Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 3, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we're live from westminster, our headlines this morning: a momentous day as westminster prepares for a showdown — the prime minister says nothing will make him delay brexit and he could trigger a snap election. labour mps and tory rebels will today try to stop the uk leaving the eu on october 31st without a deal. the election speculation has sent the pound down to its lowest levels since the referendum. i'll have more on where it might head next. in other news, hurricane dorian claims at least five lives in the bahamas and causes widespread damage. its prime minister calls
6:01 am
it a historic tragedy. johanna konta sets her sights on a semi—final spot at the us open later, but it's goodbye to the world number one and defending champion naomi osaka, who's out. in the uk much milder this morning compared to yesterday for the commute. driest and brightest in the south and east. all the details later. it's tuesday, the 3rd of september. our top story: a momentous day ahead in westminster as tory rebels join forces with opposition mps to try to block a no—deal brexit on october 31st. if defeated, borisjohnson has threatened a third general election in four years, which could come as soon as the middle of next month. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake. protester: boris, boris, boris! chanting: out, out, out! welcome back to westminster.
6:02 am
mps return from their summer break today to a raging debate about brexit. yesterday evening, the prime minister raised the stakes with a warning to those trying to block a no deal exit, they could force him to go to the polls. let's let our negotiators to get on with their work without that sort of damocles over their necks and without an election, sword of damocles over their necks and without an election, without an election. i don't want an election, you don't want an election. tory mps entertained in the garden of number 10 now know that if theyjoin with opposition parties this week in attempts to take control of what happens in the house of commons, the government will push for an early election. two—thirds of mps would need to back that, meaning labour's position is crucial. their leader sounds keen. when the election comes, i'm ready for it, you're ready for it, we're ready for it. we'll take that message out
6:03 am
there and above all, we will win for the people of this country! we will defeat this lot! we will bring about that sense ofjustice and equality! that is what our movement was founded to achieve! but last night, another senior labour figure said the party would not support an election before the brexit deadline of october the 31st. what the conversations i've had in parliament today means is that we would not support the vote, the two—thirds majority that borisjohnson needs, the 434 mps that he needs to vote for a general election to dissolve parliament, under the fixed—term parliaments act, he will not get up majority. the summer is officially over here now and time is short for all sides to make their next move, and perhaps just days for big decisions to be made. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. let's get the latest now from our political correspondent, ben wright, whojoins us now
6:04 am
here in westminster. a few technical gremlins to start with today, but we are up and running! the whole of the programme is coming live from here today. it is coming live from here today. it is another one of those days where there is so much to talk about, so many questions, that we will try to find answers to today. we will try to get as many as we can. good morning. let's get the latest from ben wright, our political correspondent. there is a sense of — dan and i have been sitting here at westminster several times, but today is different. we are going to break new levels of political drama, and i think the next 48 hours will determine so much. the future of this government, potentially the future of brexit, and wejust potentially the future of brexit, and we just don't know how it will play out. the first thing we will be looking for today is what happens in the big vote later. whether mps, led
6:05 am
bya the big vote later. whether mps, led by a former conservative chancellor, managed to seize control of the parliamentary agenda and push through a bill that would effectively closedown the possibility of a no deal brexit. if they succeed, the government will try to get parliament to approve a general election. so much is uncertain. it is question after question, because of that then goes toa question, because of that then goes to a vote and they don't get the two—thirds majority we end up in this constitutional fudge, where two—thirds majority we end up in this constitutionalfudge, where it appears that nobody knows what happens next. absolutely. in the old days, the pm had the power to order a general election. the rules have changed. now the pm needs parliament to approve, a two—thirds majority, to approve, a two—thirds majority, to get a general election. one of the massive questions is if parliament is asked to prove a general election, what will they do? they have said they wanted general election, but the fear in the party is that there could be handing the ball back to borisjohnson and then leaving open the possibility of a no deal at the end of october. so many
6:06 am
unknowns. if there are already ten different points of view they seem to be multiplying all the time. divisions within divisions at this point. the tory party is totally fractured at the moment, and it is a remarkable situation. you have senior tories who sat in cabinet until two months ago, and they are now being threatened with the selection and been kicked out of the party if they joined selection and been kicked out of the party if theyjoined the opposition effort today. the mood in the tory party is poisonous, but there is a huge argument going on with the labour party as well, about what their tactic should be if this bill passes and they are put in the position of having to approve or not a general election. just briefly, on that, if it happens, a general election — we ought to count how many times we say "if" today, the 14th of october seems to be the date? that seems to be the date. a motion will be put forward by the government tomorrow saying we would
6:07 am
like parliamentary approval for an election on october 14. one of the anxieties among opposition parties is how totally committed boris johnson would be to sticking to that date if it was approved by mps. many mps are so worried that actually he might go foran mps are so worried that actually he might go for an election after brexit day, and that would have the effect of writing parliament out of the script from now until october the script from now until october the 31st. ben, you were meant to give us a bit of clarity! there are so give us a bit of clarity! there are so many questions off the back of that. essentially, it is trying to find the numbers over the next 24—48 hours. how many rebels are there? how much support for a general election is there within the labour party? do all those numbers add up? where will we be in 24 or 48 hours? the numbers will be very tight. there are about 20 tory rebels, massive pressure piled onto them right now did notjoin the opposition. you can imagine the text m essa 9 es opposition. you can imagine the text messages this morning. you are not going to frighten people like ken
6:08 am
clarke and philip hammond and david gauke, these are people who have done the topjobs. gauke, these are people who have done the top jobs. they don't care about threats they are getting from tory whips. younger tory mps may feel differently. the other thing, how many labour mps who represent leave seeds may be tempted to vote for the government because they think that under all circumstances brexit has to happen. i think the numbers will be tight. we have a numbers will be tight. we have a number of politicians right across the brexit spectrum coming up. and throughout the morning we'll be speaking to a number of politician across the brexit divide including foreign secretary, dominic raab, labour's shami chakrabarti, and the former attorney—general, dominic grieve. sendin send in your questions and comments and we will try to filter through some of those and essentially try to make sense of what has been a rather confusing 24 hours.
6:09 am
there's a warning that hundreds of patients are missing out on life—saving transplant operations because families are blocking the wishes of potential organ donors. the nhs is calling for people who've signed up to be donors to make their wishes clear to their relatives. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. this golf course near wolverhampton means a lot to bill more's family. he loved to play here but his sudden death left his family devastated. the decision on whether or not to donate his organs was complicated by not knowing exactly what he would have wanted. we were on such a rollercoaster of emotions, and i think not knowing his wishes at the time made it even harder. if we had known that he had said he wanted to donate his organs it would have made things a lot easier. last year, nearly 70% of the families of potential organ donors agreed to go ahead. but 835 families didn't want to, mostly because they hadn't
6:10 am
discussed organ donation with their loved one. each person can donate multiple organs, so it is estimated this amounts to 2500 missed opportunities for a transplant. in the end, bill's family did go ahead, helping at least eight people in the process. it is amazing to think that he lived on and his gift of life meant so much to them. it is absolutely life changing. new laws around organ donation have taken effect in wales, and england and scotla nd effect in wales, and england and scotland will follow suit next year. consent to donation will be assumed, so you will have to opt out of the scheme rather than opting in. but families will still have the final say. it is hoped more people talk about their wishes, the easier it will be for relatives to say yes, and that should lead to more life—saving transplants. good morning to you, if you have just switched on the television. we
6:11 am
are bringing you bbc breakfast in the heart of so many questions about the heart of so many questions about the constitution, where we are going asa the constitution, where we are going as a country, and what is happening with regards to brexit. at least five people are known to have died as hurricane dorian continues to cause catastrophic damage across the bahamas. some 13,000 houses are feared damaged or destroyed. it is expected to hit the eastern seaboard of america as our north america correspondent aleem maqbool reports. overnight, life was changed in abaco in the bahamas, by the strongest storm ever recorded there. large areas of these low—lying island were totally submerged. wins reached more than 160 totally submerged. wins reached more than160 mph, totally submerged. wins reached more than 160 mph, with ocean surges recorded up to 23 feet high. please pray for us, grade 42. the roof of
6:12 am
the apartment block of this woman had been ripped off. she was clinging to the side of the building with her baby as she broadcast this. some people, the waterjust took them. their -- there has as yet been no update on her safety. people watching the waters rise around their homes, and the minister of agriculture was among them. he filmed this. aid agencies estimate that up to 13,000 homes could have been destroyed as the storm moves painfully slowly through the bahamas. for long periods, the eye of the hurricane staying in a single spot. it could be days until help reach as many, and as well as fears about lives lost and those injured, there are concerns of food and clean drinking water will be hard to come by. hurricane dorian isjust 100 by. hurricane dorian isjust100 miles away from here, and states of emergency have been declared not
6:13 am
just in this state but in four others as well, as the us mainland now braces itself for the impact of this record—breaking storm. we will keep following the path of that hurricane. hopes are fading that any more survivors will be found after boat carrying scuba divers caught fire and sank off the coast of southern california. there were more than 30 people on board. officials have warned relatives to prepare for the worst. santa barbara police say a total of eight bodies have been recovered or located on the sea bed. experts are warning about the dangers of fussy eating after a 17—year—old from bristol who lived on a diet of chips, crisps and processed meat suffered irreparable sight loss. eye doctors in bristol cared for the young man after his vision had deteriorated to the point of blindness. tests revealed he had severe vitamin deficiencies and damage linked to malnutrition.
6:14 am
bbc news bulletins were used to send secret messages to resistance fighters in the second world war. 80 years on from britain and france going to war with germany, new archive recordings from bbc history reveal how big ben chimes were sometimes replaced with a recording to confuse german bombers. i don't think there are any secret m essa 9 es i don't think there are any secret messages being sent today! there is a bit of confusion about what is happening, but we will keep going. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. the big where the story at the moment is hurricane dorian. it is a very unusual and devastating storm. it must be so terrifying for the bahamas. the strongest of the wins has been roughly in the same areas
6:15 am
for 24 hours. a 20 foot storm surge, those wins still around 130 mph, right around that call. it will continue to produce problems across the bahamas. we won't know for days yet exactly the impact it has had. there are signs that later today it will start to shift northwards. let's have a look at the forecast track. staying offshore, it will maintain some of its intensity but will be close enough to eastern parts of florida, hopefully it won't hit these heavily populated areas. even without a direct hit there is the potential for a great even without a direct hit there is the potentialfor a great deal of damage. back on to our shores, much quieter. a north—west/ south—east split. if you are north—west it will be damp and drizzly, maybe not quite
6:16 am
as heavy as the rain some of you saw yesterday, driest and brightest the further south and east you are. but compared to yesterday morning's commuted will be milder. temperatures in the teens for the majority. a bit chilly, temperatures into single figures in scotland. the best of the morning sunshine in the south—east. through western scotland, north—west england, western wales and northern england, light rain and drizzle will make for a damp morning. the rain turns heavier through the day in western pa rt heavier through the day in western part of scotland this afternoon, into northern ireland as well. drizzle on the western fringes of england and while, but across the midlands, south—east england, most of it will be dry with sunny spells, and 23 or24 of it will be dry with sunny spells, and 23 or 24 degrees. milder compared to yesterday. the rain will then spread southward through england in one, most of us with some rain, some heavy bursts mixed in. temperatures staying in the teens, turning a bit fresher into tomorrow morning further north and west. this is the picture for wednesday, this weather front producing some rain
6:17 am
for the morning commute, at least across the south—east corner, but wrapped around it a further weather front bringing heavy showers into parts of scotland and northern ireland, and strengthening wins. eastern scotland starting with sunshine, england in one with sunshine, england in one with sunshine to start, but showers developing through the day. across southern counties, a bright afternoon with some sunshine, and a blustery day right across the board. strong wind gusts, 40, 50, maybe 60 mph, making it a strong wind gusts, 40, 50, maybe 60 mph, making ita rather strong wind gusts, 40, 50, maybe 60 mph, making it a rather cool day. 11 and 12 degrees across northern scotland, and further south. closer to where we should be, around 18—20. going into thursday, the weather front moved out of the way, normally weather for a front moved out of the way, normally weatherfor a time. front moved out of the way, normally weather for a time. actually started the morning, temperatures in single figures, a bright start for many, and sunny spells continue throughout the day. it turns a bit cloudier in the day. it turns a bit cloudier in the west with outbreaks of rain. after that chilly start, temperatures around 14— 19 degrees.
6:18 am
thank you. i said you could be sure of one thing, hearing big then behind me, you will notice there is scaffolding around it. lovely to be here in westminster on another really important day. so many ifs today. what will happen next? we'll try and get some of those answers through the programme. let's take a look at today's papers. pictures of boris johnson at a lectern in front of number 10 appear on the front of several of today's papers, including the daily mail. that was about 6pm yesterday. "boris names election date", is the headline. up to 20 tory mps are threatening to join forces with labour "to take control of the parliamentary agenda", the paper reports. "johnson's ultimatum" is the headline for the guardian. it reports a source saying tory rebels are thinking about backing down after mrjohnson's televised address.
6:19 am
we will speak to some of them today and see what they say. "mrjohnson is set to gamble his entire premiership on an election that would be fought as a rerun of the 2016 eu referendum," says the daily telegraph. losing would make him the shortest—serving prime minister in history, according to the paper. and the mirror refers to the unfolding events in westminster as a "brexit dog's dinner". its front page features a photo of dillyn, a rescue puppy that has moved in to downing street under the headline, "snappy election". if you need a bit of light relief, the dog has provided a bit of light relief, some have said it's a distraction technique but they welcome it because there is so much guff to talk about, nice to talk about the dog. pictures of him being taken into about the dog. pictures of him being ta ken into downing about the dog. pictures of him being taken into downing street, a busy day then! let's talk about how things might pan out over the next few days in. with us now is maddy thimontjack from the non—partisan think tank the institute
6:20 am
for government. good morning. good morning. let's talk about today, what do we know is going to happen in parliament? mps today are going to try to take control of the parliamentary agenda tomorrow and to do this they will ask the speaker to allow an emergency debate on a motion that will say rather than government controlling the agenda tomorrow, back and chose well and if they pass the vote today then they plan on bringing forward the bill, published last night, tomorrow, and the bill is saying if mps haven't approved a deal or approved no—deal by the 19th of october, the prime minister must ask for an extension to article 50. it isa ask for an extension to article 50. it is a big question, what happens if this happens, but what likelihood of that getting through?m if this happens, but what likelihood of that getting through? it is difficult to say with uncertain numbers. quite a few conservative mps are willing to vote against the government to take control of the order paper, some aren't against exit but they are against a no—deal
6:21 am
brexit. there's a handful of leave voting constituencies that might not wa nt to voting constituencies that might not want to be seen to be voting against brexit. the bill doesn't stop brexit but it delays it to give more time to negotiate a deal. the vote on the bill happens tomorrow? there will be multiple votes on the bill tomorrow, they have to try to maintain the majority for multiple votes to get through it. if the prime minister wa nted through it. if the prime minister wanted to call an election, what would be the procedure? would need an early election motion passed by two—thirds of mps. would need an early election motion passed by two—thirds of mpsm would need an early election motion passed by two-thirds of mps. if mps successfully take control of the agenda tomorrow, that vote would be after the bill but what he might do is see how votes pan out tomorrow, lay the motion down for an early election tomorrow to allow a vote on thursday. we don't know at this stage. mps are going to quickly have to make significant decisions. there will be a lot of pressure on them to
6:22 am
decide whether or not they are going to support the bill. the bill was published yesterday, you can imagine lots of backroom conversations about it, so the people tabling it to mobley think they have a good chance of passing it. if they pass the bill they have to think about whether or not they can back an election —— presumably think. let's go a few steps ahead, the no—deal legislation goes through, boris johnson steps ahead, the no—deal legislation goes through, borisjohnson calls a general election but doesn't get the two—thirds majority, so no general election, what happens then? no—deal has been taken off the table and the government would legally need to apply for an extension to the brexit deadline but he's stood on the steps of downing street yesterday and said there's no way i will extend that beyond october the sist. will extend that beyond october the 31st. what happens then? we expect him to follow the law if the act of parliament has been passed. what he can do in theory if he thinks he has a majority is get new legislation to
6:23 am
override current legislation, but he will talk to lawyers to if there is wiggle room in the bill drafted. you can imagine mps involved in the drafting thinking they have got a watertight bill. if the eu have offered an alternative date, the 3ist offered an alternative date, the 31st of january, then the government must accept unless mps reject that actively. they think they have managed to box him in but we will wait and see. another if, we hear about october the 14th for a possible general election, what's the significance of that date? there needs to be a five—week campaigning period, so i expect it works back from that and he's also keen to have an election before the october council, the 17th of october, so if he wins a majority either on a no—deal platform or in favour of his brexit policy he can go to the eu and say the country is behind me. the interesting question will be
6:24 am
four labour mps particularly, would they back an election before the 3ist they back an election before the 31st of october? exactly, and he can say he will hold an election on the 14th of october but the motion won't include that date. otherwise it wouldn't apply under the law. it is a specifically worded motion that needs to pass and it is up to the government to set the date. there is a concern he might say the 14th of october but he could set a later date. if he goes for it there will be questions in the house about sticking to that date. there's lots of mps yesterday who were saying i have been speaking to my constituents and they have been saying this. what's the general feeling about another election? yesterday brenda from bristol was trending on social media and she was famous when asked aboutjon kay saying not another when asked about another general election. there is concern about the date that will ta ke concern about the date that will take place and what will end up playing out during the campaign. i'm
6:25 am
not sure about the mood of the public. some people will be very frustrated about what's going on in westminster. we will have to wait and see. last time we had a snap election, theresa may was miles ahead in the polls but didn't get a majority. really hard to predict. you are clearly passionate about this and thanks for making it so clear. what about the significance and the drama? have you ever imagined anything like this? this is really significant in westminster. during exit we had these crunch points but they haven't played out. brexit under theresa may is different to boris johnson. brexit under theresa may is different to borisjohnson. theresa may wasn't willing to go for no—deal, but now we have a prime minister really willing to go out of the eu with all without a deal. it feels like the pressure and tension has heightened. through this process we have seen this deterioration in relationship between government and
6:26 am
parliament significant developments have happened in the last few years that we will have to grapple with after brexit. i wish i could borrow that knowledge and keep it in my head, thanks very much, maddy thimontjack! seems like the stakes have been raised this time around. still to come on breakfast: top secret for 80 years until now. find out how bbc news bulletins were used to send secret messages to resistance fighters during world war ii. all that to come. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we'll be back live from westminster with the national headlines in a few minutes' time. good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. as young people prepare to go back to school, we've been looking at whether arts subjects are being squeezed out of the curriculum. a combination of funding cuts and the way schools are measured has meant fewer students taking a level art. it's dropped by 7%
6:27 am
in the past 5 years. but teachers, the creative industries and students themselves say the subject should be given more emphasis in the classroom. it allows you to develop your ideas. it allows you to develop your ideas. it comes up in english, it comes up in maths. analysing 3d shapes or analysing a story and coming up with something completely fresh and created off the top of your head, it's just a very important subject. more than 200 airline passengers have been arrested on suspicion of being drunk at london's airports over the last two years. people were detained for offences including sexually assaulting staff and urinating in public. some were even found to be too drunk to fasten their seatbelts. heathrow come out worst in the country with over 100 people arrested. sir eltonjohn will feature on a new set of stamps to celebrate his contribution to music. the 12 designs will show
6:28 am
some his performances in the capital as well as popular album covers. the singer—songwriter, who was born in pinner, is the only living solo music artist to appear on a set of stamps. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the entire metropolitan line this morning. everything seems ok on the trains, though. there are gas works on wandsworth high street in the one way system at the junction with wandsworth plain. in tottenham, white hart lane is closed in both directions between high road and william street due to a building fire. on clapham park road, there are temporary traffic lights near thejunction with northbourne road. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start this morning. one or two sunny spells or bright spells at least first thing ahead of more cloud, increasing through the afternoon.
6:29 am
enjoy the sunshine while we've got it this morning. a bit breezy compared to yesterday with a westerly, south—westerly breeze developing pushing the cloud in from the west through the afternoon. it stays dry and attempts reaching around 22. overnight tonight, largely cloudy with one or two brea ks largely cloudy with one or two breaks and one or two clear spells but the cloud increases again ahead of this. more rain, potentially quite heavy rain through the early hours of tomorrow through to dawn on wednesday. minimum temperature again 14 or 15, so feeling mild. waking up toa 14 or 15, so feeling mild. waking up to a wet start tomorrow and that rain gradually clearing mid—morning onwards, becoming drier and brighter with sunshine in the afternoon. temperatures tomorrow around 21. lots of dry weather in the forecast, sunshine in there between the cloud but temperatures staying in the high teens. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to dan and louise. bye for now.
6:30 am
hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we're live from westminster this morning as mps return to the commons in a crucial week for the future of brexit. we'll be talking to dominic raab, the foreign secretary, to find out if borisjohnson will try and call a general election next month. facing deselection is dominic grieve — we'll ask the former attorney—general how he feels about the direction his party has taken since borisjohnson took up tenancy in number ten. jeremy corbyn says he welcomes the prospect of a general election, but how prepared is labour to go to the polls? we'll speak to the party's shami chakrabarti. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
6:31 am
boris johnson faces a showdown in parliament later as tory rebels join forces with opposition mps to try to block a no—deal brexit. if defeated, the prime minister has threatened a third general election in four years, which could come as soon as the middle of next month. jeremy corbyn said the labour party was ready for a general election but didn't clarify a timeframe. the uk's transplant service says that a reluctance by families to talk openly about organ donation after death means that thousands of opportunities for transplants are being missed. nhs blood and transplant says that there were a record number of organ donations in 2018, but families refusing to give their consent to procedures was the largest reason for transplants not going ahead. at least five people have been killed in the bahamas, as hurricane dorian continues to batter the country. around 13,000 houses are feared damaged or destroyed, according to the international red cross. officials say dorian, the second—strongest atlantic hurricane on record,
6:32 am
remains "extremely dangerous". hopes are fading that any more survivors will be found after boat carrying scuba divers caught fire and sank off the coast of southern california. 25 bodies are now confirmed to have been found, leaving nine unaccounted for. officials have warned relatives to prepare for the worst. five members of the crew survived. experts are warning about the dangers of fussy eating after a 17—year—old from bristol who lived on a diet of chips, crisps and processed meat suffered irreparable sight loss. eye doctors in bristol cared for the young man after his vision had deteriorated to the point of blindness. tests revealed he had severe vitamin deficiencies and damage linked to malnutrition. those are the main stories today. we will be back shortly talking to some
6:33 am
mps. our constitutional expert said a few moments ago it is one of those mornings where they are waking up and asking others about what decisions they might make and what direction they might go today. also, we will keep reminding you of the timeline of what happens when, so you can be absolutely clear and know what is going on as well. john's in the studio with the sport. we start at the us open — all eyes on britain'sjohanna konta later, who's aiming to reach the semi—finals in new york for the first time. she'll have to pull off another upset though if she's to beat fifth seed elina svitolina. hopefully she can take some inspiration from this woman, belinda bencic, who knocked out the defending champion, naomi osaka, in straight sets, which means the japanese player will lose her world number one ranking, with french open champion ash barty returning to the top spot. rafa nadal is into the quarters and remains on course to meet roger federer in the final. he beat marin cilic in four sets
6:34 am
and will play diego shwartzman next. nadal is two short of federer‘s tally of 20 grand slam titles. clear your diary tomorrow — as the fourth ashes test begins at old trafford, england bowler joffra archer won't hold back against a returning steve smith, that's according to team—mate stuart broad. smith missed the third test with concussion after a bouncer from archer hit him on the neck, but the bowler won't be changing his attacking style and broad expects an epic contest. the first thing is it's great that steve is ok and coming back into test cricket, but test cricket is a brutal sport and it is a sport that countries are going hell for leather against each other, and i'm sure when steve comes in, archer will be injoe when steve comes in, archer will be in joe root‘s when steve comes in, archer will be injoe root‘s ear wanting the ball.
6:35 am
the fastest man in the world this year, american sprinter cristiamn coleman has been cleared to run at the world athletics championships in doha, which start at the end of the month. coleman had been charged with missing three drugs tests and was facing an automatic one—year ban, but the us anti—doping agency has dropped its case against him. there's been a surprise omission from ireland's rugby world cup squad. leinster lock devin toner who's got huge experience having played 60 times under head coachjoe schmidt, more than any other player, has been dropped in favour of south africa—bornjean kleyn, who only qualified to play for ireland three weeks ago. bury fans continuing the fight for their club with crisis talks being held to try to find a way to get them back into the football league. fan groups met with local mps and the mayor of manchester yesterday to try to secure a future for bury, who were expelled from the league due to financial difficulties with a buyer pulling out at the 11th hour.
6:36 am
we understand that the football league need to take action, what we feel, though, is that the punishment is unduly harsh. what we have developed today is a proposal to try and persuade the other clubs that bury should remain football league club, entering league two for the 2021 season. international football takes centre stage this week starting tonight with qualifying matches for the women's euro 2021 tournament. wales are expecting to challenge norway for top spot in their group. they cruised to a 6—0 win over the faroe islands in their opening game and tonight they host northern ireland, who were thrashed 6—0 by norway last friday. i'm sure it will be more challenging. obviously they didn't have the result they wanted in their first game but i'm sure they look at a slightly different to how they looked at norway and they will want to come in and compete. we are
6:37 am
prepared for that and i'm looking forward to what will hopefully be a good game for everybody watching, and a challenging one i'm sure. england's women are in norway for a friendly tonight and they could soon boast of having the world's best player. just three days after being named europe's player of the year by uefa, lucy bronze was nominated for the fifa award, for the best player in the world, a label she's often been given by her england manager phil neville. ijust i just try my ijust try my hardest i just try my hardest to ijust try my hardest to play my best for the team. none of the girls put me on a pedestal, theyjust treat me like everyone else, and i wa nt to treat me like everyone else, and i want to be like everybody else. i don't see myself that way. i don't think i'm the best, i don't think i'm the best player in europe. that is all the sport for now, i will hand you back to dan and louise.
6:38 am
it's a nice day here, it's chilly but it's lovely. here at westminster, another crucial day begins. tory rebels and opposition mps are expected to try and block a no—deal brexit. one of those mps is tom brake, the brexit spokesperson for the liberal democrats. we'll speak to him in a moment but first, let's take a look at what could happen over the coming days and weeks. today, mps return to the commons after summer recess where they'll vote on whether to take control of the commons in order to stop a no—deal brexit. if it passes, the government is tomorrow expected to table a motion to hold a general election. but that can only happen if it's backed by at least two—thirds of mps in a commons vote. if they vote in favour of the motion, the country will go to the polls on monday, the 14th of october. with us now is tom brake, the brexit spokesperson for the liberal democrats. thank you forjoining us. ijust wa nt to
6:39 am
thank you forjoining us. ijust want to get through timelines firstly. you are part of what some people call a rebel alliance, trying to get control of the commons. why do you want to do that? we want to rule out no deal. i think it has become more and more evident that thatis become more and more evident that that is what our pm wants to force through and he doesn't have a mandate for it. do you have the numbers, as faras mandate for it. do you have the numbers, as far as you know? as far asi numbers, as far as you know? as far as i know, i think we are there, just. clearly it will be very tight. it appears as though the government have made no attempt to lobby tory rebels, which indicates that perhaps they think they have already lost. you mentioned to me a number of about ten, that's how many might win it by? | about ten, that's how many might win it by? i hope we can get up to double figures, but often these things are one by between one and three. how do the liberal democrats feel about the prospect of a general
6:40 am
election? well, if the government dissolves parliament, and the pm wa nts to dissolves parliament, and the pm wants to do so without seeking an extension to article 50, then we will certainly not support him, because his intention would simply because his intention would simply be to hold an election, use up a lot of time on the election, have no negotiations with the european union, which of course dominic cummings has described as a sham, and he will in effect crush us out. so you are still trying to avoid a general election? what i am trying to avoid is the pm via a general election inflicting no deal on the country, which the government has said will lead to food, fuel and medicine shortages and something for which the pm has no mandate.“ medicine shortages and something for which the pm has no mandate. if they we re which the pm has no mandate. if they were to be a vote tomorrow on holding a general election, the liberal democrats as a party would vote to not have a general election? yes, unless the pm is willing to extend article 50, which means he
6:41 am
doesn't simply crush us out of the eu, we will not support that motion. it isa eu, we will not support that motion. it is a morning of maybes, but there is potentially a situation where you have to side withjeremy corbyn or the government, are you more likely to have an alliance there? we had a very productive meeting withjeremy corbyn, and i think we can win with this legislative approach. therefore, in effect, we would have a good, strong, cross—party alliance including members of all parties except the dup working on it, so thatis except the dup working on it, so that is our approach. for those people watching this morning, we we re people watching this morning, we were trying to get clarity. so much of this is unknown. so, you get your way and you effectively stop no deal. yes? you also then don't want a general election, so what happens? constitutionally this is
6:42 am
unprecedented in many ways, isn't it? it is, and i suppose the purpose of trying to stop no deal and securing an extension is to have the time to engage in negotiations, and secondly to give him the time to get that deal through parliament. but also, critically, to work out how on earth we are going to resolve this mess. clearly, that would be my means of a people ‘s vote. people often talk about the confusion around this. questions about divisions within parties, and some people in parties saying they want one thing and others going down a different route. with regards to the liberal democrats, chuka umunna was talking about stopping brexit being the goal. i don't know if that is him speaking or a liberal democrat position? that is our position as a
6:43 am
party. we think brexit is bad for the country and the best deal we haveis the country and the best deal we have is the one we have already got with the eu. what do you say to the 17.4 million people who voted to leave on that issue? what i would say to them is if the liberal democrats got our way, and there was a people ‘s vote, each and every one of those 17.4 million people would be able to vote whether they wanted the government's deal or possibly no deal, if the pm puts out on the ballot paper, or if they would prefer ballot paper, or if they would p refer to ballot paper, or if they would prefer to remain. you talk about wanting a people ‘s vote, but not a general election. some people might be confused — why the difference? the difference is that because of the timing, the proposed timing that borisjohnson has the timing, the proposed timing that boris johnson has flagged the timing, the proposed timing that borisjohnson has flagged up for a general election, the 14th of october, in effect what he is doing is guaranteeing that we would have no deal, and therefore we would be crashing out on the 31st of october without a deal. he doesn't have a mandate for that, people didn't vote for that. they didn't vote for no deal? three years ago, boris johnson went around the country telling people they would be a fantastic
6:44 am
deal because the italians wanted to sell us prosecco and the germans bmws. you have said this a million times before. what do you say to people from the government to say that by doing this you are basically stopping them from negotiating with the power they want to negotiate with? i would say to them, look at what dominic cummins hasjust with? i would say to them, look at what dominic cummins has just told this country, which is that he believes the negotiations are a sham. so, the person who is in control of the government is telling us control of the government is telling us all that the government negotiations are a sham, there are no negotiations going on. we will talk to dominic raab about his negotiations a little bit later. are you looking forward to being back in there today? it will be very intense! thank you very much. it is one of those days where i think it is really important to pay attention to the numbers, and talk about — we will try to get you
6:45 am
through some of those numbers later. numbers who might rebel, and where the support from parties like the liberal democrats and labour will be. should we talk about something we can be much more certain you say that, louise, but good morning! a bit more uncertain about the weather this morning. a north—west, southeast split roughly speaking today and the further north and west you are, the more likely you are to cloud and rain and drizzle. dry in the south—east. a breeze blowing, not as strong as yesterday but not as cold as yesterday but not as cold as yesterday morning so if you're heading out for the commute, these are the rough temperatures. double figures, if not the teens for the vast majority. coolest in the far north of but here we have the best morning sunshine with a few breaks in central and eastern parts but a lot of cloud around. rain and drizzle in central and southern
6:46 am
scotland, north—west england and western wales and northern ireland, coming and going during the day. heavy in northern ireland and central and western scotland with some of the rain making eastern scotla nd some of the rain making eastern scotland later. sunny in shetland and bright in orkney and bright conditions in east midlands and eastern england, 22—24. elsewhere, up eastern england, 22—24. elsewhere, upa bit eastern england, 22—24. elsewhere, up a bit on yesterday afternoon. rain this evening in scotland and particularly parts of northern western england and wales. that will spread south and east through the night so gardens in the south and east will get welcome rain into tomorrow morning. temperatures staying in the mid—teens and fresher into tomorrow morning further north and west, that's because of where the air is coming around and it's coming around the area of low pressure. coming from the north, cooler conditions for all. early rainfor cooler conditions for all. early rain for this weather front down towards the channel islands and the isle of wight and the south—east, sunshine for the rest of the day. elsewhere bright enough but showers in the west of scotland will develop
6:47 am
more widely in western scotland and pushing into northern england, north wales and north midlands through the day. sunshine elsewhere but a blustery day with 40 or 50 or 60 mph in north—western scotland and northern ireland and a chilly day. temperatures in the north of scotla nd temperatures in the north of scotland only around 11 or 12 and further south with the sunshine dominant, down on the past few days. we stick with the chilly air as the temperatures reduce. single figure temperatures reduce. single figure temperatures on thursday morning. lots of sunshine to begin with. cloud in overfor the rest lots of sunshine to begin with. cloud in over for the rest of the day with rain and drizzle, not too significant, but in the last few days as we've seen, northern and western areas damp and brightening up western areas damp and brightening up in northern ireland later. temperatures only 14—19, down on where we expect for the time of year and for the start of the weekend and the end of the week, temperatures roughly that level. dampness in
6:48 am
western areas on friday and brighter for all into the start of the weekend. back to down and lou reason. thanks very much, see you later —— dan and louise. we are live at westminster today stop when things start to move quickly here at westminster, one consequence can be the currency markets jumping around and the pound fell yesterday as speculation over the general election grew. sean is taking a look at what's been happening with the pound overnight. good morning everybody. that's right, currency markets often react to political events and on monday the pound fell against the euro and the dollar among intensified political uncertainty over brexit. let's have a look at what's been happening to the pound over the past three years. it is at its lowest point in pretty much to years. bouncing around a bit this morning. it's worth around one point to road
6:49 am
dollars, or one point to road euros. jane foley is a currency expert at rabobank. what is jumping out for you what is jumping out for you this what is jumping out for you this morning? currencies don't like political uncertainties so the fear ofa political uncertainties so the fear of a no—deal brexit is weighing down on sterling. this week we've known this is going to be a week full of potentially elliptical twists and turns. sterling would like is if no—deal was taken off the table at the end of next month —— potentially political. that is a bugbear for investors. we have a general election potential as well, that's not good for sterling or any currency, and then we have economic data with the deteriorating economy. yesterday we had bad data on the manufacturing sector and bad date are in germany, that brings
6:50 am
headwinds for the eurozone and the uk economy. lots to worry about for the uk for various reasons but if we saw a left in sterling, that would be if no—deal was taken off the table at the end of the month next month. a few people might think if there's an election on the horizon, the chance of no—deal might be less than at the minute with everything we've heard from the current government and boris johnson about heard from the current government and borisjohnson about pushing for and borisjohnson about pushing for a no—deal as far as they can until a deal gets done. why wouldn't the pound be a bit stronger off the back of that? again, there's a lack of clarity but also another thing that worries investors all around the world a re worries investors all around the world are left—wing governments. if we had a corbin government, that in itself is quite a negative factor foran itself is quite a negative factor for an exchange rate and certainly the pound. if a general election brought a jeremy corbyn government, many would be worried about that
6:51 am
over a no—deal brexit. that's not the end of the story. it's a strong possibility we might get a hung parliament after an election. if that was the case, there would still be quite a lot of lingering investor uncertainty and political uncertainty and political uncertainty and political uncertainty and that could create an uneven path for the pound. where talking a lot about the pound against the dollar and those lows we've not seen since after the referendum, then you have to go back to the mid— 80s when it was lower than that. what about the euro, people going on holiday, end of the summer? sterling is weak against the euro. your right to bring that up, there aren't men e.g. ten countries outperforming the dollar this year but —— there aren't many g ten countries. there's a fear if we got a no—deal brexit, we could be 1—to—1 against the euro. jane foley from rabobank, currency expert. a hung
6:52 am
parliament could beyond the horizon. even though there could be rain and election, reducing the chance of no—deal, the uncertainty around that meaning the currency isn't very strong at the moment. we will be back with you through the morning. thanks very much indeed. welcome to a lovely day in westminster. we are here because of the votes happening over the next 24 hours. sean is back in the studio and john has the sport in the studio and john has the sport in the studio and matt has the weather. there's other things to talk about as well fortu nately. details of how bbc news bulletins were used to send secret messages to resistance fighters in the second world war have been released today. this is fascinating. 80 years on from britain and france going to war with germany the archive recordings reveal how big ben was sometimes replaced with a recording to confuse german bombers. here's our arts correspondent david sillito.
6:53 am
this is the bbc home and forces programme. here is the news and this isjohn programme. here is the news and this is john snake reading programme. here is the news and this isjohn snake reading it. programme. here is the news and this is john snake reading it. the sound of big ben and the bbc news life from london. the service that links the world by radio. however, during the second world war, big ben wasn't always live. the bbc has just released archive recordings from people from the second world war who reveal that, for instance, big ben was sometimes a recording. why? if you were listening and you could hear german bombers above, it might help them target their bombs so someone was a lwa ys target their bombs so someone was always waiting with a record just in case. here you can see some of the bomb damage and the bbc was actually hit... historian david hendy has been going through this archive material and he was particularly interested about what was happening in poland. 80 yea rs what was happening in poland. 80 years after the nazi invasion, we now know the bbc was using music at
6:54 am
the end of the news to send secret m essa g es to the end of the news to send secret messages to the resistance. the bulletins broadcast to poland would be made to run deliberately short by a minute or so. then a secret messengerfrom a minute or so. then a secret messenger from the exiled polish government would deliver to the bbc under the codename peter peterkin a record that should be played in that spare minute or so. the choice of music would send a message to resista nce music would send a message to resistance groups in poland. now let's go back to broadcasting house... and getting the bbc to play the right song at the right time was the job of a man called alex sutherland, because sometimes a record was scratched and the bbc would want to substitute another tune. the recording programme assistance would look at these discs and they would see what would make a better broadcast. they would play the other band and the wrong prince would go in poland. this playground of
6:55 am
north—east london was a relic of victorian times. even the transmitter at alexandra palace was used to interfere with navigation systems of german bombers. this was all top secret at the time but 80 years on, these interviews are still revealing new insights into what part broadcasting played in the second world war. david sillitoe, bbc news. extraordinary stories! play the wrong song and on the wrong bridge. serious stuff! something tough has got to happen i think to break this deadlock we are yesterday, so—called tory rebel, antoinette sandbach told us she'll vote against her government to stop a no deal brexit and face potential deselection. we've been to eddisbury to get reaction from her constituents and what they make of the latest brexit developments. we would love you to get involved as
6:56 am
well today. go to the website to send us an e—mail and we are on social media. let us know your comments and questions and we'll try to give you some clarity on this tuesday morning. shortly we'll have the headlines from westminster. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. as young people prepare to go back to school, we've been looking at whether arts subjects are being squeezed out of the curriculum. a combination of funding cuts and the way schools are measured has meant fewer students taking a level art. it's dropped by 7% in the past 5 years. but teachers, the creative industries and students themselves say the subject should be given more emphasis in the classroom. it allows you to develop your ideas. it comes up in english, it comes up in maths. analysing 3d shapes or analysing a story and coming up with something completely fresh and created off the top of your head,
6:57 am
it's just a very important subject. more than 200 airline passengers have been arrested on suspicion of being drunk at london's airports over the last two years. people were detained for offences including sexually assaulting staff and urinating in public. some were even found to be too drunk to fasten their seatbelts. heathrow come out worst in the country, with over 100 people arrested. sir eltonjohn will feature on a new set of stamps to celebrate his contribution to music. the 12 designs will show some of his performances in the capital as well as popular album covers. the singer—songwriter, who was born in pinner, is the only living solo music artist to appear on a set of stamps. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the entire metropolitan line this morning. on the trains, south western railway services are disrupted
6:58 am
between feltham and reading. queues are building on the a13 into town through the goresbrook interchange in dagenham. in tottenham, white hart lane is closed in both directions between high road and william street due to a building fire. on clapham park road, there are temporary traffic lights near thejunction with northbourne road. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start this morning. one or two sunny spells or bright spells at least first thing ahead of more cloud, increasing through the afternoon. enjoy the sunshine while we've got it this morning. a bit breezy compared to yesterday with a westerly, south—westerly breeze developing, pushing the cloud in from the west as we head through the afternoon. it stays dry and temperatures reaching around 22. overnight tonight, largely cloudy with one or two breaks and one or two clear spells but the cloud increases again ahead
6:59 am
of this. more rain, some potentially quite heavy rain through the early hours of tomorrow through to dawn on wednesday. minimum temperature again 14—15, so feeling mild. waking up to a wet start tomorrow and that rain gradually clearing mid—morning onwards, becoming drier and brighter with sunshine in the afternoon. temperatures tomorrow around 21. lots of dry weather in the forecast, sunshine in there between the cloud but temperatures staying in the high teens. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
7:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we're live from westminster. our headlines this morning: a momentous day as westminster prepares for a showdown — the prime minister says nothing will make him delay brexit and he could trigger a snap election. labour mps and tory rebels will today try to stop the uk leaving the eu on october 31st without a deal. the election speculation has sent the pound down to its lowest levels since the referendum. i'll have more on where it might head next. in other news, hurricane dorian claims at least five lives in the bahamas and causes widespread damage.
7:01 am
its prime minister calls it an historic tragedy. johanna konta sets her sights on a semi—final spot at the us open later but it's goodbye to the world number one and defending champion naomi osaka, who's out. in the uk much milder this morning compared to yesterday for the commute. driest and brightest in the south and east. all the details later. it's tuesday, the 3rd of september. our top story: a momentous day ahead in westminster as tory rebels join forces with opposition mps to try to block a no—deal brexit on october 31st. if defeated, borisjohnson has threatened a third general election in four years, which could come as soon as the middle of next month. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake.
7:02 am
protester: boris, boris, boris! chanting: out, out, out! welcome back to westminster. mps return from their summer break today to a raging debate about brexit. yesterday evening, the prime minister raised the stakes with a warning to those trying to block a no deal exit, they could force him to go to the polls. let's let our negotiators get on with their work without that sword of damocles over their necks and without an election, without an election. i don't want an election, you don't want an election. tory mps entertained in the garden of number 10 now know that if theyjoin with opposition parties this week in attempts to take control of what happens in the house of commons, the government will push for an early election. two—thirds of mps would need to back that, meaning labour's position is crucial. their leader sounds keen. when the election comes, i'm ready for it, you're ready for it, we're ready for it.
7:03 am
we'll take that message out there and above all, we will win for the people of this country! we will defeat this lot! we will bring about that sense ofjustice and equality! that is what our movement was founded to achieve! but last night, another senior labour figure said the party would not support an election before the brexit deadline of october the 31st. what the conversations i've had in parliament today means is that we would not support the vote, the two—thirds majority that borisjohnson needs, the 434 mps that he needs to vote for a general election to dissolve parliament, under the fixed—term parliaments act, he will not get up majority. the summer is officially over here now and time is short for all sides to make their next move, and perhaps just days for big decisions to be made. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster.
7:04 am
let's get the latest now from our political correspondent, ben wright, whojoins us now here in westminster. we have seen people protesting on the streets, and continuing in some ways this morning. tell us how important today is. we have had a number of showdowns between government and parliament over attem pts government and parliament over atte m pts to government and parliament over attempts to shut down parliament before a no deal brexit. this is a momentous moment. you can see how seriously number ten are taking it with the fact that they are threatening tory rebels with d selection, kicking them out of the party, we are really looking at people like philip hammond, who was chancellor of the exchequer a couple of months ago. these are serious members of the tory party who are really worried about a no deal brexit and look like they are sticking with their plans to go with
7:05 am
the opposition to shutdown a no deal brexit. borisjohnson the opposition to shutdown a no deal brexit. boris johnson is the opposition to shutdown a no deal brexit. borisjohnson is saying you will be pretty much thrown out of the party if you do this and threatening a election if the bill goes through. looking at the numbers, last night it was 20, has it come down a little bit? very hard to say. i think most of the 20 will hold firm, because we're about seasoned veterans of the party, they are not worried about theirjobs, they won't be browbeaten by tory party whips. they have had their careers and they think this is a matter of national welfare. we could see some labour party mps voting with the government, those who represent seats that voted to leave. other things we would like to know, the possibility of the pm calling a general election, and whether they could get enough support to do that. many people say they don't want to general election, they never wanted
7:06 am
one, but clearly borisjohnson on the steps of downing street yesterday was making today's vote effectively a confidence issue. saying that if this carries today he will not be looking for an extension, he will come back to parliament tomorrow, put down emotion and ask for parliament to greenlight a general election. unlike the old days, the pm doesn't have the authority to go to buckingham palace and say, we want a general election. mps have to vote for it, and you needed two—thirds majority in the house of commons. one of the massive questions, and we are racing ahead, if today's vote carries an the legislation is passed, if we are in a situation tomorrow where we want parliament to approve a general election, what will the opposition parties do? we have had the liberal democrats saying already that they would not. that they wouldn't give approval for a general election, because the worry among opposition parties is that they can effectively write
7:07 am
themselves out of the script. even when the assumption is the election date boris johnson when the assumption is the election date borisjohnson has in mind is october the 14th, this is a brutal situation, they might think that they will try to delay this until after brexit day. interesting to see. the interesting thing, and i mentioned this earlier, is that todayis mentioned this earlier, is that today is a day where you are not entirely sure what those positions are, and things are shifting all the time because the numbers are shifting. exactly where you want to be in shifting. exactly where you want to beina shifting. exactly where you want to be in a week's time, where will i position myself now to get where i wa nt to position myself now to get where i want to be then? it is an extraordinary struggle. strategy, strength, tactics to any government that wants to get out on october the sist, that wants to get out on october the 31st, and parliament, where we know a majority of mps think leaving without a deal would be about outcome. that is the clash we are seeing playing out. indeed, and we will be talking about it throughout the morning. we will be speaking to
7:08 am
foreign secretary dominic yet raabe, and shami chakrabarti, and the former attorney general, dominic grieve. there's a warning that hundreds of patients are missing out on life—saving transplant operations because families are blocking the wishes of potential organ donors. the nhs is calling for people who've signed up to be donors to make their wishes clear to their relatives. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. this golf course near wolverhampton means a lot to bill moore's family. bill loved to play here but his sudden death left them devastated. the decision on whether or not to donate his organs was complicated by not knowing exactly what he would have wanted. it was really difficult to make that decision at the time. we were on such a rollercoaster of emotions, and i think not knowing his wishes at the time made it even harder. if we had known that he had said
7:09 am
he wanted to donate his organs it would have made things a lot easier. last year, nearly 70% of the families of potential organ donors agreed to go ahead. but 835 families didn't want to, mostly because they hadn't discussed organ donation with their loved one. each person can donate multiple organs, so it is estimated this amounts to 2500 missed opportunities for a transplant. in the end, bill's family did go ahead, helping at least eight people in the process. it is amazing to think that he lived on and his gift of life meant so much to them. it is absolutely life changing. new laws around organ donation have taken effect in wales, and england and scotland will follow suit next year. consent to donation will be assumed, so you will have to opt out of the scheme rather than opting in. but families will still have the final say. it is hoped more people talk about their wishes, the easier it will be for relatives to say yes, and that should lead to more
7:10 am
life—saving transplants. at least five people are known to have died as hurricane dorian continues to cause catastrophic damage across the bahamas. around 13,000 houses are feared damaged or destroyed. it is expected to hit the eastern seaboard of america as our north america correspondent aleem maqbool reports. overnight, life was changed in abaco in the bahamas by the strongest storm ever recorded there. large areas of these low—lying islands were totally submerged. winds reached more than 160 miles an hour with ocean surges recorded up to 23 feet high. please, pray for us. pray for abaco, please, i'm begging you. my baby's only four months old, so please pray for us. the roof of the apartment block of the mother who took this video had been ripped off.
7:11 am
she was clinging to the side of the building with her baby as she broadcast this. some people, the water just took them. there has as yet been no update on her safety and no official figure for casualties. among those helplessly watching the waters rise the minister of agriculture, michael pintard, who filmed this. aid agencies estimate that up to 13,000 homes could have been destroyed as the storm moves painfully slowly through the bahamas, at some points atjust a mile an hour. it could be days until help reaches many and as well as fears about lives lost and those injured, there are concerns that food and clean drinking water will be hard to come by. hurricane dorian is just 100 miles away from here, and states of emergency have been declared not just in this state but in four others as well, as the us mainland
7:12 am
now braces itself for the impact of this record—breaking storm. emergency workers say at least 25 people are now known to have died when a scuba—diving boat caught fire off the coast of southern california. nine people are still missing. the cause of the fire remains unknown. experts are warning about the dangers of fussy eating after a 17—year—old from bristol, who lived on a diet of chips, crisps and processed meat, suffered irreparable sight loss. eye doctors in bristol cared for the young man after his vision had deteriorated to the point of blindness. tests revealed he had severe vitamin deficiencies and damage linked to malnutrition. bbc news bulletins were used to send secret messages to resistance fighters in the second world war. 80 years on from britain and france going to war with germany, new archive recordings from bbc history reveal how big ben chimes
7:13 am
were sometimes replaced with a recording to confuse german bombers. we will have more on that a bit later. it is 7:12am. last night the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, said he and his party were ready to fight and win a general election. the leader of the opposition told supporters in salford that he would be delighted if a general election was called. when the election comes, i'm ready for it, you are ready for it, we are ready for it. we will win for the people of this country, and we will bring about that sense of justice and equality! we're joined now by labour's shadow attorney general, shami chakrabarti. jeremy corbyn there saying he is ready for an election, but there does seem to be some confusion. we
7:14 am
have spoken to members of the labour party asking if that is really the case and whether the party would vote for a general election if there was a vote. of course, by the first thing to deal with today is this legislation to lockdown this kabbalah of elitists who are currently squatting a number ten, to make sure we don't crash out. that isa make sure we don't crash out. that is a priority this morning, and that is a priority this morning, and that is why this morning the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, is meeting once more with a group of cross— party meeting once more with a group of cross—party colleagues. the other opposition leaders, and so on. to make sure our parliamentary priority in the next couple of days is to legislate to prevent a no deal brexit out. i do understand that, but a general election does seem to be on the horizon. can we just come back to you on that point. there was talk last night that labour wouldn't back a general election if it was on the table. jeremy corbyn has now
7:15 am
said he would be delighted if a general election was called. this is just a matter of sequencing. of course we always want to general election, because you don't and austerity and food bank britain without a general election, but it is about priorities. today and tomorrow the primary priority working across parties is to legislate against a disastrous no deal, because it would be disastrous for poor and working people, most of all. have you got the numbers, as far as you know, and by how many votes would it go through if it does?m is difficult to predict precise numbers because people say one thing and don't always deliver. your asking people to put nation before party, as the demonstrator is shouting in the background —— you are. i can't be precise about that and forgive me, i also won't be precise about the tactics coz we are dealing with people prepared to
7:16 am
shutdown parliament and people who wa nt to shutdown parliament and people who want to march young women out of number 10 at gunpoint. we're not dealing with anything i've seen before in my working lifetime. what is the gunpoint reference?” before in my working lifetime. what is the gunpoint reference? i believe the people currently in number 10 area the people currently in number 10 are a bunch of thugs with no respect for decency, courtesy or the rule of law. at gunpoint, what did you mean? there were reports widely reported ofa there were reports widely reported of a young conservative worker, a woman, escorted out of the building by an armed police officer. again, to come back to this so people are really clear watching, let's say, for example, you're saying it's very tight and you talk about tactics, let's say you get control of parliament and stop no—deal. let's say the prime minister puts a vote to parliament about a general in, what is the labour party going to do? this decision could come within
7:17 am
the next 24 hours. what's going to happen? alll the next 24 hours. what's going to happen? all i will say is we always wa nt happen? all i will say is we always want a general electric because we wa nt to want a general electric because we want to end austerity. jeremy is meeting with his cross—party collea g u es meeting with his cross—party colleagues this morning and they will work as a priority for this legislation... i'm sorry but these decisions are coming soon. they are, and it's going to move very quickly but we believe we can have both a legislative lockdown to vent boris johnson and his mates crashing the country out —— to prevent. and at the appropriate moment when we can secure it, have a general election. yesterday we saw a lot of mps yesterday on our programme. all out our viewers, when they get in contact they ask for clarity and what would happen if this happened. -- all what would happen if this happened. —— all of our. it's really helpful this morning. let's sayjeremy
7:18 am
corbyn is in power. the labour party in power. would brexit happen under a labour government? we have said we will put this matter back to the people but with a deal to put to the people but with a deal to put to the people and with an option to remain. the country has been so split for so long. parliament has been so split for so long. there's other priorities as well as brexit, like ending austerity first and foremost. firstly we will end the chance of a disastrous no—deal and put it back to the people for another vote versus to the people for another vote versus remain. just to be clear, going back to that question about the general election, if the prime minister called a general election, will the labour party vote for it and does timing matter? timing does
7:19 am
matter. as a priority we need to legislate to prevent a crash out during the period of a general election campaign. if it were to be before the 31st of october, with the party vote for it? it depends on whether we've managed to secure this legislative lockdown to prevent any kind of accidental crashing out, and indeed to prevent borisjohnson and his thugs from agreeing one thing, saying we won't crash out before a general election, and then delaying the general election for example so it happens after october the 31st. the reason why this is confusing is because we are not dealing with normal people with normal respect for parliament and the law, so we have to be nimble in response and we have to be nimble in response and we have to be nimble in response and we have to do that working across parties in the commons. shami chakrabarti, parties in the commons. shami chakra barti, thanks for your parties in the commons. shami chakrabarti, thanks for your point of view on breakfast. we're trying to get clarity from all the party on this. thanks for your time. let us know about what you think
7:20 am
about the guests that have come on this morning. find us via e—mail and also social media. we will look through those and read out your comments later. it is fairly cool but rather nice in westminster but what about everywhere else? here's matt. good morning. a bit cloudy across the uk today but a bit of a north—west, south—eastern split. the further north and west you are, apart from shetland, rain and drizzle around but dry through the day in southern and eastern parts, much like yesterday with a lot more cloud around to begin with and yesterday. if you're heading out, milder than yesterday morning. temperatures for the vast majority in the teens, tempered a bit by the breeze with the coolest conditions in the far north of scotland where we have the best sunshine at the moment but orkney will cloud over through the day. the rest of scotla nd through the day. the rest of scotland will be cloudy with rain and drizzle and the same in
7:21 am
north—west england, western wales and northern ireland and through the day getting damp in western scotland and becoming heavier in central and eastern parts. heavy rain in northern ireland in the afternoon but light and patchy in western fringes of england and wales with much of england and wales are staying dry and the brightest conditions in the east midlands and east anglia, staying bright in shetland. rain overnight and it spreads across most parts of the country spreads across most parts of the cou ntry followed spreads across most parts of the country followed by clear skies and a few showers. if the garden is looking parched in the south, here you will see rain to end the night into tomorrow morning. keeping temperatures up in the teens but fresher into wednesday. this is the chart for tomorrow morning, early rain courtesy of this weather front but windy conditions developing in the west as this low pressure goes east. wrapped around it, bands of showers going into scotland and northern ireland through the day after a bright start and they will go to northern england and north wales and maybe the midlands. dry
7:22 am
and bright elsewhere. blustery across—the—board. wind and bright elsewhere. blustery across—the—boa rd. wind gusts and bright elsewhere. blustery across—the—board. wind gusts at the highest in northern ireland and western scotland, may be 60 mph for one or two and rather chilly. from the north through the afternoon, 10-12 at the north through the afternoon, 10—12 at test in north scotland and even further south, cooler than recent days —— at best. 21 in central london, where we should be for the time of year. a chilly night as low pressure goes east on a more northerly airflow and high pressure comes in so clear skies for a time. single figures on thursday morning. some sunshine to begin with, sunshine lasting longest in the south and east and returning to northern ireland later but cloudy across many areas on thursday. a few showers in scotland and northern england but elsewhere a few showers can't be ruled out. 15—19 and friday into saturday, we stick with temperatures like that. some sunshine but a bit of rain here and
7:23 am
there. but nothing too untoward. thank you very much indeed. good to hear. some news coming in in the last few moments from laura kuenssberg, our political editor. justine greening, i suppose you would call her a conservative rebel, she has spoken to the today programme and she will stand down at the next election as she thinks she can make a bigger difference outside... presumably thatis difference outside... presumably that is outside whatever your politics... it is sad, she says, someone widely respected and experienced inks they can make changes outside parliament rather than inside. justine greening standing down at the next election. more clarity on that as well others perhaps considering that. david in newcastle has said negotiations have been going on for over three years, what do the opponents of a no—deal brexit hope to achieve in three months they haven't in 36 months and how more
7:24 am
importantly? michael says the government and parliament must obey the law and the default position is leaving on the 31st of october with or without a deal, now the remainers in parliament and government will change the law to suit themselves stop hillary asks what happens if new legislation is passed to prevent a no—deal brexit? do we still leave on the 31st of october and with what? i know a lot of you are commenting on the noise in the background. we fundamentally agree with the right to free speech on bbc breakfast but we fundamentally disagree with the right to free megaphones! apologies if you can't hear us at times! a number of conservatives are set to join opposition mps in opposing a no—deal brexit by taking control of parliamentary proceedings this week. one of those so—called rebels is antoinette sandbach, member of parliament for eddisbury in cheshire. but what do her constituents think? graham satchell visited the town of tarporley to find out.
7:25 am
doesn't look very rebellious, does it? this is tarporley in the eddisbury constituency of so—called tory rebel antoinette sandbach, but behind the sedate english village calm, some have reached the end of their tether. i'd like to it go through. it's what we voted for and i think they should do it and settle it on way or the other. it's tough, something tough has got to happen i think you break this deadlock we are in. one of those who says she's willing to define the government is conservative mp antoinette sandbach and we can speak to her now... on yesterday's programme antoinette sandbach said she would vote against the government to stop a no—deal brexit and face potential deselection. i'm willing to put my job on the line for my constituents. in my view it's time for conservative mps to act in the national interest, and that's
7:26 am
exactly what i intend to do. the majority here, 52%, voted leave and one of them is the former leader of the local council, mikejones, who thinks his mp is wrong. i like her as an individual but i think she's put herself in a difficult place and i hope she considers her position and supports the government on tuesday all wednesday, whenever the vote takes place. on the street, opinion of antoinette sandbach is divided. i don't the fact mps are being threatened with deselection for doing what their constituency tells them to do. i think she doesn't stand much chance of getting in next time. the argument in westminster today is whether a no—deal brexit would just so bad it should be completely ruled out. john bickley stood against antoinette sandbach for ukip at the last election. would you be happy with a no deal? yes, it wouldn't bother me at all because at the end of the day, after all the bluffing
7:27 am
has finished, the eu and certainly all those countries in the eu want to continue to do business with us so business will prevail. are you worried about leaving the eu with no—deal? worried about leaving the eu with no-deal? very much so. because? it could have grave consequences for the economy, security and would reinforce a very insular attitude within the country. so what happens if parliament does rule out no—deal? the prime minister says he doesn't want an election, we don't want an election, so there will probably be an election. no, i don't want that. why not? no, no, not yet. it's been too much of an upset. if he has a general election he may well increase his majority, but mrs may thought that in the last time and it didn't really work out like that at all, so there you go. whatever side of the argument you're on, we are in a mess. if we had a
7:28 am
general election hopefully we'd have a clear result. don't hold your breath, because more than three years on from the referendum the country remains as divided as ever. graham satchell, bbc news, cheshire. one mp's constituency. the view from cheshire at least. we are in westminster today. lots happening, lots of questions to be asked and lots of questions to be asked and lots of questions to be asked and lots of numbers to assess and today and tomorrow are significant days not only for buzz but the conservative party and everybody who calls this place home after coming back from their summer recess. really busy day for them. in the next few minutes we will speak to a labour backbencher, a pro—remain, someone who would describe themselves as a conservative rebel and a boris johnson themselves as a conservative rebel and a borisjohnson loyalist, nigel eva ns. and a borisjohnson loyalist, nigel evans. that's coming up shortly. —— conservative rebel. i think
7:29 am
conservative rebel. ithinki conservative rebel. i think i called nigel evans a rebel by accident, he is one of those who support boris johnson. theia by accident, he is one of those who support borisjohnson. theia not! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will have the headlines and those mps louise is talking about in a few minutes' time. good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. as young people prepare to go back to school, we've been looking at whether arts subjects are being squeezed out of the curriculum. a combination of funding cuts and the way schools are measured has meant fewer students taking a level art. it's dropped by 7% in the past five years. but teachers, the creative industries and students themselves say the subject should be given more emphasis in the classroom. it allows you to develop your ideas. it comes up in english, it comes up in maths. analysing 3d shapes or analysing a story and coming up with something completely fresh and created off the top of your head, it's just a very important subject. more than 200 airline
7:30 am
passengers have been arrested on suspicion of being drunk at london's airports over the last two years. people were detained for offences including sexually assaulting staff and urinating in public. some were even found to be too drunk to fasten their seatbelts. heathrow came out worst in the country, with over 100 people arrested. sir eltonjohn will feature on a new set of stamps to celebrate his contribution to music. the 12 designs will show some of his performances in the capital as well as popular album covers. the singer—songwriter, who was born in pinner, is the only living solo music artist to appear on a set of stamps. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, there are severe delays on the entire metropolitan line this morning. on the trains, south western railway services are disrupted between feltham and reading.
7:31 am
in dagenham, queues are building on the a13 into town through the goresbrook interchange in tottenham, white hart lane is closed in both directions between high road and william street due to a building fire. on clapham park road, there are temporary traffic lights near thejunction with northbourne road. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start this morning. one or two sunny spells or bright spells at least first thing ahead of more cloud, which will increase as we head further through the afternoon. enjoy the sunshine while we've got it this morning. a bit breezy compared to yesterday with a westerly, south—westerly breeze developing, pushing the cloud in from the west as we head through the afternoon. it stays dry and temperatures reaching around 22. overnight tonight, largely cloudy with one or two breaks and one or two clear spells but the cloud increases again ahead of this. more rain, some potentially quite heavy rain through the early hours of tomorrow through
7:32 am
to dawn on wednesday. minimum temperature again 14—15, so feeling mild. waking up to a wet start tomorrow and that rain gradually clearing mid—morning onwards, becoming drier and brighter with sunshine in the afternoon. temperatures tomorrow around 21. lots of dry weather in the forecast, sunshine in there between the cloud but temperatures staying in the high teens. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. plenty more discussion and comment coming both from our mps and from you, so keep those comments coming here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news:
7:33 am
boris johnson faces a showdown in parliament later as conservative rebels join forces with opposition mps to try to block a no—deal brexit. if defeated, the prime minister has threatened a third general election in four years, which could come as soon as the middle of next month. jeremy corbyn said the labour party was ready for a general election but didn't clarify a timeframe. the uk's transplant service says that a reluctance by families to talk openly about organ donation after death means that thousands of opportunities for transplants are being missed. nhs blood and transplant says that there were a record number of organ donations in 2018, but families refusing to give their consent to procedures was the largest reason for transplants not going ahead. at least five people have been killed in the bahamas, as hurricane dorian continues to batter the country. around 13,000 houses are feared damaged or destroyed, according to the international red cross. officials say, dorian, the second—strongest atlantic hurricane on record,
7:34 am
remains "extremely dangerous". emergency workers say at least 25 people are now known to have died when a scuba diving boat caught fire and sank off southern california. nine others are still unaccounted for, officials have warned relatives to prepare for the worst. five members of the crew survived, the cause of the fire remains unclear. experts are warning about the dangers of fussy eating after a 17—year—old from bristol, who lived on a diet of chips, crisps and processed meat suffered irreparable sight loss. eye doctors in bristol cared for the young man after his vision had deteriorated to the point of blindness. tests revealed he had severe vitamin deficiencies and damage linked to malnutrition. those are some of the main stories around today. and you may have spotted this, but borisjohnson has a pet dog. a 15—year—old jack
7:35 am
russell cross, who has been adopted by the pm and his partner. he was abandoned by a puppy farmer. he has abandoned by a puppy farmer. he has a new home in number ten downing st. i wonder what he makes of it all. we have the weather coming in about ten minutes, and all the sport a bit later. do we have that sport now? i think we do. john is in the studio with this morning's sports news. all eyes on britain'sjohanna konta who's aiming to reach the semi—finals at the us open for the first time later. she'll have to pull off another upset if she's to beat fifth seed elina svitolina. she could take some inspiration from this woman, belinda bencic, who knocked out the defending champion, naomi osaka in straight sets, which means the japanese player will lose her world number one ranking, with french open champion ash barty returning to the top spot. rafa nadal is into the quarters and remains on course to meet roger federer in the final. he beat marin cilic in four sets and will play diego shwartzman next.
7:36 am
nadal is two short of federer‘s tally of 20 grand slam titles. nadal cheered on by tiger woods who knows a thing or to about winning major tounamnets. clear your diary, the fourth ashes test begins at old trafford tomorrow, and after the finish to the last test at headingley tomorrow, and after the finish to the last test at headingley you won't want to take your eyes off it. steve smith missed the third test with concussion, after he was hit on the neck by a bouncer from jofra archer. he returns at old trafford and stuart broad says archer will relish the chance of bowling at smith again. the first thing is it's great that steve is ok and coming back into test cricket, but test cricket is a brutal sport and it is a sport that countries are going hell for leather against each other, and i'm sure when steve comes in, jofra will be in rootie's ear wanting the ball.
7:37 am
there's been a surprise omission from ireland's rugby world cup squad. leinster‘s devin toner, who's got huge experience, having played 60 times under head coach joe schmidt, more than any other player, has been dropped in favour of south africa—bornjean kleyn, who only qualified to play for ireland three weeks ago. international football takes centre stage this week starting tonight with the women's euro 2021 qualifiers. wales are expecting to challenge norway for top spot in their group. they cruised to a 6—0 win over the faroe islands in their opening game and tonight they host northern ireland, who were thrashed 6—0 by norway last friday. england's women are in norway for a friendly tonight, and they could soon boast of having the world's best player in their side. lucy bronze has often been given that label by her england manager phil neville, and now she's been nominated by fifa for the official award. she's already been named europe's
7:38 am
player of the year this week. ijust try my hardest to play my best for the team. none of the girls put me on a pedestal, theyjust treat me like everyone else, and i want to be like everybody else. i don't see myself that way. i don't think i'm the best, i don't think i'm the best player in europe. 38 minutes past seven, you are watching bbc breakfast. we're live here in westminister all morning. it's a crucial week in parliament over the future of brexit. a snap election could be around the corner. louise is with three mps with very different views on the issue of the uk leaving the eu. joining me now is conservative's nigel evans in support of borisjohnson, tory rebel sam gyimah and labour's alison mcgovern, a keen remainer.
7:39 am
are you going to vote today to stop ano are you going to vote today to stop a no deal brexit? i am going to vote to stop a no deal brexit. i do not have a mandate from my constituents for a damaging have a mandate from my constituents fora damaging and have a mandate from my constituents for a damaging and disorderly brexit. we have seen no sign of progress in negotiations to date, and if the pm is committed to leaving on the 31st of october, it looks like we will be leaving without a deal and that is not in the national interest. can you tell us about the pressure being brought on you? are members of the government talking to you and asking you to change your mind?|j government talking to you and asking you to change your mind? i have been surprised about how little pressure there has been from the whips. at 1.i thought the government almost wa nted 1.i thought the government almost wanted to lose the vote as a pretext for being able to call a general election, i have had very little pressure. but we have had the threat from the pm that if we vote against him today we will have the whip withdrawn. i think the right thing
7:40 am
to do in the circumstance for my constituents is to vote against no deal. nigel evans, you raised your eyebrows, i think that is probably a fair assessment when sam talked about wanting a general election. what we want is to leave the eu on october the 315t, and sam and i took pa rt october the 315t, and sam and i took part in the leadership elections if you weeks ago, boris johnson stood on the platform that we would leave on the platform that we would leave on the platform that we would leave on the 315t do or die. he got two—thirds of the tory membership voting for him. i want to give the leader of my party, the pm, the opportunity to negotiate the best deal. i'm not going to tie his hands. while michel barnier sees people like sam ready to try and block that, why would they bother coming to the negotiation table? there is no negotiation going on, we have seen no progress, he hasn't published any proposals on the backstop. why would michel barnier
7:41 am
come to the table if you are going to stop no deal brexit? if the pm is going to negotiate a new deal, he should tell us what that is. what we know overnight from leaks. can i... what progress has there been? last night he spoke ten downing st, and i'm sure sam was invited to downing street yesterday, and he said he has made advances with angela merkel, who said let's see what solution you could come up with within a month. they are working on those proposals. he has been given a month to do it andl he has been given a month to do it and i think that is important. but what i find strange is that you will be supporting legislation tomorrow, therefore, if this passes today, which gives power to the eu to extend the date... nothing will happen unless parliament accepted. actually it gives power to the european council to extend the date beyond january 2020 two a date that
7:42 am
they choose, and i think that is bonkers. you know that is not what it does. i read it this morning. our next guest is here as well, alison mcgovern, a labour mp. there are so many divisions here. let's be clear, how would you vote today? i'm going to vote to stop no deal. yesterday, i was with my constituents who work in the automotive industry at a car factory, and they need no deal to be stopped. it is theirjobs, as simple as that. i listen to what nigel evans as that. i listen to what nigel eva ns says as that. i listen to what nigel evans says and i have to be honest, i really think that it is irresponsible to leave my constituents' jobs on the table when this could have an absolutely dire impact on manufacturing families up and down the country. it is totally unacceptable. i'm going to let you pick up on that, nigel evans. 850,000 cars a year we buy from germany. they will want to keep on selling us those cars, the only way
7:43 am
that will happen tariff free is if we negotiate a proper deal, which will happen. nigel doesn't understand how cars are made in this country. it is a long supply chain between here and other european countries, and the cutting off of that supply chain will be damaging. ca rs that supply chain will be damaging. cars are made across europe these days and we are cutting ourselves off. i'm trying to be clear for viewers here. just let's talk about numbers, have you got the numbers to stop what you want, stop a no deal brexit? we don't know until the motion and the bill is put before the house of commons. i think, what i've seen is members from all different parties, from conservatives, from labour, from the liberal democrats and others saying, actually, we won't tolerate no deal.
7:44 am
if you look at that broad spread of people who are saying that, i would advise borisjohnson to people who are saying that, i would advise boris johnson to listen to them. nigel evans, you of all the mps here probably have the most inside track. is the pm going to ask an election this week, in the next 24 hours? last 97 the back garden of downing street that he does not want an early general election. but my own view is that if sam gets his way and gives the power to take it away from the government, the legislation. protecting our constituents from no deal. you are colluding with the opposition in order to wrestle the power away from your pm. if that is the case. that is ourjob as members of parliament. at the end of the day i think boris johnson may have no option but to go foran johnson may have no option but to go for an early general election and i am upfor for an early general election and i am up for it. this is precisely the
7:45 am
point. boris is in a jam. he has promised do or die by the 315t and it can't be delivered, so he wants to blame parliament for calling an election, when we are doing our jobs, which is to make sure we are given all the evidence we have that no deal will be damaging, that we ta ke no deal will be damaging, that we take it off the table, that is what we are elected to do. i'm going to ask the same question to you alison. if we get to the point in the next 24 hours, whenever it might be, and the pm puts a vote to the commons for a general election, what are you going to do? we want to general election on the labour side, because we want a labour party government. but not if a general election is an excuse to get there is no deal disaster to bypass parliament. we are not going tojust have a general election on boris johnson's terms, because he can't get what he wants out of parliament so he is throwing his toys out of the pram. of course i want his toys out of the pram. of course iwanta his toys out of the pram. of course i want a labour government, but not if we allow boris johnson to just
7:46 am
crush us out of the eu. as i was saying before, as loads of people in different parties are all now saying would be an absolute disaster, and all of us are british members of parliament and we are all trying to do what we think is best for the country. there should be no accusations of people handing power to other countries, that is an unfair accusation. i'm going to ask you one more time, is that vote in the next 24 hours for a general election, how would you vote?“ borisjohnson want election, how would you vote?“ boris johnson want to general election so he can escape what parliament is putting before him in terms of saying no to no deal, then we won't be able to just give terms of saying no to no deal, then we won't be able tojust give him all he wants. of course, look, in the end, well, there hasn't been a proposal put forward. in the end we will have to have a general election, because that is democracy. we have a hung parliament and that isa we have a hung parliament and that is a difficult situation. all i would say is, we won't be pulled into a general election just would say is, we won't be pulled into a general electionjust because borisjohnson doesn't into a general electionjust because boris johnson doesn't like what the house of commons is saying. sam,
7:47 am
let's pick up that. i want to know what you would vote for, if there is a vote about a general election. we need a mandate from the public, especially if we are considering a no—deal. a general election is being used as a distraction. what arzo should be doing this week is publishing his proposals for a deal, not threatening parliament with an election —— boris johnson. not threatening parliament with an election —— borisjohnson. that's why i won't vote for it unless he publishes what a deal will look like. if we don't know that then all the general election will do is strip us into no—deal. the general election will do is strip us into no-deal. there you are, sam wants to stop brexit and also a general election. published the deal! do you know, if there is an early general election, sam, you'll find the british government will be. i've always been ofa mind government will be. i've always been of a mind that if the british parliament continues to refuse to obey the instructions of the british
7:48 am
people in 2016, we must give the opportunity back to the public to change their parliament and i will vote for an early general election. we have some clarity i think from all of you! thanks for your time and week and certainly see parliament, even parties, are deeply divided and allison mcgovern from labour and nigel evans, conservative, and sam gyimah, thanks for your time. you've got a busy day but thanks for your time and go and continue discussions. thanks very much. a bit chillier than i thought this morning. how is it for everybody else? matt is here with a look at this morning's weather. fairly cloudy in london and the rest of the uk but before we turn to the uk, the south atlantic. such a major storm in the bahamas stop look at the satellite loop, the centre of the satellite loop, the centre of the storm. the same areas pounding grand bahama
7:49 am
with catastrophic winds and 20 foot plus storm surge and relentless rain for over a day. a terrifying storm. only for over a day. a terrifying storm. o nly slowly for over a day. a terrifying storm. only slowly seeing the winds ease a touch, catastrophic for today and hopefully it will shift further north and the track keeps thatjust about offshore but big concerns around this highly populated part of eastern florida. all sorts of surprises with this storm and it could still make landfall in florida, georgia or the carolinas as it goes north. we'll keep you updated of course. fairly cloudy in the uk for many and for the most pa rt the uk for many and for the most part in southern and eastern areas, staying dry with a few glimpses of sunshine but north and west, damp and drizzly to start. across—the—board, not as chilly as yesterday morning. rather cool air in westminster. around 14 or 15 with the breeze adding to the slight chill this morning but temperatures by and large i have than yesterday. chilli to start in the far north of but the sunniest weather will be
7:50 am
here first thing. rain and drizzle in the north and west in parts of wales through the morning and in the afternoon, the rain will turn heavy and more widespread in scotland. northern ireland turning wetter and remaining damp and drizzly in western fringes of england and wales but much of england and wales will stay dry and bright is further east you are, 22 and 24 possible. lerwick remaining dry and sunny. rain spreads across scotland and northern ireland in the evening, clearing to clear spells and showers and rain sweeping south in england and wales and much of england and wales will get spells of rain in the night and heavy bursts in the south and east will be welcome in the gardens. 14 and 15 in the morning, pressure in northern and western areas. that's because you're behind this cold front and wrapping around this area of low pressure will be rather cooler and stronger winds on wednesday. windier tomorrow and a wet start for the early commute in
7:51 am
east anglia and the south—east, clearing to sunshine in many areas. showers already in north and west and west of scotland will see strong winds and rain. touching gale force in some areas but western scotland and northern ireland could see 60 mph, adding to a distinctly chilly feel. showers continuing in the north. cooler in the south than the past few days but where we should be for the time of year. that feel continues into the second half of the week. back to both of you in westminster. did you enjoy your little jaunt down the stairs? i seriously missed judged how cold it is, might have to put my coat on! it started warm but it's getting colder. that chatjust there, easy to forget sam gyimah and nigel evans are in the same party and they are at loggerheads about what to do today, tomorrow and what might happen in the future. gives
7:52 am
you a clear indication of where we are with our politicians at the moment and why finding out what's going to happen is a really difficult question to get to the bottom of. also the sense i had from talking to them this morning is time is of the essence. decisions need to be made in the next 24—48 hours, really important decisions from all of them. we are set here asking questions saying what will you and your party do, but you get the feeling they are not quite sure and they are having those discussions themselves. it feels... i know it is noisy but it feels... vibrant! feels pertinent to be here today when some of the things that will be decided over the next 24 —— 48 hours will be huge for everyone watching around the country. this morning the value of the pound has fallen to its lowest level in two years against the dollar and sean has the latest on that. good morning. big moves on the
7:53 am
currency markets this morning. things hotting up! currency markets often react to political events and that's certainly been happening here. in the buildup to the speech by borisjohnson in the buildup to the speech by boris johnson last night in the buildup to the speech by borisjohnson last night there was a feeling the general election was more on the horizon than before. when we woke up this morning the pound was worth bang on $120. in the last half and how it has gone just below that. that's the first time that's happened since 2017. we are looking at the pound being at the lowest level for the last couple of years, since 2017, and around the levels we saw off the back of the referendum. if we want to look at is against the euro, at last count it
7:54 am
1.095 euros. earlier i spoke to jane foley, a currency expert from rabobank. she thinks there are several factors that could make the pound fall further against the euro. 30 says sterling is weak against the euro. you are right to bring that up, there aren't too many g10 currencies outperforming the dollar this year but sterling is weak against the euro and people on holiday will be sensing that. if we get a no—deal brexit there's fears we could be dealing 1—to—1 against the euro. lots of people will be watching what happens today, will there be a general election, what terms will things be under and that might make the currency markets move a bit more. if you're going on holiday, those rates, $1.19.86. those things
7:55 am
might move around as we get the announcements coming out of westminster today. it will have an impact on individuals going on holiday and businesses importing and exporting. we will be watching carefully. thanks very much. xiaomi have a bit ofa thanks very much. xiaomi have a bit of a brexit break? i think it is a nice idea —— shall we have. details of how bbc news bulletins were used to send secret messages to resistance fighters in the second world war have been released today. 80 years on from britain and france going to war with germany the archive recordings reveal how big ben was sometimes replaced with a recording to confuse german bombers. here's our arts correspondent david sillito. big ben chimes archive: this is the bbc home and forces programme. here is the news, and this isjohn snagge reading it. the sound of big ben and the bbc news live from london. the service that links the world by radio. however, during the second world
7:56 am
war, big ben wasn't always live. if german planes could be heard overhead, it was feared it would help them target their bombs. the archives also revealed details about secret messages sent to the polish resistance. the method? music sent at the end of the bulletins on. —— bulletins. the bulletins that were broadcast to poland would be made to run deliberately short by a minute or so, and then a secret messenger from the exiled polish government would deliver to the bbc, under the codename peter peterkin, a record that should be played in that spare minute or so. this playground of north—east london was a relic of victorian times. even the transmitter at alexandra palace had a role — it was used to interfere with navigation systems of german bombers. all this was of course top secret at the time but 80 years on, these
7:57 am
interviews are still revealing new insights into what part broadcasting played in the second world war. david sillito, bbc news. fascinating history lesson! the scaffolding is there so big ben is currently not in operation. no secret messages in our bulletins this morning. it's not a clock, it is just this morning. it's not a clock, it isjust ringing! we canjust this morning. it's not a clock, it isjust ringing! we can just look at the clock down there! time for the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching. see you at 8am. good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. more than 200 airline passengers have been arrested on suspicion of being drunk at london's airports over the last two years. people were detained for offences including sexually assaulting staff and urinating in public. some were even found to be too drunk to fasten their seatbelts. heathrow came out worst in the country, with over 100 people arrested.
7:58 am
as young people prepare to go back to school, we've been looking at whether arts subjects are being squeezed out of the curriculum. a combination of funding cuts and the way schools are measured has meant fewer students taking a level art. but teachers and students themselves say the subject should be given more emphasis in the classroom. it allows you to develop your ideas. it comes up in english, it comes up in maths. analysing 3d shapes or analysing a story and coming up with something completely fresh and created off the top of your head, it's just a very important subject. more than 200 airline passengers have been arrested sir eltonjohn will feature on a new set of stamps to celebrate his contribution to music. the 12 designs will show some of his performances in the capital, as well as popular album covers. the singer—songwriter, who was born in pinner, is the only living solo music artist to appear on a set of stamps.
7:59 am
let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, there are severe delays on the entire metropolitan line this morning. on the trains, south western railway services are disrupted between feltham and reading. in lewisham, one lane is closed for gas mains work on lee high road, that's westbound near the junction with belmont hill. in tottenham, white hart lane is closed in both directions between high road and william street due to a building fire. on clapham park road, there are temporary traffic lights near thejunction with northbourne road. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start this morning. one or two sunny spells or bright spells at least first thing ahead of more cloud, which will increase as we head further through the afternoon. enjoy the sunshine while we've got it this morning. a bit breezy compared to yesterday with a westerly, south—westerly breeze developing, pushing the cloud in from the west as we head through the afternoon. it stays dry and temperatures
8:00 am
reaching around 22. overnight tonight, largely cloudy with one or two breaks and one or two clear spells but the cloud increases again ahead of this. more rain, some potentially quite heavy rain through the early hours of tomorrow through to dawn on wednesday. minimum temperature again 14—15, so feeling mild. waking up to a wet start tomorrow and that rain gradually clearing mid—morning onwards, becoming drier and brighter with sunshine in the afternoon. temperatures tomorrow around 21. lots of dry weather in the forecast, sunshine in there between the cloud but temperatures staying in the high teens. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we're live from westminster. our headlines this morning:
8:01 am
a momentous day as westminster prepares for a showdown — the prime minister says nothing will make him delay brexit and he could trigger a snap election. labour mps and conservative rebels will today try to stop the uk leaving the eu on october 31st without a deal. the election speculation has sent the pound down to its lowest levels against the dollar in two years. i'll have more on where it might head next. in other news, hurricane dorian claims at least five lives in the bahamas — and causes widespread damage. its prime minister calls it an historic tragedy. johanna konta sets her sights on a semifinal spot at the us open later. but it's goodbye to the world number one and defending champion naomi osaka, who's out. weather—wise in the uk, not as chilly this morning, temperatures in
8:02 am
the teens for most. rain and drizzle in the north and west will get heavier through the day. the best of the brightness is in the shetlands and south—east england. it's tuesday, the 3rd of september. we are live in westminster. a momentous day ahead as conservative rebels join forces with opposition mps to try to block a no—deal brexit on october 31st. if defeated, borisjohnson has threatened a third general election in four years, which could come as soon as the middle of next month. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake. protester: boris, boris, boris! chanting: out, out, out! welcome back to westminster. mps return from their summer break today to a raging debate about brexit. yesterday evening, the prime minister raised the stakes with a warning to those trying to block a no deal exit, they could force him to go to the polls. let's let our negotiators get
8:03 am
on with their work without that sword of damocles over their necks and without an election, without an election. i don't want an election, you don't want an election. tory mps entertained in the garden of number ten now know that if theyjoin with opposition parties this week in attempts to take control of what happens in the house of commons, the government will push for an early election. two—thirds of mps would need to back that, meaning labour's position is crucial. their leader sounds keen. when the election comes, i'm ready for it, you're ready for it, we're ready for it. we'll take that message out there and above all, we will win for the people of this country! we will defeat this lot! we will bring about that sense ofjustice and equality! that is what our movement was founded to achieve! but last night, another senior labour figure said the party would not support an election before
8:04 am
the brexit deadline of october the 31st. what the conversations i've had in parliament today means is that we would not support the vote, the two—thirds majority that borisjohnson needs, the 434 mps that he needs to vote for a general election to dissolve parliament, under the fixed—term parliaments act, he will not get that majority. the summer is officially over here now and time is short for all sides to make their next move, and perhaps just days for big decisions to be made. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. let's get the latest now from our political correspondent ben wright, whojoins us now here in westminster. good morning, ben. as we are talking to mps this morning, there is development, statements being made at interesting news regarding justine greening. we are trying to figure how hard the tory rebellion
8:05 am
will remain through the day, i think it is holding hard. one of the conservative mps voting with the opposition to shut down a note deal brexiters the tory mp for putney in south—west london, justine greening, a former cabinet minister. and speaking to the today programme on radio four, she says she will not stand up next general election.” had sent the prime minister c and i will not stand as a conservative candidate at the next election. why? i want to focus on making a difference on the ground, and social mobility, i feel i can do that better outside parliament than inside. we had seen parliament gridlocked on brexit, i will continue to represent my community that heavily voted to remain and brexit, i have no doubt that the person following me as mp for putney will represent our community on brexit. justine greening, one of the
8:06 am
centrist tory mps of the younger generation, served in the government but thinks she can achieve more outside parliament. she has called for another referendum as a way of getting over the brexit stalemate, i think many in the tory party will think many in the tory party will think that is a loss to the tories. i have been trying to get answers from various different sides of the discussion, if they get what they wa nt discussion, if they get what they want and managed to stop a no—deal brexit in parliament, we understand it is likely the prime minister medicalfor an election. it is likely the prime minister medical for an election. what would mps medical for an election. what would m ps vote medical for an election. what would mps vote for? it is inevitable there would be the can to move by number ten, despite boris johnson's would be the can to move by number ten, despite borisjohnson's denial yesterday, i think they would put a motion invented mps tomorrow asking for a dissolution of parliament and the general election. but the law changed a few years ago, it is no longerjust the prime minister's prerogative, he has to get the approval of parliament before that can happen, he needs to thirds of mps to green light the election, thatis mps to green light the election,
8:07 am
that is about 434, he needs the opposition to vote for it. one of the big questions today and into tomorrow if the bill goes through todayis tomorrow if the bill goes through today is what labour will do. you spoke to tom brake from the lib dems, he said they would not approve a general election. what will labour do? they will be conflicted, in some ways labour have demanded an election for two years, they say there needs to be won. but they look at the opinion polls and how close we are to leaving the eu, they are worried about no—deal brexit, will they give borisjohnson what he wa nts ? they give borisjohnson what he wants? jayne mccubbin seems to be 100% behind an election, but then other members of the party were on newsnight saying it depends whether no deal is on the table, so confusion. —— jeremy corbyn seems to be 100% behind an election. boris johnson be 10096 behind an election. boris johnson is hoping to pile pressure on to the tory rebels, but it seems
8:08 am
like the rebellion remains pretty firm. we are talking about really senior tories like phillip chat —— philip hammond, he was the chancellor two months ago, david lidington, a former deputy prime minister. we have been here so much, we have talked about crucial weeks... we are running out of hyperbole, but this is as big as it gets. there is the political drama which is compelling, we don't know how it will play out, but what is at sta ke, how it will play out, but what is at stake, whichever way brexit goes, it represents the biggest change to britain's relationship to the world in peace time. this clash between the government and parliament we have seen playing out for months and months is now reaching its conclusion. it is interesting today that boris johnson conclusion. it is interesting today that borisjohnson has been un number ten for about six or seven weeks, he has had the political pitch to himself, parliament has beenin pitch to himself, parliament has been in recess, the atmospherics changed dramatically today because mps are back and the combat begins
8:09 am
in earnest. we are getting a real sense of that this morning. thank you. and a real sense of division in the party in power. and in the next hour, we'll speak to two tories across the political divide — the foreign secretary, dominic raab, and the former attorney general, dominic grieve. we are double dominic in the next hour! the uk's transplant service says that a reluctance by families to talk openly about organ donation after death means that thousands of opportunities for transplants are being missed. nhs blood and transplant says that there were a record number of organ donations in 2018, but families refusing to give their consent to procedures was the largest reason for transplants not going ahead. at least five people are known to have died as hurricane dorian continues to cause catastrophic damage across the bahamas. around 13,000 houses are feared damaged or destroyed. it is expected to hit the eastern seaboard of america as our north america correspondent aleem maqbool reports.
8:10 am
overnight, life was changed in abaco in the bahamas by the strongest storm ever recorded there. large areas of these low—lying islands were totally submerged. winds reached more than 160 miles an hour with ocean surges recorded up to 23 feet high. please, pray for us. pray for abaco, please, i'm begging you. my baby's only four months old, so please pray for us. the roof of the apartment block of the mother who took this video had been ripped off. she was clinging to the side of the building with her baby as she broadcast this. some people, the water just took them. there has as yet been no update on her safety. among those helplessly watching the waters rise the minister of agriculture, michael pintard, who filmed this. aid agencies estimate that up
8:11 am
to 13,000 homes could have been destroyed as the storm moves painfully slowly through the bahamas, at some points atjust a mile an hour. for long periods, vi of the hurricane stage in a single spot. —— the eye of the hurricane stage. it could be days until help reaches many and as well as fears about lives lost and those injured, there are concerns that food and clean drinking water will be hard to come by. hurricane dorian is just 100 miles away from here, and states of emergency have been declared notjust in this state but in four others as well, as the us mainland now braces itself for the impact of this record—breaking storm. we will keep you up to date with the progress of that hurricane. emergency workers say at least 25 people are now known to have died when a scuba diving boat caught fire and sank off southern california. nine others are still unaccounted
8:12 am
for — officials have warned relatives to prepare for the worst. five members of the crew survived, the cause of the fire remains unclear. experts are warning about the dangers of fussy eating after a 17—year—old from bristol — who lived on a diet of chips, crisps and processed meat — suffered irreparable sight loss. eye doctors in bristol cared for the young man after his vision had deteriorated to the point of blindness. tests revealed he had severe vitamin deficiencies and damage linked to malnutrition. it is 12 minutes past eight. we are live from westminster. as we heard from a political correspondent, we have talked about so many different imperatives with regards to what is going on in politics over the last few months, but this seems to be a very critical day. so many different mps on all sides are speaking to us, there are so many sides to discussions, particularly today, about what they want to vote for, what everybody wants and what will
8:13 am
happen. we will try to get some more later. we will speak to a conservative rebel, former attorney general dominic grieve, in the next few moments. let's have a look at the weather in westminster, slightly cloudy skies. matt is here with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. at least the weather is reasonably straightforward. lots of cloud, but the best of the sunshine will be across southern and eastern areas, as well as shetland. across many western parts we will see the clouds thicken to produce rain or drizzle. a damp and drizzly start to the morning commute across many areas. not as chilly compared to yesterday, temperatures in single figures. in the far north and scotland, double figures if not for teens elsewhere. tempered little bit by the wind when you are out of the sunshine. plenty of cloud across the country, said iestyn shetland, brea ks country, said iestyn shetland, breaks in the midlands and eastern
8:14 am
and southern england. western wales, north—west england, scotland and northern ireland, rain and drizzle in the air becomes heavier across northern ireland and more widespread and heavy across parts of scotland. rain and drizzle to the western fringes of england and wales, but central and eastern parts are dry and brighter, temperatures 22 to 24. rain will push into night and clear away for a time in scotland and northern ireland, replaced by showers later. all of us will get some rain tonight, heavy bursts by the end of an eye towards the south and south—east of england, 14 or 15 the temperatures, cooler tomorrow because the winds will be coming from the north wrapped around this deep area of low pressure pushing into the north of scotland. clearing away early rain for the early morning commute. sunshine comes out for the rest of the day. showers move into northern and western
8:15 am
scotla nd move into northern and western scotland and northern ireland, then into northern england, north wales and northern parts of the midlands. a windy day tomorrow, winds touching gale force. and, northern and western scotland and northern ireland, gusts of 40, 50 or 60 mph adding toa ireland, gusts of 40, 50 or 60 mph adding to a chillier field. ireland, gusts of 40, 50 or 60 mph adding to a chillierfield. it ireland, gusts of 40, 50 or 60 mph adding to a chillier field. it will feel chillier by the end of the afternoon as the winds started dig their way in. as the low pressure pushes away, northerly winds for a time, gradually clear and temperatures dropping back single figures. one jacket for the thursday morning rush—hour, sunshine warming things up but clouding over through the day —— a warm jacket for the thursday morning rush—hour. northern ireland will brighten up after a jump—start, stain brighter towards east anglia and the south—east, but nobody will be above 20 degrees on thursday afternoon, just 10 celsius
8:16 am
in lerwick, 19 in london, down on what we would expect for this time of year. similar temperatures for thursday, friday and saturday. back now to the dry and breezy in westminster. thank you. it is definitely getting chillier as the morning goes on. we are live in westminster today. as another crucial day in westminster begins, a number of tory rebels risk being deselected from their party if they vote to try and stop the uk leaving the eu without a deal. we'll speak to one of those mps — dominic grieve — in a moment. thank you forjoining us. but first, let's look at what might happen in the coming days and weeks. today, mps return to the commons after their summer recess, they'll vote on whether to take control of the commons in order to stop a no—deal brexit. if it passes, the government is expected to table a motion to hold a general election. we spoke a lot about that yesterday. but an election can only go ahead if it's backed by at least
8:17 am
two—thirds of mps in a commons vote. if mps vote in favour, the country will go to the polls on monday, the 14th of october. that is the date that has been suggested. dominic grieve joins us now. good morning. you have been in politics for 22 years. how do you assess this week and its importance and how significant it is?” assess this week and its importance and how significant it is? i think it is very important. the prime minister appears intent in taking us out of the eu with no deal on october 31. i know he says it is partly a negotiating position but there is no evidence of any negotiations taking place, and his adviser, mr cummings, has described the negotiations as a sham. for those others who think no—deal brexit would be uniquely damaging to the country, short—term, because of the country, short—term, because of the disruption, longer and medium—term because of the loss of jobs, the fall in the value of the
8:18 am
pound, the disruption of trade and the loss of revenue, this isn't an a cce pta ble the loss of revenue, this isn't an acceptable outcome and so relu cta ntly acceptable outcome and so reluctantly we think we had to take every reasonable step to stop it.“ does not appear from what we have heard you say that you will shift your position. we were talking about deselection, being thrown out of the party, do you remain firm in your position? it makes no difference, it is painful, i have been an mp for 20 to get under member of the conservative party for 48 years. i see myself as a conservative, i will not go off and join another party, but if ultimately the prime minister and leader of my party is doing something i think it so fundamentally wrong and i can't continue supporting it, if that means he decides to throw me out of the party, that is a matterfor him. are they phoning you, texting you, what is going on? i have had no
8:19 am
communication whatsoever. my work run me in the summer holidays, but that was before this had stood up. __ my that was before this had stood up. —— my whip rang me. there was a suggestion i was meeting the prime minister yesterday but nothing was communicated to me. i have had no communication from the prime minister or anyone else in the last few days. yesterday we spoke to antoinette sandbach, no contact from the prime minister's office, she said, or the higher a chance of the party. is that how things would normally happen or do you feel like you are being sidelined? on one hand there is talk about these meetings, on the other hand they are not happening. if the prime minister wa nts to happening. if the prime minister wants to communicate with me, i am prepared to communicate with him. he might not like what i say, but of course i am available. he might say that if no deal is taken off the table, that weakens the uk's negotiating position.
8:20 am
8:21 am
i think that is nonsense, i do not think there was a negotiating position. the eu has a framework in which it operates, it has always been quite clear that the end result of negotiations would be dictated by other red lines. he keeps on believing he can get a special deal by threatening them. a general election is a democratic event. the key issue from my point of view is that ifjeremy corbyn
8:22 am
will back this week cannot crash out of the eu in the middle of the general election campaign. it is a matter for general election campaign. it is a matterfor him. general election campaign. it is a matter for him. clearly any crash out during the general election would be very bad. you talked about “ are would be very bad. you talked about -- are you tossing and turning in bed at night, thinking that potentially i and others could bring down a conservative government?“ is possible, but we are far removed. ina sense, is possible, but we are far removed. in a sense, the prime minister is bringing down his own government, because if he removes the whip from conservative mps who vote for this motion today, in a sense he is cutting his own nose to spite his face. he is deciding voluntarily to do this. he himself rebelled over brexit matters several times in the
8:23 am
last year since he resigned from office. quite apart from the fact that he abandoned collective responsibility in cabinet, but nobody talked about slinging him out of the party. this is undoubtedly a new ruthlessness on his part, and for broadchurch party like the conservatives i think it bodes ill for us that we should start adopting such tactics towards each other. bodesiu such tactics towards each other. bodesiuin such tactics towards each other. bodes ill in a channel election? and for the party's feature, i do not see the conservative party surviving in its current form if we continue behaving like this towards each other. we have been based on pragmatism and tolerance towards each other, it is now becoming a heavily ideological party being led ina way heavily ideological party being led in a way that i don't identify as being conservative at all. a very realistic possibility, in your view, that the party might split? forget about what happens in the commons, the evidence in my constituency is
8:24 am
that conservative voters are haemorrhaging away from the party and will probably vote lib ten or will not vote at the next election. very interesting to hear your point of view, thank you for your time, dominic grieve. dominic raab will be on the programme in around 20 minutes, somebody from the other side of the conservative debate. thank you for your comments, some of you have been speaking about questions we put to mps, asking questions about what will happen constitutionally if there is a general election and it is not voted for, what will happen over the next days, weeks and months. quite a few questions about the appearance of labour's shadow attorney general. lots of you getting in contact about what she had to say. one viewer said i was most surprised to hear the baroness referred to the present government as thugs, another describing her description of a young woman being led a complaint
8:25 am
from number ten was grossly exaggerated, this is one example of how the matter is descending into ugly. how the matter is descending into ugly, bitter chaos. it goes on to say this behaviour is no means straight and exclusively by the labour party. on that incident, we have more information, we know the incident she referred to surrounding the former adviser to the chancellor sajid javid, the metropolitan police said a police officer stationed at the jewel of number ten downing street escorted a woman from the front jaw to the street escorted a woman from the frontjaw to the exit gate as she did not have a security pass at the time after her security clearance was withdrawn. that is what the metropolitan police said about that incident. we asked her about that on two occasions and we have more information, but there is a difference between carrying a gun for a job and is courting somebody at gunpoint, maybe we should have challenged him or at the time. thank you for your comments on that and everything else this morning. a number of conservatives are set to join opposition mps in opposing a no—deal brexit, by taking control of parliamentary
8:26 am
proceedings this week. one of those so—called ‘rebels' is antoinette sandbach, the member of parliament for eddisbury in cheshire. but what do her constituents think of her position? graham satchell visited the town of tarporley to find out. doesn't look very rebellious, does it? this is tarporley in the eddisbury constituency of so—called tory rebel antoinette sandbach, but behind the sedate english village calm, some have reached the end of their tether. i'd like to it go through. it's what we voted for and i think they should do it and settle it on way or the other. it's tough, something tough has got to happen i think you break this deadlock we are in. one of those who says she's willing to defy the government is conservative mp antoinette sandbach and we can speak to her now... on yesterday's programme antoinette sandbach said she would vote against the government to stop a no—deal brexit and face potential deselection.
8:27 am
i'm willing to put myjob on the line for my constituents. in my view it's time for conservative mps to act in the national interest, and that's exactly what i intend to do. the majority here, 52%, voted leave and one of them is the former leader of the local council, mike jones, who thinks his mp is wrong. i like her as an individual but i think she's put herself in a difficult place and i hope she considers her position and supports the government on tuesday or wednesday, whenever the vote takes place. on the street, opinion of antoinette sandbach is divided. i don't like the fact mps are being threatened with deselection for doing what their constituency tells them to do. i think she doesn't stand much chance of getting in next time. the argument in westminster today is whether a no—deal brexit would just so bad it should be completely ruled out. john bickley stood against antoinette sandbach for ukip
8:28 am
at the last election. would you be happy with a no—deal? yes, it wouldn't bother me at all because at the end of the day, after all the bluffing has finished, the eu and certainly all those companies in the eu want to continue to do business with us so business will prevail. are you worried about leaving the eu with no—deal? very much so. because? it could have grave consequences for the economy, security and would reinforce a very insular attitude within the country. so what happens if parliament does rule out no—deal? the prime minister says he doesn't want an election, we don't want an election, so there will probably be an election. no, i don't want that. why not? no, no, not yet. it's been too much of an upset. if he has a general election he may well increase his majority, but mrs may thought that in the last time and it didn't really work out like that at all, so there you go.
8:29 am
whatever side of the argument you're on, we are in a mess. if we had a general election hopefully we'd have a clear result. don't hold your breath, because more than three years on from the referendum, the country remains as divided as ever. graham satchell, bbc news, cheshire. that is the view of some of those residents. we went there because antoinette sandbach was on the programme yesterday, one of the tory rebels being threatened with deselection from the party. she spoke about her constituents we thought we would go and find out what they thought about her opinions in the build—up to a huge 24th 48—hour set westminster. louise has gone to interview dominic raab, he will be on the programme in a few minutes. we will get his view from the other side of the tory party. we spoke to the former attorney general
8:30 am
dominic grieve, dominic raab is firmly in the government camp. we will find out more before 9:15am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and sally bundock. bracing for brexit — the political drama increases in westminster, but are businesses prepared for leaving the eu? live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 3rd september. parliament returns today and the clash over brexit gets bigger, but what are the implications for business? also in the programme... hong kong leader carrie lam has denied ever offering to resign,

64 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on