Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 4, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
you're watching bbc newsroom live with annita mcveigh in westminster, the headlines at 11. after a dramatic defeat for the prime minister last night, mps will today try to rush through legislation to block the possibility of a no—deal brexit. borisjohnson says he'll seek a general election if he's forced to request an extension. if mps vote tomorrow to stop negotiations and to compel another pointless delay to brexit, potentially for years, then that would be the only way to resolve this. but labour and the liberal democrats say they will block an election until the threat of a no—deal is removed. get the bill through first in order to prevent... in order...
11:01 am
in order to take no deal off the table. but in a boost for the prime minister, scotland's highest court has ruled that his plan to suspend parliament for five weeks ahead of brexit is lawful. meanwhile 21 conservatives have been suspended from the party after helping to defeat the government in last night's vote on mps taking control of today's parliamentary agenda. they suddenly find that they're in danger of being deselected. this is something mrs thatcher would never have considered doing. i'm joanna gosling, the other stories this hour. hong kong leader, carrie lam, will withdraw the extradition bill, which sparked three months of anti—government demonstrations. and after battering the bahamas, killing at least seven people, hurricane dorian is heading for the florida coast. coming up just after 11.30am, we'll be answering your questions on all things brexit and what could happen this week in a bbc ask this. the contact details
11:02 am
are on your screen now. welcome to westminster, and what a difference a day makes. after a hugely dramatic return to the commons after the summer break, borisjohnson lost his working majority, his first vote in the commons and potentially control of the entire brexit process. mps voted by 328 votes to 301 to take control of the parliamentary agenda as they look to block a no—deal brexit. the commons will decide later whether to back the bill which would bring another brexit delay. 21 conservative mps voted against the government, which led to a late night
11:03 am
round of phone calls from downing street expelling them from the party. they include the former chancellor, philip hammond, the father of the house, ken clarke and the grandson of sir winston churchill, nicholas soames. borisjohnson has warned mps if they vote to delay the uk's departure date from the european union beyond the 31st october deadline he will try to trigger a snap general election on tuesday 15 october, just days before a crucial eu summit. but will parliament allow him to call an election? this picture shows the current makeup of the 650 mps in the house of commons. borisjohnson started yesterday with a working majority ofjust one, and this morning is now 22 mps short of a majority. meanwhile, the court of session in scotland has thrown out an attempt by over 70 parliamentarian to stop boris johnson's planned suspension of parliament. our political correspondent, jonathan blake reports.
11:04 am
it was boris johnson's first test of his authority as prime minister in parliament and it ended in a decisive defeat. some on his own sidejoined opposition parties in voting to take control of the house of commons to attempt to block a no—deal brexit. order. the ayes to the right, 328, the noes to the left, 301. labour and others want to force the prime minister to ask for an extension to brexit if he can't get a new deal. mrjohnson says he'd never do that, so, if they succeed, his only option would be to hold a general election. i don't want an election, the public don't want an election. i don't believe the right honourable gentleman wants an election. but if the house votes for this bill tomorrow, the public will have to choose who goes to brussels on october 17th to sort this out and take this country forward. two thirds of mps would need to back his call for an election, but labour say they'll only do that
11:05 am
once the legislation blocking no—deal becomes law. he wants to table a motion for a general election. fine. get the bill through first! after three hours of debate in the commons, those conservatives who voted against the government knew they would be thrown out of their party. mps are in charge here, for now. the government must consider its next move as the battle for control of the brexit process grinds on. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. with me now is our assistant political editor norman smith. there's an awful lot to take stock of, both what has happened late last night, and what is going to be happening today. shall we begin with this issue of whether a general election could take place? well, it could, but not in the way boris johnson imagines. because his hopes
11:06 am
of triggering a snap general election look to me to have pretty much hit the buffers now, because labour have signalled they are not up labour have signalled they are not upfor it labour have signalled they are not up for it unless legislation is passed a ruling out no deal. you have the slight sense that boris johnson is going to have to move very quickly to come up with a plan b. because his plan a exit strategy has biological up in smoke, —— his plan a brexit strategy. and as he surveys the wreckage this morning veering to the smoke, he has no parliamentary majority, it is worse than theresa may's, he is 22 short ofa than theresa may's, he is 22 short of a majority. he has threw his abrasive strong—arm tactics, threatening to suspend parliament and suspend mps, managed to unite the disparate band of cross—party opponent into a relatively cohesive force and he has left a real sense of rancour and anger on the tory
11:07 am
benches. not just at the deselection of long—standing, well established experienced senior tories, but also the tactics and in particular dominic cummings, his chief adviser with one tory saying he was a foul mouth oaf who should be marched out of downing street. labour have confirmed they are not going to help borisjohnson trigger a confirmed they are not going to help boris johnson trigger a snap confirmed they are not going to help borisjohnson trigger a snap general election. well, listen to what he said. we want an election, of course we want an election, we want to get rid of this government. but we're not going to walk into a trap. we're not going to give up. this week it is crucial that we complete the task in hand. we are not going to dance to borisjohnson is tune, neglect that and go for an election, on a promise from boris johnson that it will be on the 15th of october which we don't believe. keir starmer. so norman, looking at today's business and the attempts to set another delay to brexit, what
11:08 am
will happen in your opinion?” set another delay to brexit, what will happen in your opinion? i think mps will almost certainly succeed today in pushing through the legislation, there had been some suggestion or hopes on the government's side that some of the rebels might reca nt government's side that some of the rebels might recant at the last minute, no chance, they have cross the rubicon now, they have nothing to lose. they will stick with it and the bill will go through the commons. the question is now whether the government can scupper it in the house of lords basically by getting sympathetic peers to talk and talk and talk and talk. the filibuster. absolutely, and to that end, there are 92 separate amendments which have been put down to try and drag this out and talk it out. i'm not sure that's going to succeed because opposition peers are absolutely determined that they will sit through the night, they will go into the weekend if necessary. so i suspect this legislation will be passed. which then, as i say, leaves
11:09 am
borisjohnson passed. which then, as i say, leaves boris johnson with passed. which then, as i say, leaves borisjohnson with a quandary. how does he get to where he wants to be, which is to have an election? and i think what may well happen is that mrjohnson will in effect have to say tojeremy mrjohnson will in effect have to say to jeremy corbyn, mrjohnson will in effect have to say tojeremy corbyn, ok, you win this round, you have got your no deal legislation, it has gone through the commons and the lords, 110w through the commons and the lords, now will you back a general election? in other words, now will you back a general election? in otherwords, he now will you back a general election? in other words, he will calljeremy corbyn's bluff. you said you would not back in election until you would not back in election until you have got the legislation, you have got it, so now back an election. that might provide a way for him to have an election and then his calculation will be, if he wins the election, he can overturn the no deal legislation and we can all leave on october 31. lots of ifs and buts. the other thing he has to do is think about how he bines the tory
11:10 am
party together. the deselections have left deep, deep scars. and a lot of tories who are not remainers, even brexiteer is, are deeply uncomfortable about this. rory stewart was telling us this morning that he was informed by text last night so it was pretty fast, you are out. i'm confident that the majority of conservative mps will encourage the prime minister to be thoughtful about this. this isn't the way to behave. we don't purge people in this country, and it's not a good way of running a country. so you think that borisjohnson might be persuaded to return the whip to you and your colleagues who have been suspended, who have been thrown out of the party? i certainly hope so. i think that's what happening is, numberten is panicking. because they're trying to drive through a strategy which was always impossible. and as they begin to realise that their whole strategy, which they won the leadership election on, was never going to work they're panicking into things
11:11 am
that are going to regret but when they come to their senses, they are going to realise that trying to do something in this way, trying to take on our parliamentary democracy, is not the way to deliver brexit. it willjust mean, even if they get it through, that they would produce something very divisive, unsustainable and unstable, it wouldn't carry support for the decades that it would need to bed in. i have to say at the moment, there is no sign of team johnson deciding to allow them back in, no softening in their approach. certainly that was the message sent out by the business minister. the government was very clear that people who voted against the government in that vote would have the whip withdrawn from them. and i think that was the right policy. now, many of the people who rebelled against the government are good people, i served in government with them. but they were told very clearly that this was the consequence of their actions and the government delivered on that.
11:12 am
a point that rory stewart raised in that interview earlier today was that interview earlier today was that he thinks there are now enough mps who would back theresa may's withdrawal bill if it was to come back, what are the chances of that happening? not much i think is the honest truth. i think that moment has passed. it's very hard to see borisjohnson? has passed. it's very hard to see boris johnson? tories voting has passed. it's very hard to see borisjohnson? tories voting for mrs may's deal, boris johnson borisjohnson? tories voting for mrs may's deal, borisjohnson has denounced it and almost made it a creed occur that he will not countenance that deal. there is an amendment on the labour side by some labour mps saying, bring it back, let's have another go. i think team corbyn think there are bigger fish to fry. i think they are looking at tabling a motion of no confidence, perhaps when parliament comes back after the queen's speech on october 14, after the queen's speech on october 1a, not a given but i think they
11:13 am
think the boris johnson 1a, not a given but i think they think the borisjohnson government is looking so shaky, the name of the game is not just is looking so shaky, the name of the game is notjust brexit, it is who is in government. i don't think they will be looking to find a way to resolve this, what they are looking for is away to get into power. so i would think that the chance of mrs may's deal being reinvented as a last salvage operation is extremely remote. the stakes have gone way beyond that. what we are now going to wait to see is whenjeremy corbyn decides to trigger this whole process by putting down vote of no confidence as he has signalled his plan to do. that news from the scottish courts that the suspension of parliament is not unlawful and not a matter for the courts, saying that the accountability is to parliament and the electorate and not the courts. that could be some small measure of relief for boris
11:14 am
johnson this morning but only a tiny amount because he has plenty on his hands to deal with in parliament. let's say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. let's just take a look again at the makeup of those tory rebels, 21 conservative mps voted against the government, which led to a late night round of phone calls from downing street expelling them from the party. they include the former chancellor, philip hammond, the father of the house, ken clarke and the grandson of sir winston churchill, nicholas soames. i have been told by the chief whip,
11:15 am
who is my friend and who i like very much, but he has told me that it will be his sad duty to write to me tomorrow to tell me that i've had the whip removed, after 37 years as a conservative member of parliament. i've voted against the government three times in 37 years and i've had the whip removed. do you recognise your party tonight? no, it's been taken over by a rather knock—about sort of character, who's got this bizarre crash—it—through philosophy, in charge. a lot of people... a cabinet which is the most right—wing cabinet any conservative party's ever produced. they're not in control of events. with me is one of the 21 conservative rebels who voted against the government last night, the former immigration minister, caroline nokes. thank you forjoining us and how did you receive the news that the whip was being withdrawn from you, you are being expelled from the party? it was no surprise to me, but i was in bed asleep by the time i got the phone call so there was a voice mail for me explaining that i have had the whip withdrawn, it was very sad. a message that he will keep perhaps will for posterity. do you think
11:16 am
there is any chance that boris johnson will have a rethink on this and offer to return the whip to you and offer to return the whip to you and your 20 colleagues who voted against the government last night?|j against the government last night?” have always been a loyal conservative, i have served as a minister for three conservative, i have served as a ministerfor three years conservative, i have served as a minister for three years and i would love nothing more than to be allowed back into the conservative party, the party i have been in since i was a student, and to be allowed to continue serving my constituents as a conservative mp. the most important thing for me at the moment is to serve my constituents, they confess. what is your intention come the next election, whenever that is, do you hope to stand as a conservative candidate again? of course, very much so. conservative candidate again? of course, very much so. i hope i will be able to stand as a conservative candidate, i was unanimously re—elected to stand in the seat which i won from the lib dems in 2010 but that is in the hands of the party whips. it puts the constituency in a difficult
11:17 am
position, they are in the middle of what is a civil war in effect between some of the party's mps, and the government. to me this doesn't feel like a civil war, it feels a very sad event. i want us all to come back together as a party, i hope when borisjohnson became a minister that he would work very ha rd to minister that he would work very hard to unify us, and i think there is still hope. my local association have been very fantastic in supporting me through thick and thin previously and i hope they will continue to do so. would you potentially stand as an independent if the whip was not returned to you? i love serving the people of romsey and southampton north, i have lived there all my life and i grew up and went to school there, i have had over 2a hours hundreds of messages from my constituents asking me to do just that. i have got a period of reflection and consideration coming up, iwon'tjump reflection and consideration coming up, i won'tjump into very quick decisions. do you feel in any way or accept in any way that you are doing what boris johnson accept in any way that you are doing what borisjohnson suggested,
11:18 am
cutting off his ability to negotiate with the eu, or are you just not convinced that he is trying to get a deal with the eu that he has talked about? i've always been very clear that i want a deal with the eu and three times i voted for theresa may's deal to secure that. i don't wa nt may's deal to secure that. i don't want us to leave with no deal, that was bad for the country as a whole and specifically my constituents. i went to the meeting with the prime minister yesterday, i was not convinced he was serious about getting a deal. we have seen the comments from dominic cummings that it isa comments from dominic cummings that it is a sham negotiation. i don't wa nt it is a sham negotiation. i don't want it to be that, i want us to be able to continue working with our neighbours in europe and upon the ma nifesto neighbours in europe and upon the manifesto i stood on it which promised a deep and special relationship with europe going forward. would an election solve anything? i don't think so, i think it would change some of the faces but it will not change the numbers any. it would be a cynical ploy to have an election now which potentially could leave us in a position where, with no deal as the default position, we would crash out with no deal with no chance of
11:19 am
parliamentary scrutiny or no chance to make sure we get a deal with europe and it's so important to me that we do. thank you for your time. so how will today unfold? let's have a look at how the commons process could play out. mps take control of commons business today to debate and vote on a bill which would delay brexit until the end of january. if it passes, a vote on whether to hold an election will follow. johnson needs two thirds of mps on board to trigger an early election. tomorrow, the anti no—deal bill will move to the house of lords, if it succeeds in the commons. parliament is not due to sit on friday, but mps could decide it should, to help rush the bill through. and if it passes, the bill could be given royal assent by the queen and become law on monday the ninth of september. the commons will vote later whether to pass a bill which could potentially see a further delay to the brexit process.
11:20 am
meanwhile, 17 labour mps have tabled an amendment to try to bring back theresa may's brexit deal. one of them is melanie onn, and shejoins me now. thank you for coming along today. remind our viewers festival how you voted for theresa may's withdrawal bill on previous occasions. the withdrawal agreement, which was not the bill, came forward three times andi the bill, came forward three times and i did not support on those occasions. partly for the reason that it was a blind brexit, at the point that she was going to bring back the withdrawal agreement bill, it was no longer blind, it had a huge amount of content, there had been negotiations taking place with the labour party front bench and the labour party leader, concessions had been made and at the point that she was due to bring that forward to parliament, boris johnson and was due to bring that forward to parliament, borisjohnson and his acolytes, in pursuit of the power grab that they have undertaken to get themselves into number ten, made sure it was wrecked and it led to her leaving number ten. this is not
11:21 am
about bringing back that bill. we know there were concerns ahead of that bill coming forward, it's about saying, this is a starting point and we must be able to salvage something from that withdrawal agreement bill that lots of people took an up a lot of time to work on and build consensus around , of time to work on and build consensus around, to bring something forward that could get support in the commons. so you're saying there is the basis of something here which could get support, this is notjust you reaching the end of your tether and thinking, this is the least worst option as far as you are concerned? absolutely not, there is something here which could be the building blocks of an agreement in the house of commons. if the concern is about leaving the agreement with no deal, and that seems to be exactly the concern in the house of commons at the moment, the alternative to that is that we end up alternative to that is that we end up going down the route of a second referendum or revoking article 50 which i do not feel comfortable with, or are we seriously look at a deal that the whole of the house of
11:22 am
commons can support and then we can deliver the outcome of the 2016 referendum. how confident are you that in this process, you and labour mps will get a hearing on this?” have fingers crossed, we are working on getting support from other parties and individuals from across the house. we have had some indications that we have had some support and hopefully the speaker will select the moment and we will be able to discuss it today.“ will select the moment and we will be able to discuss it today. if john bercow doesn't select the amendment, then what is your route? it makes it very difficult, i will stay away from making any predictions, i would rather wait to see whether the speaker does select this... i would urge him to listen to mps on the common. you must have a plan b? at the moment, this is what we are focusing on and if we try to go too far down the road, we will be in difficulty. this has to be the focus and that's what we concentrate on,
11:23 am
building support across the commons. but he will vote for an extension? this is the focus at the moment and we are trying to get support for this amendment and that's exactly what we hope to do and we hope will look for that. so you might not vote foran look for that. so you might not vote for an extension? the focus is on the amendment. i tried, you're not going to answer that question! let's get more on that breaking news in the last hour that scotland's highest court has rejected an attempt to block borisjohnson's proroguing of parliament. lorna gordon has been following the hearing in edinburgh. good morning. bring us the detail of what thatjudgment good morning. bring us the detail of what that judgment says festival. thejudge —— what that judgment says festival. the judge —— first of all. the judge just took a few minutes to issue the summary just took a few minutes to issue the summary of his determination in court this morning. lord doherty said the advice given in relation to suspension of parliament was a matter of high policy and political
11:24 am
judgment which he said could not be measured against legal standards. he went on to say that the matters that had been before the courts were issues for politicians and voters to judge, not the courts. so in making those comments, he went on to refuse that motion brought by that cross— party that motion brought by that cross—party group of parliamentarians, who had been seeking a ruling that the suspension of parliament was illegal. i think you can read into it that this is a victory for the uk government, which had argued in court here yesterday that the suspension of parliament was a matter of politics, rather than the law. but it's not over yet. we expect a hearing here at the court of session this afternoon, that will be procedural, but we are told those behind this legal challenge are bringing in a and
11:25 am
appeal and that full appeal will be heard tomorrow. thank you for that update. tomorrow here in london, we are expecting the case to be heard involving gina miller, the businesswoman and sirjohn major, the former conservative prime minister joining the former conservative prime ministerjoining her in that legal action to try to get the courts to rule that the suspension is illegal. let me bring you some breaking news coming from the european commission, a spokeswoman saying we are working with the irish authorities in the uk government in order to ensure the unique situation on the island of ireland is just, this unique situation on the island of ireland isjust, this is about the backstop which has remained the thorniest issue from the referendum onwards, to avoid a hardboard on the island of ireland. the european commission spokeswoman —— a hardboard. as far as the eu is concerned, the backstop is the only
11:26 am
solution identified at this stage to safeguard the irish police are called. i reiterate, —— the irish peace accord. the eu says, the backstop is the only solution identified at this stage to safeguard the irish peace accord. there might beat twists and turns along the way but that is the only thing that they will work with. this goes to the heart of whether conservative mps are convinced that borisjohnson conservative mps are convinced that boris johnson and the conservative mps are convinced that borisjohnson and the people around him are offering up the concrete solution that the eu has been calling for, a concrete alternative to the backstop. many people have been unconvinced of that even though borisjohnson has talked in very general terms about negotiations continuing with the eu to try to solve this issue. many mps have remained unconvinced that there is a serious alternative proposal from
11:27 am
the uk, so therefore they believe that because of that, there is no way the eu is going to offer the uk an alternative deal. so those lines just coming into us from the european commission. we will be back here very soon at westminster, a blustery westminster today, lots of pens blowing off the desk beside me! let's go back to joanna in the studio. the hong kong leader, carrie lam, has announced the withdrawal of a controversial extradition bill that has plunged the city into its worst political crisis in decades. protests against the bill have been going on for months and have widened to include calls for an independent inquiry into police brutality and demands for greater democracy. let's go live to hong kong now where we can speak to our correspondent stephen mcdonell. withdrawing the controversial extradition bill, how far will that go in fixing the situation? well,
11:28 am
that's a very good question. it's definitely a significant humiliating backdown, not only for carrie lam and her administration here in hong kong, but also for ageing. three months ago, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets here —— also for beijing. three months ago hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets calling that it not be introduced, people were worried about being sent to mainland chinese courts controlled by the communist party. mass demonstrations were dismissed by carrie lam at the time, and now we have these weekly violent clashes with petrol bombs, probability and tear gas regular feature of the streets in this asian financial hub. carrie lam by her own reckoning has described the unforgivable havoc that she has created by bungling the response to the opposition of that bill, and finally it will be withdrawn. it will take place in october when the
11:29 am
legislative meets next, they will ta ke legislative meets next, they will take it off the table. this potentially shows that beijing, and we think many people think that beijing is calling the shots, has allowed carrie lam to do this. firstly to try and show that the government here has the autonomy that it government here has the autonomy thatitis government here has the autonomy that it is supposed to have, and secondly to attempt somehow or other to ta ke secondly to attempt somehow or other to take the heat out of this. the problem for both beijing and for hong kong in terms of the governance of them is that the longer it has taken to try and do this, the broader the demands of the activists have become. now they want a genuine independent inquiry of these allegations of police collusion with underworld triads, they want universal suffrage. so are proportion of that movement, especially the young more radicalised hardcore activists and there are tens of thousands of them, i don't think this will be enough to stop them gathering. the broader movement, the hundreds of thousands,
11:30 am
they might think, this is why we took to the streets in the first place, sure, we would not mind those other things, but at least the bill is dead and we have one. —— we have won this one. so it might be that there is a difference of opinion between those who have been using peaceful methods and those who have been really taking it up to the authorities with more violent means. but i don't think this means it will finish this political crisis. what it does show is that the hong kong government and the chinese government and the chinese government have been running out of ideas to try to stop this crisis. so they have finally had to give something to the other side to try and take the wind out of their sails. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather.
11:31 am
we saw how blustery it was at westminster there and that is similar across the uk. look at these impressive waves across the isle of wight. that is due to strong winds and we continue with blustery conditions. the rain clears into the south—east. notice this bulk of rain across scotland and northern parts of england coming in through the afternoon, that spreads right to the south east. further showers in the north, these winds, the arrows are gusting up to 45 mph in the west of scotland, those of the strongest and elsewhere still windy conditions. temperatures down in the last few days, feeling chilly, autumnalfor many of us, around about 15—18dc. through the night, though showers tend to clear away, clear spells going into thursday, that will be a largely dry day for many of us with a few showers scattered around across scotland, north—west england and the midlands. for most, staying dry and temperatures again in the mid to high teens. goodbye.
11:32 am
hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... after a dramatic defeat for the prime minister last night, mps will today try to rush through legislation to block the possibility of a no—deal brexit. borisjohnson says he'll seek a general election if he's forced to request an extension. if mps vote tomorrow to stop negotiations and to compel and pointless, delay to brexit —— pointless, delay to brexit —— pointless delay to brexit, potentially for years, that would be the only way to resolve this. labour and the liberal democrats say they will block an election until the threat of a no—deal is removed. get the bill through first in order to prevent... in order to take a new
11:33 am
deal of the table. but in a boost for the prime minister, scotland's highest court has ruled that his plan to suspend parliament for five weeks ahead of brexit is lawful. meanwhile 21 conservatives have been suspended from the party after helping to defeat the government in last night's vote on mps taking control of today's parliamentary agenda. the chancellor, sajid javid, will announce an additional two billion pounds of brexit funding for whitehall when he sets out next year's public spending plans later, he'll also confirm plans to increase spending on public services. in other news, hong kong leader, carrie lam, has withdrawn the extradition bill, which sparked three months of anti—government demonstrations. and now to the sport there's been a wicket already in the cricket for england.
11:34 am
australia have won the toss and decided to bat on the opening day of the crucial fourth ashes test at old trafford, but it's england who got off to the perfect start once again opener david warner was dismissed by stuart broad. warner went in the first over of the day for a duck. it's the fifth time broad has dismissed him in the series. a few moments ago australia were xx for x if austraia win this match they”ll retain the ashes. england remember kept alive their chance of regaining the famous urn with that remarkable, ben stokes inspired one there's been a real shock at the us open overnight. roger federer has been knocked out by grigor dimitrov in the quarter finals. five—time champion federer had won all seven of their previous meetings but dimitrov fought back from two sets to one down for a memorable victory in new york. federer was hampered by injury in the latter stages. bulgarian dimitrov will play fifth seed daniil medvedev in the semi finals.
11:35 am
just low, you know? disappointed it's over, because i did feel i was playing really well, after a couple of rocky start. you know, it'sjust a missed opportunity, to some extent, you know, that you're in the mix, you can get through. i had two days off after and it was looking good. but you've got to take the losses, you know. it's part of the game. johanna konta is out after losing to elina svitolina. konta was the first british woman to reach the quarterfinals of the tournament sincejo durie back in 1983. however, she lost in straight sets to the ukrainian fifth seed. svitolina is the highest seed left in the draw and will now play six times champion serena williams in the last four. some some rugby union news, and harlequins centrejoe marchant will start england's final warm—up match against italy on friday, despite not being part of the world cup squad. marchant is alongside piers francis in the midfield, in what's described as a "mix
11:36 am
and match selection strategy". ruaridh mcconnochie will finally make his debut on the wing and joins jonny may and anthony watson in the back three. there's just been another wicket. australia 28—2. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. welcome back to westminster where borisjohnson welcome back to westminster where boris johnson lost his welcome back to westminster where borisjohnson lost his majority. welcome back to westminster where boris johnson lost his majority. and possibly the entire brexit process. control of that at least. i'm joined by our reality check correspondent chris morris who is here to break down whatcould happen next. obviously we're counting down to the deadline of october the 31st because that's when, as the law currently stands, and if nothing changes that's
11:37 am
when we will leave the eu with or without a deal. so we know the rebel alliance, including 21 conservative mps from last night, are determined to stop that, and that's what's happening today. there'll be a vote to block no deal by forcing the prime minister to ask the eu for a three month brexit extension untiljanuary 31st next year. so the first question — to be answered in a vote later this evening — will it pass or will it fail? if it fails which looks unlikely given that there was a majority last night to hold today's debate, but if it does fail, well the government keeps control of the brexit process, and the prime minister will look to fulfil his promise to leave at the end of october — he says he wants a deal but he's prepared to leave without one. would the opposition have any other way of stopping him?
11:38 am
they could call a vote of no confidence, but if they can't pass this legislation today, would they really be able to win that vote? if they did, we could be heading for an election, but time would be really tight. if today's vote passes, will the government accept it, or reject the path that the opposition and tory rebels have forced upon them? if the government accepts it, borisjohnson would have to do something he has promised not to do — request another delay to brexit. if the european council, the other 27 leaders, agree — that would mean the article 50 brexit negotiating period would be extended until the end ofjanuary or possibly even later. if the eu offers a later date, today's bill would force the prime minister to accept it unless it is specifically rejected within 2 days by mps in the house of commons. if the eu refuses to offer any extension — unlikely but you never know — well the default position still stands — we're heading for brexit at the end of next month, deal or no deal. and what if the government refuses, says it can't accept pa rliament‘s instruction? well the prime minister has already said that they will seek to hold
11:39 am
a general election. now for this to happen it would require the support of two thirds of mps in the commons. if the government gets that support the election is expected to be held on or around october the 14th. now if mp‘s reject that snap election the government has said it will follow the law, but what if it tries to wriggle out of that and delay this new legislation blocking a no—deal brexit? there would almost certainly be legal challenges. don't forget, parliament is due to be suspended from next week for five weeks — if it hasn't already been so the role mps play could be limited? will some kind of negotiations continue in brussels and elsewhere, looking for a compromise brexit deal? maybe — or does the election that everyone is talking about become inevitable? and that seems to be where we're heading. if and when today's legislation is set in stone, and the opposition is confident that it cannot be changed, and that no deal has for now been avoided then it looks overwhelmingly likely that we're heading for a general election.
11:40 am
welcome back to westminster, where it's time for ask this. we'll be answering your questions on what might happen next after parliament voted to take control of the commons agenda last night, allowing them to bring a bill requesting a further delay to brexit. i'm joined now by maddy thimont jack, senior researcher at the institute for government, and our reality check correspondent, chris morris. what do the terms ‘remove whip' and ‘deselect‘ mean and what is the result? a good question to get back to basics. to get back to basics, the whip is... you always have whips and opposition parties, they'll remember to make sure mps all vote the way the party wants them to vote so if you the party wants them to vote so if you remove the party wants them to vote so if you remove that, that means they are no longer compelled to vote with the party and essentially no longer conservative mps which is what they did last night, so they said they would remove the whip from the conservative mps who voted against the government. in terms of the deselection, that relates to a general election that would be saying these mps could not stand again as conservative members in their constituencies, so there is a bit of a question extent to which the government controls a selection, and the conservative party
11:41 am
constitution, but that is what they have said as they will not be able to do that. they have said they cannot support these mps. .. that is the case in point. and anonymous question. why can't the remainers form a national unity interim government for the purpose of settling the brexit issue? chris, do you want to tackle that one? in theory they could if they could prove they had a majority in the house of commons, if they had a vote of no confidence in as prime minister, he was was forced to resign, then they could prove they would have a majority. they could do that, but of course, to tell you about numbers, it would be about politics. we saw about numbers, it would be about politics. we saneremy corbyn row saying a few weeks ago let's have a vote of no confidence and i will lead the interim government to sort brexit out. the liberal democrats may not want to sit in a government even for a short period underjeremy corbyn so there's a lot of politics involved that interiors can happen but it's not just involved that interiors can happen but it's notjust about brexit, it's about manoeuvring for this election which we think is coming sooner rather than later. lots of
11:42 am
manoeuvring, keyword. a related question. with no working majority, therefore no longer an effective government, why can't the opposition ask the queen to form a government? it comes down to what chris just said. the protest works in a way that you do not have to have a formal vote to prove you do not have the confidence. you just have the vote. if mps want to say they do not have the confidence in the government, they can table a formal vote of no confidence or they could in theory table a vote saying we no longer have the confidence of this government but we do have the confidence of someone else which might put pressure on them to recommend an alternative to the queen. it seems that there is not the number for that. then queen. it seems that there is not the numberfor that. then they queen. it seems that there is not the number for that. then they will stay on as the government. what sequence would happen if the government simply resigned to the queen —
11:43 am
no votes involved? if he does not think he has the support of the house of commons anymore, cannot prove a majority, he couldn't even do that and we would have this period of which you would have this period of which you would have the chance to see if anyone else can form a government. the fixed term parliament act has changed things in the last few years and prescribe the way things are going, but it would be another route eventually, you imagine, to get to an election, but this discussion about how you get to an election is all being held in the context of what you're saying earlier of this looming of the end of october where the law currently stands that he would leave the eu deal or no deal. that is dominating every other thought when people come to political tactics, i think. another question on the house of lords. will the un—elected house of lords be able to filibuster and ‘talk out‘ the proposed legislation to delay
11:44 am
brexit? no one putting your name to that question but it is a good one. that is what we will look at today. what they are trying to do today, the house of lords, is pass a motion that will be able to manage the bill for the passage through the house of lords much more quickly on thursday and friday later this week which they normally cannot do but what government peers are trying to do is talk out that motion today. the business motion as 86 amendments that have been tabled by government piers and in the lord, you cannot select the amendment you want to talk about. if you want to talk about one, you can. might make that sort of voting. if you want to get through the 86,... that is a long process. you are looking at a lot of hours. 86. times 86. if you remember -- if hours. 86. times 86. if you remember —— if you are a member, you might wa nt —— if you are a member, you might want to invest in a sleeping bag. let's see how things go over the next few days but it's a different process. we heard norman say some piers are determined to sit at the
11:45 am
weekend if necessary to make sure this gets through, they get through all this business. can the pm ignore or not comply with the law to avoid no deal? if he can or will, what's going to happen next? the question is if this legislation passes today, the government is being pretty clear. we will follow the law, we will uphold the law. borisjohnson has the law, we will uphold the law. boris johnson has been the law, we will uphold the law. borisjohnson has been equally clear that i will never be a prime minister that accepts an extension to the brexit process. again, logical... you have this clash. there's been speculation about could you try and delay royal assent or could the prime minister and government simply ignore the law? i don't think so. we heard from jacob rees mogg and others in the debate last night, we will uphold the law. the government has made a very clear they will follow the law and their plan is to see if they can hold an election to they are not in a position that they need to follow
11:46 am
the law for get to that point but given that the bite in the law is in october, there was very little that they can do if that is what is sent for. what, following the upcoming general election, prevents a future winning conservative government/coalition from repealing any no—deal brexit legislation? that is from simon roper. nothing. that is from simon roper. nothing. that is from simon roper. nothing. that is the short answer. if this legislation goes through today and it becomes the law of the land, if then borisjohnson were to wind a pretty clear majority, he could repeal it or in fact, if you look at the detail of the legislation, it does say, i do not have the exact words in front of me, but it suggests that there is a majority in the house of commons follow deal, they could proceed in that direction so again the direction is clear. if you can come back with a better mandate and proper majority or a majority in the house of commons, then, yes, he could change course.” agree with that. as you say, the order say have their prove no deal
11:47 am
they can go for no deal. also he... if the eu offers an alternative, they can reject that exception as you said earlier. the other thing to flag is what i wasjust you said earlier. the other thing to flag is what i was just saying. you said earlier. the other thing to flag is what i wasjust saying. the timing is quite a problem. the election... now the government are saying the 15th of october is the preferred date. given it is on the 19th, you have to get parliament back up and running to repeal the legislation so that might be the biggest problem for them, particularly if mps don't support the election motion tonight, they will push back when it can take place. whatever scenario unfolds, it is incredibly squeezed. the majority of mps are against no—deal but what are they in favour of, what do they want and is there any chance of the eu agreeing to it?
11:48 am
we had a series of vindictive votes trying to establish whether there was a majority in the house of commons. the answer appear to be at that stage there was not really. we know what they are against. there is a majority against leaving with no deal. it didn't appear to be a majority in favour of a particular way forward which again, i do not wa nt to way forward which again, i do not want to sound like a broken record, suggests an election to give somebody a clearer mandate may be the only way forward. the danger, of course, is the election may well produce another hung parliament. it's all about numbers. we spoke to melanie earlier who is a labour mp who is trying to get the amendment through. that would bring back the
11:49 am
kernel of theresa may's deal.” agree with chris, we saw the indicative votes. that is interesting in terms of looking at who voted yesterday, as you have to have this very strange coalition working together at this point to agree an extension. you have people who actually want brexit, they want no deal. they want a second referendum, no brexit at all and sundry very willing to support two is as deal if it comes back again so although they might be able to get a majority in favour of asking foran get a majority in favour of asking for an extension, actually trying to find one for anything elsejust seems really, really difficult and labour mps have said they want another vote on theresa may's deal but i do not know if they will have a majority to do that at this stage. we have to wait and see what happens. it will be another very compelling evening in parliament watching what happens. thank you both very much indeed for answering our view is‘ questions and you to
11:50 am
you as always. for sending them in. this well the former chancellor philip hammond is one of the senior conservative mps who rebelled against the government last night. he has said he will vigorously contest any attempt to deselect him as a candidate in the next election. our correspondent andy moore is in his constituency and has been following mr hammond's political movements. he went to his constituency association on monday, perhaps fearing something like this was coming. he managed to get reselected so you have this strange situation where a conservative association has selected somebody to be their candidate as a conservative mp. very strange times indeed. the constituency here as they were rushing off to work had this to say. you might know 70. due to his own record. —— you might know 70. due to his own record. -- no sympathy for him due
11:51 am
to his own record. i have no scent of the forum. i think it's the best thing hammond has done for the constituency in years. he shown a bit of backbone which i did not think he had. i'm very impressed. i hope the conservative government gets royally trounced. a fascinating constituency this. any referendum, they voted to remain byjust 0.15% so if you want to find a constituency that is split right down the middle, this is probably eight. with me to discuss yesterday historic events, and what lies ahead is the mirror's political correspondent, nicola bartlett and the guardian's political correspondent, kate proctor. welcome, i guess it is hard to... we can speculate what might lie beyond today but let's begin with today and do you think... let's begin with you, that vote to stop extend the date of which the uk might leave the eu, will it get passed? it will do.
11:52 am
you saw last night a sizeable number of tory rebels who broke away from their party and were sacked for it. that is such a dramatic thing to have happened. this 21 of those guys and that's enough to make the numbers all work together. you have an opposition group, labour, lib dems working together. it will pass tonight. model boris johnson wasn't response to that be? it has been interesting to see... what will borisjohnson's response interesting to see... what will boris johnson's response to that interesting to see... what will borisjohnson's response to that be? he has going for this very macho, very all or nothing strategy. he has got his own push for a general election which we will put forward today as well. basically he is setting himself up in opposition to parliament and he wants a general election where he can say, these people are thwarting what you want but i knew one standing up for it. where does that leave us with their huge clash happening in parliament?
11:53 am
do you think the mps opposed to no deal can form a strong enough and long lasting and off coalition if you like in, informal coalition to mean they ultimately wind the day? they can but only for a very limited amount of time it was what is on the horizon as a second referendum and thatis horizon as a second referendum and that is still tearing the labour party a pa rt that is still tearing the labour party apart and that is still a very difficult issue for those conservative rebels of those 21 that there are only a few of that want a second referendum so they can coalesce around a certain amount of ideas but when it comes to being a group that pushes forward with further policy ideas on brexit, particularly should we have a vote, should i go back to the public? they will splinter. white mcnicol, you spoke about boris johnson's will splinter. white mcnicol, you spoke about borisjohnson's matter, aggressive strategy. do you think you will be pushed into a position where we will say, ok, let's rule out no deal, let's have a general election and basically call labour's bluff and then a labour will have
11:54 am
the reason to say we do not want a general election right now? his instinct i think will be to double down today. that'll be the message coming from number ten and his advisors. what do you mean by that? he has committed himself to no deal essentially over the past few weeks. the rhetoric has been increasing over that, the fact the uk can crash out and do it by themselves. you cannot really save face and go back from that at this point. i'm afraid we are out of time. it was a very brief discussion but good to get your thoughts on what could happen today. just a reminder of another couple of heat key headlines from this morning, the scottish courts have ruled that borisjohnson's suspension of parliament is not unlawful in their opinion, not a matter for the courts. they are saying, also hearing from the eu commission today, as far as it is concerned, the backstop is the only
11:55 am
concrete proposal around to try and avoid a hardboard on the island of ireland. it says the uk has not come up ireland. it says the uk has not come up with an alternative yet. let's cross live now to the house of commons where we are expecting boris johnson to face mps at pm cues very shortly and we have politics live for you. another day of high drama at westminster. after last night, i didn't think anything else could surpass it. just stepping back... just stepping back for a moment, we are leading into the first prime ministers questions for boris johnson. we are about to see jeremy corbyn taken boris johnson johnson. we are about to see jeremy corbyn taken borisjohnson in this format for the first time with this enormous clash between them, not just over brexit but over when the country should have a say. it is another massive box office moment. the first time jeremy corbyn another massive box office moment. the first timejeremy corbyn and borisjohnson were in front of each
11:56 am
other, which was just at the end of the last session, some of our viewers might remember, boris johnson, it's fair to say, some labour mps have said, absolutely pummelled him but the politics of already changed extremely quickly and they are both under immense pressure. borisjohnson together with his close team has decided to ta ke with his close team has decided to take an enormous, audacious, deeply risky and dangerous play by starting to splinter off party and pushing foran to splinter off party and pushing for an election. just as i came in, this is a battle of the mandates. whose mandate is bigger? boris johnson has a mandate from the tory party to do whatever it takes to stick to the brexit deadline. jeremy corbyn has a mandate from his own members and they will fight over what that meant, what the general election mandate meant but by hook or crook, sooner election mandate meant but by hook or crook, sooner or election mandate meant but by hook or crook, sooner or later, we are heading into an election and we have a government with no majority and that cannot last. that might be quite soon. the law passed that would force an extension, once it
11:57 am
has received royal assent, the labour party will agree to a general election before october 31. that is currently the front bench position as we just heard john outline accepting that it could mean if borisjohnson gets a majority, we could yet leave the european union without a deal but there has been a hastily brought together meeting of the parliamentary labour party this morning and a lot of mps think that is just not something that they should accept. if both front benches with or tell their mps to back a general election, one is the anti—no deal bill is passed, perhaps on friday or perhaps dipping into monday, then i think it is most likely that mrjohnson will get this two thirds majority but not without a very chunky rebellion on the labour side. there are some others in the shadow cabinet who are pushing for a more day approach. and whether or not they should be
11:58 am
signing on board right now. you cannot have a government with no majority in parliament. you cannot have a prime minister that has lost the trust of a large number of his own mps or government and parliament in deadlock, particularly over brexit. you cannot be in opposition and not want the chance to become the government. thejob and not want the chance to become the government. the job today, why we will vote as we do tonight, is we need to get this legislative lock in place. name before the people then decide whether they do want to give borisjohnson the mandate. decide whether they do want to give boris johnson the mandate. good luck with trying with that. there is a big swathes of political opinion... in the public. whether they voted leave or remain, they believe quite rightly that a no—deal brexit, britain crashing out in that way we
11:59 am
do deep damage to our country and thatis do deep damage to our country and that is what you're preventing today. do you accept these two things, unhappiness and the party with your strategy? yeah, i accept different views about the tactics of this. notjust different views, deep unhappiness. the reason for that i put to you is because if stopping no deal is your overriding priority, you put that by agreeing to a general election fought to the 31st. we do the authors, moved to a general election under boris johnson was a mandate from the people to crash out without a deal, let him fight. we will wind that election if that's what the tory party want to do. who does wind the general election? who does win the general election? who does win the general election? looking at the parties on their way they are sung might set up, it will be hung again. you might of course. there will be mad, for the outcomes. ordinary folk will not know what they are voting for, they
12:00 pm
will be very many people abstaining. what you vote for if you are a labour northern lever? what do you vote ? labour northern lever? what do you vote? labour. but i've seen you for brexit. endless rhetoric. hang on, the liberal democrats are clear in what they say. the brexit party is clear in what they say. when i say, who is going to win, it would not be easy to call. it would not. the last election did not follow a script that anyone thought it would, we are in volatile times. this is what number ten feels, let's see if they feel realistic or how much wine they have had to drink, they hope that borisjohnson can unite the half of the country that
12:01 pm
is leave and the remaining votes —— the remaining votes split. labour think that they can win, jeremy corbyn thinks they can win, after yea rs of pressure corbyn thinks they can win, after years of pressure on public services and we saw what happened in the last election and boris johnson and we saw what happened in the last election and borisjohnson is divisive. but they face the job of straddling both leave and remain voters, this has become the dividing line in british politics and it will remain so, no pun intended, until there is a resolution to all of this. what wise heads talk about on both sides is the unpredictability and the high likelihood of a hung parliament because the lib dems could hoover up also to people in the middle —— all sorts of people in the middle —— all sorts of people in the middle —— all sorts of people in the middle who don't really know where to go. but it has not got through parliament yet. it will at some point. in this day and age, things are so febrile and whether
12:02 pm
the public wants another vote. let's find out. i know the whole house will want to pay tribute to pc andrew harper who was killed on duty. his death and the serious injuries sustained by stuart out and and gareth phillips in birmingham are a powerful reminder of the dangers that police officers face every day. mr speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others in addition to my duties in the house, i shall have further such meetings later today. mr speaker, can i associate myself with the brave acts mentioned in regard to the police officers. the former prime minister's deal was unacceptable to this house in brexit, but to leave without a deal is unthinkable. yet the prime minister pursues a game of brinksmanship, built on the
12:03 pm
likelihood —— livelihood, health and future of my constituents and our country. but there is still an option to resolve this once and for all. if the prime minister really believes in no deal, let him put it to the people and ask our people if thatis to the people and ask our people if that is the price they want to pay. mr speaker, as the honourable lady knows very well, this government will take this country out of the european union on october the 31st. there is only one thing that stands in ourway, it there is only one thing that stands in our way, it is the surrender bill currently being proposed by the leader of the opposition. and can i invite her to confirm, the leader of the opposition to confirm when he stands up shortly, that if that surrender bill is passed he will allow the people of this country to have their view on what he is proposing to happen, to hand over in their name with an election on october the 15th, mr speaker. can my
12:04 pm
right honourable friend confirm that when we leave the european union on the 31st of october, no longer will we be subject to eu rules on vat in terms of energy bill is costing constituents in harlow around 55 extra pounds a year. will he confirm that we will take back control of our energy bills and save ourselves around £1.5 billion a year on heating and lighting.” around £1.5 billion a year on heating and lighting. i thank my right honourable friend for his excellent suggestion. as he knows, we do plan to reduce the 5% rate on domestic fuel which is the lowest allowed under eu law, but of course when we leave the european union on october the 31st, it will be open to us to change this for the benefit of the people of harlow. thank you, mr
12:05 pm
speaker. i start by paying my deepest respect to pc andrew harper who died in the line of duty. it is a reminder of the risk he faced and police officers face all of the time trying to protect communities and our sympathy to his family collea g u es our sympathy to his family colleagues and friends. i also want to send our condolences to those affected by hurricane dorian that hit the bahamas at the weekend. i am hoping and i'm sure the government will be doing to make sure all help is sent there that is necessary. yesterday it was revealed that the prime minister's negotiating strategy is to run down the clock. and that the attorney general told the prime minister his belief that the prime minister his belief that the european union would drop the backstop was a complete fantasy. are these reports are accurate, or can these reports are accurate, or can the prime minister provide the detail of the proposals he has put forward to the eu? i tell you what
12:06 pm
our negotiating strategy is, and it is to get a deal by the summit on october the 17th undertake this country out of the eu on october the sist. country out of the eu on october the 31st. and get brexit done. and what his surrender bill would do would wreck any chance of the talks and we don't know what his strategy is at all were he to take over. he is asking for mobs of momentum activists to paralyse traffic in the name of his... what are they supposed to chance, mr speaker? what is the slogan? what do we want? dither and delay. when do we want it? we don't know. that is his policy. and can he confirm again that he will allow the people of this country to decide on what he is
12:07 pm
giving up in their name with a general election on october the 15th? or is he frit. mr speaker, my first question to the prime minister, and no answer given. i asked what proposals have been put to the european union. we asked yesterday, many colleagues asked, and the prime minister seems utterly incapable of answering. any rational human being would assume therefore none have been put, and there is no a nswer to none have been put, and there is no answer to the question. the prime minister and his cabinet colleagues have been saying that he is making progress. the eu's chief negotiator, the chancellor of germany, the leader of ireland, say no proposals have yet been made by the uk. if the prime minister thinks he has made progress, will he publish those proposals that he has put forward to
12:08 pm
replace the backstop. as the right honourable gentleman knows very well, you don't negotiating public, and we are making substantial progress. order. prime minister, please forgive me interrupting. there is a long way to go, there's a lot of questions to be reached, so the questions must be heard and the responses from the prime minister must and will be heard. prime minister. mr speaker, let us be absolutely clear, this government is going to get a dealfrom ourfriends in brussels and we will get the backstop out and we will get an agreement that i think this house can approve. the only thing that is standing in ourway can approve. the only thing that is standing in our way is the undermining of those negotiations by the surrender bill which would lead to more dither and delay. we delayed in march, we delayed in april, and now he wants to delay again for
12:09 pm
absolutely no purpose whatever. what does he intend by this? we are spending £1 billion to put 20,000 more police officers on the streets. he wants to spend £1 billion a month net to keep us in the eu beyond october the 31st, and i will never allow that. i really fail to see how ican be allow that. i really fail to see how i can be accused of undermining negotiations. no negotiations are taking place. he has been prime minister for six taking place. he has been prime ministerfor six weeks taking place. he has been prime minister for six weeks and he promised to get brexit sorted. in six weeks he has presented nothing to change the previous prime minister's deal which he twice voted against. these negotiations that he talks about are a sham. all he is
12:10 pm
doing is running down the clock. at the weekend, the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster said food prices will go up under no deal. will the prime minister publish the yellowhammer documents so that people can see which food prices will go up and by how much? the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster said absolutely no such thing. i can tell him that preparations for no deal, thanks to his good offices and efforts, a re very deal, thanks to his good offices and efforts, are very far advanced. i tell you the surest way of getting no deal is to undermine this country's ability to negotiate, which is what he is doing. and i have to say, that if this deal goes past this afternoon, i don't want an election, and i don't think he wants
12:11 pm
an election, but there is a petition on his own labour website with 57,000 people, including carroll, nigel, graham and phoebe, calling foran nigel, graham and phoebe, calling for an election. i don't know if there is a jeremy on the list. mr speaker, i know he is worried about free trade deals with america but there is only one chlorinated chicken that i can see in this house, and he is on that batch —— bench. will he confirm that he will let the people decide on what he is doing to this country's negotiating position by having a general election on october the 15th? well may be the prime minister could tell us what the negotiating position actually is. and since the question i asked, the prime minister might
12:12 pm
have forgotten it in his lengthy response there, that the british retail consortium said, and i quote, that it was categorically untrue when the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster denied there would be shortages of fresh food. mr speaker, i hope that no more young female staff are going to be frogmarched out of downing street. because... there was another government leak at the weekend concerning disruption of our ports. the leaked documents written by the government in the last fortnight show no deal would lead to shortages on the shelves and of medical supplies and hospitals. people need to prepare. so can i ask the prime minister again, will he publish in full the yellowhammer documents so people can see which
12:13 pm
foodstuffs are not going to be available, which medicines are not going to be supplied, and what will happen to the shortages of vital supplies in every one of our hospitals all over this country? i'm afraid that the right honourable gentleman is guilty of the most shameless scaremongering. we have made ample preparation for coming out of the eu. what his party is recommending... order. it's very difficult to hear the responses from the prime minister. members must calm themselves. there is a long way to go. the prime minister. what he is recommending is yet more dither, yet more delay, yet more uncertainty for business. what we in this government want to do is deliver on
12:14 pm
the mandate of the people. now he used to be a democrat. he used to be leave in upholding the referendum result. can he say now whether he would vote in favour of a leave or remain, and can he say now whether he is in favour of a second referendum or not? the prime minister failed referendum or not? the prime ministerfailed to referendum or not? the prime minister failed to answer my questions about food supply, about medicine supplies and about the problems in hospitals. he refuses to publish the yellowhammer documents, and he talks about scaremongering, where does the information come from other than his office in his government? and he is obviously so confident of the position he has adopted that he is now proposing to spend £100 million of our money on an advertising campaign in order to try and persuade people that everything is fine. he knows it's not, they know it's not, he is hiding the facts. the government has
12:15 pm
refused to publish its impact assessments on how a no—deal brexit will affect poverty levels in this country. they received a request under the freedom of information act from the glasgow—based property alliance. the dwp replied that the public interest would not be served by that disclosure. will the prime minister publish that analysis? if he won't, what has he got to hide? unlike the right honourable member, who would squander £1 billion a month of taxpayer money on staying poi ntlessly month of taxpayer money on staying pointlessly in the eu, this government is getting on with running a sound economy so that the poorest people in our country are seeing increases in their wages for the first time in more than a decade and i'm proud to say that those on the living wage, mr speaker,, they
12:16 pm
are now taking £4500 more home every year than they were in 2012, thanks to the conservative government. you don't have to go very far to see real destitution. people begging and sleeping on the streets. child poverty is up since 2010. pensioner poverty is up since 2010. pensioner poverty is up since 2010. pensioner poverty is up. in work poverty is up. and he won't give us any of the information of the assessments of increased poverty that could come from his government's proposals. we are from his government's proposals. we a re less from his government's proposals. we are less than 60 days away from leaving the eu with no—deal. the prime minister has had two days in office before the summer recess, and then planned to prorogue parliament. yesterday, he lost one vote. his first vote if parliament. he now wa nts to first vote if parliament. he now wants to dissolve parliament. he is absolutely desperate to avoid scrutiny. and... in his third day in
12:17 pm
office, after five questions from me, we haven't had an answer to any of them. i can see why he is desperate to avoid scrutiny. he has no plan to get a new deal. no plan, no plan to get a new deal. no plan, no authority, and no majority. if he... mrspeaker... no authority, and no majority. if he... mr speaker... order if we have to go on longer because people sitting on the treasury bench are yelling to try to disrupt, so be it, we will go on longer. some people used to believe in good behaviour, i believe in good behaviour on both sides of the house, it had better happen or it will take a whole lot longer. very simple. very clear. jeremy corbyn. thank you mr speaker. if the prime minister does to the country what he has done to his party in the past 24 hours, i think
12:18 pm
a lot of people have a great deal to fear from a lot of people have a great deal to fearfrom his a lot of people have a great deal to fear from his incompetence, a lot of people have a great deal to fearfrom his incompetence, his vacillation and his refusal to publish known facts that are known to him, about the effects of a no—deal brexit. to him, about the effects of a no-deal brexit. i really don't see how with a straight face the right honourable gentleman can accuse anybody being unwilling to stand up to scrutiny when he will not agree to scrutiny when he will not agree to submit his surrender bill to the will of the people in an election. he is frit. he is frightened. he makes a contrast between this government and his own proposal, the contrast could not be clearer, he thinks we think that the friends of this country are to be found in paris and inner be lynn, and in the white house and he thinks they are in the kremlin and in tehran and in... —— and in berlin. and caracas, i think he is crackers. we are
12:19 pm
putting 20,000 police on the street. upgrading, 20 new hospital up grades. we are growing the economy, he be contrast would put a £300 billion tax on every company in the country. he wants a tax on homes, and he's calling incessantly for a general strike. the shadow education secretary, the shadow education secretary says that their economic policy is growing the economy, he be contrast would put a £300 billion tax on every company in the country. he wants a tax on homes, and he's calling incessantly for a general strike. the shadow education secretary, the shadow education secretary says that their economic policy is i quote "(bleep) or bust." i say it is both mr speaker. what this country needs, what this country needs is sensible moderate progressive conservative government and to take this country out of the eu on thrvert and that is what we are going to deliver. ——
12:20 pm
october 31st. order. order. there will be more starting with the closed question, dr julian there will be more starting with the closed question, drjulian lewis. thank you, a well behaved question eight on the national security adviser. the prime minister. as my right honourable is aware, the decision to put the two roles together was taken by my predecessor, i have a high admiration for the gentleman in question. drjulian lewis. welll hope my right honourable gentleman isn't going tole follow every policy by his predecessor. this is one he shouldn't. the defence committee needs... the defence committee needs
12:21 pm
to ta ke needs... the defence committee needs to take evidence from the national security adviser on the previous failure to anticipate the iranian reaction to the british seizure of a tanker in the gulf. it is hardly likely, however, that the cabinet secretary will come before the defence committee. wouldn't it make sense as soon as defence committee. wouldn't it make sense as soon as possible to have a full—time ok pant of the post of national security adviser, so select committees and the nsc itself can do ourjobs properly. committees and the nsc itself can do our jobs properly. —— committees and the nsc itself can do ourjobs properly. —— occupant.” think the role has been very well performed in recent time, i take my right honourable friend's point humbly and sincerely and i will make sure that invitations are considered in the usual way and he gets all the satisfaction that he desires.
12:22 pm
thank you mr speaker. last night, parliament once again defeated the shambolic tory government. today, mr speaker, we have seized back control from a prime minister who is behaving like a dictator more than a democrat. the prime minister must be stopped. mps must unite across this house, to take no—deal off the table tonight. mr speaker, we will defeat the government against, so can the prime minister tell us, when we succeed, will he respect the democratic vote of this house, the democratic vote of this house, the democratic will of the people we represent. and finally act to remove the threat of a catastrophic no—deal brexit. mr speaker, i might ask the right honourable gentleman if he
12:23 pm
will respect the democratic will of the people of the united kingdom as this house voted to do time and time again, and that is implement the result of the referendum. mr speaker, i know he is a new boy but cani speaker, i know he is a new boy but can i suggest... we ask the question, he is supposed to answer them. quite simply, mr speaker, me and my colleagues, we are sent here by the people of scotland, we have a majority. the people of scotland voted to remain in the european union. we are not going to be dragged out against our will by the prime minister. mr speaker, the prime minister. mr speaker, the prime minister. mr speaker, the prime minister also mustn't be paying attention to the polls this morning that show that the snp is polling to win a majority in scotla nd polling to win a majority in scotland once again. with the tories in retreat, so if he wants an election, enable the bill and bring it on.
12:24 pm
it is clear for it on. it is clearfor all of it on. it is clear for all of us to see that the prime minister is playing a game of bluff and bluster. he doesn't care about stopping a no—deal brexit. his strategy is as his lead adviser put it is a sham. this isn't a parliament versus the people, it is a parliament standing up people, it is a parliament standing upfor people, it is a parliament standing up for the people. mr speaker, the people did not vote for a no—deal brexit. there prime minister is robbing the people of power, handing control to the leave campaign a cult now running number ten, so once againi now running number ten, so once again i ask the prime minister are you a dictator or are you a democrat? well, the prime minister —— will the prime minister accept the legislation today so no—deal can bya the legislation today so no—deal can by a voided and let us vote for an election so that the people can truly decide the next steps. order. iama truly decide the next steps. order. i am a democrat, i want to respect the will of the people in respect of
12:25 pm
the will of the people in respect of the referendum, but i also want to have an election, or i am willing to have an election, or i am willing to have an election if the right honourable gentleman opposite's terrible bill goes through. i tell you there is a reason why, mr speaker, why the separatists in scotla nd speaker, why the separatists in scotland drone on and on about breaking up about smashing the old est breaking up about smashing the oldest and most successful political union. there is a reason they go on about it. that is to detract from their appalling domestic record. they are a total shambles. look at them, they have the highest, they have the highest taxes anywhere in europe. they have, their educational standards falling for which they are responsible. and their signature policy, their signature policy, this isa policy, their signature policy, this is a useful one, their signature policy is to return scotland after brexit to the european union, com plete brexit to the european union, complete with the euro and the eu
12:26 pm
laws and as i never tire of saying surrendering scottish fish just when they have been taken back by this country. thank you mr speaker. can i warmly welcome the prime minister to his place. my constituents sent me here to speak for them. what they care about is better hospital care, more police on our streets, a good school for their children. does the prime minister agree with the people in telford that these are the issues we should be discussing in this place and will he commit to building on its announcement to deliver great sub pick —— public service for my constituents in telford.” sub pick —— public service for my constituents in telford. i thank her very much. we love telford and tell for will see more when my friend the chancellor announces his spendling review very shortly, —— spending.
12:27 pm
there will be investment in nhs, in the nhs, in more police officers to keep our streets safe, to keep the honourable lady's streets safe and more money for every school in this country. mr speaker. conservatives are delivering on the priorities of the british people. mr speaker, you know i am not a dimster oar glimster. i would like top thank the prime ministerfor glimster. i would like top thank the prime minister for supporting scottish... according to research, a no—deal brexit would cost up to 1100 jobs in dunfermline and west fife and 63,000 across scotland. can the prime minister explain to me, and my constituents, who are facing this dreadful prospect what their
12:28 pm
families should do in terms of the heavy price they are paying for a brexit they never voted for. of course we are preparing for a no—deal brexit if we must, i don't think the consequences will be anything like as bad as the merchants of project fear have said. but, the way to avoid a no—deal brexit is to allow this government to get on and dod a deal, at the summit on october 17th. the choice for this country is who do they want doing that deal? this government or that labour party led byjeremy corbyn. we don't name people in the chamber people must observer the rules. no, no, order. orderl no, order. order i am simply and politely informing the prime minister of the very long established procedure with which everybody, including the prime minister must come play, that is the position, no doubt, no argument, no contradiction, end of the matter.
12:29 pm
mr speaker, can i welcome the new prime minister to the despatch box and tell him this yore we celebrate ten yea rs and tell him this yore we celebrate ten years since this house passed the autism act. it is still the only disability specific piece of legislation in the uk. the all party parliamentary parliamentary group from all sides of this house are going to publish this week the ten year annual review which recommendations for government right across the board. will my right honourable friend undertake to look at the recommendations carefully and instruct his chancellor to put more resources and more money into helping people with autism and their family receive the help and service they need. everything she has done for that cause over many years, and also to reassure here that shortly, the chancellor will bh outlining not just more money for primary schools,
12:30 pm
and secondary schools, but also a big investment in schools for special educational needs and disabilities, and that is again, delivering on the priorities of the british people. people in swansea voted to leave the eu but leave voters are saying to me that they did not vote for a no deal, they did not vote for do or die on the 31st of october. they wa nted die on the 31st of october. they wanted to vote for good things for more money, morejobs and more control, and now they will get less money, lessjobs, less control. they wa nt money, lessjobs, less control. they want the final say. will he undertake when he goes to extend article 50 after the passage of this bill this afternoon, will he ensure that there is a proper referendum so there is a choice between a managed deal and remain and not kamikaze no deal? i can tell the honourable
12:31 pm
gentleman that if he wants to put the matter to the people, he can persuade his right honourable friend in the front row to summon up the courage. and if he is going to do this referendum bill, i will do it in the form of a general election. he should vote with this government are not with the surrender bill tonight. the prime minister has said that the prorogation of parliament was nothing to do with brexit. is that still his position? as my right honourable friend knows full well, there has been demands for prorogation of parliament in the form of a queen's speech from the right honourable lady there, from across this house. this parliament has lasted longer than any in the last 400 years and on brexit there
12:32 pm
will be ample opportunity to debate the brexit deal after october the 17th in this house, if this government is allowed to get on and deliver a deal. the chancellor today announced another £2 billion on top of the £63 billion already allocated to help companies after a no—deal brexit. industry, the public and parliament have a right to know which industries will benefit, for how long, and what the total cost will be to the taxpayer. can the prime minister tell us? i can tell the honourable gentleman that there isa the honourable gentleman that there is a great deal of preparatory work going on, particularly in the west midlands, which he represents, to
12:33 pm
make sure that automotive supply chains are ready for a no deal scenario, but we do not want a no deal scenario, and the way to avoid it is not to vote for the absurd surrender bill that is for the house today and let the government get on and negotiate a deal, because that is what we want to do. the scotch whisky industry is hugely important in moray and the potential tariff supplied by the us as part of their trade war with the eu could cost hundreds of thousands ofjobs across scotla nd hundreds of thousands ofjobs across scotland and the uk, so what representations has the prime minister made to president trump on this matter, and will his government do everything possible to avoid these tariffs being applied to the scotch whisky industry?” congratulate my honourable friend on everything he does to represent that vital industry which indeed earns billions in revenue for this country andi billions in revenue for this country and i think that tariffs on scotch
12:34 pm
whisky would be absurd, a point we made repeatedly to our friends in the united states, but again, when we do free trade deals around the world scotch whisky is one of those products that will have its chances boosted in export markets. mr speaker, last weekend in lincoln and across the country there were cross party against prorogation of parliament. does this unelected prime minister, who has no majority in this house, believe that his attack on our democracy is his only means of forcing a disastrous no—deal brexit on lincoln and on the businesses of —— and people of this country? if she wants to speak to the people of lincoln who after all voted to leave. yes, they did. the best thing she could do is make sure that we come out of the eu on october the 31st with a deal, and if she is genuinely prepared to frustrate that ambition through the surrender deal proposed today, will
12:35 pm
she at least have a word with her friend on the front bench and urge him, since she speaks of democracy, urge him to submit his bill to the will of the people in the form of a general election on october the 15th? will she at least say that to us? many of us in this house will know the value of community hospitals and our constituencies, none more so hospitals and our constituencies, none more so than the hospital in my constituency. there was recently a consultation on the provision of in north staffordshire and there is understandable concern about the future of the hospital. can i ask the prime minister tojoin my campaign to keep the hospital open in league with enhanced services for the benefits of all people in staffordshire? firstly, can i thank my right honourable friend for everything she has done for the people of northern ireland and thank her rightly for raising this issue in her constituency with me. of course, she will understand that
12:36 pm
decisions affecting those hospitals must be led by clinicians, but i hope that a solution can be found that benefits everybody in my right honourable friend's constituency. that benefits everybody in my right honourable friend's constituencym a desperate attempt to win yesterday's vote, the prime minister a p pa re ntly yesterday's vote, the prime minister apparently made emotional appeals to conservative mps that he was serious in seeking a deal. but his answers in the house yesterday make it clear there are no real negotiations, in public or in private. those with whom he claims to be negotiating in the european union have said nothing has been put on the table. so does the prime minister understand why across this country people find it difficult to trust a word he says? cani difficult to trust a word he says? can i tell the honourable gentleman that what the people of this country wa nt to that what the people of this country want to see is us come together, to
12:37 pm
come out of the eu on october the sist come out of the eu on october the 31st with a deal. we are making great progress with our friends and partners both in brussels and in dublin and even in paris, but those talks are being currently undermined, i'm afraid, by the absurd bill that is before the house today. i urge him to reject it, and if he must pass it, can he have a word with his right honourable friend and ensure that the bill is put to the people in the form of a general election? in light of the prime minister's answer to my right honourable friend the member for south west hertfordshire, could the prime minister explain why it has proved impossible to find any official or minister who is prepared to state that the reasons for prorogation were to pave the way for a queen's speech in the course of the current legal proceedings in which the government is involved? and with the prime minister —like to
12:38 pm
reconsider the answer he has just given to the house. i think, i hesitate to advise my right honourable and learned friend about legal proceedings, but i think if he looks at what happened in scotland this morning he will discover that that case was thrown out. as a result of home office cuts enacted in london while he was mayor, police numbers plummeted. there were 1000 fewer offices in the london command unit alone, and one third down in my borough of westminster. he is now promising as to get as back to where we we re promising as to get as back to where we were in 2010 with an additional 20,000, and he said again today that those 20,000 will be front line police and on the streets. it is however now clear that at least 7000 of those officers will not be front
12:39 pm
line police. so in order to help this house build some trust in any of the promises he makes, can he tell us if that is true? it is absolutely bizarre that a labour member of parliament for london should ignore the role of the present mayor of london who is frankly not a patch on the old guy, andi frankly not a patch on the old guy, and i left him £600 million by the way and he has squandered it on press officers. he has squandered it on press officers and the faster we get rid of sadiq khan and get the officers on the street the better, and that is the best possible argument i think for sean bailey as mayor of london. in the remaining minutes of this session i appeal to colleagues to take account of the fa ct colleagues to take account of the fact that we are visited by a distinguished group of lebanese parliamentarians. at the invitation of the interparliamentary union and the all— party group
12:40 pm
of the interparliamentary union and the all—party group on the lebanon chaired by the right honourable gentleman the member for south holland and the deep things. we would like to set them a good example. i'm not sure how impressed they will be at the moment.” example. i'm not sure how impressed they will be at the moment. i think ican they will be at the moment. i think i can comply with that. my i welcome the extra £14 billion recently announced for our schools, especially in south west devon where we had the largest increase in the country to correct historic underspending. does my right honourable friend agree that this cash boost will help our hard—working teachers to prepare the next generation to reach their full potential, and won't it be wonderful once again when we can get through brexit and start talking about education, health and social care, the things our constituents are really bothered about. exactly right, and i thank my friend, that's exactly why we need to have this three—year investment in education and get brexit done, mr speaker, on october the 31st and don't be
12:41 pm
attracted to any more dither and delay and confusion under the labour party. the prime minister yesterday booted out 21 mps from his own party for voting against a reckless no—deal brexit. these included very well respected members of this house, including a former chancellor, including churchill's grandson and the father of the house. presumably on the orders of his chief of staff. given that the prime minister himself voted against the former prime minister's deal without losing the whip, does this not show and demonstrate to the british public his view of life, namely one rule for him, and one rule for everybody else? mr speaker, i'm not going to take any lessons
12:42 pm
from people in the labour party. allow me to control the proceedings andl allow me to control the proceedings and i will be grateful for your assistance in that regard. that heckling will cease and we will hear the reply. mr speaker, i won't take lectures from anybody in the labour party about how they run their party. this is a party where good hard—working party. this is a party where good ha rd—working mps are party. this is a party where good hard—working mps are daily hounded out by anti—semitic mobs. let's be absolutely clear, if the right honourable gentleman is actually interested in democracy, then i hope he has been listening to what i've been saying today. in an anti—democratic way, the bill before the house today would hand over this country's right to decide how long to remain in the eu and it would hand it over to the eu itself. that is what that bill involves, and if he thinks that's a good idea, let him submit it to the judgment of the british people in election.”
12:43 pm
him submit it to the judgment of the british people in election. i am sure you will know that tomorrow is the ninth annual watford jobs fair. iam taking the ninth annual watford jobs fair. i am taking particular interest in the 1000 or so vacancies this year andi the 1000 or so vacancies this year and i felt that other members of both sides of the house might be interested as well and i would like to thank victoria lynch and anna cox for organising it. we have a thousand vacancies in more than 60 companies, and mr speaker, i would like the prime minister if he has any spare time tomorrow to maybe pop up any spare time tomorrow to maybe pop up to watford where he would be very welcome. i thank my honourable friend who has been a wonderful champion for watford and for conservative values, and he has also done a great deal, and i have been to campaignfor done a great deal, and i have been to campaign for him in watford and i
12:44 pm
have seen how popular he is. may i say that there are 20,000 job vacancies now in the police, if he wishes to take up that role or anybody in watford wants to take up that role. and there are many, many more in nursing, because as he knows, in watford and across the country, unemployment is at a record low and employment is at a record high because of the sound economic policies this government has followed. this week the director—general of the cbi wrote to all mps director—general of the cbi wrote to allmps in the director—general of the cbi wrote to all mps in the north—west urging us to do everything we can to get a deal that works for businesses in our region. the cbi says a no—deal brexit would be disastrous for north west business, particularly small businesses. and we all know what the prime minister has said in the past about business, but now that he has
12:45 pm
assumed a position of some responsibility, will he stop this relentless posturing around no deal, listen to the cbi and work to protect our vital businesses? againa bit again a bit rich from a member of a party whose shadow chancellor says business is the enemy, and she should listen, she should listen, she should listen, have you got that? he has gone. she should listen to the people of her constituency who voted to leave the eu, and implement their wishes, and that is what this government is going to do. mr speaker, much has been made about provision for eu nationals resident in the united kingdom post—brexit. much less comfort has opinion offered to those 1.5 million united kingdom nationals resident throughout the rest of the european union. is the prime minister in a
12:46 pm
position to confirm not on an piecemeal but pan—european basis, that all pension also be paid in full, that exportable benefits will continue to be paid in full, that health care will be covered in full, and that rights of domicile and freedom of movement will be protected. there are frightened people who need an answer. prime minister. i thank my right honourable friend conditioned i can assure him that that matter is of course at the top off our concerns with all our eu friend and partners and we have made it clear, mr speaker, that the very, very generous offer that this country has rightly made, to the 3.4 million eu citizens here in this country, must be reciprocated and in full by our friends in the way he has described. thank you mr speaker, the prime minister has said the great city of portsmouth is too full of obesity and drug addiction, despite this disgraceful inaccurate statement
12:47 pm
about my home city, how would he expect our much loved nhs to deal with these issues, when it is his government who is exposing us to medicine and staff shortages according to his own home secretary by hurtling us to a no—deal brexit. mr speaker, i must correct the honourable gentleman, because in fa ct, honourable gentleman, because in fact, unemployment is well down in his constituency, employment is up, and health outcomes, health outcomes are up, and when i made those remarks, which was many, many years ago, it was, i am afraid, when his constituency had the sad miss fortune to have a labour government in power. that is no longer the case. thank you very much mr speaker. like me i know my right honourable friend has deep concerns
12:48 pm
about the up fair loan charge. it is tearing families apart. driving people to display, and reportedly some to suicide. with over 8,000 people signing my petition, saying we cannot go on like, can my right honourable friend advice the house on what urgent action his government will be taking to address this? this? i thank my right honourable friend because this is an issue my own constituents have raised with me andi own constituents have raised with me and i know many of my right honourable friends have had it raised with them. all sides of the house who will met people who have taken out house who will met people who have ta ken out loan charges house who will met people who have taken out loan charges in the expectation they could reduce their tax exposure. it's a difficult issue, a very difficult issue and what i have undertaken to do, is to have a thorough going review of the matter, and of course, i will make sure that my right honourable friend has every opportunity to have further discussions with the
12:49 pm
treasury, about how to regress the situation about the gravity. thank you very much. mr speaker, if i decide to wear a turban or you decide to wear a cross or he decides to wear a skullcap or she wears a hijab, does that mean it is open season for right honourables of this house to make derogatory and divisive remarks about our appearance? for those of us from a young age have had to endure and face up to being called names such as towel head or taliban or coming from bongo bongo land we can appreciate the hurt and pain felt by already vulnerable muslim women when they are described as looking like bank robbers and letter boxes. so rather than hide behind sham and whitewash investigations, when will the prime minister finally apologise
12:50 pm
for his derogatory and racist remarks which... applause racist remarks mr speaker, which have led to a spike in hate crime. and given the increasing prevalence of such incidents, within his party, when will the prime minister finally order an inquiry into islamophobia within the conservative party, something he and his chancellor promised on national television. order, order. let's hearthe promised on national television. order, order. let's hear the answer. mr speaker... order, order. order. the response from the prime minister will be heard. the prime minister. thank you mr speaker. can ijust say
12:51 pm
to the honourable gentleman, that if he took the trouble to read the article in question, he would see that it was a strong liberal defence, as he began his question by saying of everybody‘s right to wear whatever they want in this country, andi whatever they want in this country, and i speak as somebody who is not only proud tow have muslim ancestors but to be related to sikhs such as himself. and i am also proud, mr speaker, to say that under this government, we have the most diverse, the most diverse cabinet in the history of this country, and we, we truly reflect, we truly reflect modern britain, we truly reflect modern britain, we truly reflect modern britain, we truly reflect modern britain and mr speaker, what we have yet toe hear, from anywhere in the labour party, is any hint of apology for the virus of anti—semitism that is now rampant, now rampant in their ranks and i would like to hear that from the
12:52 pm
honourable member opposite. thank you, thank you mr speaker. the great lady who you and i both revere iam sure great lady who you and i both revere i am sure mr speaker, once said advisers advice, ministers decide. cani advisers advice, ministers decide. can i ask the prime minister to bear that statement closely in mind, in relation to his own chief adviser, dominic cummings. order, order. order, order. the reply must be heard, if the house we re reply must be heard, if the house were to want as maker of course to allow clapping, by decision of the house so be it but it should not become a regular practise, should not become a regular practise but we have heard the question, pungently expressed. let us hear the answer.”
12:53 pm
am using to breasting applause from labour audience, am using to breasting applause from labouraudience, particularly am using to breasting applause from labour audience, particularly since, particularly since unlike the gentleman opposite we are devoted to delivering on the mandate of those labour constituencies and we are going to take the uk out of the eu on 31st october. as for the excellent question that my honourable friend asked, be in to doubt, be no in doubt we are deciding on a policy to take this country forward, not backwards as he would do. finelyjo swinson. would do. finely jo swinson. thank you. can i say to the prime minister, that his response to the honourable member for slough was appalling. an apology is what was required rather than some kind ofjustification that there is ever any acceptable context for the remarks such as he made in that column. he is the prime
12:54 pm
minister of our country, his words carry weight, and he has to be more careful with what he says. my constituent kristen is afraid because her mum, a european citizen, has been struggling to get settled status after 45 years in this country. our friends, colleagues status after 45 years in this country. ourfriends, colleagues and neighbours deserve better than his failures and his carelessness with language. mr speaker n the case of his constituent, if, of her, forgive me, the case of her constituent kristen, if she has been here for 45 years andi if she has been here for 45 years and i am sure she has, then she should be, automatically eligible to settled status, so, so, clearly mr speaker, it is a difficult case, but the answer is for her to bring it to
12:55 pm
the answer is for her to bring it to the home secretary and i am sure we can sort it out. order. before her proceeded was the labour mp desai who said the loose offensive language used by the prime minister to describe some muslim women was outrageous. we also heard from some of the rebel tory mps, who put questions dominic grieve and david gauke about the reasons for prorogation and there is is a legal case of course ongoing there and margotjames, case of course ongoing there and margot james, former business minister, then pointed to dominic cummings and his behaviour. we are now going to return to house of
12:56 pm
commons, because we are expecting the speaker to call sajid javid, the chancellor to make a spending round ina chancellor to make a spending round in a statement. lets me start by saying a few rounds round today's statement. we are in uncharted water, its understand the strong feelings on these pawn questions but it cannot be right, for a proud sovereign democracy to ignore the will of the people. if the house votes for this bill this afternoon, then, all that we are doing, is delaying what the people have entrusted us to do and creating more uncertainty for our democracy and our economy, through a engeneral election that nobody wants. but mr speaker, we cannot allow that
12:57 pm
u nseve nty, speaker, we cannot allow that unseventy, to disstract us from delivering on the people's priority, so delivering on the people's priority, so today, we give certainty where we can, iannounce so today, we give certainty where we can, i announce our so today, we give certainty where we can, i announce our spending plans for britain's first year outside the european union. after a decade of recovery from labour's great recession, we are turning the page on austerity and beginning a new decade of renewal. a new economic era needs a new economic plan, and today we lay the foundation, with the fastest increase in day—to—day spending in 15 years. the plans i announced today mean that we will be able to build a safer britain, where our streets are more secure, a healthier britain, where we can care for people throughout their lives, a better educated britain, where every child and young personal has the opportunity to succeed, no matter where they came from, or who their pa rents where they came from, or who their parents are. we will build a global britain, where we will walk talk in the world with more, not less of a
12:58 pm
presence on the international stage. a modern britain, where we will embrace diversity as a strength, an enterprising britain where we will proud of scientists, a prosperous britain where we will leave within our means and growth comes from every corner of this nation, today, we lay the foundation for a stronger, fairer and more prosperous future for our great country. mr speaker. it has been three years and three month since the british people gave us their instruction to leave the european union. if people are going to have faith in the ballot box again, we absolutely have to follow through on that instruction. that is why we have set a deadline of october 31st just 57 that is why we have set a deadline of october 31stjust 57 days away. a government still believes this government still believes that the best outcome would be to leave with a deal and we could not be more
12:59 pm
serious, in negotiating for such an outcome. my right honourable friend the prime minister has set out our position, and our central ask is very clear. to remove the anti—democratic backstop from the withdrawal agreement. but without the ability and willingness to walk away with no—deal, we will not get a good deal. and i know that some businesses and households are concerned, about what a no—deal outcome would mean for them. i recognise that, and i understand that the uncertainty around brexit is challenging. but this is ultimately a question in trust in our democracy, in the end, a strong economy can only be built on the foundation of a successful democracy. so... so let me reassure you of this. order. yes, point of
1:00 pm
order ordinarily follows statements andl order ordinarily follows statements and i know the father of the house is well aware o and i know the father of the house is well aware 0 that. the opening remarks of the chancellor were frankly out of order, that is the reality of the matter, order, i don't need any help from anybody challenging the position, no, no, with the greatest of respect i will provide the rulings from the chair, thatis provide the rulings from the chair, that is the way it works in this place. i hope everybody's very clear about that. that is the way it works in this place. the opening remarks from the chancellor were out of order, i exercised a degree of latitude, but the right honourable and learned member is right that the statement should be focussed on and exclusively concerning the spending round. as it is, the right honourable gentleman consulted me yesterday because he was concerned about the length of the statement, it shouldn't be longer as a result of remarks that don't relate to that subject. that is all i need to say. very straightforward and i knee the
1:01 pm
chancellor

50 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on