90%. compared to several years ago. there has been good news got jaguar land rover and n sync and investment in electric vehicles with substantial governmental support. many companies are holding off on investment
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because they don't know what's happening with brexit and the form of the trading relationship with the eu. peugeot have said they will invest in the north—west, it minded to build the next generation of car there but no deal means no investment. the car industry relies on just supply chains. remind the viewers what that means. that means car companies do not hold huge stocks, they may have stock of just a few days at best and the orderly parts to arrive just as they need them to keep stock down and make sure things are efficient. they rely on this flow of hundreds, over 1000 containers of components crossing the channel every day coming into the uk and being delivered to factories exactly at the time they need them in order need them. that's keep the system as efficient as possible. if we have no deal, custom delays, that becomes very difficult. barclay said last week, let me quote
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him, the car industry supply chains rely on a fluid cross channel trading, we need to start talks now and how we make sure this continues and how we make sure this continues a pulley without a deal. the car industry has been asking for action for much longer. the car industry have been saying this for three years. it is great he finally realises it but it is a bit late and we don't have a lot of time. it also suggests no deal would be very damaging because you would imagine all the customs delays getting in the way of those deliveries. how much is a brexit behind the concerns, the problem is that you are talking about? there are other global issues that have nothing to do with brexit that are affecting the car industry, surely? we've seen a shifting away from diesel which has impacted uk output. months of declining output worse than during the global financial crisis. big decline in sales in
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china has had a big impact and only third is a brexit uncertainty. the industry is grappling with all these issues and brexit adds to it at a time it's making big investments and transition to what electric cars. thank you, david bailey. thank you very much for that. we will stay on ca rs very much for that. we will stay on cars and let's pick out one elements ofa cars and let's pick out one elements of a car. you open your glove box and there is the material inside its. a company manufactures that material here in birmingham and i will speak to its owner now. he is in brussels on business. thank you for joining in brussels on business. thank you forjoining us from brussels. you are there for business meetings, presumably brexit is on your agenda? all the time, unfortunately. this is a time when we should be... a time
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we are growing our business and brexit is interfering with that. how is it interfering? investment decisions are on hold. there is a downturn in orders, as professor david bailey said we had 14 months of downturn that is reflected across the supply chain. the material that you used to make the flocking, where does that come from? they come from mainland europe and it's a real problem for us to understand how we account for the materials we buy. we are a travel stocking right now because we feel the situation for october the 31st is potentially what worse than the march 29 deadline. —— triple stocking. why is that? suppliers on the continent seem to have stretched
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their order time. our current supplier in germany went from a four—week order period to an eight—week order period, even longer than march the 29th. that was a five—week period. we have that stock lots of extra materials to carriers over that period. that is a big influence on our cash flow. and it will be for many small businesses. it isa will be for many small businesses. it is a real problem to find the cash flow to cover that extra stocking we need. the extension of the period, delivery period from your suppliers, is that because they anticipate delays in getting their product from the continent to you in the uk? yes, it is. i think it a tendency to be overcautious but, even so, they would rather we make sure we have stocks here and warn of potential long period of reorder rather than
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find a shortfall and a problem with supply to the various manufacturers that we supply. you have obviously had to stockpile ata you have obviously had to stockpile at a financial cost to you but are you confident the orders will come infor you confident the orders will come in for that material you have stockpiled? we have the orders at present but we have no certainty of continuity beyond that date. as professional david bailey said we are not certain what will happen for investment and it depends on the fact of whether we come out with no deal or we have a deal of some sort and this will depend on the ultimate's, original manufacturers, jaguar, vauxhall and all people like that and whether they continue to invest in this country or not. you are focusing on brexit but do you accept that there are others, i was discussing with professor bailey, other issues at play in the car industry globally that might be
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affecting the orders coming to you besides brexit? absolutely. it is almost a perfect storm for the motor industry. you have the diesel situation, the downturn in trade in china, brexit, and a tightening of consumer credit. all these issues impact on the automotive industry in this country particularly. finally, what would you say to the prime minister, to the government right now? we need a deal. we must have a deal. we need a deal. we must have a deal. we cannot afford the risk of no—deal brexit. 0k, david. talking to us from brussels, thank you very much for that. really interesting to hear about the automotive industry here, both of the big picture and as we just heard from david, a manufacturer who makes one component that we find in the car is made here. later at this hour i will be
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getting the view from the polish expat community each year about how brexit is affecting them. back to you for the moment, simon. there is a cabinet meeting this afternoon, speculating mounting borisjohnson is afternoon, speculating mounting boris johnson is looking afternoon, speculating mounting borisjohnson is looking to launch a general election and possibly asking parliament as early as wednesday to do so. there has been speculation he might look to, in the words of his critics, flood the house of lords with brexiteers in order to try and ease its passage through parliament. lord speaker tweeted this at... when i assumed this office i did the current political position.
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norman fowler, a former tory cabinet member, of course and now the speaker of the house of lords. let's talk to the snp's europe spokesperson — stephen gethins who joins us from westminster. your leader nicola sturgeon, snp leader, said about a general election and the speculation, bring it on. she says and must be before 0ctober it on. she says and must be before october at the 31st. absolutely right, bring it on, let's kick the tories out of scotland because the damage they are doing and the anti—democratic nature. listen to that, trying to flood the house of lords with hundreds of pro—brexit tories. you could not make it up. nicola is right. people need a proper choice and that means not going out with no deal on the
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3ist not going out with no deal on the 31st of october. bring on an election but let's have the dates before that no—deal brexit. is that because there is suspicion it could be a trap? i don't trust boris as far as i can throw him and even then i would throw him and even then i would throw him and even then i would throw him further away still. he has proved himself to not only know what he's doing but he is utterly u ntrustworthy he's doing but he is utterly untrustworthy as well. i don't think anybody wants to trust a word that he says and this is too important. you heard in your last package about the industry worrying about people's jobs. we must remember that, it is about people's jobs and livelihoods and about the warnings we are getting from doctors this morning as well about medicines. this is real stuff. i do not trust borisjohnson with my constituents' jobs, with their well—being. we need to nail this down. let's talk about the politics because you are backing your leader nicola sturgeon, all that boris johnson
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onceis sturgeon, all that boris johnson once is to back him. there are those that see if we cannot guarantee that then that's what an election will have to sort out. that is a matter for the conservative party. from day one this has been a bitter infighting in the conservative party. it's been a much wider than that. it is about a split country, isn't it? there are splits and that's what it would have been good previously to reach out. nicola sturgeon reached out after the election are put together a wide range of experts and collea g u es together a wide range of experts and colleagues from different parties and we came up with the compromise. that was rejected and the government made no meaningful means of engaging. i would like to see a referendum, give people a choice with remain on the ballot and may be at long last we will see boris johnson tell us what brexit actually means because we have no plans and we know the calamity that no—deal brexit would be. that's something that unites some of those in the
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conservative party, snp, liberal democrats, plaid cymru and even the labour party as well. there is no mandate for no—deal brexit in parliament. iam going parliament. i am going to be due a tweet because it solves a problem for me. it says i know this goes against the bbc news agenda but try this with the next remain. is it not a fact the reason you cannot stomach no deal is because you know it would deliver what was voted for, a clean break from the eu. what is the answer? the answer is if no deal was meant to be they would have told us that before we voted and borisjohnson, michael gove and the rest said it would be the easiest deal and they would be the easiest deal and they would be the easiest deal and they would be a deal. so i am afraid nobody voted for no—deal brexit. if they had boris johnson nobody voted for no—deal brexit. if they had borisjohnson a michael gove would not have told us before the referendum there would be a deal and it would be the easiest one we could ever make. a general election, if it is called on wednesday, what do you think the
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reaction will be? let's see what happens. i welcome an election and anything to get rid of this dangerous and damaging tory government. is there a risk this is good for the brexit party? in scotland the snp hammered the brexit party at the european elections, they might be winning elsewhere about the snp was beating them with our positive pro—european message that we can take to the people. i think the snp would do very well and an election and it's also an opportunity to get rid of a dangerous and damaging tory government with that very clear message that no—deal brexit harms our constituents and we will not stand for it. 0ur political editor, we seem to get a clearer idea of what those who are opposing no—deal brexit will do tomorrow in parliament in terms of legislators. they are looking to extending changing the law to delay brexit until january extending changing the law to delay brexit untiljanuary 31, that is something you would support?
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getting rid of no—deal brexit is something that's very important. we've been working with colleagues across the political spectrum for yea rs across the political spectrum for years and over the past few months and we want to remain in the eu, others want to stay in the eu but we are united in wanting to stop no—deal brexit on the 31st of 0ctober so that is something we will support. is that party policy? this topic no—deal brexit is absolutely party policy and has been from day one. it's not something people voted for, it will do damage to all of our constituents and when we said we will do everything we can to stop no—deal brexit we meant it. the bottom line is whatever happens in terms of no—deal brexit, an election comes after? either it comes after we managed to set a date before but first of all if it comes after no deal must be off the table first. it's important to get that. we cannot allow boris
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johnson's trickery and anti—democratic nature to get, to ta ke anti—democratic nature to get, to take us into no—deal brexit by default. those kind of political games with people's lives is not acceptable. i want to see the back of this government. we need to sort out no—deal brexit first of all and then let's get rid of this tory government. we are in from a hell of a day tomorrow, aren't we? i'm afraid so. thank you. hundreds ofjobs could go at a steelmaking factory in wales after its owner announced it was shutting part of its operations. the steel giant tata is closing its 0rb electrical steels base in newport which will mean up to 380 jobs could go from the plant. the company has been up for sale since may last year as tata had decided to concentrate on its core steel production business. dame barbara windsor was in downing street today today to tell the prime minister about what she describes at the "devastating state" of dementia care in the uk. the former eastenders actor was diagnosed with dementia in 2014
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and now needs 24 hour care as a result of the illness. she delivered an open letter from the alzheimer's society signed by more than 100,000 people — calling on the government to improve care for the disease. a trainee pilot in australia has managed to safely land a light aircraft during his very first flying lesson, after his instructor passed out. operators at an airport in perth, western australia, guided max sylvester through the landing — he circled the airport for nearly an hour, practicing the approach, before touching down. both max and the operator remained remarkably calm throughout, as you can hear here. do you know how to operate the aeroplane? this is my first lesson. are they unconscious? he's leaning over my shoulder. i'm trying to keep him up but he keeps falling down. the first thing we are going to do is make sure the wings stay level. and that you keep a consistent speed and consistent altitude. you are doing really, really well. you're doing an amazing job. yeah, well, my flight
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instructor did say that i was the best student he's had. well, you'll definitely have a story to tell at the end of this. now, let's move away from calmness because we are looking at hurricane dorian. real concern about this because it is not going anywhere at the moment. normally these systems move through at the reasonable pace, 15 mph or so. really sustained, strong, damaging winds tend to be in most areas for a couple of hours but this has stalled with these category five wins. it's difficult to get on the ground footage at the moment but you can only —— imagine the devastation. this is the satellite image from yesterday. it's from yesterday because it's a visible satellite
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image and we can get more detailed. i want you to concentrate on the eye. notice for a time as it intensifies under here and the eye gets really tiny like a pinhole as it intensifies, it hit peak intensity at 185 mph winds and then notice how the eyes starts to open up notice how the eyes starts to open up and that is the start weakening. we will look at that again and if you look for that you can make out a couple of concentric circles like an onion. that is due to the fact this is such a great storm it cannot sustain itself and almost reaches terminal velocity, it sustain itself and almost reaches terminalvelocity, it spinning sustain itself and almost reaches terminal velocity, it spinning at such a rate the eyes starts to colla pse such a rate the eyes starts to collapse upon itself and so then it begins to regenerate and regenerate with a slightly larger radius. that gives you a bigger area of devastating winds. they've come down slightly but still very strong and
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it's affecting a much bigger area. possibly ten times the size of the pinhole ami am i right that they get their strength from the warm water? yes, the only thing we can see now as it approaches florida, we have a big landmass, drierair approaches florida, we have a big landmass, drier air across the land, it isn't getting that pull in from the moisture in the world. that should start to decelerate it. it can go through several cycles of that regeneration especially if it is this powerful. the thought at the moment is that this circle marks where they think the i will go. some people think this cone is the i of the storm, that is the uncertainty area. there is thought that the i could track inward on the florida peninsula. it could look out into the atlantic. at the moment it looks like it will get close to the
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florida coast. it is staying offshore, but such a big system, those damaging outer bands will cause significant problems for florida. this red area is the warning area. the storm surge alone over 20 foot to the coast. how do you determine where this is going to go? this is the biggest headache. the weather on the ground, we have high and low pressure systems but we also have the weather pattern in the upper also have the weather pattern in the upper atmosphere. we talk about the jet stream for the uk, similar thing, the upperair jet stream for the uk, similar thing, the upper air drives what goes on all around the globe. there isa goes on all around the globe. there is a feature across the tropics cold the subtropical ridge, and that steers these things across the atlantic. that was behaving fairly consistently for a while, and it looked like the storm would go across florida into the panhandle, and, this will be a phd subject for some people, because there is so
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much science involved. this system has got so intense it has pulled warm airso farup has got so intense it has pulled warm air so far up into the atmosphere it has affected how this pattern sits. it has eroded this area of high pressure and this rich, and now this is the pattern, as we saw the storm get towards the bahamas it has shifted the whole pattern. we have the hurricane and this flabby part here with no steering force, and it is now moving at one mile per hour. instead of three orfour at one mile per hour. instead of three or four hours of hideous weather, people are getting 24 hours of it across parts of grand bahama. and we are waiting now, there is a clear weather trough we can see across canada, we are waiting for that to kick in, engage with this, and hopefully arc it back out over the atlantic. but all those uncertain elements, the nature of the storm, the regenerating eye, the hotairof into the storm, the regenerating eye, the hot air of into the atmosphere, makes it so difficult. these are
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very clever models, but it is very difficult. this is quite a small feature to pinpoint with detail in such a big pattern. it makes what's happening here rather dull. yes, it isa happening here rather dull. yes, it is a bit benign back here. but if you are here in the uk, there has been a contrast in the days to the north and the west, a story of increasing cloud and outbreaks of rain. to the south, a lot of sunshine. a little bit more cloud coming in now. we have our own area of low pressure. we are struggling with our forecast because the interplay of dorian with things will that night we have a succession of low centre going into the north of the uk and france interjecting. as they tuck into a more cloud to the south overnight tonight. we move into a warm sector, and a milder
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night is the key thing. it was chilly first thing this morning. tomorrow morning, 11—13. cloud around first thing. the best of the sunshine to the south and east. a bit like today, front step into the north. some rain laterfor northern ireland, scotland, a few showers from northern england and perhaps north wales. milder to the north for stornoway. 0n the pressure chart, this triangle is what we call the warm sector. overnight tuesday and wednesday, rain sweeps across the uk, then we move behind the cold front into colder air. rain in the south—east first thing. that pulls away. there will be sunshine around, but a chilly day. top temperatures high teens. a notable north—westerly wind. temperatures to the north of scotla nd wind. temperatures to the north of scotland struggling to get into single figures. the wind is pronounced. for the rest of the week, the low pulls away to scandinavia. further lows coming
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into the northern half of the uk from the atlantic. still looking entitled to the north. further outbreaks of rain to come for scotla nd outbreaks of rain to come for scotland and northern ireland. to the south, sunny conditions for thursday. warmer here as well. and finally milder. temperatures will cease all across northern scotland as those warm sector come in and out. temperature is to the finals will eventually plunge. a white story across the northern half of the uk on friday. by the weekend it becomes quieter. a reasonable amount of dry weather. temperatures looking a little disappointing. temperatures looking a little disappointing. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the cabinet is summoned to downing street this afternoon, as speculation mounts that a snap election could be called. it comes as downing street warns potential tory rebels to back boris johnson on brexit,
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or face the sack. they are almost goading people into voting, because strategies to lose this week and then seek a general election. we expect conservative mps to support the conservative prime ministerand to support the conservative prime minister and conservative agenda. politicians should not seek to take the authority of government and handed to the leader of the opposition. meanwhile, sources say groups opposed to a no—deal brexit will demand a three month extension to the uk's eu departure date — labour leaderjeremy corbyn says that his party will do everything it can to stop a no—deal brexit — and that he is ready for a general election. it is the people, not an unelected prime minister, who should determine our country's future. an election is
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the democratic way forward. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began: hurricane dorian smashes in with winds of up to 180 miles an hour — causing huge damage and severe flooding. and, are you fed up of late mail? we'll be finding out an extreme delivery service, using a jet engine—powered suit. we'll have the sport in the moment, but we are in the former chancellor philip hammond has written to the prime minister about brexit. chris joins us from westminster. what is in this letter? further illustration of the previous establishment have become the rebels and vice versa. philip hammond, the former chancellor, to the prime minister, sets out six questions that he and 21 colleagues wanted to ask boris johnson if they had had the chance to meet him over the last couple of
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days. that meeting didn't happen. philip hammond says he and his collea g u es philip hammond says he and his colleagues want to know what steps have been taken since misterjohnson visited berlin 11 days ago to set out what the uk's alternative text would be to replace the backstop. that guarantee for keeping the border in ireland open and any circumstances. to confirm the changes the government ones are limited to the backstop and don't extend beyond that. to publish the uk's proposals for an alternative to the backstop. to confirm that these alternatives have been sent to the european union. to confirm and commit to publishing any response from the european union, and to set out in detail what negotiation has gone on between whom, and where, as far as negotiation between the uk and the eu is concerned since the prime minister made those trips to berlin and paris. mister hammond concluded his letter by saying that
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given these were the questions that his colleagues wanted to put to the prime minister and get answers from the prime minister on, prior to these votes expected in the next couple of days in the comments, it would be very helpful if the prime minister could reply before the house sits tomorrow. you get some sense they are, with my waffling summary, just how detailed and specific those questions are, and blu ntly, specific those questions are, and bluntly, how hard it is likely to be for the prime minister to provide a nswe rs for the prime minister to provide answers that mister hammond at his collea g u es answers that mister hammond at his colleagues would regard as adequate. thanks, chris. sport now on afternoon live with gavin ra mjuan. joe denly played his part in that incredible ashes test at headingly — and will now be at the top of england's batting order. he will open for england, reward for that performance was that most of the headlines were about ben stokes,
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but his contribution has been recognised and he will open against australia. he opened on his debut against west indies but moved to number three and later number four. perhaps has a point to prove back at the top of the order. he will swap places with jason roy who has struggled in the series so far, but denley feels it is great that roy is still involved. i got a call from joe root after some time off and said he'd like me to go to top of the order and try to get us off to a good start. officerjason lowe bat four, it is great for england cricket. with jason roy four, it is great for england cricket. withjason roy in the four, it is great for england cricket. with jason roy in the team we are better, that is for sure. with him coming in at four, hopefully the new ball worn off, and myself and rory doing ourjobs at the top, it enables him to come in and play his way. he is a dangerous player, so it's great to have that.
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i destroy you to make changes, namely which batsmen will be dropped to make way for steve smith. use the top run scorer and has now recovered from the concussion that saw him miss that third test. he's only been there a matter of weeks but romelu lukaku has been the subject of racist abuse in italy? yes, he was subject to racist abuse yesterday. he scored what turned out to be the winner. it is the transfer deadline.
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it's the transfer deadline for scotland and leagues one and two today — plus the clubs in europe. roma have reached an agreement with arsenal to sign midfielder henrikh mkhitaryan on a season—long loan deal. the italian club will pay a loan fee and the player's wages, but there is no option or obligation to buy the armenia international. liverpool defender virgil van dijk is in line to pick up another award. after beating lionel messi and cristiano ronaldo to the uefa player of the year honour, he's up against them again for fifa's best player award.
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van dijk‘s managerjurgen klopp is among the nominees for best men's coach and england's lucy bronze is nominated for the best women's player award, alongside the americans alex morgan and megan rapinoe. england manager phil neville is on the shortlist for best coach in the women's game some news coming in from the old bailey. this is to do with gross negligence in the case of the death ofa negligence in the case of the death of a three—year—old cold alfie lam who was crushed behind a car seat in february last year. stephen watterson is 26, from croydon. he denied any involvement in alfie's death at an earlier trial in february. the jury death at an earlier trial in february. thejury had been unable to reach a verdict on the manslaughter charge against him. it acquitted alfie's mother of a manslaughter charge but convicted of child cruelty. she remains in prison. we are hearing that stephen watterson pleaded guilty. this came as his retrial for watterson pleaded guilty. this came as his retrialfor manslaughter was about to get under way. this is three and a half year old alfie he
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was crushed behind his car seat. distressing images of the car seat we re distressing images of the car seat were shown at that previous trial. thejury were shown at that previous trial. the jury about to be sworn in. but we are hearing that he has in fact pleaded guilty to manslaughter by gross negligence. corresponded his at the old bailey. we will establish contact with him and bring you more. a multi—million pound government advertising campaign has been launched urging businesses and the public to get ready for brexit. we can expect to see billboards and tv and social media adverts appearing in the coming weeks. it's been reported that the campaign could cost as much as £100 million as ministers seek to inform people what they might need to do, if anything, ahead of the deadline. joining us now is benedict pringle — author of the politicaladvertising.co.uk blog.
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in advertising terms, this is a huge deal. it is a massive amount of money, especially given that needs to be spent within two months. it is roughly the same amount of money that amazon spent in the whole of last year their advertising. if you haven't seen the campaign yet, i can assure you , haven't seen the campaign yet, i can assure you, you will do soon. are you getting an idea where they are putting priorities? social media are traditional newspapers or telly? given the price tag i think we'll see a bit of everything, or rather a lot of everything. so far we have seen some social media advertising some big billboard adverts. if you believe the press releases, it will believe the press releases, it will be on tv, radio, podcasts. they will try to get everyone in the country. what's the most expensive form of advertising? tv advertising is
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probably the most expensive. if you wa nt probably the most expensive. if you want a 32nd ad in the middle of the great british bake off, you could pay hundreds of thousands of pounds forjust pay hundreds of thousands of pounds for just that one pay hundreds of thousands of pounds forjust that one piece of airtime. direct mail is also expensive because you have to print out leaflets a nd because you have to print out leaflets and pay to get them delivered. that's expensive, but at least you are guaranteeing that someone will see a piece of the direct mailfrom when someone will see a piece of the direct mail from when they pick it up direct mail from when they pick it up off their doormat to when they carry it to the recycling bin. each of the different media has its benefits. what about electronic billboards? so far i have seen that they get ready for brexit messages running on those. you get the same reach as a traditional poster, but you sometimes have to pay a little less because you are sharing the space with other people. is it possible to spend that amount of money on something like this in such a short time? it is possible, but it
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means that it will be a real blitz. the chances of you missing it are very slim. whether you are watching live tv, sport and live tv, listening to your favourite commercial radio show, chances are they will be in it. spend this much money on that much time, they will need to buy up pretty much every bit of space that they can. michael gove he was in charge of no deal plans says this is to encourage a shared responsibility for preparing to leave the eu on 31st of october. 0ne rather senses it is about, don't blame me because we have told you what to do. the initial fear is that this would be some sort of thinly disguised conservative party election campaign, paid for by the public purse. i don't think that's what we've seen in this instance. it
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isa what we've seen in this instance. it is a fairly straightforward bit of public information advertising. when you see the statistics, albeit provided by the government, there is huge uncertainty as to what no—deal brexit would mean. something like 4296 brexit would mean. something like 42% of small to medium—sized businesses say they have idea what they need to do or how they need to do it. to get ready for a no—deal brexit. 0nly do it. to get ready for a no—deal brexit. only 50% of people think that brexit is going to happen by the 31st of october. if you take those figures, people don't expect anything to happen, but if you take the government at their word, it is likely that we will have a no deal scenario. people do need to start taking it seriously. now, as we look ahead to westminster returning to action tomorrow, today the news channel is in birmingham where we're gauging the mood of the city which narrowly
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voted for the uk to leave the eu in 2016. ijoins us from there. yes, birmingham is home to the second largest polish expat community in the uk. joining me is the founder and director of the polish expat association here. how are polish people here generally feeling about the political process right now, and the political process right now, and the continuing uncertainty?” the political process right now, and the continuing uncertainty? i think people are anxious since the brexit referendum, and uncertainty is not happening. —— is not helping. people are still not sure what is going to happen. 0ur are still not sure what is going to happen. our people going to lose their rights and the state is going to change, but what in practical terms that is going to mean, we are still not quite sure. what is happening with people's applications
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for settled status? are people going through that process or are they holding back waiting to see what happens? there is a relatively small number of people applying people are holding back to me to see what happens. people are making the decision whether they are going to stay here after brexit. certainly it is about in the polish community a lot of people choosing to return to poland. we know that romanians and bulgarians are coming in big numbers, but polish people are waiting to see what happens. there's also a lot of issues with applications. many people have been rejected despite the fact that they meet all the criteria and meet all the conditions to have settled status. there is a lot of problems with the system, so people are waiting for a later time to go through with it. what are members of your association telling you about attitudes towards them throughout this process. it has changed quite a
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lot, attitudes, since the brexit process started. but now at the moment as we are closer to the date, we come across many cases where people are being put under pressure to register, for example, employers of some people who come across demand on them to have registration done within the month, even though we still have nearly two years to com plete we still have nearly two years to complete the process. people are being rejected and turned down by job centres because they don't have registration through yet. it is the same case with landlords. even though you say people are holding back from applying, they are finding that sometimes that has a negative impact when it comes to finding employment? yes, by the home office guidelines we have nearly two years to register. but you encourage people to go ahead and start that process now? yes, it is properly
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safer. but it shouldn't be. just because we don't have rights respected by employers and institutions. but the reality is, u nfortu nately, institutions. but the reality is, unfortunately, it is safer to go through with the process and have the security. thank you. founder of the security. thank you. founder of the polish expat association. more on what's coming up this afternoon. i've been asking people here what they think about all sorts of things related to brexit, including rumours ofa related to brexit, including rumours of a possible snap election, and later, after 5pm i will talk to the former boss ofjohn lewis, now conservative mayor of the west midlands. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. there is a bbc documentary on the palm oil industry. why is that important? it is a matter of privacy
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between producers and environmentalists who say that everything we use palm oilfor, from the make up that you and i use, through to crisps and margarine, it really co m es through to crisps and margarine, it really comes in every aspect of modern life. and environmentalists say that this is destroying ra i nfo rests say that this is destroying ra i nforests in places say that this is destroying rainforests in places like indonesia and malaysia. 0n rainforests in places like indonesia and malaysia. on their side, the prime minister of malaysia has said that this is grossly unfair, and that this is grossly unfair, and that it that this is grossly unfair, and thatitis that this is grossly unfair, and that it is sustainable. emmy burbidgejoins me now from bristol. she went to look at palm oil estates, and took a bbc camera crew with her. why were you so interested
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in this? well, i own a beauty salon in somerset, and being a make—up artist, i feel that people in somerset, and being a make—up artist, ifeel that people be more aware of what they are using on their skin, aware of what they are using on theirskin, and aware of what they are using on their skin, and their toiletries. and find out if the brands we are using are sustainable. i think that isa using are sustainable. i think that is a big issue that we all need to look into. we are seeing pictures here of the palm oil estates in papua new guinea which you visited. what was your impression of what you saw? when we visited the first plantation, it was the sustainable plantation, it was the sustainable plantation, and the workers were very happy, they were paid fairly, andi very happy, they were paid fairly, and i didn't see any bad issues going on, because what they are doing is helping to not put down
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ra i nfo rests doing is helping to not put down rainforests and put back nature in these buffer zones. it was really interesting to see also the scientific research they are doing to try to stop taking down rain forest. in the documentary you can see that they are helping find new ways of research via stem cell technology to produce more but plant less trees. we have to leave it they are afraid, but you can see that documentary on the bbc news channel, find it on our website. thank you for joining find it on our website. thank you forjoining us. let's go live now the old bailey. yes, this case relates to three and a half year old alfie lamb who was pulled unresponsive from the passenger seat of a convertible in
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february last year. initially, both his mother and stephen watterson denied knowing what happened to him. stephen watterson was accused of pushing the car seat back into the little boy, crashing and asphyxiating him. he died after three days in hospital. in february ajury three days in hospital. in february a jury was unable to reach a verdict on whether stephen watterson was responsible for alfie's manslaughter. you face retrial today, and just before the retrial was due to start, he said that he was due to start, he said that he was guilty of alfie's manslaughter and will be sentenced next week for that. he has been in prison since february last year. he was taken into custody shortly after alfie was found dead. he remains in custody waiting for his sentence. alfie's mother was found guilty of child cruelty and is still in prison.
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now let's get the weather. hello, three today we have seen cloud piling through the northern half of the uk, bringing ad breaks of rain, all tied to an area of low pressure. to the south, blue skies and sunshine. through the evening and overnight, the cloud will spread further south. most of the rain will pull away into the north sea becoming increasingly light and patchy. the big differences with the cloud by the time we get into the early hours of tuesday morning it is so much milder than it was on monday. in some spots temperatures dipped down to freezing. lows of 12-13 dipped down to freezing. lows of 12—13 first thing on tuesday. tuesday daytime starts cloudy. sunshine for central and eastern areas through the morning. to the north are next front approaches, wetter weather come the afternoon. up wetter weather come the afternoon. up to 22 in the best of the sunshine
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in the south—east. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4: the cabinet is summoned to downing street, as speculation it comes as downing street warns potential tory rebels to back boris johnson on brexit, or face the sack. they are almost goading people into voting against the government because i think thier strategy, to be honest, is to lose this week and then seek a general election. we expect conservative mps to support the prime minister and the conservative agenda and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and hand it to the leader of the opposition. meanwhile, sources say groups opposed to a no—deal brexit will demand a three month extension to the uk's eu departure date — if there's no new deal passed by parliament by october the 19th.
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labour leaderjeremy corbyn says that his party will do everything it can to stop a no—deal brexit, and that he is ready for a general election. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began — hurricane dorian smashes in with winds of up to 180 miles an hour, causing huge damage and severe flooding. a man has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of a toddler, who was crushed behind a car seat last year. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. england have a new opening partnership ahead of this week's ashes test but there are tributes to one member of the squad who will not be playing. all of that at half past. it was a pretty chilly start to the new week for eastern areas of scotland, first in aberdeenshire and
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temperatures into single figures across south east of england. more mild night awaits but plenty of cloud, i will have the outlook for tomorrow and the coming days coming up tomorrow and the coming days coming up shortly. also coming up — we'll be finding out about the backlog of passengers who were stuck on the isles of scilly. that's in news nationwide, in just over half an hour. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. speculation is mounting that boris johnson could be about to announce plans for a snap election this weekjust as mps return to parliament. we're expecting ministers to arrive for an unscheduled cabinet meeting in the next hour at downing steet. meanwhile, mps opposing the government including rebel conservatives are expected to try to force the prime minister to seek a three month extension
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to the brexit deadline of october 31st. it's understood that boris johnson will treat the move as a confidence vote and push for an early election if he's defeated. the former chancellor philip hammond has written to the prime minister urging him to hold more talks with the party and asking for a revised withdrawal agreement from the eu. let's get the latest from our political correspondent ben wright. good morning, how lovely to see you on this sunny morning. behind the bonhomie, cabinet ministers are threatening a purge of tory mps who join opposition efforts to block a no—deal brexit in the commons tomorrow. so, will that stop the tory rebels? what rebels? are there rebels? there certainly are, including conservative mps who sat in cabinet until borisjohnson took over. it seems to me like they are almost goading people into voting against the government, because i think their strategy, to be honest, is to lose this week and then seek a general election, having removed those of us
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who are not against brexit, not against leaving the european union, but believe we should do so with a deal. there are just days before parliament is suspended for mps to try to pass a law that will aim to stop borisjohnson taking the uk out of the eu without a deal. number 10 has warned conservative mps they will be kicked out of the party if they join that effort. but rebel resolve seems strong. borisjohnson will find if he purges moderate, sensible conservatives, conservatives like me who are willing to leave with a deal, who voted for it three times, unlike him, he will pay a penalty, i think, at the ballot box. westminster is reassembling for a seismic week, a showdown between the government and parliament that could determine how or even if brexit happens at the end of next month. and this morning, cabinet ministers said it was right to demand loyalty from conservative mps.
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this is the standard relationship mps have with the government. we expect conservative mps to support the conservative prime minister and the conservative agenda and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and hand it to the leader of the opposition. but complaints of hypocrisy adds to the tension here. earlier this year, several tory mps now in the cabinet defied the party whip and voted against theresa may's brexit deal. the numbers could be very tight in tomorrow's vote, and if the prime minister carries out his threat to withdraw the whip from rebel tory mps, this week he would immediately wipe out his minuscule commons majority of one. and that makes an autumn general election even more likely. sources have told the bbc there is a live discussion under way in government about possibly asking mps to approve an election as early as this week, if the law is changed to force a brexit delay. but that would need labour to vote in favour of having an election,
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and at the momentjeremy corbyn's focus seems to be unblocking a no—deal brexit. we must come together to stop no—deal. this week could be our last chance. we are working with other parties to do everything necessary to pull our country back from the brink. then we need a general election. and today, the former labour prime minister tony blair warned jeremy corbyn not to fall into the elephant trap of agreeing to an election before brexit was resolved. there was another new arrival in downing street this morning, boris johnson has a loyal new friend. but his willingness to take britain out of the eu without a deal is fracturing the tory party and pitting the government against mps. joining me now is bronwen maddox, the director of nonpartisan think tank the institute for government
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it seems as though borisjohnson has control of what's going on in one way or another. he has really managed for about a week, which is a long time in politics, to keep control of the agenda, first by the decision to suspend parliament and now by these rumblings that the cabinet discussions beginning he is going to say he will call for an election within the next couple of days. to start the process for one. be crucial to that is the fault. if he says to parliament i want it for 0ctober he says to parliament i want it for october at the 17th, before a no—deal brexit, it's within his power nearer the time to change his byme and do it after the 31st. he certainly has the power to set the date, the question is whether labour signs on to this butjeremy corbyn has sent so many things about
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wanting a general election it would be hard for him not to assent to this. borisjohnson, be hard for him not to assent to this. boris johnson, having indicated a date, the debate is whether he could change that and there is much speculation on twitter whether under his powers she has whether under his powers she has whether he could do that. i think the political cost of that kind of footwork would be considerable, even for someone who is trying it on in so many ways as he is at the moment. do you not now? i don't think it is a case of knowledge, we are really into debates about how convention is interpreted. that's exactly the kind of thing that has proved very fluid in the past year. the move to try to have an election before the departure date could prove rather shrewd, hard for labour to turn down inconceivably something he could put to his advantage by keeping saying, iam to his advantage by keeping saying, i am trying for a deal. tomorrow will be a very long time.
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we seem to be getting a clearer idea that those opposed to no deal or planning, an extension of about three months to the current deadline. how much time would they have to make that happen and how would they do it? they've been working for some weeks to getan they've been working for some weeks to get an agreement with each other and then on the wording on this to say to the government, bring the legislation saying if the government have not done a deal by october the 19th, say, we ask you to go out we force you to go to the eu and asked force you to go to the eu and asked foran force you to go to the eu and asked for an extension of about three months. what has given them something of a headache is trying to get the wording tights not only to force the government to do that but try to force the government to accept an extension if the eu were to give one. legally it is quite complicated and also politically complicated and also politically complicated to get all those opposed to no deal to agree to what they are trying to do. we heard tony blair issuing a
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warning tojeremy corbyn, speaking at the institute for government, your institution. it was a public chat, if you like. he squeaked out what he called a complement to jeremy corbyn he squeaked out what he called a complement tojeremy corbyn which turned out to be a backhanded compliment to jeremy corbyn turned out to be a backhanded compliment tojeremy corbyn and he told him not to go for an election, partly on the grounds he might lose it, partly, tony blair wants a second referendum and jeremy corbyn swiped him away saying, sorry, i'm keen on an election. did you ask tony blair if he would vote labour? idid and vote labour? i did and i got some moments of silence over at the room and then a grimace and he said it's really very difficult and then he said, there was a qualification embedded, he said there is virtually nothing i would not do to stop no deal, even
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possibly voting forjeremy corbyn. i was pushing for an unequivocal yes or no atty left some out of there. it's great to see you, as ever —— and he left summed out there. 0ur chief political correspondent, vicki young is in downing. we are waiting on this cabinet meeting. we see dominic raab, the foreign secretary going into number ten already, the meeting will take place. we do not know what they will be discussing although of course what is due to happen in at the next couple of days in parliament will be pretty high on the agenda. the big question is tomorrow, do the rebels along with labour and liberal democrats and snp, do they have the numbers to change the law to try to force borisjohnson to brexit? it doesn't look like they do pop partly because lots of former ministers are now on the back benches —— it does
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look like they do. we've seen a borisjohnson say look like they do. we've seen a boris johnson say to look like they do. we've seen a borisjohnson say to them tomorrow is so significant we will treat it asa is so significant we will treat it as a confidence vote so you have to back the government's main policy and if you do not we will effectively kick you out the party and you will not be able to stand as and you will not be able to stand as a conservative during the election. he is saying if you back brexit or you lose your job he is saying if you back brexit or you lose yourjob or you riskjeremy corbyn becoming prime minister. that is the tactic from number ten, trying to narrow this down to a couple of options for mps and say to them, you cannot as a conservative riskjeremy corbyn becoming prime minister, i don't think that will work and i think there are lots of conservatives who feel very strongly about this. they think no—deal brexit would be disastrous for the country and for the conservative party. some of them said they will stand down at the next election so it does not bother them, that
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threat. 0thers it does not bother them, that threat. others are willing to sacrifice their careers to try to prevent no deal. it's possible, even by tomorrow, that would have possibly got through the house of commons it would then go to the house of lords. the question is if it happens, how does borisjohnson react? let's talk about this sort of general election becausejeremy corbyn has made it clear he wants an election, it would be difficult him to say no if borisjohnson goes to the house on wednesday and says that is what he wants. let's just think why boris johnson might do that. he said we are leaving on the 31st of october do or die. what he cannot do politically as prime minister is a goat to the eu and ask for a delay to brexit. he knows politically he would be finished if he went back on his word. you must come up with something else, such as an election but things are trickier than the use to be and you cannotjust call an election anymore as prime minister. you have to get it through parliament either by putting down a
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motion and say here you go, this is the motion, vote for it. he needs two thirds, over 400 mps to vote for that. you need conservative, labour mps and that's what tony blair was talking about. it's putting pressure onjeremy corbyn, who is calling for an election for a long time and telling him to vote for it. when will that be? will he give a date and could he change the date? all this uncertainty is there and that's partly because it feels as if the rules have been ripped up on both sides. looking over the past year in parliament, the way the speaker helped mps have their say, he's willing to potentially bend the rules and push them to the limit to give mps there say but the downing street operation are prepared to do the same on the other side with dominic cummings, controversial senior advisor in number ten, really driving things towards brexit. and
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are willing to come again, push the rules to the limit. in normal times, we speculate lots of what might happen and we might have a good idea but of course if neither side is playing by convention and the rules it's even harder to do than normal. the one thing you get the sense of at the moment is a borisjohnson has to seize the agenda and is holding onto that. he has come in and if you look at the past five weeks all he spoken about is leaving with or without a deal at the end of october. he wants the eu to understand or think he is serious and he is willing to take that step which some people think is incredibly controversial because he believes unless the eu knows he is serious about its, they will not come up with a new deal or any kind of compromise which is what he is so irritated with his own conservative mps who are trying to take no deal off the table because he think it
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ta kes off the table because he think it takes away any leveraged he may have undermined his negotiating position. many conservative mps say hang on, you cannot take the country to no deal because it will be disastrous for the economy. that's the battle we are still in more than three yea rs we are still in more than three years after people voted to leave. so much for having —— for the puppy having a quiet day at his new home. a cute puppy downing street all points towards a general election. that's the new puppy. thank you very much. now, as we look ahead to westminster returning to action tomorrow, today the news channel is in birmingham where we're gauging the mood of the city which narrowly voted for the uk to leave the eu in 2016. annita mcveigh is right in the city centre, in centenary square for us. thank you. such a lot going on in westminster at the moment but that makes it the perfect time to be here
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away from the westminster bubble in away from the westminster bubble in a place like birmingham where the decisions that are happening at westminster are affecting people. we've been speaking to market traders, business owners, car industry experts and so on. birmingham isa industry experts and so on. birmingham is a really interesting place, ten westminster constituencies, nine of those are held by labour mps won by a conservative. if you look at the referendum, leave won the vote by the narrowest of margins, 50.4%, one of the narrowest of margins in the country. today i've been asking people in birmingham about their views on boris johnson, people in birmingham about their views on borisjohnson, brexit and generally what's happening in westminster. it's really annoying. it'sjust annoying. without the where we are. do you think what boris johnson without the where we are. do you think what borisjohnson is doing is right? no. there is a rumour general
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election might be called as called as soon as this afternoon, what would you say to that? that's a very good idea. a very good idea. that's the best thing to do for the country at the moment. i really don't agree with boris johnson and his new government and the way they are trying to force through a no—deal brexit and its just could be catastrophic for the country. did you think borisjohnson really wa nts did you think borisjohnson really wants no deal, is that they were chipping up? or wants no deal, is that they were chipping up? 0rare wants no deal, is that they were chipping up? or are these tactics? it isa chipping up? or are these tactics? it is a stand—off and obviously europe are not bowing down to the tactics at the moment. it is a bit of brinksmanship. he says he does not want no deal but it's surprising his own has gone from 1 million to one chance to now we are three or four weeks away and it looks the most likely thing to happen. i'm quite concerned about the long—term impact on the country. it
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feels quite divisive. it feels like we are settling into two different camps are different camps and long term i am concerned about what it's doing to our country, yeah, the tensions is causing. do you think a no deal seems more likely or do you think this is a strategy that boris johnson is trying to follow? i think it's a strategy and i think probably the no deal is more likely. i don't know. i am done with predicting the country because you just, they keep on doing things i don't want them to do. there is a suggestion a general election could be announced as early as this afternoon, this evening, what would you make of that? i would be surprised yet again but i don't know, ijust think
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i would be surprised yet again but i don't know, i just think we are i would be surprised yet again but i don't know, ijust think we are in such a mess. i feel like we are in a mess. do you think a vote, an election would help sort anything out? it could do, yeah. it might give people another opportunity to make a choice. there is quite a lot of confusion going around and lots of emotion. it could go either way. with me again in birmingham this afternoon as alex from the centre for brexit studies. 0ne lady i was chatting to said that she has given up chatting to said that she has given up trying to predict what's going to happen and who could blame her, frankly. nonetheless, i'm going to ask you to try to do that. boris johnson, we know for sure, is trying to direct the pace and agenda, set the direction for what happens next. he is and of course for an election he would need two thirds of mps to support them so it would not happen
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without labour supporting it. labour wa nt without labour supporting it. labour wantan without labour supporting it. labour want an election so if borisjohnson asked for one he will likely get one. it would have to be well before the end of october because opposition parties would not want to see is crash out in the middle of that. i think it's quite likely that could happen. you will either head off at the pass and try and push for one or get one landed on him possibly through a vote of no—confidence. the odds of that happening are quite high, i beyond that, to what end? do we get an extension with brussels? that would be most likely, i think. what are the calculations for conservative rebels, the remaining camp right now? calculations for the remaining camp are in terms of trying to avoid leaving with deal at the end of october. trying to mandate the prime minister to seek an extension from brussels. it is key for them. if we
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end up with an election before the end up with an election before the end of october and a different government that does not want to leave with no deal the first think it would do is ask brussels for an extension. it's very difficult to predict that with any certainty because the polling suggests the tories may have about one third of the vote at the moment with the brexit party eat into that vote? and so on. what is your sense about birmingham, a city that voted by the narrowest of margins to leave. have people substantially change their minds orare people substantially change their minds or are people who voted remain saying, let's get this done whatever happens? from our own studies and outreach events talking to people some degree of buyers‘ remorse among some lever voters. they said if we knew then what we knew now we would have voted differently in terms of the impact on economy and price of food and so on. that would suggest there‘s been
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some of his shift, based on limited evidence. he also seen is some camps hardening oppositions. —— what we have also seen. if we had election soon i would guess birmingham would probably be marginally remain but i don‘t think i would necessarily say hugely. the fact we still think 30% of people support living with no deal attest to that. —— leaving with no deal. coming up at five pmi will be talking to the former boss ofjohn lewis, the conservative mayor for the west midlands. the conservative mp and member of the backbench 1922 committee nigel evans joins us. what will happen tomorrow, nigel eva ns ? it looks as though the rebels on my own side willjoin with the
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opposition and the speaker will tear up opposition and the speaker will tear up the rule book yet again to this motion to go ahead and they want to extend article 50 by another three months. the real problem with that is if it did pass, boris will not agree to it, he cannot, for all the things vicki young said earlier in her report. and that, for me, means the prime minister really has a very few options left. my own view is that if parliament cannot obey the instructions of the british people in the referendum that took place in 2016 then the british people deserve the opportunity to change their parliament. i have come round to the view that if the rebels win the vote tomorrow then we should seek the dissolution of parliament and an early election. when, how early? that would be up to the prime minister to decide but i
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cannot see, if he makes that decision this week then i suspect it will be before october to 31st. because you will not have an election lasting seven weeks. at least that will smoke out the labour mps because it is all over the place right now. in lancashire i represent one of the seats, all the constituencies in lancashire labour and conservative all voted and leave. some bite 70%. over the past three years lots of the labour mps have done everything in their power to dilate brexit or obstructed. they do not want us to leave the eu. three quarters of parliament voted to remain in the eu and it‘s the remain as that one extension. not a single lever voting mp thinks we got to have another three months. listening to people like david gauke and philip hammond, they want to tie
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the hands of the prime minister and push him to brussels and for boris to say to michel barnier, give me a deal, whatever deal, iwill to say to michel barnier, give me a deal, whatever deal, i will have to accept. that will not be a great dealfor the united accept. that will not be a great deal for the united kingdom. accept. that will not be a great dealforthe united kingdom. i accept. that will not be a great dealfor the united kingdom. i want the prime minister to be able to go to the eu and negotiate from a position of strength. what we saw from the meeting that borisjohnson had in berlin with angela merkel as she said i will give you one month, come up with a solution to the backstop issue so there has been some movement with the eu. that‘s a question of interpretation as to exactly what she meant by that. i am interested in this date of the 17th because some people suggest he could ask for an election on the 17th and then delay it until after eight no—deal brexit happens, what are the chances of that? —— delay it until after no—deal brexit. it is so unpredictable. i have been
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an mpfor27 it is so unpredictable. i have been an mp for 27 years and i have given up an mp for 27 years and i have given up trying to second guess what‘s going to happen. we have seen the rule book torn up, we‘ve seen conventions go out of the window, we are about to go into a period that may be turned into a dissolution. we simply do not know. i know one thing because i‘ve been chatting to lots of people and boris is getting the thumbs up from lots of people because they see he is showing leadership, somebody said there‘s lots of positivity, he is brightening the mood of politics. the fact is he knows what he wants to go and what he wants to do, delivered for what the british people voted for. i get a sense, reflected in the opinion polls on sunday, the conservative party are bouncing back greatly. i know some people said if we left without a deal it would be a disaster for the party. if you want a disaster for the conservative party look at the local election results and look at
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the european union elections where we we re the european union elections where we were on 9%. we are back to about 34% now and i think the trajectory is going in the right direction, the momentum is there and people will now see boris wants to deliver for the people and we cannot have people within the conservative party who are, notjust within the conservative party who are, not just ignoring within the conservative party who are, notjust ignoring the referendum result but even ignoring the leadership election we have just had when boris stood on a platform that we leave on the 31st with or without a deal and he got two thirds of the party membership voting for him. some members on my own site say we don‘t care about that, we are going to side withjeremy corbyn and ta ke going to side withjeremy corbyn and take control of the order paper tomorrow, that‘s an absolute scandal. the analogy of a football tea m scandal. the analogy of a football team were one of the, one of your own players keep tripping up the captain and scores a number of own goals, they would not stay on the pitch for long.
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we are out of time. nigel evans. dame barbara windsor was in downing street today today to tell the prime minister about what she describes at the "devastating state" of dementia care in the uk. the former eastenders actor was diagnosed with dementia in 2014 and now needs 24 hour care as a result of the illness. she delivered an open letter from the alzheimer‘s society signed by more than 100,000 people — calling on the government to improve care for the disease. the coast guard and fat department are trying to reach people who were below deck when the fire broke out —— the fire department. let‘s go to los angeles and our correspondence who is there. what‘s the latest? there is a huge rescue, search and rescue operation under weight right now, the conditions are quite
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difficult, heavy fog in that area which is typicalfor the islands difficult, heavy fog in that area which is typical for the islands off the coast of california. just to the north of los angeles. this fire broke out in the middle of the night about 3:30am. a fierce blaze on this vessel, 75 foot boat that was being used on a scuba—diving expedition. it headed out a couple of days ago from santa barbara. there have been fatalities, we don‘t know how many have lost their lives. the coastguard has been saying 33 people are still unaccounted for. it‘s close to the harbour, there are hopes some people might have been to the shore bots at the moment it is assumed all of those people are still missing and a huge search is under way. looking at social media, local media reports as well, we could be looking at something quite devastating here.
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potentially this could be a terrible disaster. it would be extremely unusualfor disaster. it would be extremely unusual for bouts in this area to get into trouble, there have been some incidents over the years but a vessel carrying so many people, more than 30, 70 five foot boat, not a huge boat, clearly in quite cramped conditions, imagined that fire breaking out in the middle of the night, terrifying conditions. we do not know the full extent of what‘s happening. extremely foggy conditions in that area and that kind of weather is typical for the area and not making it easy for the rescue services. many people are out there, the us coast guard has been operating since the middle of the night and it is now breakfast time in los angeles. thank you. now it‘s time for a look at the weather, with susan powell.
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we have seen cloud across the northern half of the uk today, bringing outbreaks of rain. that is tied in with an area of low pressure. in the south, clear skies and sunshine. through the evening and sunshine. through the evening and overnight the cloud will spread further south. most of the rain will move the north sea becoming light and patchy. into the early hours of tuesday morning the cloud is milder thanit tuesday morning the cloud is milder than it was on monday. some spots tipped down to freezing. lows of 12-13 tipped down to freezing. lows of 12—13 for the first thing on tuesday. tuesday daytime starts cloudy. some sunshine for central and eastern areas for the morning. to the north, our next front approaches. wetter weather come the afternoon for northern ireland, scotland, some showers for northern england and the north of wales. up to 22 in the best of the sunshine in the south—east.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. cabinet ministers prepare to arrive at number ten, as speculation mounts that a snap election could be called in the coming days. it comes as downing street warns potential tory rebels to back boris johnson on brexit, or face the sack. they are almost goading people into voting against the government.
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because their strategy to be honest is to lose this week, and then seek a general election. we expect conservative mps to support the conservative prime minister, the conservative agenda, and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and hand it to the leader of the opposition. meanwhile, it‘s understood those opposed to a no—deal brexit will demand a three—month extension to the uk‘s eu departure date — if there‘s no new deal passed by parliament by october the 19th. labour leaderjeremy corbyn says that his party will do everything it can to stop a no—deal brexit — and that he is ready for a general election. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began — hurricane dorian smashes in with winds of up to 180 miles an hour, causing huge damage and severe flooding. a man has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of a toddler, who was crushed behind a car seat last year. and we‘ll be finding
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out about the backlog of passengers who were stuck on the isles of scilly. that‘s in news nationwide, in just a few minutes. sport now on afternoon live, with gavin ra mjuan. the ashes start on wednesday but still talk today about a man who won‘t be featuring. rivalry resumes, but one man who won‘t be part of that is james anderson. england‘s leading test wicket takers out for the rest of the series with a calf strain. his team—mate stuart broad, next on the list of those wicket takers, says it is important that he takes a break. much of the talk today today has been about joe denly. much of the talk today today has been aboutjoe denly. he will swap places with jason roy, who drops down to number four places with jason roy, who drops down to numberfour in places with jason roy, who drops down to number four in the order. england making changes to have an impact early in the game as they look to take the lead in the series.
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they have had to play without james anderson for most of the series, and stuart broad knows the fast bowler will be disappointed to miss out on the test at his home ground. he'll obviously be disappointed for a period of time. i had in mind that it was written in the stars he would back and open the bowling at the james anderson end and bolus to victory. that‘s not going to happen. he‘s obviously got a lot of cricket left in him, and he will be different desperate to get that right. australia need to decide who will replace steve smith, the top run scorer, and has recovered from the concussion that saw him miss the third test. romelu lu ka ku has been the subject of racist abuse in italy?
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the former manchester united striker — romelu lukaku — says football authorities need to do more to tackle racism in the game. it comes after he was subjected to racist abuse yesterday. playing for his new club inter milan. lukaku scored what turned out to be the winner, to send his side top of the table in serie a, but was targetted with monkey chants from sections of the crowd before and after his penalty kick. in a post on instagram this afternoon, the belgian also said social media platforms need to work harder to stamp out online abuse. roma have reached an agreement with arsenal to sign midfielder henrikh mkhitaryan on a season—long loan deal. the italian club will pay a loan fee and the player‘s wages, but there is no option or obligation to buy the armenia international. javier hernandez has left west ham, to join spanish side sevilla. the mexican‘s future had been uncertain following the arrival of record signing sebastien haller. hernandezjoined west ham two years ago from bayer leverkusen — and scored 16 goals for the premier league club. liverpool defender virgil van dijk is in line to pick up another award. after beating lionel messi
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and cristiano ronaldo to the uefa player of the year honour, he‘s up against them again for fifa‘s best player award. van dijk‘s managerjurgen klopp is among the nominees for best men‘s coach and england‘s lucy bronze is nominated for the best women‘s player award, alongside the americans alex morgan and megan rapinoe. england manager phil neville is on the shortlist for best coach in the women‘s game. the women‘s super league, that starts next weekend, will be broadcast overseas for the first time. they‘ve signed a three—year rights deal with sky mexico and a scandinavian broadcaster, which means the matches will be screened to viewers across central america, norway, sweden, finland and denmark. the fa will also stream highlights from some england and club cup matches. big news in the men‘s draw is the withdrawal of the defending champion and world number one novak djokovic. he was two sets down in his 4th round match against stan wawrinka when he had to call it a day because of a shoulder injury that had been troubling him
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all week in new york. he was booed off court, he later apologised to the crowd but explained that he just couldn‘t carry on. look, i‘m not being offended by, you know, mistreated by anybody. i don‘t really pay too much attention. you know, i like to respect others, and i hope that others can respect me and my decision. i‘m sorry for the crowd, obviously they came to see a full match, and it just wasn‘t to be. that‘s all the sport for now. now on afternoon live
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let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to bbc spotlight‘sjohn danks who is in penzance and is talking about the backlog of passengers who were stuck on the isles of scilly. and look east‘s richard westcott is in cambridge, talking about a new screening test to guard against a virus in babies that‘s being developed in the east of england. 0ver tojohn — when did passengers start arriving back from the isles of scilly and how long were they stranded ? the ferry was only repaired last night, they put on additional services today, they are doing to return services from penzance to st mary‘s, trying to clear the backlog. as many as 800 passengers have been stuck. we heard stories of some people chartering their own boats to get back, and some trying to book onto flights. at this time of year there just aren‘t that many flights. people complaining there weren‘t
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additional services for them to get home before the ferry was repaired. have people been angry? you might expect so but some have been taking a positive view, saying, we have had our holiday extended. that is all well if you can extend your accommodation and don‘t mind shelling out for a few more days. some i spoke to had mixed reviews, some not happy with the company behind the ferry that broke down, they said the problems could have been more clearly communicated to them. some had more positive views. communication wasn't brilliant from the steamship company. it was all not very forthcoming. they have reduced the price in the hotel as well. it does put you off a little bit. we love coming to the silly i'll. but... you ask about the
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attitude and the boat. we had a few cheeky days, so we are not moaning. they couldn‘t have enough warm words, some of them. as for the ceo of the isles of scilly steamship company. he was speaking to passengers, he would not give us an interview on camera but give an interview on camera but give an interview earlier today and said they were communicating to passengers through sending e—mails and text messages as well as posting on their website. he said that having heard complaints from passengers, we certainly need to look at the way we have been communicating and improve in certain
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areas. he said in the area of compensation, they will look at that ona compensation, they will look at that on a case—by—case basis. richard talking about this screening. it is a virus, we have probably both had it, but it is dangerous for unborn children. if pregnant women get it, it is one of the leading causes of deafness. two to three children a day are damaged by the virus. you don‘t always get it, but it can be damaging and cause brain damage. it is this really common virus, we have all had it, but most of us have not heard of it. what is being done where you are? there is a team of 100 nhs staff, all on their own time, unpaid, have gone away and develop the country‘s first targeted screening programme.
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basically if a newborn in this part of the world fails to hearing tests, they get this different new swab test, they are tested for the virus and if they have it the mothers are offered early treatment, and potentially that early treatment can stop a child going and can even reverse some of that deafness. it is quite experimental, could potentially lead to screening across the country but they are testing it here first. we were catching the virus too late and a lot of the damage was done. we had to treat cmv within one month of life. the research was starting to show that that was making a difference. that for some children it was preventing that hearing loss deteriorating. watch the advice to pregnant women? if you are pregnant or know someone who is pregnant, three tips. it is spread from toddlers quite often. if you are pregnant, don‘t share food with a toddler. if you change the nappy, wash your hands, critically,
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don‘t kiss them on the lips. some toddlers will kiss you on the lips, try to avoid that, also snotty noses. hugs are fine, but it is those fluids. try to avoid them just when you are pregnant. after that, fine, but just when when you are pregnant. after that, fine, butjust when you are pregnant. john danks, on the isles of scilly. the recall of the silly is, apparently. you can see more on any of on bbc iplayer. a man has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of a toddler who was crushed behind a car seat last year. stephen waterson, who‘s 26, had denied any involvement in the death of alfie lamb, who was three, but pleaded guilty as his retrialfor manslaughter was about to get under way. our correspondent richard lister
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is at the old bailey. this relates to alfie lamb, three yea rs this relates to alfie lamb, three years and nine months old, he was pulled unresponsive from the rear foot well of an audi convertible car in tetbury last year. he died in hospital a few days later. initially both stephen watterson, and his mother, denied knowing what had happened to alfie, and lied to the police about the circumstances which ended with alfie‘s death. there was a trialfor ended with alfie‘s death. there was a trial for manslaughter. as it was my mother was acquitted of manslaughter but found guilty of child cruelty last february. but the jury child cruelty last february. but the jury was unable to come to a verdict on whether stephen watterson was guilty of manslaughter. there was a retrial due to go ahead today at the 0ld retrial due to go ahead today at the old bailey retrial due to go ahead today at the 0ld baileyjust retrial due to go ahead today at the old bailey just before retrial due to go ahead today at the 0ld baileyjust before it got under way. stephen watterson pleaded guilty to that single charge of manslaughter by gross negligence. he
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had previously pleaded guilty to perverting the course ofjustice, and had been found guilty at that trial in february of witness tampering, guilty of intimidating a witness. he will now face a sentence next week. thejudge witness. he will now face a sentence next week. the judge will come back next week. the judge will come back next monday and delivery sentence on him. he has admitted his guilt in the manslaughter of alfie lamb, the three—year—old boy pulled unresponsive from behind a car seat where stephen watterson now admits he was responsible for crushing him with a car seat and asphyxiating him. a cabinet meeting scheduled to go under way in a cabinet meeting scheduled to go underway ina a cabinet meeting scheduled to go under way in a few minutes. we just saw andrea leadsom going on. it would appear that all of those who need to be there are now there.
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we‘ll keep an eye on the door but i don‘t think anything will happen in the next few minutes. thousands of secondary school and university students in hong kong have boycotted classes, in the latest pro—democracy protests there. organisers say 10,000 pupils from 200 secondary schools did not turn up for the first day for the new school year, while thousands more students joined a rally at the chinese university of hong kong. protests over the weekend saw some of the worst violence in weeks between demonstrators and police. in a moment the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. ministers prepare to arrive in downing street for a cabinet meeting as speculation mounts that a snap election could be called. meanwhile, sources say groups opposed to a no—deal brexit will demand a three month extension to the uk‘s eu departure date — if there‘s no new deal passed by parliament by october the 19th. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began — hurricane dorian smashes in with winds of up
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to 180 miles an hour, causing huge damage and severe flooding. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the steel giant tata is closing its 0rb electrical steels factory in newport, wales. up to 380 jobs could go from the plant, which makes electrical steel used in power transmission. the company has been for sale since may 2018 as tata had decided to concentrate on its core steel production business. uk manufacturing output fell in july to the lowest level since records began 7 years ago. the drop was sharper than most economists had been expecting. the reasons — political uncertainty and global trade tensions. a deal that saved debenhams from administration is to be challenged in the high court this week. the rescue deal meant debenhams had to shut 50 stores and cut rents. the challenge comes from one of debenhams‘ landlords. he‘s been backed by mike ashley‘s sports direct group which used to own 30% of the company. if successful, the challenge
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could mean debenhams goes back into administration. what have been the main stories today in business? in the steel industry we have seen the likely end of 380 jobs at one of the tata subsidiaries in wales. 0ne one could say these are the worst manufacturing figures we have had, they are the worst figures in this record set, which goes back to 2012. notan record set, which goes back to 2012. not an enormously long time, but still not good. and the pound, we talk about that a lot, what with all the consternation we have had, it is not very good. what is that actually
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against? it is the euro. it has been down to1.09, against? it is the euro. it has been down to 1.09, popped back up. still very weak. against the dollar, close to its 30 year low against the dollar. is the pound going even lower? it's what we might have expected given the news on the potential election. certain buyers are coming in for the pan. it has been the best barometer of what is going on as regards brexit, not surprising the barometer has gone down a little this afternoon. manufacturing. the worst in seven years, which is bad, but how bad? it is pretty bad. fourth
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consecutive month of manufacturing contracting. it follows a poor second quarter and confirms that has continued in the last couple of months of the summer. not surprising given the uncertainty in the uk. but also, a lot of global uncertainty. similarly per numbers from germany, france, italy, and a slowing down in some of the same measures in the us. the global backdrop of trade wars and slowing economic backdrop is not good, the uk bank robber brexit adds to that. how important is this? manufacturing, 18—20% of the uk economy, it always feels like a serious figure to look at and be worried about. but in the context of the uk economy... is it that serious? less important than the service area, but in the service area we have seen warnings from the
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eu, we saw concern last week. it is more difficult to measure that side of the economy. but that side is not booming either. manufacturing not helping, and service is not coming to its rescue in the way it has done in the past. a minority of the economy but an important part nonetheless. there is a pound against the dollar. the ftse is up, thatis against the dollar. the ftse is up, that is dominated by international companies which make their million dollars. not looking happy, rough times ahead.
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macroalgae has hugely important properties for some. 0ur correspondent has been to a factory. it isa it is a concentration of vitamins we can give to animals for performance. we can apply to plants and use it for certain chemicals. here in britain the bioreactor is 80 metres of pipes. eventually it will have hundreds of kilometres, making it your‘s largest farm. hundreds of kilometres, making it your's largest farm. it is a single celled microalgae which divides into two and then four after being fed with photons from the sun. also
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nutrients and carbon dioxide. in the digestive system it activates essential vitamins and amino acids. adding it to chicken feed boosts egg production by 4%, and spring it on vines and potato leaves reduces the need forfungicide. vines and potato leaves reduces the need for fungicide. it is more than 2 billion years old. it lies at the start of the food chain. now this concentrate, which has come down through the ages, can form part of daily nutrition. for the health—conscious there is a bottled version for human consumption. a culture that might one day be part of our food culture. there is a cabinet meeting in downing street as we speak. and i think there is a drinks party going on. laura ginsberg has tweeted that
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they have all had to hand in their phones. that is the convention, anyone going and has to hand on their phone. you have the cabinet, they are having a meeting. and i think in the downing street garden they are having a drinks reception for conservative mps, which seems to have been brought forward. it is happening at the same time as a cabinet meeting. we have virtually all of the conservative party locked in downing street without their phones. which is an intriguing thought. 0n the way and nigel evans, brexiteer, when asked about a general election said bring it on. a lot of speculation today about whether that could be an option for borisjohnson if whether that could be an option for boris johnson if mps whether that could be an option for borisjohnson if mps are successful
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in passing a short new law in the next couple of days which would force him to ask the eu for a delay to brexit. something he has said he will never do. politically it is something he can‘t do. he would fear that if there was to be election the brexit party would take away a lot of votes. that is something he doesn‘t want to do the question is whether he wants to ask for that election whether mps will back it. it is not like the old days, you can‘t just call an election it is not like the old days, you can‘tjust call an election anymore. mps to back it. that puts pressure onjeremy corbyn to decide whether you want to vote for that, even though some are suspicious it might bea though some are suspicious it might be a trap. we heard tony blair warning of that, thinking it could mean you end up with no—deal brexit. in the coming hours will see what comes out of the cabinet meeting or indeed a drinks party when they come out. no doubt we will talk about it again tomorrow as well. huw edwards
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is live in downing street he will bring you the news live at 5pm. that is it from afternoon live. we‘ll leave you with a look at the weather. hello, today we have seen cloud piling through the northern half of the uk, bringing ad breaks of rain, all tied to an area of low pressure. to the south, blue skies and sunshine. through the evening and overnight, the cloud will spread further south. most of the rain will pull away into the north sea becoming increasingly light and patchy. the big difference is with the cloud by the time we get into the early hours of tuesday morning it is so much milder than it was on monday. in some spots temperatures dipped down to freezing. lows of 12—13 first thing on tuesday. tuesday daytime starts cloudy. sunshine for central and eastern areas through the morning. to the north are next front approaches, wetter weather come the afternoon. up to 22 in the best
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of the sunshine in the south—east.
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today at five... we‘re live in downing street as the prime minister holds an emergency cabinet meeting with talk of a possible general election. as ministers gathered at number ten there was talk of a brexit showdown if the government is defeated in a key parliamentary vote this week. but a group of conservative mps — despite the threat of disciplinary action — says it‘s still ready to try to block the prospect of a no—deal brexit. and for labour, jeremy corbyn says he‘d welcome a general election — he says the voters deserve a say on what should happen next with brexit. it is the people, not an unelected prime minister, who should determine our country‘s future.

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