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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 2, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at five... we're live in downing street as the prime minister holds an emergency cabinet meeting with talk of a possible general election. as ministers gathered at number ten there was talk of a brexit showdown if the government is defeated in a key parliamentary vote this week. but a group of conservative mps — despite the threat of disciplinary action — says it's still ready to try to block the prospect of a no—deal brexit. and for labour, jeremy corbyn says he'd welcome a general election — he says the voters deserve a say on what should happen next with brexit. it is the people, not an unelected prime minister, who should determine our country's future. an election is the
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democratic way forward. birmingham on brexit, away from the westminster bubble, i'm live in the westminster bubble, i'm live in the west midlands to find out what people here think the developments there mean for them. we'll have more from annita in birmingham — and the latest on the mounting brexit crisis here at westminster. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... a man has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of alfie lamb, the toddler who was crushed behind a car seat last year. the most powerful storm to hit the bahamas since records began — hurricane dorian causes damage and severe flooding, with winds of up to 180 miles an hour. and as japan resumes whale hunting after 33 years we take a look at changing attitudes to the industry among the public.
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it's 5 o'clock. we're live in downing street, where the cabinet is now in session it's an unscheduled meeting and it takes place amid mounting speculation that the prime minister wants to call a general election if the government loses a key brexit vote in the commons this week. that might be the message borisjohnson will deliver to conservative mps as they gather for a reception in the garden of number ten this evening. but over at the house of commons, some conservative mps are likely to side with opposition parties to try to delay brexit again if the prime minister has failed to reach a new deal with the eu. those tory mps have already been threatened with disciplinary action if they vote against the government.
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so tensions are running very high. as things stand, the uk is due to leave the eu on the 31st of october. we'll have the latest on the brexit crisis, and we'll be getting different perspectives on what this week is likely to bring — but first, our political correspondent ben wright on the day so far. good morning, how lovely to see you on this sunny morning. behind the bonhomie, cabinet ministers are threatening a purge of tory mps who join opposition efforts to block a no—deal brexit in the commons tomorrow. so, will that stop the tory rebels? what rebels? are there rebels? there certainly are, including conservative mps who sat in cabinet until borisjohnson took over. it seems to me like they are almost goading people into voting against the government, because i think their strategy, to be honest, is to lose this week and then seek a general election, having removed those of us who are not against brexit, not against leaving the european union,
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but believe we should do so with a deal. there are just days before parliament is suspended for mps to try to pass a law that will aim to stop borisjohnson taking the uk out of the eu without a deal. number 10 has warned conservative mps they will be kicked out of the party if they join that effort. but rebel resolve seems strong. borisjohnson will find if he purges moderate, sensible conservatives, conservatives like me who are willing to leave with a deal, who voted for it three times, unlike him, he will pay a penalty, i think, at the ballot box. westminster is reassembling for a seismic week, a showdown between the government and parliament that could determine how or even if brexit happens at the end of next month. and this morning, cabinet ministers said it was right to demand loyalty from conservative mps. this is the standard relationship mps have with the government. we expect conservative
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mps to support the conservative prime minister and the conservative agenda and politicians should not seek to take the authority of government away from government and hand it to the leader of the opposition. but complaints of hypocrisy adds to the tension here. earlier this year, several tory mps now in the cabinet defied the party whip and voted against theresa may's brexit deal. the numbers could be very tight in tomorrow's vote, and if the prime minister carries out his threat to withdraw the whip from rebel tory mps, this week he would immediately wipe out his minuscule commons majority of one. and that makes an autumn general election even more likely. sources have told the bbc there is a live discussion under way in government about possibly asking mps to approve an election as early as this week, if the law is changed to force a brexit delay. but that would need labour to vote in favour of having an election, and at the momentjeremy corbyn‘s focus seems to be unblocking
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focus seems to be ——on blocking a no—deal brexit. we must come together to stop no—deal. this week could be our last chance. we are working with other parties to do everything necessary to pull our country back from the brink. then we need a general election. and today, the former labour prime minister tony blair warned jeremy corbyn not to fall into the elephant trap of agreeing to an election before brexit was resolved. there was another new arrival in downing street this morning, boris johnson has a loyal new friend. but his willingness to take britain out of the eu without a deal is fracturing the tory party and pitting the government against mps. we live in downing street, cabinet is now in session, an unscheduled
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meeting, we see ministers arriving in the past 15—20 minutes, there will be a reception brighter, who knows what message the prime minister will offer at that point? with me is our chief political correspondent. —— there will be a reception later. where are we now, with what the strategy is and why this cabinet meeting is taking place right now? it's intriguing, if you think about it at the moment we have almost the entire conservative party behind that door without access to their telephones, you have to hand them in as you go through the door, so them in as you go through the door, so who knows what's coming in the next hour or so? but it's clear if you think about it that boris johnson does not want to be forced to delay brexit. a very basic point but he has talked since becoming panellist and before that of leaving at the end of october, do or die, he's not going to change that. —— since becoming prime minister. so i think the question is, if mps are successful in the next couple of daysin successful in the next couple of days in a changing the law, controversial thing in itself, to seize control of that house of commons, bring in a low, forcing to do some thing he doesn't want to do,
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how is he going to react to all of that? there is new so upset about this is that heating is its bad for his negotiating strategy with the eu. -- his negotiating strategy with the eu. —— he thinks it's bad for his negotiating strategy. here's what one mp had to say. what i've seen today listening to people like david gauke and philip hammond, is that they want to tie the hands of the prime minister. they want to push him to brussels and for boris to have to say to michel barnier, give me a deal, whatever deal you're going to give me, i'm going to have to accept. well, that's not going to be a great deal for the united kingdom. so i want the prime minister to be able to go to the eu, to negotiate from a position of strength. and what we saw from the meeting that borisjohnson had in berlin with angela merkel is that she said, well, i'll give you a month. come up with a solution to the backstop between northern ireland and ireland. so there has been some movement in the european union. the conservative mp, leading brexit supporter, former deputy speaker nigel evans, who went into number
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tenjust a few nigel evans, who went into number ten just a few moments ago, he sang bring it on, talking about a general election? yes, there's been a lot of speculation about that today, in the end borisjohnson speculation about that today, in the end boris johnson has speculation about that today, in the end borisjohnson has a majority of one on paper. actually his majority doesn't fully exist. how long can he go on with that? i'm not sure they're necessarily what a general election but if his choices, you're to be forced to ask for a later brexit, he simply cannot do that politically because he has nigel farage in the brexit party breathing down his neck, so it's better to have a general election may be in the middle of october. but it's not as easy as it used to be, a prime minister can'tjust call a general election, yes to put it to the house of commons, there are various ways, you would normally needs two thirds of mps, labour would need to vote for it. general carbon has been calling for an election for a long time but as we heard from tony blair heating sets a trap. —— corbyn has been calling for an election. the rules have been ripped appear in
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that's why it's difficult to predict what's going to happen but even more so now. “— what's going to happen but even more so now. —— the rules had been ripped up so now. —— the rules had been ripped up here. even the speaker, john bercow, has pushed rules to limit to let m ps bercow, has pushed rules to limit to let mps have their say and now downing street has decided they're going to push the rules as well, so it's hard to predict. as you say, the next hour could bring some notable news from inside number ten, cabinet meeting and this reception with mps, and parliamentary allies. and in terms of where it goes next, isa and in terms of where it goes next, is a key, just to help viewers with this, tomorrow, mps who are of a different persuasion will try to come as you say, grab control of the parliamentary timetable to force the prime minister to delay. that's a sequence we're looking at. yes. and we thought they might do an emergency debate tomorrow and seize control and do it on wednesday, they could even do it sooner. and if you have a speaker who is willing to help mps have their say, there is no
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reason they couldn't start that process of a new bill tomorrow, it could even go through stages tomorrow, it does still have to go through the house of lords, that's a lwa ys through the house of lords, that's always a bit trickier, but there is always a bit trickier, but there is a huge majority against a no—deal brexit there so it probably would go through. and i think all eyes on thursday are on how the prime minister reacts to whatever has happened, if they're successful in changing the law. the pressure has been piled on tory mps, it's changing the law. the pressure has been piled on tory mps, its huge. they're basically being told, you are going to be sacked, there is a general election coming up so you could be out of a job in a few weeks' time. but some have said they are willing to sacrifice their careers if that's what it takes to stop a no deal because they think it would be so damaging to the uk economy, so the numbers as always will be tight. but they have done it before, they could well do it again and it's all on, how eyes does boris johnson respond to that? the last thing he wants to do is go back to the eu, i cannot see him doing that. people still arriving for this reception, and you mentioned the
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mechanics of how that election might be facilitated. and under the fixed empowerment act, as you say, it needs a two thirds vote in the house of commons. —— fixed term power and its. so is it kind of all down to whatjeremy corbyn its. so is it kind of all down to what jeremy corbyn decides? not all conservatives would vote for an election because they see is that her —— see it as a trap, carolyn lucas, the green mp saying the same thing, that she wants an election but once to stop a no—deal brexit first, and that's the same conversation in the labour party. and if you're jeremy conversation in the labour party. and if you'rejeremy corbyn, you have confidence in your own ability to wina have confidence in your own ability to win a general election but others would be very concerned about a general election, it were better than predicted for the last time but they still didn't win, they be worried that borisjohnson could come back with a bigger majority and then you'd get a no—deal brexit so thatis then you'd get a no—deal brexit so that is the argument they would be having a bad weather they would vote foran having a bad weather they would vote for an election or do they prioritise stopping a no deal? —— the argument they be having about
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whether they would vote for. and there are other ways borisjohnson to getan there are other ways borisjohnson to get an election, you could bring ina to get an election, you could bring in a bill, she would only need to win by one, but then it could be amended... so it would be more risky. and from monday, that's the date from which the government could tell parliament to go off for five weeks. so that's the time pressure on mps, that is alarmist. they didn't think they would have to do it as quickly and they have to get together and agree on something. —— thatis together and agree on something. —— that is enormous. i think boris johnson is relying on the fact that evenif johnson is relying on the fact that even if there is a confidence vote and even if he were to lose it, there would be two weeks where you would have to find another prime minister who does have the confidence of the house and they could be relying on the fact that actually, the opposition are divided on that as well, the liberal democrats would be very reluctant to backjeremy corbyn as prime minister. so we will have to see what happens. some people get very angry at the thought of leaks i'm wondering how soon will we do get a couple of bits and bobs? they have
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to get the phone is back first. once it's all finished, you never know, we may hear something from somewhere else before that, people going in there from all wings of the party haven't seen philip hammond, though. he may not turn up. we are watching, we are watching. thanks very much. we'll have a word again later on. what i'd like to do now is bring in henry hill, assistant editor of the commentary analysis and news website conservative capital back home. thanks forjoining us, what you're reading of what's going on today? thanks forjoining us, what you're reading of what's going on today7m looks as if the prime minister is basically teeing up what is going to be perhaps the make or break of this stage of his premiership. he is going to have to face only house of commons challenged his entire brexit agenda and if he fails it's likely we will end up with a snap general election. so i think the goal is, a mixture of carrot and stick. we have already seen the stick, he's going to try and maximise the amount of
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pressure on mps, on potential rebels to toe the line whilst at the same time trying to bring as many into the tent as possible with sort of a more positive agenda, that might be what this meeting is this evening. what you're reading, then, of the mood and whether you think and whether that kind of pressure, given the fact that we are dealing with some very the fact that we are dealing with some very senior conservatives on the who take a strong view on what they think the argument is, what is your view on how that pressure is likely to play out? the numbers in the house of commons are now so tight that pure to defeat the government in a vote, you need very few conservative rebels, really. so i think the number of pro—eu or sort of anti—no deal mps that we have seen suggests that even if the government, the prime minister has very successful effort, the number of mps that are simply standing down at the next election under this immune to the pressure of the
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selection means that he is running a very strong chance, i think, suffering a reversal. however we have been here before. cooper that one, as this bill was known before, only passed by one vote previously. so it isi only passed by one vote previously. so it is i mugs game try and guess how parliamentary numbers will play out, but if i were the parliament whips i'd be looking at the number of opposition and the number of government rebels, and feeling nervous. in terms of the dynamics of today in terms of the cabinet, it's an unscheduled meeting, what is your sense of the view among cabinet ministers as they approach this new week and they've all returned after the summer and the way the actual political temperature has risen quite considerably in the last seven or eight days or so, what's your reading of the mood among them? or eight days or so, what's your reading of the mood among them7m course, no one is inside the cabinet table. i think what we have seen with this cabinet, compared with theresa may's, it has proved much more united on the central tenets of
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the government. theresa may famously tried to keep quite a broad church cabinet and as a result there were an awful lot of cabinet splits, most famously when four cabinet ministers actually defied a three line whip to abstain on commons business. boris johnson is running a very different administration, he has made it clear that even quite eminent conservative mps who don't get with the programme can expect to be deselected, and as a result even mps like amber rudd who has not only previously been quite a strongly anti—no deal candidate but has also sitting on a very small commons majority in her seat of hastings and therefore probably isn't relishing the prospect of an early election have so far toe the line and we haven't seen anything out of them. whether or not cabinet discipline will hold once we reach boiling point this week and next week remains to be seen but at the minute it appears as if the prime minister's authority inside the cabinet room is much stronger than his predecessor's. thanks forjoining us, good to talk
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to you. i'd like to go to brussels now and talk to our correspondent there. on the kind of perceptions, i suppose, on what's going on right now, what is the reading first of all of the prime minister's own strategy? how do the eu leaders perceive the strategy that they are seeing here from borisjohnson and his team with a number ten? good luck trying to get an eu leader to comment on what's happening in british domestic politics. i would be very surprised if any other eu leaders got involved in what's happening right now. they are watching like the rest of us, working out what might happen, what it might mean, and waiting for something substantive and concrete that they can get their teeth into. but when you talk to the eu's negotiating team, diplomats here in brussels who work on brexit, they all say the same thing. they do not buy boris johnson's all say the same thing. they do not buy borisjohnson's strategy here.
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they say there is not some better withdrawal agreement with no backstop in it in a drawer waiting to be pulled out by the eu if only borisjohnson to be pulled out by the eu if only boris johnson can vanquish to be pulled out by the eu if only borisjohnson can vanquish his critics and his opponents in westminster. first, they say that's just not how the eu's negotiating strategy works. the eu looks at its objectives, which are maintaining an open border on the island of ireland while at the same time protecting the integrity of the eu's single market. they say that will not change just because of a change in the parliamentary arithmetic. the second thing they say is that they do not expect the rebels to give up this week, they think that this could continue right until the last minute, in the brexit process, which as we all know is the 31st of october. in terms of if boris johnson does end up starting the process of calling an election, i think then the question people here will be asking will be, does that require an extension to the article 50 process? then that'll have to be
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managed. in the short term, people are still wondering, is a boris johnson's brexit negotiator, senior civil servant called david frost, going to turn up on wednesday as planned and again on friday as planned, and will he have in his briefcase it worked out a set of proposals for the irish border? because as we've learned from michel barnier, the chief negotiator‘s article in the sunday telegraph this weekend, that is what the eu is waiting for and they will only sign up waiting for and they will only sign up to it if it delivers exactly what the existing backstop deliveries, which is, back to where i started, and open border on the island of ireland and detection of the single market, no matter what happens. —— protection of the single market. thanks for your analysis there in brussels. we are gathering reaction, of course, today to the kind of build—up of tension and expectation, given that this cabinet meeting is going on now, it's been in session for the last 35 minutes or so. and
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we are gathering reaction, notjust at westminster but across the uk. and of course, if you think, for example, about one of the major cities of the uk, birmingham, which was a narrow vote to leave the eu back in 2016, we've been talking to people they today about how they perceive what's going on in this brexit process. because of course, in different ways, it affects everyone across the uk in all of its corners. my colleague is there for us with some thoughts this evening. thank you very much, yes. it was a 50.4% vote to leave in the referendum in 2016, so the narrowest of margins. i'm here ina so the narrowest of margins. i'm here in a centenary square, you can see the hsbc building behind me, the birmingham library, the symphony hall, it's a really vibrant place in the city, a sign of a forward looking city. and it's been really interesting talking to people here today about their views on politics.
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it is incredibly busy at westminster, but that makes it all the more important to get away from the more important to get away from the westminster bubble, as it's called. out to somewhere like birmingham to find out what people here think about the developments there, and how it's having an on them. so a little earlier i chatted to people in the square, i asked them about those rumours of a possible general election, about borisjohnson possible general election, about boris johnson and generally possible general election, about borisjohnson and generally what they think of politics at the moment. i really don't agree with boris johnson and his new government and the way he's trying to force through a no—deal brexit. it'sjust, could be catastrophic for the country. do you think that borisjohnson really wa nts you think that borisjohnson really wants no deal? is that how it's shaping up? orare wants no deal? is that how it's shaping up? or are these tactics? it's a stand—off, and obviously... sort of a bully boy tactics almost. it's a bit of brinksmanship. he says he doesn't want to go out without a
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deal but it's surprising that, you know, his own it's like it's gone from million to one chance to looking like the most likely thing to happen. it's annoying. we don't know where we are. do you think what borisjohnson is know where we are. do you think what boris johnson is doing know where we are. do you think what borisjohnson is doing is right? there's a rumour that a general election might be called as soon as this afternoon, what would you say to that? that's a very good idea. very good idea. i think election is the best thing to do for the country at the moment. i'm quite concerned about what is the long—term impact on the country. it feels quite divisive and it feels like we are settling into two kind of different camps, just long—term, i'm a bit concerned about what it's doing to our country, just... yeah, the tensions it's causing. do you think that no deal now seems more likely,
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or is this a strategy that boris johnson is trying to volunteer?” think it is a strategy, and yes, i do think probably no deal is more likely. but i don't know. i don't know, i'm done with predicting the country now, because you just, they keep on doing things i don't want them to do! there's a suggestion that a general election could be announced as early as this afternoon. what would you make of that? i think i'd be surprised, yet ain! that? i think i'd be surprised, yet again! but again, i don't know. i just think we're just in such a mess. i feel like we're just a mess. and do you think a vote, general election, would help sort anything out? i think it could do, yeah. it might give people another opportunity to make a statement, make a choice. but i think there is quite a lot of confusion, still going around. and a lot of emotion stop so it could go either way. i'm very pleased to sayjoining me
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here now in birmingham is the conservative mayor of the west midlands, you may know him as the former boss ofjohn lewis. welcome. you're just saying to me that you still think of yourself as a businessman rather than a that's very much your approach to the role. they like to think that, maybe after 30 years in john they like to think that, maybe after 30 years injohn lewis, you can't put that behind you, only two years in politics. it's so important in these difficult political times that you try and bring a businessman's practicality to finding a way through the issues. so straddling those different roles, how are you trying to prepare the west midlands, both are potentially a deal that would back, that you're an advocate for, leaving with a deal, versus a no deal scenario? i'm very clear that particularly in the west midlands, if you that beyond birmingham, the west midlands as a whole voted decisively to leave so that should be fomented by the government but i strongly believe that we have to achieve a deal. ——
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should be implemented by the government. and i've been hearing throughout the course of the day that a deal would really allow us to continue the economic progress we have seen, so anything i can do to persuade politicians in london that they need to get movement from the use of the deal can be delivered, that's in economic interests of this place. are you concerned that boris johnson has no deal still on the table? if you listen to what the prime minister said and did what michael gove said yesterday, they are very michael gove said yesterday, they are very clear that the policy of the government is to achieve a deal. and i fervently hope that comes about. he is keeping no deal on the table because he believes that's the right negotiating tactic and i can respect that. from business, you know in any negotiation you go into, you have to know when you walk away. soi you have to know when you walk away. so i respected but i do not want it to be the outcome. could you ultimately back him as conservative leader if it looks like no deal is actually on the cards? you ask to be early what we are doing to prepare, very clear that, i don't want it to be the outcome but it would be
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irresponsible on my part and on the region's part if we did not think about preparing for it. you've also heard during the course of the day, i think from the chamber of commerce, and the cbi, we are doing all we can to make sure businesses prepare for what could possibly happen. do you think the general election that's being rumoured today, could that help to sort things out? bring an end to this impasse? you're right to use the word impasse, that in my view, if we do not find a way through the impasse, actually, it's corrosive in its right. and you hearfrom businesses have a damaging uncertainty is. so i can see the scenario where we have to turn to a general election to sort it out eventually. i hope it won't come to that because i hoped the deal will be struck and parliament will be able to get behind it but if you asked mccann imagine it happening, cani asked mccann imagine it happening, can i see that it might be the only way through eventually, yes. that's right for you asked me if i can imagine it happening. —— you asked
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me if! imagine it happening. —— you asked me if i can. have people imagine it happening. —— you asked me ifi can. have people change their mind since 2016? obviously is not a scientific survey but i'm trying to get a sense of what people are saying to you. it's difficult to a nswer are saying to you. it's difficult to answer that because in the situation what you hear is echoes, village of what you hear is echoes, village of what was said back in 2016, that people had strong views, those views are even stronger now. i've met very few people who have changed their view. the majority of views that you hear from people who are not that politically excited is the view which basically said, we are fed up of this taking so long, let's just find a way through it. and you will definitely have heard from businesses that uncertainty is more damaging than anything else. so that sort of moment that says we've got to bring this to head, i understand why that has to be. i'm not sure when you last spoke to boris johnson, i know you're on his hs to task for us, but what your message for him? —— his hs2 task force. i spoke to the prime minister, we talk
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about the need for a deal, birmingham isa about the need for a deal, birmingham is a manufacturing region, a lot at risk today for sub i've also spoken to michael gove more recently and he too understands that. do you believe boris johnson genuinely wants a deal?” that. do you believe boris johnson genuinely wants a deal? i do, actually, and i asked michael gove many times if that was the policy of government, just as ruth davidson said last week, she and i both needed to hear that is the case and i absently heard michael gove say to me, that is what this government wa nts. me, that is what this government wants. ——i me, that is what this government wants. —— i absolutely had. me, that is what this government wants. -- i absolutely had. thank you for your time today. that is the view from birmingham and the west midlands. back to you. thank you very much. it's 5:29pm, and injusta thank you very much. it's 5:29pm, and injust a few thank you very much. it's 5:29pm, and in just a few seconds, we will update you on what's going on here in downing street because, as i was telling you earlier on, the cabinet has been meeting in, i suppose you could call it an emergency session because it's an unscheduled meeting of the cabinet and that has of
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course provoked a lot of speculation about exactly what this meeting is about exactly what this meeting is about and what the prime minister is up about and what the prime minister is up to, what borisjohnson is intending to discuss. with his cabinet colleagues. we've also seen dozens cabinet colleagues. we've also seen d oze ns of cabinet colleagues. we've also seen dozens of conservative mps and others going in, because there is a reception at number ten this evening as well, so as you can imagine there's a lot of expectation as to what the messages. our chief political correspondent is with me, i think we've been told in the last few seconds or so, we can expect to hear from the punisher this evening? — pure hear from the punisher this evening? —— pure from the prime minister. hear from the punisher this evening? -- pure from the prime minister. he is going to come out sometime this evening to make a statement, we don't know what he's going to say, the old days, without, is he going to call a general election? of course as we were discussing earlier, it's not easy. it could be that he's just laying out how he sees things going into this momentous week, where he has some of his own mps as well as opposition mps trying to force them to do
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something he does not want to do, which is delay brexit if he cannot get a deal. if you think about it, for him politically, the idea that he could go to the eu at the end of october and say, actually, i'm going to ask for a delay, politically he can't do that. he's made it so clear that he wants to leave, do or die, and with the brexit party breathing down his neck, i can't see any way of doing that. so it could be that he is lying out to mps what the choices are that face them, and for his own mps, the message to them, you can back me up brexit, i'm trying to get a deal, don't undermine me by taking no deal of the table and if you do do that, all you're doing is potentially given the keys to downing street tojeremy corbyn, someone who of course for those in the tory party, is pretty toxic. so that will be the message, and you never know, he may well say how he would react if the law is changed, and you could come out and
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say, if you do this i will bring forward a motion in the commons at the end of the week calling for a general election for stop so he sent to mps not only am i going to effectively sack you by taking away the whip so you can some election, i'm going to have that election and then you'll be out of a job in a few weeks' time. so that's where we are with all of this. he is, as one tory said to me he was against no deal, he said that, i was convinced boris johnson did want a deal that he was serious about it but now i'm not so convinced, i think he locked himself in and actually maybe he is not, and maybe he is going all guns blazing for no deal. so we will find out in the next half hour also what it is he's going to lay who knows? we have been sent earlier in years gone by with a prime minister emerging on the streets again in street saying i will call an election, i have decided to go to
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the queen for permission to dissolve parliament. -- in downing street. but it is not straightforward. for borisjohnson to deliver that is not as simple as it may sound so that is the reason this is a far more complex equation and lots of people realise. yes, it is. it is a fixed term which means you have an election every five years. to break that, you have to do video things. the prime minister can bring forward a motion as to reason needed but you need conservative mps to back it and he does not have enough conservative mps so he needs the opposition and thatis mps so he needs the opposition and that is wherejeremy corbyn comes in. he has been calling for an election for a long time. as the leader of the opposition, it will exchange to some jeremy leader of the opposition, it will exchange to somejeremy corbyn did not back the idea of an election but the labour party is split on this. some say we have to focus on
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stopping no deal, an election muddies the waters, we need to make sure no deal does not happen first. it is not entirely clear how labour would vote on it. the green party, caroline lucas was saying she wants an election but she wants no deal to be taken of the table first so not clear that would happen. there are other ways boris johnson clear that would happen. there are other ways borisjohnson could do it but the big question is when with that election be? would it be before the brexit date or after? that is a high—risk strategy. if before, johnson is going to the country to status i will deliver this, again thatis status i will deliver this, again that is risky. if he banks on the other side of the argument, those votes would be split.” other side of the argument, those votes would be split. i will bring you back in on a moments because i have been told that labour's senior mp, hilary benn, chair of the brexit select committee has published
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online the bill they are proposing. this is the bill which sets out the path, the legislative path for blocking and no deal, so far not allowing the prime minister to get the uk out of the eu without a formal deal in place. that bill is no online, it has been published this evening and is therefore eve ryo ne this evening and is therefore everyone to see. it is exactly what some of their conservative mps like philip hammond and others who had declared against no deal, will be looking at this closely. they will have had a big hand in this, in terms of the cross—party co—operation. that will be scrutinised carefully within number ten downing st as well. i suppose that will be the making of this bill, and what it presents in terms ofa bill, and what it presents in terms of a threat to borisjohnson, bill, and what it presents in terms of a threat to boris johnson, that will be part of the thinking which informs the statements that we will get from the prime minister on the steps here in about 25 minutes'
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time. yes, i think they are saying if no deal has been passed by parliament by the 19th of october, the prime minister has to go to the eu to ask for an extension until the end of january. do eu to ask for an extension until the end ofjanuary. do not forget, he can ask for it, he will not, but it does not mean he would get it from the eu because it has to be unanimous, all 28 countries have to agree so it is not a given. who knows what the eu thinks, what the donald tusk assay but use this time wisely after the last delay. the argument from downing street is what you delaying for? in the end, we will be in the same position as we are now and as we were in march and june. i'd be doing it for our general election, another referendum? general election, another referendum ? boris general election, another referendum? boris johnson general election, another referendum? borisjohnson knows his opponents are not agreed on what happens next. if you look at the
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people who signed this, philip hammond, david gauke, former cabinet ministers from the toadies, that is interesting and they are old people who voted for ideal. they accept result of the referendum they see and have voted to leave with a deal. some of the others like stephen gethins snp, have not voted for a deal, they want another referendum and want to stay in the eu. if you're in downing street, they might be united on this bill but they are not to —— united over what happens next. that is what they are banking on, the opponents not being agreed or overjeremy corbyn becoming prime minister. that could be the thing which gives boris johnson minister. that could be the thing which gives borisjohnson the confidence to stay i will try a general election. we will see what he says, not long to go. thank you very much. this is what we know so far. while we wait for news weather
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thatis far. while we wait for news weather that is to be an election or not. tomorrow, mps return to the house of commons after the summer recess. legislation to stop no deal will be introduced by opposition mps, we adjusted the first page of its published by hilary benn. on wednesday that bill we —— that bill will be debated in the house of commons. boris johnson will take will be debated in the house of commons. borisjohnson will take to the desk for his first prime minister's questions on wednesday. on thursday, the house of lords will discuss the bill if it is passed by the house of commons, otherwise there is consideration that the bill could spill over into monday. the bill passes all its hurdles, it could then become law, presenting borisjohnson could then become law, presenting boris johnson with could then become law, presenting borisjohnson with quite a challenge. let us talk tojill rutter who isjoining us, director at the institute government, what is
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your reading of things today given this emergency cabinet meeting and that we knew the prime minister is making a statement in 20 minutes?” think it is clear that the prime minister does not want to give the initiative to the rebels which is why we are seeing action in downing street because otherwise your news agenda would be about what the rebels are doing, their press conferences and the building have just published. the prime minister is probably trying to see mike that downing street remains in charge of the set six o'clock and this is what we are planning to do. —— trying to say that downing street remains in charge. this is the first skirmish ina week charge. this is the first skirmish in a week of battles. what what is your thought on the way this week is likely to play out? now that we have seen the bill and vicky was telling
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us seen the bill and vicky was telling us about the contents, and the dates, what is your thoughts on the likelihood of that bill getting through the house of commons? the first thing they have to do tomorrow isa first thing they have to do tomorrow is a very unusual procedure, we do not formally know that the speaker will allow it, standing order number 24 will allow it, standing order number 2a process to take control of business on wednesday. that is the first hurdle. then we will get an indication of how many people are on the site of the rebels, so how many people are prepared to vote against the government which is obviously the government which is obviously the critical thing, those on the conservative side. we then need to have those stages of the bill on wednesday because they want to allow the maximum time for this to go to the maximum time for this to go to the lords when it is likely to face bigger problems. they can programme the bill on wednesday so they can see we can get to the stage by five o'clock, listed by seven o'clock, and throughout the stages on
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wednesday in the commons, much harder in the lords weather could be lots of amendments put down by pro—brexit lords, there are not huge numbers of them but there are enough and that is the risk people will talk out the bill so they need maximum time in there. there is race against deadline with parliament protect —— potentially proroguing on monday evening. remember when they try to do this last time, the yvette cooper legislation only sneaked through at the last minute by one vote. quite a lot of conservative mps made it clear this morning that they would have preferred not to be doing this now, to see whether the prime minister's tactics showed any sign of working and do it when parliament reassembled. the decision to prorogue last week has force the hands of people and force them to go early so it is not amplified —— my
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preferred timetable. i do not know, we will get first indications tomorrow of the numbers. the fact downing street is having this emergency cabinet meeting suggest downing street at least is very close to having the numbers to put the legislation through. in terms of the legislation through. in terms of the way that elections can be called, you have alluded to this already, more than one option, not just under the fixed term, it would be possible to create a separate bill which would go through the parliamentary process, how realistic is that? possibly realistic if there was some sort of deal by both sides. the interesting question is how do you achieve the result that people want? as vicky young said, in order to use this to thirds provision, the prime minister needs labour votes but labour had two objectives, one is to have a general election but
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this morning as well, tony blair was speaking and said this is an elephant trap. you could be suggested into a general election and find out either lose the general election because people may not want jeremy corbyn as prime minister or you might find that you end up with the prime minister heading for no deal anyway so it is an interesting question. you do not want to let borisjohnson set question. you do not want to let boris johnson set the date for question. you do not want to let borisjohnson set the date for an election unfettered by parliaments which he has at his discretion. it is interesting, the question with it being into the both sides to agree a short bill that actually make provision both at a general election but also make provisions to ensure that the uk did not exit during the general election campaign. there have been a lot of concerns that the prime minister willjust let the uk slip out of the eu —— the eu while that general election was taking
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place, something that a lot of people with argue with bust constitutional conventions, like the thing we have a convention called harder which means that a government should not be making major decisions during a general election campaigns and should not be shutting off options available to the opposition in case there is another government shortly afterwards so that might mean that as a preferred route. it could also change the timing, cut it shorter than the five weeks provided for by the fixed term. good to talk to you again, thank you very much. just to remind you, cabinet meeting under way, and unscheduled one and we are told that at six o'clock the prime minister will emerge to make a statement on the steps of downing street. what will he see mike? will it be about an election? we do not
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know. stay with us, we will have more for you throughout the evening, let usjoin more for you throughout the evening, let us join band. more for you throughout the evening, let usjoin band. thank more for you throughout the evening, let us join band. thank you very much indeed. we will be back in downing street shortly. let us take a look at some of the other news. a man has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter by gross negligence of his 3 and a half year old stepson. alfie lamb was crushed to death by a car seat in february last year. his mother, adrian hoare was convicted of child cruelty but the child's step—father, stephen waterson had denied any invovlement in the child's death. he pleaded guilty as his retrial for manslaughter was about to get under way. richard lister was in court this relates to alfie lamb who was pulled unresponsive from a card last year, he died three months later.
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initially his mother and stephen hall denied seeing that they knew what happened to alfie and denied in you about the circumstances. there was a trial for manslaughter, indian hole was acquitted but found guilty of child cruelty. the duty was unable to come to a verdict as to whether the other man was guilty of manslaughter. i read trial was due to go ahead today. just before it started, stephen waterson stood up and played guilty to manslaughter. he had previously pleaded guilty to perverting the course ofjustice and he had also been found guilty of that trial in february of witness tampering, guilty of intimidating a witness so he will now face a sentence next week. thejudge witness so he will now face a sentence next week. the judge will come back next monday and deliver a
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sentence. but he has admitted his guilt in the manslaughter of alfie lamb, i3—year—old guilt in the manslaughter of alfie lamb, 13—year—old boy, pulled unresponsive from behind a car seat where stephen watson though admits he was responsible for crushing him and asphyxiating him. hundreds ofjobs could go at a steelmaking factory in wales after its owner announced it was shutting part of its operations. the steel giant tata is closing its orb electrical steels base in newport which will mean up to 380 jobs could go from the plant. the company has been up for sale since may last year as tata had decided to concentrate on its core steel production business. our correspondent, hywel griffith, is at the plant in newport. let's get the latest. yes, it is the news many of the workers here have traded for a year, since the company was put up for sale. according to
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tata they have not made a profit for four years and not even twice in the last ten years. so things have not augured well but this is tough news. tata says potentially they could absorb the workforce into its other sites in the uk, it employs 6000 steelworkers across wales. these are uncertain times for the steel industry, it is highly specialised here, they make transformers for electrical vehicles but how they do it here does not involve the latest technology so it would require huge to bring this back to scratch and be competitive and to compete also with the prices of chinese steel so tata says u nfortu nately, the prices of chinese steel so tata says unfortunately, it has to close. we do not know how long it will take to speak to workers and potentially find them other work but the unions have come back fighting seeing they will hold tata feet to the fire over
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the pledge of redeployment and they will threaten strike action potentially if there is any threat of compulsory redundancies. thank you very much. let us go back to downing street as promised, we are waiting for the prime minister to make an address at six o'clock. let us go to the keung, we will go to her in a moment but just to remind you that the cabinet has been meeting in emergency session with talk of a possible general election, if the government loses it brexit vote in the commons this week. of the bill that the anti—no deal mps have prepared has been published by the labour mps hilary benn, the former minister.
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essentially it says that the purpose of the bellies to ensure the uk does not leave the european union on the 3ist not leave the european union on the 31st of october without an agreement, parliament consents. he says that the european council proposes an extension then the prime minister must accept that extension within two days, unless the house of commons rejects it. the bill has cross— party commons rejects it. the bill has cross—party support says hilary benn, from mps who believe that the consequences of no deal for the economy of the country would be highly damaging, new deal is not in the national interest. just a bit more detail on what this bill which has just been published which includes. it is that if these conditions have not been met by the 19th of october, the day after the european council meeting concludes, the prime minister would have to send a letter to the european
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council requesting a brexit extension of the article 50 for three months, from october to the end of january, taking three months, from october to the end ofjanuary, taking us to the 3ist end ofjanuary, taking us to the 31st of january 2020. so all of that is contained in this bill that the anti—no deal brexit mps have prepared cross—party group of mps, hilary benn is one of them. there area hilary benn is one of them. there are a few toadies in there as well who have been warned about deselection if they pursue this rebellion against the johnson government. —— there are a few conservatives in there as well. let us go to the key young. percival, borisjohnson we are expecting in the next few minutes, what you think he will say? —— first of all.” think it is likely to be him setting out how he sees this week, where he
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is on out how he sees this week, where he isona out how he sees this week, where he is on a collision course with the house of commons. remember he said do ordie we house of commons. remember he said do or die we will leave the eu by the end of october. but some mps are trying to do is force them to delay brexit. i cannot imagine that is something he can do because politically, it destroys them, if you went into an election having done that, nigel farage and the brexit party will take away a lot of his votes. that is something he cannot contemplate. he is trying to make it difficult for his own tory mps. he is saying if you decide to change the law and vote against me and my government and my policy, we will put you out of the tory party. you cannot stand as a conservative candidate in an election. this brings to general election. he cannot call an election because of the system, he has to go through parliament but what he could to, and
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it is likely, he could say to parliament, if you try to force me to do something i do not want to do, then i will put forward a motion in then i will put forward a motion in the house of commons calling on election perhaps for five or six weeks' time. then he is seen to labour, if you want an election, vote for it. he is taking a massive gamble of going to the country before brexit happens in saying do you trust me to deliver brexit or do you trust me to deliver brexit or do you wantjeremy you trust me to deliver brexit or do you want jeremy corbyn? you trust me to deliver brexit or do you wantjeremy corbyn? of course he and those around him think they can win that election whereas labour and jeremy corbyn think they have a good chance of winning themselves. even though chance of winning themselves. even thoutheremy chance of winning themselves. even though jeremy corbyn chance of winning themselves. even thoutheremy corbyn has been calling for our general election, there are some in his party who say we have to concentrate on getting no deal of the table first rather than an election which no one can be sure of winning. tell us more about this proposed bill that hilary benn has
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been publishing, effectively asking to push the prime minister to ask for a delay to break —— to brexit untiljanuary. you can see the light turn being brought out, how many moments of these have we seen in the last three years. always a sign that something pretty important may well be about to happen. the bill that mps are hoping to be made into law may be tomorrow, maybe a couple of days, is to say to the prime minister, if you have not got a deal and it hasn't gone through parliament by the love october, then you have to delay brexit until the end of january. —— you have to delay brexit until the end ofjanuary. —— by the middle of october. another delay of three months. those in downing street would say what is the point of another delay? we have had delays. what will you use it for? will you
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use it for a general election on a referendum? use it for a general election on a referendum ? those who use it for a general election on a referendum? those who are opposed to no deal and not agreed about what the end point is. they are divided on that. if you look at the names on that bill, people like philip hammond, david gauke, former conservative cabinet ministers who have voted three times for a deal to leave the eu. if you look at some of the others, liberal democrats, snp and labour, they have never backed a deal so they are split on that. some in the labour party want a referendum, others do not. if you are downing street, you hope your opponents are divided and remain divided. up till this summer, it looks like opposition parties have worked together with conservatives to d raft worked together with conservatives to draft this bill and have a decent chance of getting it through parliament in the coming days. before islay to go, this is a big
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moment for boris johnson. —— before islay to go, this is a big moment for borisjohnson. —— before i let you go. this is a job he has wa nted i let you go. this is a job he has wanted all his life, we are tooled, we are in the brexit end game but this week is crucial for mrjohnson, is it not? yes, he is trying to force a choice onto mps. he is trying to say it is my deal or no deal. he hopes to put pressure on the eu that he is serious and will be without a deal. the only levity has got is to say he will leave a nyway has got is to say he will leave anyway which will be difficult for all others. —— the only h. many in parliament here think it is much worse for the uk economy. he is trying to put pressure on the eu to get a concession and bring a deal back to parliament and get it through and leave with the deal. but if you cannot get that, he is
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willing to leave without one. the message he will give to his mps tonight is if you take no deal of the table, you are removing the pressure from the eu to do a deal. not only that, you are bringing forward the possibility thatjeremy corbyn will become prime minister. many thanks for all of that. our chief because —— our chief political correspondence, vicky young there. you can see the lakes on getting adjusted to get the perfect angle for the cameras. —— lectern. the prime minister will be coming out of downing street at the top of the arrow. we can go to our political correspondent who is monitoring all of this for us as well. jessica, so
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many excellent maybes, what are you hearing about where parliament and the government are going on this?” have just seen something interesting. apparently the podium does have the government crest on it which means it is unlikely that borisjohnson will be calling a general election, it will be a government based statement. we will have to wait and see what he says but there is often a lot of excitement as to whether these podiums at the crest on them or not. what will you be talking about? we have to wait and see, we are speculating here. it has been clear that signals from downing street over the past few days are designed to trying to get conservative mps to back the government approach on brexit. you have been discussing with the key this legislation which has now been published. it is a group of cross—party mps against
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no—deal brexit, trying to ensure borisjohnson no—deal brexit, trying to ensure boris johnson cannot take no—deal brexit, trying to ensure borisjohnson cannot take the uk out of the eu without an agreement on the 31st of october. whether the legislation will work, whether it will be debated, whether it will pass the house of commons and house of lords, that is all to come by at the shape of things in terms of those efforts. in terms of conservative mps against no—deal brexit, they have a choice to make and no doubt borisjohnson has been reminding them of that. today backed the government? boris johnson reminding them of that. today backed the government? borisjohnson has said he wants to get a deal from the eu or do back this attempt as a kind of insurance policy to block a no—deal brexit? that is the decision they have to make and perhaps body johnson will address that matter very shortly. yes, thank you. we we re very shortly. yes, thank you. we were just seeing pictures of the mps in downing street. it will be
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interesting to see what the prime minister will be saying. he will be talking at that podium, it is being prepared for the prime minister and he will be talking in just a few minutes. you're watching a bbc news special — we're live in downing street where the prime minister, borisjohnson is about to deliver a statement outside number ten as speculation mounts that he's poised to trigger a general election if his government is defeated by mps seeking to stop a no—deal brexit. this afternoon he gathered his ministers for an unscheduled cabinet meeting, as opponents of his brexit strategy prepare to put forward draft legislation to delay the uk's withdrawal. that will be tabled in the commons tomorrow when mps return

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