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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 5, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and louise minchin. our headlines today: a late night pact between the government and labour to ensure the bill to block a no—deal brexit goes through parliament. it comes after another humiliating defeat in the house of commons for the prime minister, when mps rejected his calls for a general election. it's a story that's changing rapidly. we'll ask the key players how this affects the october brexit deadline, what it means for borisjohnson and whether there'll be a snap general election. rescuers begin to reach the northern bahamas, left devastated by hurricane dorian,
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as the death toll rises to 20. the weather gets in the way of the first day of the fourth ashes test. but not even a stray beach ball could stop steve smith, as he helps australia into a strong start at old trafford. the wind will not be quite as strong today there. but also it will be a dry day by and large with few showers around . the full forecast here on brea kfast. it's thursday september 5. our top story: another night of drama here in westminster. the bill designed to stop a no—deal brexit could become law on monday after the government announced it will complete its passage through the lords by the end of tomorrow. labour rejected borisjohnson‘s plea for an earlier election — saying they will only agree to go to the country once the legislation has been passed. our political correspondent
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jonathan blake reports. —— chris mason. what do we know now? the house of lords were discussing until 20 minutes past one. some even turned up minutes past one. some even turned up with blankets expecting it may be later than that. and the date of the night what they agreed was that they will limit how much discussion they will limit how much discussion they will do on this whole business of this new planned law to block a no—deal brexit did it they were debated later today, they will debated later today, they will debated tomorrow as well. but by the end of tomorrow it should there which means on monday it should come the law of the land. can we rewind a little. there was also a vote on whether or not to call a general election and that was rejected. yes. the current law sets out that if you wa nt the current law sets out that if you want a general election you need a two—thirds majority, notjust half plus one, you need to thirds to
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borisjohnson said he wants this because this no deal law will scupper his ability to govern. he wa nts a scupper his ability to govern. he wants a general election. last night labour and the scottish national party abstained, they did not bother to vote. they said borisjohnson is playing games because the no deal law is not yet law and they wanted to delay. the crucial question now, which will become live at the beginning of next week, is once this no deal bill is law, at that point are labour in the scottish national party then willing to say it is election time? some people in labour say you have to wait until the no deal law is implemented and brexit is stopped from happening at the end of october, no election until over. 0thers of october, no election until over. others say thatjeremy corbyn is a chicken and is checking out of an election. that is the battle we will have over the next few days. in a
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way, jeremy corbyn calls the shots isn't he in charge this morning? he isn't he in charge this morning? he is in isn't he in charge this morning? he isina isn't he in charge this morning? he is in a powerful position and labour mps say that we are in power already, able to exert power already at least. but over there, already, able to exert power already at least. but overthere, every convention is being stretched, every rule is being examined to see if it can be extended stretched or bent a little. and one other thing is being talked about is that maybe next week there is an attempt to try and get a general election where you only need a normal majority. half the votes plus one. in that circumstance, the conservatives plus the scottish national party who are much keener ona national party who are much keener on a general election now than labour mps on a general election now than labourmps are on a general election now than labour mps are could form a majority themselves withoutjeremy corbyn. as i say, he will be conscious of the accusation that he is sticking out of the election because if it is seen to be delaying his critics will say he is only doing that because you fear you might lose. 0k. it is
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kind of like when not if there is a general election at this point. so to that question, when? probably next month, maybe one month after. the absolute pivot point is that point at the end of october. that is when we are legally due to leave the eu. delayed but fear is this, that you say yes to a general election next week and it happens on tuesday, 0ctober15, the date borisjohnson wa nts. 0ctober15, the date borisjohnson wants. if he wins that election he then overturns this law to be that stop say no deal and we leave without a deal at the end of 0ctober. that is the fear from labour. 0thers 0ctober. that is the fear from labour. others within labour and the broader opposition parties who say no, no. if there is a general election we go in and we defeat borisjohnson election we go in and we defeat boris johnson and then election we go in and we defeat borisjohnson and then there is not a no—deal brexit. so depends on your confidence within the labour party over your ability to win an
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election. but, make no mistake. a general election is coming. brenda from bristol needs to be aware that it is all happening again. all that said, we all know now. we will be here throughout the morning. we speak to labour party and we will speak to labour party and we will speak to labour party and we will speak to nigel farage as well as the chancellor sajid javid. and what we will try to do is to be clear and get as much clarity as we can because every single move is important. and we want to hear your questions as well, please get in touch with us. let's look at the situation that is going on on the other side of the channel. because michel barnier is reported to have told european diplomats that negotiations with the uk are in a state of paralysis. he's believed to have made the remarks after four hour talks with borisjohnson‘s europe adviser david frost in brussels yesterday. the prime minister has repeatedly claimed that progress is being made
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in renegotiating elements of the withdrawal agreement. hurricane dorian has torn through the bahamas, leaving 20 people dead. one of the worst hit regions — the abaco islands — have been devastated with hundreds of buildings missing roofs. david willis reports. along the eastern seaboard, they are battening down the hatches. dorian is on a collision course with the carolinas and people are being urged to leave. 0ur message today is if you are still in an evacuation zone, you still have time to get out. but time to get out is running out, because once wind speeds get to about a0 or 45 miles an hour, the emergency crews will not be able to come in and get you. oh, my god! in its wake, dorian left a tropical paradise in ruins. the abaco islands of the northern bahamas were torn apart — homes flattened, entire communities submerged by one of the most powerful atlantic storms on record.
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relief officials are gearing up for a major humanitarian disaster. as the floodwaters recede, the death toll is expected to grow. with the city of charleston, south carolina now in its path, dorian is expected to bring with it winds of around 120 miles an hour and a ten foot storm surge that could lead to catastrophic flooding. david willis, bbc news, washington. ryanair pilots have voted for seven more days of strikes later this month in a row about pay and conditions. their union, balpa, says it wanted to settle the dispute, but claims the airline has refused to take part in mediation. rya nair has described the walkouts as "pointless".
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a theory on the existence of the loch ness monster "remains plausible" according to scientists. teams have carried out a dna investigation in the water and are due to unveil theirfindings later this morning. 0ur reporter iain macinnes has been down to the water's edge. it's a mystery which endures — just what exactly lies beneath the murky waters of loch ness? and this is what you saw. how big was it? from here to the tail, oh, as big as a bus. the sightings of nessie stretch back hundreds of years, but as yet, no definitive explanation has been found. a team of scientists led by new zealand's 0tago university has been testing water samples and collecting environmental dna from all forms of life in the loch, including plants, fish and mammals. you basically take a litre or two of water and you filter it out, and in the stuff that is filtered out will be dna.
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and using that dna, you can then a sequence it, on the basis of the types of organisms that are present in the water. the scientists say their research discounts most theories, but details of one which they claim remains plausible will be revealed later, as the search for nessie goes on. that really would be something, wouldn't it? maybe we will get evidence of that before we get brexit. let's go to matt. how is it for everybody? it is a little chilly out there this morning but nowhere near as windy as yesterday. we will stick with that story because let's return to what has been happening on the other side of the atlantic with devastating scenes across parts of the bahamas. dorian has moved on and
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allowing access to see what is happening. the latest radar charts show the position of dorian and it has strengthened again. 115 mph around the core but the big story across parts of northern florida, georgia and into the carolinas is torrential rain. flooding is a big trouble and one of the biggest problems when it comes to this hurricane and the storm is moving north and could make landfall again over the next 2a hours across the carolinas did potential for more damage and destruction and flooding as we in the week and that storm moves northwards, it weakens but could bring torrential rains to eastern canada and it could move to the north of the uk. a big area of low pressure in the middle of next week but what we will seem will not be much different to what we have seen this week in the what will —— what we will see. more if you will
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spend the day dry. a little on the cool side first thing. temperatures down into single figures on the northern half of the country particular. rural areas further south with the sunshine pokes through now it is a bit on the chilly side in the breeze, probably most blustery across northern and eastern scotland down towards the south—west but generally lighter thanit south—west but generally lighter than it was yesterday. we start with sunny spells this morning, a bitter blue sky around central and eastern parts but cloud and patchy rain through scotland this morning moving eastward through the day down across northern england this afternoon into northern england this afternoon into north wales in the north midlands. producing a few showers here and there. nowhere near as much wet weather as we saw yesterday. many spending the day dry. a little warmer west of scotland. compared with yesterday, a little cooler south across the country. if you are heading off to the ashes at old trafford i cannot promise it will stay dry. the middle part of the day is likely to see spots of rain and drivel that make drizzle. and
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-- rain —— rain and drizzle. that pushes into northern england and north wales as well. it will keep temperatures up for many compared to last night although a cool night tonight across pea ks last night although a cool night tonight across peaks of us —— east anglia. a cloudy day for england and wales tomorrow with rain initially in northern england and the north midlands, patchy rain and drizzle pushing southwards into southern areas of the day. in northern parts we will see sunshine come out but a few scattered showers around, staying blustery and quite cool as well with temperatures for the most pa rt well with temperatures for the most part down with a should be for the most part, “i, 18 or part down with a should be for the most part, 1a, 18 or 19 degrees. if you are already eyeing up your weekend, high pressure is set to move its way into the we still have low pressure close enough to eastern coasts on saturday to make a windy and cool day here. temperatures are struggling. a few showers for the south—east corner of east anglia, most of saturday however will be dry with good long sunny spells for a
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time. temperatures still around 13— 19 degrees. a cool night will follow today because into sunday but sunday at the moment is looking largely dry for many of you. a lot of sunshine around in the morning, clouding over to the north—west later in the day. and with the great north run happening on sunday, near perfect conditions with temperatures lifting a little bit as well. back to you both in westminster. i hope you can hear me at home because we have been trying to hear my mike —— repair my mike. because we have been trying to hear my mike —— repair my mikel because we have been trying to hear my mike -- repair my mike. i can hear you. it is ok. over the past couple of days, the conservative party has seen its majority in the commons wiped out after phillip lee defected to the liberal democrats. their numbers were then further depleted when 21 mps were fired after voting against the government. tim muffett visited the one of their constituencies to see what voters think. here in westminster, people are
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angry. conventions are being thrown out the window. 21 tory mps were effectively kicked out of the party fortifying the government. 0ne effectively kicked out of the party fortifying the government. one of them is stephen hammond, and his constituency is about eight miles away in wimbledon. stephen hammond was elected in 2005, so for the first time in14 was elected in 2005, so for the first time in 1a years, wimbledon doesn't have a conservative mp. first time in 1a years, wimbledon doesn't have a conservative mpw is sad to see people get kicked out of theirjobs for what is sad to see people get kicked out of their jobs for what they believe in. i don't like him, of their jobs for what they believe in. idon't like him, i of their jobs for what they believe in. i don't like him, i don't like the conservatives, but he voted with his conscience, and i think you have to ata his conscience, and i think you have to at a time like this. it said not to at a time like this. it said not to have anybody that sense for you, yes, it's wrong. he's notjust standing for himself, his standing for the people of wimbledon, not for him himself. so from that point of view i think he's very wrong to do what he did. it was different from what he did. it was different from what he did. it was different from what he promised. would was the tory ma nifesto. what he promised. would was the tory manifesto. yes. and that is no longer what he represents. know, so we are seeing something quite strange in british politics where
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the british government is almost dictating to the people what things should be. anyone for tennis? anyone for another election? a bit nerve racking, another election. ithink it's a bit all over the place. so i would be reluctant. i don't know what would happen. i think we would have another hung parliament and people not really know what's going on, sojust more confusion, u nfortu nately. on, sojust more confusion, unfortunately. wimbledon common, home to the wombles, who famously recycle rubbish. some feel mps are doing the same. they are not answering straight questions. i know politicians can be routinely accused of that, but they really aren't. i think the transparency and the honesty has completely gone, and this whole brexit debate, how we are still running a country, i don't know. uncertainty, anger, political stalemate. mps say they have never known anything like this. and on that point, at least, voters agree.
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i think that is one of the things even the politicians seem confused about, where this goes, whichever party they are in, about what are the different twists and turns and possibilities over the next few days. thank you, and apparently you can hear me, so i am glad to hear it. and events are moving really fast. this is the third day and every day we wake up and say another dramatic night at westminster. there was another dramatic night at westminster. the lords discussed this bill until the early hours of the morning. let's look back at the papers printed for that decision came. “— papers printed for that decision came. —— before the decision came. let's take a look at what today's papers say. cornered johnson suffers triple commons defeat is the headline on the front of the guardian, after the prime minister lost a series of votes in the house of commons. his move to call a general election was not successful after labour whipped its mps to abstain from the vote. the mirror uses its front—page headline to declare mrjohnson britain's worst pm since the last one. an image of what the paper calls a deflated mrjohnson looking
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downwards fills the front page, along with an inset photo of theresa may smiling. if we stay on the daily mirror... never mind, moving on. i wanted to tell you about diy sos, 20 years old. it has done incredible work over those 20 years and we will be talking about it throughout the programme this morning. hypocrite corbyn rejects election to break deadlock, says the headline on the front page of the daily telegraph. the paper says mr corbyn has been persuaded by brussels—loving blairites to not support an election. the sun goes a little further, superimposing a photo of mr corbyn‘s face onto a picture of a red rooster. the main headline asks, is this the most dangerous chicken in britain?
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so the language around the way the papers are describing what is going on is very interesting. we are really going to get into some kind of nitty—gritty as well with our next guest. lots of things happening. let's talk about the next steps with maddy thimont jack from the institute of government. are you enjoying this week? it is probably an unfair question. are you enjoying this week? it is probably an unfair questionm are you enjoying this week? it is probably an unfair question. it is a slightly unfair question. 0bviously there's a lot innovation happening around the commons, so i do think it is interesting for those following it. so i will take you through events but i will fast forward and rewind. last night in the early hours of the morning we know the lords were talking about this bill to stop the no deal. then what happened? yes, so yesterday they we re happened? yes, so yesterday they were trying to pass a business
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motion that would have allowed the lords to get through all of the stages by the end of this week. normally in the house of lords you don't programme a bill and it can ta ke don't programme a bill and it can take a don't programme a bill and it can takea a don't programme a bill and it can take a a while to get through everything. they basically laid down a load of amendments to try and talk through the business motion to the extent where they just don't through the business motion to the extent where theyjust don't get through the business motion to the extent where they just don't get to the bill by the end of the week. 0pposition piers were ready to really go head—to—head with this, and ready to sit through the night if they needed to to get through this. —— opposition peers. they realised this bill was going to get through and there was no point standing on the way. they have agreed to say the bill can be considered in the house of lords, ready to roll this out and it will become law next week. so that means the bill will become law, come monday next week? exactly, if the house of lords amended the commons will have to consider those amendments on monday but if they don't amend it, it will be ready to get royal assent and become law on monday. and rewinding a little bit, one of the other votes was about a general election, and this is because of the rules of the fixed
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term parliament. borisjohnson, the prime minister, had to get a lot of votes for that to go through, which he didn't get. he needed two-thirds of the house of commons to support him, so although he won the vote, he didn't get enough because labour abstained. they said now is not the time foran abstained. they said now is not the time for an election. we want to wait until the bill is definitely law. if they had supported him last night the bill would not have been able to become law, and that is what their concern was. they wanted it in law to take no—deal off the table. and yet boris johnson law to take no—deal off the table. and yet borisjohnson clearly still wa nts and yet borisjohnson clearly still wants an election and the word from downing street is they will kind of do whatever it takes to get an election. how can he do it? what other little tricks and parliamentary games can he play to try and get what he wants? from my perspective there are two things he could try. firstly he could pass his own short deal which would override the terms of the fixed terms parliament act and says let's set aside those provisions and have an election on a specific day. he obviously wants 15 october, he could
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try and pass a law saying that. the problem with that is mps would have to approve that law and it would have to go through the house of lords, and timing is an issue. the other thing that has been suggested as he could call a vote of no confidence in himself, essentially, an try and with his own mps to vote that they don't have confidence in the government. it would be a lot harderfor labour to the government. it would be a lot harder for labour to actively vote confidence in boris johnson harder for labour to actively vote confidence in borisjohnson rather than abstain on something like that. that was a question i was asking this morning, that actually what the prime minister might... 0ne this morning, that actually what the prime minister might... one of the options which are there is literally putting vote for people to say he has no confidence in himself. that is an option. under the fixed term parliament act, it is open to him. it would be pretty extraordinary to be in that position. it is also worth saying, if he goes down that route, it would still trigger the 1a day period under the fixed term parliament act where someone else could try and form government. he would bank on the fact the opposition is still too divided to get behind one candidate to become alternative prime minister. but it
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would also delay when a general election could happen, it would be very tight to have one x 31 october. so it could be, and we are going into the realms of ifs and coulds and buts, the opposition could try and buts, the opposition could try and form government. they could, but they would have to agree who would lead the government. in the summer, jeremy corbyn wrote to opposition leaders saying i am willing to lead a government and ask for an exception to —— extension to article 50,i exception to —— extension to article 50, iam not exception to —— extension to article 50, i am not sure whether he would be willing to support someone else, for example, who could do that instead. i heard some theory about the nuclear option where he could prorogue and resign and call an election that way. if he resigned during prorogation, he would be obliged to recommend someone else to the queen to form government. because of the fixed term parliament act. previously, that was passed in
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2011, a prime minister could call an election when he wanted to, and we wouldn't be in this position and he could have called an election on his terms. but because of the fixed terms. but because of the fixed terms parliament act, the only way to get to one is having a vote in the house of commons. if they are not sitting you can't call an election. you have obviously been studying this for many years. have you ever imagine anything like this and how would you describe the significance of what has been going on? what we have seen is quite a lot of innovation going on, as i have mentioned. even the way we got to introducing this deal was the speaker allowing an unprecedented motion under emergency debates. there is quite a big question mark about whether this will set house of parliament functions going forward. the way that parliamentary rules work, it essentially works if you have a majority government. we don't have a majority government. we don't have a majority government. we don't have a majority government and both parties are split on a core issue, brexit, which makes it much harder for them to govern. it raises some questions about going forward, as quite a lot of people expect, and minority parliaments and hung
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parliaments become more usual. there isa parliaments become more usual. there is a question about does parliament work in that? parliament has such strong control, which is why parliament is innovating to express government views. i think it does raise some quite big questions about how parliament works, really.|j raise some quite big questions about how parliament works, really. i like your word, innovate. the other word is shenanigans. innovate is probably... there have been shenanigans on both sides. both sides are trying to get their way through. and as to innovations, being a bit creative, there are different ways to talk about what is going on. thank you very much, you will be back later in the programme. all explained, all clear, yes? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. crime on the railway network has risen by more than 12% over the past year, according to figures from the british transport police. the highest number of crimes were recorded in an area which includes north london.
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the two areas covering london and the south—east showed the biggest rise in theft of passenger and railway property. btp says that despite the increase, when put into context, the chances of becoming a victim of crime is still very low. residents who live at kingswood council estate in southwark are claiming their neighbourhood has fallen into disrepair after complaints have been ignored. the council says it intends to fix the problems by carrying out major works, including the cladding the estate, which council tenants have already said they do not want. damages inside each flat, and we are proposing this other counsel should focus on repairing this problem in each flat, instead of cladding our block. a family from luton whose five—year—old son has a rare disease is fundraising to pay for gene therapy in poland. huzaifah zia is one of only six children diagnosed with aadc deficiency in the uk.
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his family want him to go abroad to have pioneering treament which is still at the research stage. the treatment is not available on the nhs. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning, apart from on the metropolitan line, which has severe delays from aldgate to wembley park due to signal problems. 0nto the roads, in swiss cottage, the a111 finchley road is closed southbound from adelaide road to stjohn's wood tube station following a burst watermain overnight near queens grove. and heading towards paddington station, praed street is closed between spring street and norfolk place for crossrail and electricity works, with nine bus routes on diversion. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. lets with elizabeth rizzini. have a look at what the wea1 is lets have a look at what the weather is going to have for us all. hello, good morning. it's a cooler start to
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the day then we saw this time yesterday. we've still got that rather chilly north—westerly breeze blowing. but they will be a lot of sunshine around, as well, and it will stay dry for most of the day. but there are some showers, just a very short while this morning, tracking down on that north—westerly breeze. you might well catch one of those. the early cloud will and break. we'll see a lot of sunshine around, a little bit more cloud here and there as we head towards the end of the day, but generally a sunny day. you have to factor into a bit of wind chill as well into these temperatures, which are lower than they were yesterday, between 16 and 19 celsius by end of the afternoon. now, through this evening and overnight, we'll see clear skies, i think, for much of the time. a bit more cloud developing into tomorrow morning, but temperatures will slip back into single figures. so it will be quite a chilly night ahead. now, on friday it will feel perhaps just a touch warmer. a lot of cloud around, and there will be some outbreaks of rain at times as well. it does look mostly dry through the course of the weekend, with some sunshine, but a cool northerly breeze. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with louise minchin and jon kay. we're live from westminster this morning after another dramatic day in parliament. coming up on the programme. as the prime minister's hopes for a quick general election are dashed, for now, we'll ask what happens next when we speak to the chancellor sajid javid. borisjohnson has accused labour of running scared after they voted against his plans. shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell will be here to tell us the thinking behind that. and as a law to stop a ‘no deal‘ brexit gets one step closer, one person who won't be happy is the leader of the brexit party nigel farage. he'lljoin us at 8.30. good morning. here's a summary of today's main
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stories from bbc news. it's thursday september 5. our top story. another night of drama here in westminster. the bill designed to stop a no—deal brexit could become law on monday after the government announced it will complete its passage through the lords by the end of tomorrow. labour rejected borisjohnson's plea for an earlier election — saying they will only agree to go to the country once the legislation has been passed. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports. four parliamentary voters prime minister and four defeats. to the left, 56. the latest was last night, blocking his attempt to hold a general election on october 15. general election on 0ctober15. borisjohnson argued it was needed
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because opposition parties had scuppered negotiations by trying to stop a no—deal brexit. scuppered negotiations by trying to stop a no-deal brexit. the house has voted repeatedly to leave the eu and yet it has also voted repeatedly to delay actually leaving. in it has voted for negotiations and today i am afraid it has voted to stop, to scupper any serious negotiations. labour and the scottish national party abstained to jeremy corbyn argued it is too soon and living without a deal should be ruled out first. the offer of an election todayis first. the offer of an election today is like offering an apple to snow white and the wicked queen because what he offers is not an apple but the poison of a no deal. so, mr speaker, i repeat. i repeat what i said last night. let this
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bill pass and gain royal assent and then we will support an election so we do not crash out with a no deal exit from the eu. meanwhile in the house of lords, they prepared for a very long night. vote after vote well into the small hours but then, at 20 past one this morning, an agreement. the lords will finish at scrutiny of this planned new law by tomorrow night. so no deal not quite ruled out yet. no election called this time around. but make no mistake, one is coming, and as soon. meanwhile, what is happening on the other side of the channel? the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, is reported to have told european diplomats that negotiations with the uk are in a state of paralysis. he's believed to have made the remarks after 11—hour talks with borisjohnson's europe adviser david frost in brussels yesterday.
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the prime minister has repeatedly claimed that progress is being made in renegotiating elements of the withdrawal agreement. there is a lot to uncover this morning and many questions still to be asked. we will speak to various politicians from all sides here and we will trader get answers to some of. get in touch with us this morning, we do love hearing from you. 20 people are now known to have died after hurrican dorian devastated parts of the bahamas. aid agencies suggest more than 75,000 people need urgent food, water and shelter. forecasters have warned it could make landfall in the united states on the coast of south or north carolina today. ryanair pilots have voted for seven more days of strikes later this month — in a row about pay and conditions. their union, balpa, says it wanted to settle the dispute, but claims the airline has refused to take part in mediation. rya nair has described the walkouts as "pointless". the existence of the loch ness
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monster ‘remains plausible' according to scientists. a team has carried out dna tests in the water, compiling a detailed list of everything that lives there. they say their research has ruled out most theories about nessie, but leave one possibility, and they'll give more information later this morning. iam i am absolutely fascinated by the loch ness monster. wouldn't it be amazing? i don't think we have time to deal with it today, do we?“ amazing? i don't think we have time to deal with it today, do we? if you are watching us this morning. it is still early but there are a few things to talk about. mostly one subject. the loch ness monster, right? we will be speaking to sajid javid and john mcdonald from labour and at 830 the brexit party ‘s nigel farage. those are some of the interview is to look forward here morning
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on bbc breakfast. we need to know what is going on it is like every morning we wake up with a brexit hangover. 0k. let's have some light relief. let us know about the sport. the first day of the fourth ashes test was all about the wind, the rain. . .and almost inevitably steve smith. the australia batsmen stayed firm as others were virtually blown off their feet in some really autumnal conditions at old trafford, and that has given his side the advantage. i don't know if this is about to be light relief. get your ben stokes scarves! now £8 only on the scarves! talk about a tough act to follow — ben stokes scarves and even jack leach costumes, a happy reminder of england's heroic win at headingley.
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surely old trafford couldn't match that drama. well, briefly, it tried its best, as stuart broad set about ramping up the decibels, australia soon 28—2 as england started in style. but then a familiar obstacle. steve smith missed the last test after being hit by a jofra archer bouncer. welcome back. but soon smith was calling the shots. that's why he's the world number one batsman. only the weather, seemingly, could stop him, a lengthy rain delay followed by a few wind—powered problems. beach balls, crisp packets, even the bails kept blowing off. australia, though, seemed unruffled, as smith and marnus labuschagne reached half centuries before, finally, england finally found the breakthrough, . labuschagne bowled by craig 0verton. smith, though, was still there for 60 at the close, once again australia's rock. a testing day, then, for england and they still face a familiar question — how do they get get out steve smith? andy swiss, bbc news, old trafford.
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not even the great british weather helping there. to new york next, where in the last hour rafael nadal has made it through to the semi—finals of the us 0pen. he beat diego schwartzman in straight sets. a comfortable victory there for him. remember both roger federer and novak djokovic are already out, so it looks like its opening up for nadal to win his 19th grand slam title, leaving him just one short of federer‘s record. he plays the italian matteo berrettini in the last four. also opened up in the womens's draw, here's bianca andreescu the canadian teenager at the bottom of your screen, booking her place in the last four. she beat elise mertens. she's only 19, but has won two titles this year, she's up to 15th in the world rankings and into herfirst grand slam semi final. jamie murray meanwhile had a busy day at flushing meadows.
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first he qualified for the semi—finals of the men's doubles with british partner neil skupski, then he went one better in the mixed doubles, reching the final alongside the american bethany mattick sands. england have got a couple of qualfiers for next year's they a new name in the squad is aston villa's tyrone mings, and he's come a long way. he lived in a homeless shelter as a child, and worked as a mortgage broker before breaking through as a footballer. i cannot say the while i sat on my desk cold calling or trying to help people remortgage that playing for england was an achievable goal. but asi england was an achievable goal. but as i have worked with some great coaches and been able to play for
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some great clubs everything has come together to get me to this point. at different times i have had to reassess goals, injuries and the like, but it makes it almost sweeter to be sitting here right now. and seven members of the england squad who reached the semi—finals of the women's world cup are in the running to be named in the fifa team of the year. amongst them is lucy bronze, the recent winner of the uefa player of the year award. scotland and wales are in euro qualifying action this weekend. northern ireland meanwhile play a friendly against luxembourg tonight, before hosting germany in a qualfier on monday night. michael 0' neill‘s men top their group with 4 wins from 4 games. we were not going to get bogged down. that is not the issue here. the most important thing is preparing the team for monday night and the important thing is that the
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players who come in a given the best opportunity to do well. and i think we will give them that and hopefully we will give them that and hopefully we will give them that and hopefully we will get a performance and a positive result. and the man who beat anthonyjoshua to take his world titles says he wants more than "15 minutes of fame". andy ruinunior caused one of the biggest upsets in the history of boxing when he beat joshua in june. the pair have been in saudi arabia, where they'll have their rematch in december. i feel that once you walk a tightrope once and you cross the bridge and you walk it again and stumble you have two options. to fail walking on it again or to backup your ideas and try a second time. i going for the titles again. there is always an option to take some time and continually ask for warmup fights but i want to swim in the deep end. it will be a huge moment for him. that is all from myself, all the sport for now and i will hand you
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back to westminster and we have a busy morning up ahead? alistair cooke isjoining busy morning up ahead? alistair cooke is joining us? busy morning up ahead? alistair cooke isjoining us? he is excited. i think he is disappointed he not in the studio today. i have my autograph and everything! —— autograph and everything! —— autograph book. on any normal day in westminster, the chancellor telling us how much money he was going to spend would be the biggest story in town. but these are not normal times. in his first spending update yesterday, sajid javid promised an end to austerity and announced the biggest increase in spending since 200a. the £14 billion spending spree will include an extra £2 billion for brexit preparations and a £62 billion boost for the nhs. critics say it is electioneering, and the worsening economy might make the pledges impossible. vicky pryce, former chief economic advisor to the department for trade and industry, is with us now.
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good morning to you. what do you make of this? when you watched the chancellor yesterday giving this review, can we hold anything to eat? firstly, this is only for one year. we are supposed to have a three—year spending review so we have no idea of what will happen afterwards it he has relaxed the fiscal rules, he is still within them but he will be looking at them again. if we remember philip hammond wanted to relax them from what george osborne had before. so supposedly moving towards a balanced budget but this may not happen. what he has done is within the headroom he thinks he has at the moment he has allowed for extra spending of about 1k billion plus a little on infrastructure so all departments get a first time in ages increase that he already told us ages increase that he already told us this over the last few weeks. basically schools are getting more, the nhs has already had some idea. some of it is extra and we have to look and see how much of that
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perhaps is a repeat of what has been said earlier and already assume. in reality, he has to do that because the economy has been slowing quite significantly and if the government does not put money in it will grow even more slowly and if anything the fear is that we will have a contraction in the next few months and possibly within a year if we leave with no deal although that is less likely. and you hear a headline figure of £14 billion and that sounds like an enormous amount of money. what difference does it make on the ground in hospitals? money. what difference does it make on the ground in hospital57m money. what difference does it make on the ground in hospitals? it is a 496 on the ground in hospitals? it is a 4% plus increased. that's not bad but it does not make up for the cuts that were happening before. and they we re that were happening before. and they were substantial cuts. 30% for local authorities in terms of money they had been getting for the last few yea rs. had been getting for the last few years. so since the coalition came to power has been a serious period for most services. so at least there is an improvement now but it will
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not make up for what we saw the fourth. so the issue will be does he need to borrow more in the future? he may need to with the economy slows down. the next two years will be crucial. at some point we will have a budget and we will see who pays for this and then of course we have to relook at what the economy is doing. so instead of an extra billion being borrowed we may have two borrow more. and if you cannot borrow, what then happens? higher taxes or cuts elsewhere? borrow, what then happens? higher taxes or cuts elsewhere ?|j borrow, what then happens? higher taxes or cuts elsewhere? i think you probably can borrow because interest rates are low. but they are for everybody because everyone is very low. i think it will be relatively easy to borrow but that would go against the fiscal rules of reducing public debt. he said he will review those fiscal rules and also he will be working, as he said, with the government and the bank of england to make sure that everyone has helped. and i think we will see a
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lot coming from their. of course, all of this in some way is unknown at the moment because of what is going on in parliament, because of what may or may not happen with brexit and how it does or does not happen. so how difficult is it for an economist to reallyjudge what is going to happen? it is incredibly difficult, and you are absolutely right. we may have an election, of course, and who knows what may happen at the end of it and what may happen at the end of it and what type of economic policies whoever is in power... we have some idea perhaps of what borisjohnson might do, up to a point, but this is going to be very worried about this. they are worried in any case. they had not been investing, as we know. we have seen manufacturing and construction output go down, services are stagnating, basically. we may just have services are stagnating, basically. we mayjust have zero growth in this quarter we are we mayjust have zero growth in this quarterwe are in, we mayjust have zero growth in this quarter we are in, or even a fall, that would mean a recession in the uk. so businesses have been very wa ry uk. so businesses have been very wary of putting any money into the
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economy if they don't actually know where we might end up. economy if they don't actually know where we might end uplj economy if they don't actually know where we might end up. i suppose the chancellor might say, and we will hear from chancellor might say, and we will hearfrom him later, this is a new government that is committed to domestic issues and people's priorities, and we're just telling them we're going to put our money our mouth is. in a way, it is correct. i presume this is supposed to be the sort of conservative government who is helping also businesses, although so far it hasn't done an awful lot, and the coalition and the government we had just before didn't do an awful lot in terms of listening to what businesses were worried about. they we re businesses were worried about. they were worried about the future, trade, having enough people to do thejobs trade, having enough people to do the jobs they need to do if migration is reduced. they have not had a very sympathetic ear. now the government would like to tell them that we do have a sympathetic ear, maybe cutting taxes even more than we said before, for you. corporation tax and so on. if they are going to encourage them to go and invest, for the moment they haven't done so and they will be very careful in terms
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of what they do in the future. as you pointed out, there are a lot of unknowns. thank you, for the moment. 0n the subject of unknowns, he knows everything! matt has the weather. thank you very much, i do know quite a bit about the weather today. a better start for some of you compared with yesterday. this is the sunrise captured over london over the last half hour or so and it has beena similar the last half hour or so and it has been a similar picture for many of you. what will be generally a drier and brighter and less breezy day then we saw yesterday. it is a little bit on the cooler side, as we have been sitting here in westminster. temperatures in the northern half of the country at the moment in single figures, just about holding above and the south but that rias is making it feel cooler. pushing these conditions down the eastern coast in the far south of wales and south—east england. but nowhere near as windy as we finish yesterday. dry and sunny weather around this morning for the commute but showers and outbreaks of rain in western scotland and putting across the west of scotland —— rest of scotland and into the north of
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england. maybe the north midlands could see that the zone of the cloud and patchy rain and drizzle. many in the south will stay dry, dry into the south will stay dry, dry into the afternoon across a good part of scotland and northern ireland, shetland being the main exception, 11 degrees there. but a little bit on the cool side out of the sun, temperatures in single figures. after yesterday's excitement at old trafford, it will not be quite so turbulence, the weather, during the day. but there will be something of a breeze and through the afternoon the chance for some interruptions and further outbreaks of rain. the rain tonight will start mainly in scotland and northern ireland, finishing the night into tomorrow morning's rush hour across northern england and north wales. with that, a bit more breeze and cloud, not quite as chilly of the north of england and the uk. tomorrow morning's rush hour will start dry and bright once again but it will cloud over with outbreaks of rain. northern england, north and west wales starting cloudy with some damp weather pushing its way southwards. many in the northern half of the country will see sunny spells during
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the day, especially during the afternoon. a few showers dotted around and quite easy on friday. that keeps temperatures a little bit on the cool side, at around 12— 18 degrees. we should be around 17— 21 celsius at this time of year. we will stay on the cooler side as we head into the weekend. but if we have any outdoor plans, this area of high pressure pushes in as low pressure pushes away. it generally means drier conditions but at least for saturday the low pressure to the east of us, a few showers to eastern parts of england, one or two isolated ones further west but most will be dry. sunny spells, a bit of cloud building up here and there, but temperatures down these eastern coasts, thanks to a stiff breeze to begin with,13— coasts, thanks to a stiff breeze to begin with, 13— 15 degrees. feeling warm in the sunshine, lighter winds further west, and all internet to start sunday. after a chilly start, day with lighter winds, clouding over into western scotland and northern ireland later on but the vast majority will be dry on sunday.
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if you are doing the great north run, conditions and still look fine. light winds, rather cool on the starting line. but it will get warm once the race is under way —— won't get to one once the race is under way either. i have misjudged the weather! we are just giving an introduction, and debating amongst ourselves already. welcome back to westminster the morning after borisjohnson's bid to hold a snap general election was defeated in the commons. with us we have two journalists from opposite ends of the political spectrum. guardian columnist 0wen jones and tom harwood from the political blog guido fawkes. good morning to both of you. good morning. so where do we begin today? where are we? can we see on this law to outlaw no deal, that's it, it
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will not happen? the reason this was so important is the fear of the opposition is that you can't trust a single prime minister says. on monday he was saying he didn't want a general election, which was self—evidently not the case, but the fear of the opposition was of britain crashing out during a general election campaign. the opposition all agree, all the different parties, that there has to bea different parties, that there has to be a general election which is now absolutely inevitable. it will probably be agreed in the next few days. the fear was that before people get the right to have their say, that we would crush out without —— crashed out without a deal, which would be a self—inflicted shock before we go back to the eu in a weakened position, without the british people having a say over it. so all that is now being guaranteed and it will be pass by the commons on monday. they can't crash britain out without a deal before a general election takes place. so next week, without a doubt, almost certainly by monday or later on, the commons will vote for a general election. the debate has been about whether that should take place on 15 october or there is one in november, but i think 0ctober there is one in november, but i think october is what is going to happen. and tom, on a similar
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question, is no deal now off the table? will it have to come off the table? will it have to come off the table? that is not the law yet. it looks likely due to this law which was struck in the house of lords la st was struck in the house of lords last night that that will happen on monday. but it is 2019 so we can't ta ke monday. but it is 2019 so we can't take anything for granted. what i would say is that it is quite interesting how labour have been prevaricating on this position, trying to find any excuse not to call a general election. jeremy corbyn, even though he said he wanted an election, he refused to back it. he has been doing the same this week. this is a labour party that doesn't really want to go back to the people, and you can see why with where they are polling, with their leader being less popular than trump in this country, jeremy corbyn, so it is quite a strong line he has come out with today. it will be interesting to see if labour come through with that on monday. again, the only person who said they don't wa nt the only person who said they don't want a general election is the prime minister himself, and that was all of three days ago. so the issue now. . . of three days ago. so the issue now... sorry to interrupt you, just
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for people watching at home, and again, to go back to what you said and explain it, jeremy corbyn, i we have seen him over and over saying he wanted a general election. it seems strange, doesn't it? because they want to rule no deal out during a general election campaign. the danger is that we will dissolve parliament, that is what is going to happen. there is definitely going to bea happen. there is definitely going to be a general election, it will almost certainly happen in the middle of october, but nobody trusts borisjohnson not middle of october, but nobody trusts boris johnson not to middle of october, but nobody trusts borisjohnson not to rule out no—deal during a general election campaign. they want us to crash out without a deal, which would be a very temporary state which would hit working communities. but the british people have to have a say first about whether they want that to happen, if that is what the election would ensure. all opposition parties wa nt to would ensure. all opposition parties want to general election, the only person who said he didn't want to general election was the prime minister three days ago. the issue now is, will the people have that say? and the reason people don't
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trust boris johnson say? and the reason people don't trust borisjohnson is he is a man sacked twice for dishonesty, he said he wasn't going to prorogue parliament, and he did. two this is a lot of conspiracy theories from labour. he chose to allow the commons to sit so this can be debated. it is a total conspiracy that he called an election and change the date of the election in the middle of the election. this is labour trying to avoid election and making up any excuse to avoid it. do you think the people out there watching really want an election?” think ideally we would have left the eu in march and got back onto the domestic agenda that we want to talk about. but ultimately it looks like this parliament is so dysfunctional, it is the most rotten parliament we have had for hundreds of years in this country. it is time that it comes to an end. this is something owen andl comes to an end. this is something owen and i will agree on. mp5 who have left their respective parties,
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joint new parties, joint the liberal democrats, gone back on their manifesto commitments and their promises to people, it is right that they face the people and that this parliament which looks very different to the promises that politicians gave to the people in an election, it is right that that is dissolved. if he is going to accuse labour and opposition parties are conspiracy theories, he should listen instead to 21 members of the conservative party who have been purged from their own party, some who are members going back decades, some who were until a few weeks ago in the cabinet, they did not trust a single word borisjohnson said. these are people who have known him in politics for decades. and the reason they don't trust him at his word is he has been sacked twice for dishonesty. he has spent three days saying he didn't want to general election. this is why it is important to have it in legislation so he can't crash britain out without a general election which has to ta ke without a general election which has to take place. we will put that to those mps. thank you very much for your time this morning. and we will
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agree to let you go. can we agree on that? thank you very much indeed. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. crime on the railway network has risen by more than 12% over the past year according to figures from the british transport police. the highest number of crimes were recorded in an area which includes north london. the two areas covering london and the south—east showed the biggest rise in theft of passenger and railway property. btp says that despite the increase, when put into context, the chances of becoming a victim of crime is still very low. residents who live at kingswood council estate in southwark are claiming their neighbourhood has fallen into disrepair after complaints have been ignored. the council says it intends to fix the problems by carrying out major works, including cladding the estate, which council tenants have already said they do not want.
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damage is inside each flat, and we are proposing the southwark council should focus on repairing those problems in each flat, instead of cladding our block. a family from luton whose five—year—old son has a rare disease is fundraising to pay for gene therapy in poland. huzaifah zia is one of only six children diagnosed with aadc deficiency in the uk. his family want him to go abroad to have pioneering treament, which is still at the research stage. the treatment is not available on the nhs. let's take a look at the travel situation now. a few problems on the tubes. the metropolitan line has severe delays from aldgate to wembley park due to signal problems. and on the victoria line, there's no service victoria to brixton while emergency services deal with an incident. onto the roads, in swiss cottage, the a41 finchley road is closed southbound from adelaide road to stjohn's wood tube station
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following a burst watermain overnight near queens grove. and heading towards paddington station, praed street is closed between spring street and norfolk place for crossrail and electricity works, with nine bus routes on diversion. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a cooler start to the day than we saw this time yesterday. we've still got that rather chilly north—westerly breeze blowing, but there will be a lot of sunshine around too, and we'll stay dry for most of the day. but there are some showers, forjust a very short while this morning, tracking down on that north—westerly breeze. you might well catch one of those. the early cloud will thin and break. we'll see a lot of sunshine around, a little bit more cloud here and there as we head towards the end of the day, but generally a sunny day. you have to factor in a bit of wind chill as well, though, into these temperatures, which are lower than they were
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yesterday, between 16 and 19 degrees celsius by end of the afternoon. now, through this evening and overnight, we'll see clear skies, i think, for much of the time. a bit more cloud developing into tomorrow morning, but temperatures will slip back into single figures, so it will be quite a chilly night ahead. now, on friday, it'll feel perhaps just a touch warmer. a lot of cloud around, and there'll be some outbreaks of rain at times too. but it does look mostly dry through the course of the weekend, with some sunshine, but a cool northerly breeze. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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an economist to reallyjudge what is going to happen? good morning welcome to breakfast withjon kay and louise minchin. our headlines today: a late night pact between the government and labour to ensure the bill to block a no—deal brexit goes through parliament. it comes after another humiliating defeat in the house of commons for the prime minister, when mps rejected his calls for a general election. it's a story that's changing rapidly. we'll ask the key players how this affects the october brexit deadline, what it means for borisjohnson and whether there'll be a snap general election. elsewhere, hurricane dorian is expected to bring a deadly storm surge to the american east coast, after causing devastation in the bahamas.
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i will have the latest on that as it strengthens to a major category three storm once again and the carolinas are in the firing line. uk weather today looking dry and bright and less windy than yesterday. the weather gets in the way of the first day of the fourth ashes test. but not even a stray beach ball could stop steve smith, as he helps australia into a strong start at old trafford. we are bringing the bbc breakfast red sofa into the of the latest diy sos bill to celebrate 20 years of this amazing programme. it's thursday fifth september. our top story. another night of high drama here in westminster. the bill designed to stop a no—deal brexit could become law on monday after a late night pact between the government and labour in the house of lords. jeremy corbyn rejected boris johnson's plea
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for a snap election — saying they will only agree to go to the country once the legislation has been passed. our political correspondent chris mason reports. four parliamentary votes as prime minister and four defeats. ayes to the right, 298. noes to the left, 56. the latest was last night, blocking his attempt to hold a general election on october 15. borisjohnson argued it was needed because opposition parties had scuppered negotiations by trying to stop a no—deal brexit. the house has voted repeatedly to leave the eu and yet it has also voted repeatedly to delay actually leaving. in it has voted for negotiations and today i am afraid it has voted to stop, to scupper any serious negotiations.
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labour and the scottish national party abstained. jeremy corbyn argued it is too soon and living without a deal should be ruled out first. the offer of an election today is like offering an apple to snow white and the wicked queen because what he offers is not an apple or even an election, but the poison of a no deal. so, mr speaker, i repeat. i repeat what i said last night. let this bill pass and gain royal assent and then we will support an election so we do not crash out with a no deal exit from the eu. meanwhile in the house of lords, they prepared for a very long night. vote after vote well into the small hours but then, at 20 past one this morning, an agreement. the lords will finish scrutiny of this planned new law by tomorrow night.
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so no deal not quite ruled out yet. no election called this time around. but make no mistake, one is coming, and soon. chris is with us now. let's talk. before we talk about the upcoming election, let's talk about today because this bill is being discussed in the house of lords. yes. once they have had a bit of kip the peers will get back together, back into the house of lords and that will be the focus of their scrutiny of this plan to stop a no deal brexit at the end of next month. what we know is the timeframe. they will discuss it today and tomorrow. if there are any twea ks they today and tomorrow. if there are any tweaks they make to it, amendments, they will have to go back to the house of commons on monday. what we have a reasonable sense of now is
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that this bill, this planned new law will become more pretty soon, probably by the beginning of next week. and then the big question is are we then in election territory? is that enough for labour to say ok, thatis is that enough for labour to say ok, that is now the law of the land, we back a general election. or will we still have noise within labour saying that is still not enough, we have to wait until it is actually implemented and has an effect on brexit is delayed before we get into elections. so the ball is in jeremy corbyn ‘s court. he is almost in power now. the opposition are in power, the government is in power but has no power anymore. there is a tussle over power and the timing of an election. weighs their discussion about it? because all sides are trying to work out when it is best for them for it to be called. the government wants it to happen in the
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middle of next month before brexit is due to happen. but still, the official labour position, there is a lot of noise within the party saying there should maybe be a dilated that will be the focus of discussion away from the house of lords over the next few days, when should the election happen? but it is going to happen, it is just election happen? but it is going to happen, it isjust a matter of election happen? but it is going to happen, it is just a matter of when. and people watching this morning trying to guide their selves through. how significant. these are extraordinary times and when will we getan extraordinary times and when will we get an answer? that is what i want to know. when are we going to know? that is a good question. wejust don't know. there is so much that is unknowable. we will get a general election soon. how soon? we don't know. and what does that actually mean for when the accident happens or not? wejust mean for when the accident happens or not? we just do mean for when the accident happens or not? wejust do not mean for when the accident happens or not? we just do not know. of course it depends on the outcome of
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the election. so i get that there is a desire for clear answers but frankly there is only so much clarity we can offer. i will take soon as an answer. thank you, as always. we will speak to many different politicians throughout the morning to try and get some clarity. thank you. or we could just take soon and go home. we got an answer! it is not just soon and go home. we got an answer! it is notjust here, of course, that all eyes are on brexit. the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, is reported to have told european diplomats that negotiations with the uk are in a state of paralysis. he's believed to have made the remarks after 4—hour talks with borisjohnson's europe adviser david frost in brussels yesterday. the prime minister has repeatedly claimed that progress is being made in renegotiating elements of the withdrawal agreement. in a few minutes we'll be speaking to the chancellor sajid javid.
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what does he think of what is going on at the very heart of government here in westminster right now is to mark sitting here is interesting and watching the comings and goings of politicians as they do the rounds and other journalists politicians as they do the rounds and otherjournalists again asking similar questions to what we are. we are here through the morning as we have been over the last few days or so. let's tell you about the other news. hurricane dorian is expected to bring a deadly storm surge up the east coast of the united states today after causing destruction and at least 20 deaths in the bahamas. one of the worst hit regions, the abaco islands, have been devastated with roofs coming off hundreds of buildings. david willis reports. along the eastern seaboard, they are battening down the hatches. dorian is on a collision course with the carolinas and people are being urged to leave. our message today is if you are still in an evacuation zone, you still have time to get out.
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but time to get out is running out, because once wind speeds get to about 40 or 45 miles an hour, the emergency crews will not be able to come in and get you. in its wake, dorian left a tropical paradise in ruins. the abaco islands of the northern bahamas were torn apart — homes flattened, entire communities submerged by one of the most powerful atlantic storms on record. relief officials are gearing up for a major humanitarian disaster. as the floodwaters recede, the death toll is expected to grow. with the city of charleston, south carolina now in its path, dorian is expected to bring with it winds of around 120 miles an hour and a ten foot storm surge that could lead to catastrophic flooding. david willis, bbc news, washington.
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ryanair pilots have voted for seven more days of strikes later this month — in a row about pay and conditions. their union, balpa, says it wanted to settle the dispute, but claims the airline has refused to take part in mediation. rya nair has described the walkouts as "pointless". the number of crimes recorded on britain's railways is on the rise. there were more than 68,000 incidents reported last year, up 12% on the year before. violent crimes and sexual offences both increased. british transport police says serious violence and knife crime is one of its key priorities. and while we try to get to the heart of exit find some answers, there is another long running saga that we need to address this morning. a theory on the existence of the loch ness monster "remains plausible" according to scientists. teams have carried out a dna investigation
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in the water and are due to unveil theirfindings later this morning. our reporter iain macinnes has been down to the waters edge it's a mystery which endures — just what exactly lies beneath the murky waters of loch ness? and this is what you saw. how big was it? from here to the tail, oh, as big as a bus. the sightings of nessie stretch back hundreds of years, but as yet, no definitive explanation has been found. a team of scientists led by new zealand's 0tago university has been testing water samples and collecting environmental dna from all forms of life in the loch, including plants, fish and mammals. you basically take a litre or two of water and you filter it out, and in the stuff that is filtered out will be dna. and using that dna, you can then a sequence it, on the basis of the types of organisms that are present in the water.
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the scientists say their research discounts most theories, but details of one which they claim remains plausible will be revealed later, as the search for nessie goes on. what are they going to say when they get the results. was genuinely excited and i have always been fascinated by the loch ness monster. that is what they are talking about here. the only thing they are about here. the only thing they are about here. no, they are talking about brexit. the sun is shining and it was windy early but once again the political world others in the public waits and watches to try and work out what is going on. so let's talk about what we have been discussing over the past few days. boris johnson lost his first three commons vote and the latest was a rejection for his calls for a general election. what does he do next and
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where does it go from here? let's speak live now to the chancellor of the exchequer, sajid javid. thank you forjoining us. borisjohnson was elected a few weeks ago by your party to get this sorted, to clear up party to get this sorted, to clear up the mess, to unite the country and unite your party. and this morning it looks messier than ever. the prime minister, for the moment, from the moment he took office has been focused on delivering on our central policy which is to leave the european union on october 31. we are trying to do that with a deal. a huge amount of work has gone into that and continues to go into that we have also been clear that if we cannot get a deal then we will u nfortu nately have cannot get a deal then we will unfortunately have to leave without a deal. and that has been our central focus. what we have seen in parliament this week has been uncertain. no—one would have wanted it to turn out this way. but what we
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have now is a situation where the leader of the opposition is trying to get his way, which is to basically make sure we never leave the european union and he is trying to do that by kibosh in the negotiations the government is carrying out. but only a few weeks ago you were at the hustings standing against boris johnson ago you were at the hustings standing against borisjohnson and saying you will never provoke parliament, to do that is wrong. and now it looks like we could get a parliament pro— road. your special adviser frogmarched out of downing street and fired without proof of doing anything wrong. you would not have done things like this would you? you see, sometimes your political opponents do take what you say out of context. when i spoke before about suspension of parliament that is clearly in the context of when you are being asked that if you were leader would you shut down parliament for month finesse on and instrument no—one would do that. what we're doing is a government is what new prime
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ministers have done for decades which is when they take office you wa nt to which is when they take office you want to set out an agenda, what your government will be about and you do that by having a queen ‘s speech. prorating parliament for a queen ‘s speech is perfectly correct, especially when there is plenty of time to debate things as we have seen this week. but the central issue here is now that we absolutely need to deliver on our mission to leave the eu after the 31st. we have seen how parliament and certainly the opposition has worked to try and essentially get britain to surrender the in these negotiations and make sure that we never leave the eu and we never get a good deal. and that is unacceptable. but for us it is not just about brexit. is unacceptable. but for us it is notjust about brexit. what is unacceptable. but for us it is not just about brexit. what we is unacceptable. but for us it is notjust about brexit. what we had yesterday was my spending round which allowed us to set out a bit more about what this government will be about. yesterday we saw the biggest increase in departmental spending in 15 years. we saw for the
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first time since 2002 that there was no cut in any department spending. and now we want to focus on what i think other people ‘s priorities. i get your frustration, i get yourfrustration, as chancellor you want to talk about your spending review and what you wa nt to your spending review and what you want to do, but the trouble is until brexit is sorted, none of that features, does it? you will not be able to do anything and at the moment it seems like it is less sorted than ever. at what cost to your party and the country are you prepared to get this through as mac look, of course brexit is dominating the political landscape, and eve ryo ne the political landscape, and everyone i think understands that after over three years ago we voted to leave and here we still are as a country not having left, and that is why we cannot have another extension. but what we have also showed as a new administration coming injust five showed as a new administration coming in just five or six weeks ago is that we are focusing on so many of the things that matter to people.
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iamat of the things that matter to people. i am at the police training college in hendon, the reason i am here is one of the announcements i made yesterday is securing the funding for hiring 20,000 more police officers. i have also talked about the increase in funding for the nhs, a multi—year settlement in funding for our schools, our colleges, this is what people want to hear about. that is what i have been talking about, and yesterday we landed all the funding which is necessary to ta ke the funding which is necessary to take all of those areas, all those priorities, forward. boris johnson was elected by your party because he was elected by your party because he was thought to be a winner. that is what members wanted. but he has lost his majority, he has lost a by—election, he has lost 21 mps, he has lost four votes in three days. he is not a winner anymore, is he? well, actually, yesterday what you saw in parliament, the final vote was something that i never thought would happen, certainly so soon, which was a vote to see if we can
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have a general election. that is not something i wanted to see. i didn't wa nt to something i wanted to see. i didn't want to have a general election earlier than necessary stop but what we have now is actually three years, or certainly since the 2017 election, we have had a parliament that keeps saying what it doesn't wa nt that keeps saying what it doesn't want when it comes to brexit, but it is not deciding on what it wants. i think we have got to the point now where we need to let the people decide who should govern this country. and the choice is going to be clear. whenever that election comes, they can choosejeremy corbyn, and all of his dithering and his desire to ignore the will of the people and stay in the eu, or they can choose borisjohnson, who will not only deliver on that central promised to leave the eu, but also on the people's priorities. how proud of you are —— how proud are you of the way your government and your party has handled exit? we all know that when we came back into office in 2017 we didn't have a majority. we reached an agreement
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with the dup. i think you realise when the parliamentary arithmetic changes that things will be tough. but despite that, there was an understanding, correctly, ithink, by the british people that the parliamentarians would collectively back their decision to leave the eu. i think it is wrong that you have some parliamentarians that decide which votes they want to honour and which votes they want to honour and which ones they want to ignore. i think it is a fundamental test of the very fabric of our democracy that we leave the eu, and we cannot keep delaying this. so i am proud of a party that continues to work to deliver for the will of the people, but also delivering on the priorities and trying to take this country forward. we saw things yesterday that i would rather have not had, which is this deal progressing through parliament. but also we saw yesterday through the spending review what can happen when
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you have a government which is focused on what people really want to see. that party of yours has now got 21 fewer mps, they were kicked out for rebelling the other night. there were reports investments this morning that some senior cabinet ministers have said to the prime minister that that is not acceptable. you have to find a way of bringing them back into the fold. have you spoken to the prime minister about that? are you one of those senior cabinet ministers?” minister about that? are you one of those senior cabinet ministers? i am not going to get into discussions i have with the prime minister, but i am saddened to see 21 colleagues, 21 conservatives, no longer carrying the conservative weapon. these are my friends, these are good people, but they also knew that when the prime minister of the day says a vote is a matter of confidence, what would be the consequences of proposing that. i think there is an understanding of that. this is not something i wanted to see, but we do need to step back and think about how do we deliver on the central mission to leave the eu by 31 october, and continue to govern this country in a way that people feel
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their priorities are being met. chancellor of the exchequer sajid javid, thank you forjoining us here on breakfast. and throughout the programme we will be speaking to john mcdonnell and nigel farage as well. it is a rather lovely day in westminster this morning. well. it is a rather lovely day in westminsterthis morning. it well. it is a rather lovely day in westminster this morning. it is a bit chilly, but lovely. and matt has the details for everyone else. good morning, you have summed it up well, a chilly start in dumfries and galloway. compared with yesterday, nowhere near as wet or as windy as it was. still a bit of a breeze adding to the chill this morning, and recent in the northern half of the country have been down in single figures vary widely. a chillier commute but that is tempered by the breeze. strongest along the eastern coast and down towards the
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south—west at the moment but nowhere near the level they were during the evening commute yesterday. we have some rain around, showers in the west, especially across parts of scotland. longer spells of rain and drizzle for a time, pushing its way eastwards before brightening up in the afternoon. northern ireland brightens up into the afternoon, but the north midlands turning cloudier. some rain and drizzle here and there as well. but most places will spend the day dry. temperatures range from around 11 in lerwick to 19 in london, a warmer day in scotland and northern ireland compared with yesterday. still feeling chilly for those heading to old trafford and while there will be a lot of dry weather today, some rain possible during the afternoon. still quite breezy, although thankfully the winds nowhere near as strong as those yesterday. as we go through into tonight, the breeze picks up again. western scotland, northern ireland and outbreaks of rain in northern ireland overnight. by the time we had to tomorrow morning's admit it will be across northern england and north wales. further south, dry through the night and here we will see the coolest conditions into the morning. east anglia and the south—east chilly start. not quite as cold, ran across northern england and north wales and that area of thicker cloud, rain and drizzle pushing into southern england as we head towards friday afternoon in the end of the working
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week. it does mean a mixture of sunshine and a few showers around four scotland, northern ireland and northern england during the day. still a little bit on the breezy side and certainly on the cool side, with temperatures 12 to 18 degrees. we should be around 16, 17, 20 or 21 at this time of year. as we head towards the weekend, i am sure some of you have your highs on the prize already and is heading its way in. an area of high pressure, good news for those with outdoor plants. low pressure on saturday so the eastern coast of england and eastern scotla nd coast of england and eastern scotland will be quite windy and quite cool. a few showers in east anglia and the south—east, one or two isolated ones, but the vast majority will be dry with sunny spells. 13 to 15 down those eastern coast, so a chillier day. warmer in the west where the sun shines out but after a cold start to sunday, a fine day for just about all. most places dry, sunny spells in the morning, a bit more cloud into the afternoon. especially across western scotla nd afternoon. especially across western scotland and northern ireland, and temperatures up a little bit on
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saturday's values for many. overall, the weekend looking largely dry. thank you very much indeed. you can see that wind is picking up in westminster. so a quick election has been rejected for the time being. labour have said they want a guarantee that no—deal is off the table before they commit. but what do the liberal democrats think? leaderjo swinson is with us now. where are you compared with yesterday? yesterday was a positive day. the liberal democrats want to stop brexit altogether so stopping no deal brexit is an essential part of that. we have this bill which will require, if the government are unable to get a brexit deal through the house of commons, obviously we have the eu council plans for the middle of next month. if they are unable to get a brexit deal through the commons after that, they should ask for an extension of article 50. i would argue that the purpose of that should be for holding people's
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vote, so that the public and have the final say on a specific brexit deal, and that should have the option to remain in the european union. where do you stand on a general election? so i think people's vote is a better way to resolve the brexit issue, because it is very clear. it will be just about that one issue, and obviously general elections are always about a variety of different issues. but i clearly have no... we do not think borisjohnson is a fit person to be prime minister, and so i am very much looking forward to taking him on in much looking forward to taking him onina much looking forward to taking him on in a general election, whenever that happens. and it might be sooner, it might be later. and we understand that there may be another vote as early as monday, possibly, on whether or not there will be a general election. you will vote for it next time? i think mps need to make sure we vote really responsibly. as a liberal democrat we have reason to think we would
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have a good result in an election that came. this shouldn't be about the conservative or labor party interests, it should be about the national interest. and having a general election with the threat of crashing out of the eu, either in the middle of it or in the immediate aftermath, i think is something that would be irresponsible. so we need to re m ove would be irresponsible. so we need to remove that threat, we need to make sure we have secured an extension to article 50 so that if we hold an election we are doing so ina calm we hold an election we are doing so in a calm and orderly way, and in a way that doesn't mean that people in the country need to be anxious or worried. so it is a yes, but if... if there is an extension of article 50, yes. and doesn't have to have a date and become law, or does it have to go to the eu? so if there is an extension of article 50. so it is after he goes to the eu and is successful. we are in a situation with a prime minister who has he will shut down parliament, that they might not obey the rule of law. and, you know, iwouldn't might not obey the rule of law. and, you know, i wouldn't put anything past him. he has got friends and
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governments in the eu. could he ask one of them to block an extension? therefore there is a lot of risk attached to any course of action, and we need to be certain. we cannot risk accidentally crashing out without a deal. it is a bit rich, some people will say, for you to sit here and say borisjohnson is ignoring democracy, because there was a huge democratic vote, a referendum, where people voted to leave. you are the liberal democrats, but the charges you take democracy when you like it and ignore it when you don't. we have been very clear about our belief that our place is best in the european union, that that is what is best for the united kingdom. and we stood on that platform very straightforwardly. that's how we got elected, and tens of thousands of people arejoining a elected, and tens of thousands of people are joining a party, elected, and tens of thousands of people arejoining a party, and that isa people arejoining a party, and that is a position shared by millions of people across the country. it is important that remainers in this country have a voice and the liberal democrats are the strongest party that remain. the difficulty about
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the point you raise is i don't think despite the vote in 2016, there is no majority for any specific exit path, and i don't see how it would be responsible to go ahead with any specific path, whether that is no—deal or theresa may's deal, if we cannot be certain that that is what the country wants us to do. and briefly, phillip lee has crossed over to the liberal democrats. are you talking to other mps? over to the liberal democrats. are you talking to other mp5?” over to the liberal democrats. are you talking to other mps? i am talking to mps from all parties and more people arejoining talking to mps from all parties and more people are joining the talking to mps from all parties and more people arejoining the liberal democrats. that is happening right across the country and in parliament as well. thank you for your time on bbc breakfast. we will have all the headlines bring you up—to—date with what has been happening behind those windows and walls overnight. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. crime on the railway network has risen by more than 12% over the past year according to figures from the british transport police. the highest number of crimes were recorded in an area which includes north london. the two areas covering london and the south—east showed the biggest rise in theft of passenger and railway property. btp says that despite the increase, when put into context, the chances of becoming a victim of crime is still very low. a family from luton whose five—year—old son has a rare disease is fundraising to pay for gene therapy in poland. huzaifah zia is one of only six children diagnosed with aadc deficiency in the uk. his family want him to go abroad to have pioneering treatment, which is still at the research stage. the treatment is not available on the nhs. we wa nt we want our son to get better, to be able to do things like a normal child would do. two it would be the
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best thing ever. it is the only thing we can, as parents, as a family, hope for, for him to go to poland to get this done. a school in south—west london has teamed up with a theatre company to prevent drama from being squeezed out of the school curriculum. nationally, the number of students taking the subject at gcse has fallen by 19%, and 21% at a—level since 2014. but, to broaden the curriculum, one school in twickenham teams up with the orange tree theatre in richmond. let's take a look at the travel situation now. a few problems on the tubes. the metropolitan line has severe delays from uxbridge to aldgate due to signal problems. the victoria line has severe delays, and the overground has minor delays between gospel oak and barking. onto the roads. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. and heading towards paddington station, praed street is closed between spring street and norfolk place for crossrail and electricity works, with nine bus routes on diversion.
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now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a cooler start to the day than we saw this time yesterday. we've still got that rather chilly north—westerly breeze blowing, but there will be a lot of sunshine around too, and we'll stay dry for most of the day. but there are some showers just for a very short while this morning, tracking down on that north—westerly breeze. you might well catch one of those. the early cloud will thin and break. we'll see a lot of sunshine around, a little bit more cloud here and there as we head towards the end of the day, but generally a sunny day. you have to factor in a bit of wind chill as well, though, into these temperatures, which are lower than they were yesterday, between 16 and 19 degrees celsius by end of the afternoon. now, through this evening and overnight, we'll see clear skies, i think, for much of the time. a bit more cloud developing into tomorrow morning, but temperatures will slip back into single figures, so it will be quite a chilly night ahead. now, on friday, it'll feel perhaps just a touch warmer.
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a lot of cloud around, and there'll be some outbreaks of rain at times too. but it does look mostly dry through the course of the weekend, with some sunshine, but a cool northerly breeze. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and jon kay, live in westminster. it will turn out to be a beautiful day but how clear it is on brexit, we will find out for you. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the bill designed to stop a no—deal brexit could become law on monday after a late night pact between the government and labour in the house of lords. jeremy corbyn rejected borisjohnson's plea for a snap election — saying they will only agree to go to the country once the legislation has been passed. it's expected to complete its passage through the lords by the end of tomorrow. meanwhile the chancellor sajid javid
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has defended the decision to expel 21 rebel conservative mps. the group voted against the government in a bid to block a no deal brexit and immediately had the party whip removed. iam sad i am sad to see 21 colleagues, 21 conservatives no longer carrying the conservative whip but of course i am. these are my friends and good people but they also knew that when the prime minister of the day says a vote is a matter of confidence, what the consequence of opposing that would be. and there is an understanding of that. this is not something i want to see but we do need to step back and think about how do we deliver on the central mission to leave the eu by october 31 and continue to govern this country in a way that people are feeling their priorities are being met. and we will talk to one of those conservative mps here on
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brea kfast those conservative mps here on breakfast in a few minutes. the prime minister says he is trying ha rd to prime minister says he is trying hard to get a new deal. but the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, is reported to have told european diplomats that negotiations with the uk are in a state of paralysis. he's believed to have made the remarks after 4—hour talks with borisjohnson's europe adviser david frost in brussels yesterday. the prime minister has repeatedly claimed that progress is being made in renegotiating elements of the withdrawal agreement. 20 people are now known to have died after hurricane dorian devastated parts of the bahamas. aid agencies suggest more than 75000 people need urgent food, water and shelter. forecasters have warned it could make landfall in the united states on the coast of south or north carolina today. ryanair pilots have voted for seven more days of strikes later this month — in a row about pay and conditions. their union, balpa, says it wanted to settle the dispute, but claims the airline has refused to take part in mediation. rya nair has described
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the walkouts as "pointless". the number of crimes recorded on britain's railways is on the rise. there were more than 68,000 incidents reported last year, up 12% on the year before. violent crimes and sexual offences both increased. british transport police says serious violence and knife crime is one of its key priorities. brexit may divide the country and politics here like nothing else. apart from the existence of the loch ness monster. the existence of the loch ness monster ‘remains plausible‘ according to scientists. a team has carried out dna tests in the water, compiling a detailed list of everything that lives there. they say their research has ruled out most theories about nessie, but leave one possibility, and they‘ll give more information later this morning. and that is without question. they arejust going to and that is without question. they are just going to leave us hanging. that would be an amazing story, that
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the loch ness monster may exist. it is 735. coming up on the programme matt will have the weather. but right now, let‘s go find out about the sport. yes. steve smith has been blowing england out of the water. the first day of the fourth ashes test was all about the wind, the rain. . .and almost inevitably steve smith. the australia batsman stayed firm as others were virtually blown off their feet in some really autumnal conditions at old trafford, and that has given his side the advantage. as andy swiss reports. get your ben stokes scarves! now £8 only on the scarves! talk about a tough act to follow — ben stokes scarves and even jack leach costumes, a happy reminder of england‘s heroic win at headingley. surely old trafford couldn‘t match that drama. well, briefly, it tried its best, as stuart broad set about ramping up the decibels, australia soon 28—2 as england started in style. but then a familiar obstacle.
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steve smith missed the last test after being hit by a jofra archer bouncer. welcome back. but soon smith was calling the shots. that‘s why he‘s the world number one batsman. only the weather, seemingly, could stop him, a lengthy rain delay followed by a few wind—powered problems. beach balls, crisp packets, even the bails kept blowing off. australia, though, seemed unruffled, as smith and marnus labuschagne reached half centuries before, finally, england finally found the breakthrough. labuschagne bowled by craig 0verton. smith, though, was still there for 60 at the close, once again australia‘s rock. a testing day, then, for england and they still face a familiar question — how do they get get out steve smith? andy swiss, bbc news, old trafford. and later we will stalk to alistair cooke. that is after 8.30 and maybe he will have the answer.
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to new york next, where in the last hour rafael nadal has made it through to the semi—finals of the us open. (00v)he beat diego swartzman in straight sets. he beat diego schwartzman in straight sets. remember both roger federer and novak djokovic are already out, so it looks like it‘s opening up for nadal to win his 19th grand slam title leaving him just one short of federer‘s record. he plays the italian matteo berrettini in the last four. also opened up in the womens‘s draw, here‘s bianca andreescu the canadian teenager at the bottom of your screen booking her place in the last four, she beat elise mertens. she‘s only 19, but has won two titles this year, she‘s up to 15th in the world rankings and into herfirst grand slam semi final. jamie murray meanwhile had a busy day at flushing meadows. first he qualified for the semi—finals of the men‘s doubles with british partner neil skupski, then he went one better in the mixed doubles, reching the final alongside the american bethany mattick sands.
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there have been some unusual routes to the top of football, tyrone mings can attest to that. the aston villa defender lived in a homeless shelter as a child, and worked as a mortgage broker before breaking through as a footballer. he could make his england debut in the next few days as they play a couple of euro 2020 qualifiers. i cannot say that while i sat at my desk cold—calling or trying to help people remortgage, that playing for england was an achievable goal. but as i have worked with some great coaches and been able to play for some great clubs everything has come together to get me to this point. at different times i have had to reassess goals, because of injuries and the like, but it makes it almost sweeter to be sitting here right now. and seven members of the england squad who reached the semi—finals of the women‘s world
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cup are in the running to be named in the fifa team of the year. amongst them is lucy bronze — the recent winner of the uefa player of the year award. and the man who beat anthonyjoshua to take his world titles says he wants more than "15 minutes of fame". andy ruinunior caused one of the biggest upsets in the history of boxing when he beat joshua in june. the pair have been in saudi arabia, where they‘ll have their rematch in december. i feel that once you walk a tightrope once and you cross the bridge and you walk it again and stumble you have two options. to fail walking on it again or to backup your ideas and try a second time. i going for the titles again. there is always an option to take some time and continually ask for warmup fights but i want to swim in the deep end.
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a big fight to come. and it will be fascinating to hear from the former england test captain, alistair cooke, whojoins us herejust after 8.30. maybe he knows how to bowl out steve smith. but for now, let‘s head back to westminster. we are joined but for now, let‘s head back to westminster. we arejoined by but for now, let‘s head back to westminster. we are joined by a couple of mps and we were just discussing the cricket because that seems to be a useful distraction this morning. over the past two days the conservatives have lost their working majority and expelled 21 mps. it‘s a party divided to put it mildly. one of those to lose the party whip was winston churchill‘s grandson sir nicholas soames. mr speaker, i mrspeaker, iam mr speaker, iam not mr speaker, i am not standing at the next election and i am thus approaching the end of 37 years service to this house of which i have been proud and honoured beyond words to be a member of. i am surely very sad that it should end in this
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way and it is my most fervent hope that this house will rediscover the spirit of compromise, humility and understanding that will enable us finally to push ahead with the vital work in the interest of the whole country that is inevitably had to be sadly neglected way we have devoted time to wrestling with brexit. with us are andrew bridgen, who‘s a tory mp, and ed vaizey, who‘s not. he was one of the 21 who were effectively fired for voting against the government thank you very much forjoining us. so, ed. how did you know that this would happen? how were you told? i picked it up on twitter and a few news bulletins that that this was the threat the government was making. we had a meeting with the prime minister on the morning of the vote where he sort of did not quite say it in explicit words but he said it seemed incompatible to take the tory whip and not vote with the government and then i was told just
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before the vote and i got a text afterwards. and how do you feel about it? on the night i felt a sense of liberation. i felt i about it? on the night i felt a sense of liberation. ifelt i had done the right thing and getting fired made me feel better. in a strange and bizarre way. yesterday i felt pretty. relatively relaxed about it but very much wanting the tory whip back. today i feel a mounting sense of anger and now you wonder why someone like kenneth clark, who has served for 50 years, has been expelled. we had to put up with nine members of the cabinet voting against the government ‘s flagship policy when theresa may was prime minister and the leader of the house of commons who lay down on the front benches because he was so bored hearing independent mps speak. he voted 100 times against the government but is now a fated and honoured member of the government. andrew, are you sorry to see ed go?
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lam. andrew, are you sorry to see ed go? iam.| andrew, are you sorry to see ed go? lam. lam andrew, are you sorry to see ed go? i am. i am sorry they voted against the government and lost the web but there is a huge difference. i voted against the government on issues like the referendum and hs two, the withdrawal agreement. but the difference between voting on a policy and voting to take where the government '5 ability to legislate on handing it to the opposition and thatis on handing it to the opposition and that is the crucial difference. do you see that difference? of course not. in the great way is that you constructed constitutional principle to support your argument. andrew is an extremely independent minded mp and always has been since he came in and always has been since he came in and to his credit, unlike someone like me who has had no interest in moving up the party hierarchy and taking ministerialjobs. moving up the party hierarchy and taking ministerial jobs. he moving up the party hierarchy and taking ministerialjobs. he voted against the government numerous times under david cameron and so on and he has always kept the web because there has always been an understanding, particularly in a first past the post system, is that every political party is a broad church. andrew is now, for the first
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time in my life, actually, parroting a party line that i don‘t think he actually believes in because at the moment he‘s going are in the cabinet. i think what is clear is, although we now have a prime minister in borisjohnson who is we now have a prime minister in boris johnson who is determined to get us out of the european union, it hasn't changed the arithmetic in the house behind us, which is overwhelmingly packed out with remain supporting mps, and i expect we will be fighting the rabble that is now the labour party, the nationalist, the lib dems, and everyone else. unfortunately we have ended up fighting 21 of our own mps, and that is why we are in the constitutional mess we're in now. the remaining mps who are tories, there is a letter from dozens of them saying the decision to kick out people like ed was wrong in principle and bad practical politics. apparently borisjohnson has been told by senior cabinet misters it was just the wrong thing
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to do, and he will try and change it —— cabinet ministers. is there any chance of them being back in the fold before long? it depends if they will vote with the government on our key policy, getting out of the european union on 31 october. it is probably a little bit late for that now. i think it is a really reg retta ble now. i think it is a really regrettable situation. i am losing some good friends at the moment. i think we are heading to a general election, and the sad thing is that anyone will not be able to stand because they don‘t have the weapon. how damaging is that going into a general election? from where we are sitting, your party looks deeply divided. it is deeply divided. i think the election strategy is very clear. borisjohnson has a good chance of defeating jeremy corbyn. he isa chance of defeating jeremy corbyn. he is a quantum leap better politician. but if they are going to when they have to pick up seats in the north of england, because a lot of traditional tory seats in the south of england, i think, will be under severe threat, especially some of the seats where mps have been expelled. and quickly, for me, because i am not entirely clear,
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when there is a general election, what happens to you exactly? technically if i haven't got the weapon i cannot run as a conservative candidate. anyone can stand for any constituency provided they get enough signatures and put up they get enough signatures and put upa they get enough signatures and put up a deposit. so would you run against the conservative party official candidate? i don't particularly wa nt official candidate? i don't particularly want to, there are huge ties that bind me to the conservative association, but there is this thing called the british sense of fair play where i have had thousands of e—mails of support from my constituents, and they would be pretty angry not to have the chance to vote. what do you think of that, that some of these 21 mps might be standing against other conservative candidates? that is not going to help the conservative cause, and i think all of the 21 will agree that the biggest threat to our country is not brexit, hard brexit, orany form of brexit, it isjeremy corbyn and his hard left marxist government. they stand against conservative candidates and make his election
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much more likely. i think this lack of discipline, the rot set in under theresa may. when you voted against the withdrawal agreement.” theresa may. when you voted against the withdrawal agreement. i never voted to give the power to legislate to the opposition. we sort of tore our hairout, i to the opposition. we sort of tore our hair out, i am a remainer, we thought we would be out now. our hair out, i am a remainer, we thought we would be out nowm our hair out, i am a remainer, we thought we would be out now. if they had been a withdrawal agreement, i would have voted for it. he never lost the web for voting for what he perceived to be his principles. i have lost the web for voting what i believe are my principles. i want the country to leave the european union. cricket, what is going to happen? 21-0. 52-48. thank you very much indeed. we will speak to you over the next few weeks and months. we will get the weather from matt, not just for the uk, we will get the weather from matt, notjust for the uk, but dramatic weather events on the other side of
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the atlantic. certainly are, now that hurricane dorian has cleared away from the bahamas, we have seen the horror of what has been left behind. it has re— strengthened in the last few hours, still offshore around this well—defined eye, winds over 115 mph. but the biggest issue over 115 mph. but the biggest issue over the coming hours parts of florida, the carolinas, torrential rain, may be as much as 400 millimetres, and a storm surge about eight foot above where it normally would be. and that centre of the storm where the destructive winds are could make landfall again tomorrow across somewhere around the carolina coast. this story is not done yet. it will put its way northwards, weakening into a category 1, where it could approach the canadian maritimes. remnants could pass the north of the uk next week but bringing us nothing like the weather we have seen. much more like something we saw yesterday, a bit of wind, a bit of rain, but nothing untoward for the time of year. out there today, we are
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starting in the uk on a brighter note that many started yesterday. lots of sunshine around and it will be nowhere near as windy or as wet as yesterday. fewer showers around, winds continuing to ease down. a bit on the cooler side, we saw that with john and louise in westminster this morning. temperatures still in single figures, just above in the south but the breeze making feel cooler. the wind down across coasts in the south—west. those winds nowhere near as strong as yesterday. outbreaks of rain into the west of scotland, some rain and drizzle in northern ireland. that rain and drizzle bushes eastwards across scotla nd drizzle bushes eastwards across scotland through the morning, becoming confined towards shetland during the afternoon. the north midlands and north wales will turn cloudy and here there could be some rain and drizzle at times. by and large, most places spending the bulk of the day dry, the best of the sunshine in the afternoon in the south and northern ireland. temperature is still down a touch on yesterday, and if you are in the stands at old trafford for the second day of the ashes, it will
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still feel cool and blustery. not as windy as yesterday, but while most of the time it will be dry, during the afternoon there will be some interruptions from a few showers here and there. as we go into tonight, rain returning to scotland and northern ireland, and some blustery winds. that ran by the end of tonight into tomorrow morning‘s rush hour will beer across northern england and north wales. it keeps the temperatures up compared to last night. east anglia and the south—east into tomorrow will start dry and bright. through the day, rain to start within northern england and north wales. rain and drizzle pushing its way southwards during the midlands, wales through the morning. it means the northern half of the uk tomorrow afternoon reasonably bright and breezy, with a few showers here and there. a bit of sunshine as well, still feeling a little in the cool side. as we had was the weekend, i on the prize for this area of high pressure starting to nudge its way in allsup saturday that area of low pressure is still closed eastern coast. it will be quite windy, a few showers in east
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anglia and the south—east. one or two showers further west. a little bit on the cool side, most places dry, but nice in the sun. and that will be the case again on sunday, with most places staying dry. will be the case again on sunday, with most places staying drym will be the case again on sunday, with most places staying dry. it is one of my favourite kinds of days, and even though we are a little bit chilly, it is one of those sharp blue days. the sun is coming out and it is rather lovely. and it is rather cold, for now. it has changed the lives of so many people, and now the tv programme diy sos is celebrating its 20th anniversary. we have managed to squeeze the red sofa into their latest build, and jayne mccubbin is there. good morning. good morning to you. good morning. good morning to you. good morning, everybody. the first trade is a down here, and we have squeezed the red sofa into the big build —— first tradies. we will talk about the legacy of this amazing... get to work, you lot. the clock is
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ticking, come on. we will talk about the legacy of this programme in the next hour. but first i want to talk about why we are here in saint silas church in blackburn. each of these units in front of us are going to be turned into little mezzanine rooms, home from home, for young people who have found themselves without a home. it is the children in need big build project. let me bring in the reverend. good morning. hamish, the producer on diy sos, just described you as a hero to me. no, it is a tea m you as a hero to me. no, it is a team effort. may be so, but tell me how it started. it was very simple. we wanted this building to be a blessing on our community, and the one thing we kept coming back to was whenjesus said one thing we kept coming back to was when jesus said if you one thing we kept coming back to was whenjesus said if you have one thing we kept coming back to was when jesus said if you have two cloa ks, when jesus said if you have two cloaks, pass one over to someone that hasn't got one. and that is
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essentially what we have done. we have ta ken essentially what we have done. we have taken this building, it was being used but it wasn't really connecting with the local community. we knew there was a massive homeless problem in blackburn, particularly amongst young people, and we knew a few of these people and said and you make use of this building? you got the call from the diy sos... you must have felt like you had won the lottery. let‘s come and meet the team, and mr nick knowles. good morning, everybody. nick, first of all, let me start with you before a chat to jan and simon. there are a million projects you can do. why this one? because it is about young people, it is about kids who are homeless. it is a fantastic charity we are working with, and they believe there are up to 40 to 50 young people sleeping rough or
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homeless in this one area. you multiply that across the country, we are talking about hundreds of thousands of young people who actually don't have somewhere to sleep tonight. and we are talking 16-25 sleep tonight. and we are talking 16—25 —year—olds. it is utterly ridiculous. if we can bring the community and the greater immunity together to work together, and in this house we are working together, to build something, it helps the charity and it helps young people like simon. and simon, you are here today because you are one of the plasterers here, but you have been helped, haven‘t you? plasterers here, but you have been helped, haven't you ?” plasterers here, but you have been helped, haven't you? iwas plasterers here, but you have been helped, haven't you? i was 60 and having a few problems at home, so i was introduced to night safe, and i used to visit the drop—in centre, and stuff like that —— nightsafe. without nightsafe, what do you think
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would have happened? on the streets alone, at 16. jan, you are the ceo of the charity. give me a sense of some of the heartbreaking stories that you here. yes, we are so delighted that simon is where he is out today, but some of the young people we work with have come from... the vast majority have come from... the vast majority have come from family breakdown, and they are really struggling when they present with us at nightsafe. they are in a crisis. so what we are able to do is just help them, and it is amazing. amis, the producer, told me about one boy who came to you and said i need some salt. why? —— hamish. one boy who came to you and said i need some salt. why? -- hamish. he was a street homeless, and we had helped him do all sorts of things, and that night he said i need a tub of salt, and it stayed with me forever, because what he needed the ta blet forever, because what he needed the tablet for was to draw a ring of salt around his sleeping bag, because he was sleeping under a canal bridge. to stop slugs getting onto him. it is heartbreaking. nick,
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you need something today. we need plastere rs, you need something today. we need plasterers, we need carpenters, we need general builders. if you can do that, we need floor layers, if you can do that, come down and join us. 20 years we have been doing this, and we're up it again. people think we do that to wind people up, we genuinely need them now. there is more from us in the next hour, hopefully some volunteers as well. first the news, travel and weather where you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london, i‘m victoria hollins. crime on the railway network has risen by more than 12% over the past year according to figures from the british transport police. the highest number of crimes were recorded in an area which includes north london. the two areas covering london and the south—east showed the biggest rise in theft of passenger and railway property. btp says that despite the increase, when put into context, the chances of becoming a victim
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of crime is still very low. a family from luton whose five—year—old son has a rare disease is fundraising to pay for gene therapy in poland. huzaifah zia is one of only six children diagnosed with aadc deficiency in the uk. his family want him to go abroad to have pioneering treatment which is still at the research stage. the treatment is not available on the nhs. we want our son to get better, to be able to do things like a normal child would do. it would be the best thing ever. it's the only thing we can as parents, as a family, hope for, for him to go to poland to get this done. a school in south—west london has teamed up with a theatre company to prevent drama from being squeezed out of the school curriculum. nationally, the number of students taking the subject at gcse has fallen by 19%, and 21% at a—level, since 2014. but to broaden the curriculum, one school in twickenham is teaming up with the orange tree
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theatre in richmond. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. a few problems on the tubes. the metropolitan line has severe delays from uxbridge to harrow on the hill due to signal problems. the victoria line also has severe delays. onto the roads. westbound traffic on the highway is slow into tower hill, not helped by the roadworks to the south of tower bridge. and in swiss cottage, the a41 finchley road is closed southbound from adelaide road to stjohn‘s wood tube station, following a burst watermain overnight near queens grove. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it‘s a cooler start to the day than we saw this time yesterday. we‘ve still got that rather chilly north—westerly breeze blowing, but there will be a lot of sunshine around too, and we‘ll stay dry for most of the day. but there are some showers just for a very short while this morning, tracking down on that north—westerly breeze. you might well catch one of those. the early cloud will thin and break. we‘ll see a lot of sunshine around, a little bit more cloud here and there as we head
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towards the end of the day, but generally a sunny day. you have to factor in a bit of wind chill as well, though, into these temperatures, which are lower than they were yesterday, between 16 and 19 degrees celsius by end of the afternoon. now, through this evening and overnight, we‘ll see clear skies, i think, for much of the time. a bit more cloud developing into tomorrow morning, but temperatures will slip back into single figures, so it will be quite a chilly night ahead. now, on friday, it‘ll feel perhaps just a touch warmer. a lot of cloud around, and there‘ll be some outbreaks of rain at times too. but it does look mostly dry through the course of the weekend, with some sunshine, but a cool northerly breeze. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning.
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welcome to bbc breakfast, withjon kay and louise minchin. our headlines today: just after eight o‘clock. a late—night pact between the government and labour to ensure the bill to block a no—deal brexit goes through parliament. it comes after another humiliating defeat in the house of commons for the prime minister, when mps rejected his calls for a general election. it‘s a story that‘s changing rapidly. we‘ll ask the key players how this affects the october brexit deadline, what it means for borisjohnson, and whether or when there‘ll be a snap general election. elsewhere, hurricane dorian is strengthening and expected to bring a deadly storm surge to the american east coast, after causing devastation in the bahamas. more on dorian as it becomes a major category three storm. the carolinas are in its firing pattern. in the
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uk, it is looking drier and brighter and less windy than yesterday. i will have all the details. the weather gets in the way of the first day of the fourth ashes test. but not even a stray beach ball could stop steve smith, as he helps australia into a strong start at old trafford. look who is here! we brought the bbc brea kfast look who is here! we brought the bbc breakfast red sofa into the heart of the latest diy sos big build as you celebrate the 20th anniversary. exactly, 20 years! it has been a great 20 years! good morning. it‘s thursday, 5th september. our top story. another night of high drama here in westminster. that bill designed to stop a no—deal brexit could become law on monday after a late—night pact between the government and labour in the house of lords. but before that, jeremy corbyn
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rejected borisjohnson‘s plea for a snap election, saying they will only agree to one once the legislation has been passed. our political correspondent, chris mason, reports. four parliamentary votes as prime minister and four defeats. ayes to the right, 298. noes to the left, 56. the latest last night, blocking his attempt to hold a general election on october 15th. borisjohnson argued it was needed because opposition parties had scuppered negotiations by trying to stop a no—deal brexit. the house has voted repeatedly to leave the eu and, yet, it has also voted repeatedly to delay actually leaving. it has voted for negotiations and today, i am afraid, it has voted to stop, to scupper any serious negotiations.
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labour and the scottish national party abstained. jeremy corbyn argued it‘s too soon, and living without a deal should be ruled out first. the offer of the election today is a bit like offering an apple to snow white and the wicked queen because what he offers is not an apple or even an election, but the poison of a no—deal. so, mr speaker, i repeat... i repeat what i said last night. let this bill pass and gain royal assent, then we will support an election, so we do not crash out with a no—deal exit from the eu. meanwhile, in the house of lords, they prepared for a very long night. vote after vote well into the small hours. but then, at 20 past one this morning, an agreement. the lords will finish its scrutiny of this planned new law by tomorrow night.
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so, no—deal not quite ruled out yet. no election called this time around. but make no mistake, one is coming, and soon. we will pick up your thoughts about times on the general election in a moment. chris is here now. and we understand the prime minister will make a speech today. downing street has said in the last 50 minutes we will hear from boris johnson later, we don‘t quite know where and when. we will see the dividing lines of the general election that will come sooner rather than later, we don‘t quite know the date yet. so what is he going to say? elect me as prime minister and you know what i am going to deliver, i will deliver brexit and i will go to the summit in brussels next month and secure brexit with a deal with out a deal and if you getjeremy corbyn, in his view, there will be dither and delay and no resolution. the argument you would hear from the
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and no resolution. the argument you would hearfrom the leader of and no resolution. the argument you would hear from the leader of the opposition is a no—deal brexit is incredibly dangerous and he as prime minister would ensure that will not happen, and his argument is he would get a better deal. whether that would be easy huge question around that, but that is the key dividing line in the selection that is coming at some stage. when we see boris johnson at that podium today and he is looking prime ministerial, is he really still in charge of events? is control right now? no, he isn't. crucially, that is the insight we should remember in the context of all of this. nobody is quite in control. every individual player will tell you what they want to happen, but that doesn‘t mean it is what will happen. the argument from borisjohnson is that is why an election is needed, because there is good luck in there and his argument, there is a division between what people in their think around brexit and what people in the country think. there is now a really intense
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battle about the timing of the general election. why is there such a battle? because the timing could influence the outcome. there is a tussle because of that like of power at the centre over when that election happens. let's rewind, it is almost breathless here. yesterday, mps voted against having a general election and that is because of concern over timings. yes, it is topsy—turvy, you think opposition party, surely they want to govern and they want a general election? everything is so confused that the moment and that is not what happened at the moment. the government that is weak wanted an election, the opposition that hopes to win said no. why did they do that? because they say they want to be set in a no—deal brexit cannot happen at the end of next month. some say they would be happy to be certain once this bill has become the law of the land. others say that is not good enough because if the conservatives were to win an election, they could overturn that act and still have a no—deal brexit. so some are saying perhaps you delay the election till november. the key
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battle now is over the timing of the election. and we will speak to john mcdonnell in the next half an hour on bbc breakfast so at least we will get his point of view because it may differ to other members of his party. absolutely, there are divisions within the party and right at the top of the party, so his a nswer to at the top of the party, so his answer to your question about when the election should be will be fascinating. ok, chris, see you later. new line so many conversations going on in that building between parties, within parties, between former members of parties, between former members of parties trying to sort that out. we are trying to get to the nub of it this morning for you. on the other side of the channel is the other pa rt side of the channel is the other part of this conundrum, how are the eu handling this? the eu‘s chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, is reported to have told european diplomats that negotiations with the uk are in a state of paralysis. he‘s believed to have made the remarks after four—hour talks with borisjohnson‘s europe adviser, david frost, in brussels yesterday. the prime minister has repeatedly claimed that progress is being made in renegotiating elements
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of the withdrawal agreement. you are watching breakfast at let‘s get you up today on the other news as well. hurricane dorian is expected to bring a deadly storm surge up the east coast of the united states today, after causing destruction and at least 20 deaths in the bahamas. one of the worst—hit regions, the abaco islands, have been devastated, with roofs coming off hundreds of buildings. david willis reports. along the eastern seaboard, they are battening down the hatches. dorian is on a collision course with the carolinas and people are being urged to leave. our message today is, if you are still in an evacuation zone, you still have time to get out. but time to get out is running out, because once wind speeds get up to about 40 or 45 miles an hour, the emergency crews will not be able to come in and get you. oh, my god! in its wake, dorian left
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a tropical paradise in ruins. the abaco islands of the northern bahamas were torn apart — homes flattened, entire communities submerged by one of the most powerful atlantic storms on record. relief officials are gearing up for a major humanitarian disaster. as the floodwaters recede, the death toll is expected to grow. with the city of charleston, south carolina, now in its path, dorian is expected to bring with it winds of around 120 miles an hour, and a ten—foot storm surge that could lead to catastrophic flooding. david willis, bbc news, washington. ryanair pilots have voted for seven more days of strikes later this month — in a row about pay and conditions.
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their union, balpa, says it wants to settle the dispute, but claims the airline has refused to take part in mediation. ryanair has described those walkouts as "pointless". the number of crimes recorded on britain‘s railways is on the rise. there were more than 68,000 incidents reported last year, up 12% on the year before. violent crimes and sexual offences both increased. british transport police says serious violence and knife crime is one of its key priorities. as well as brexit and what happens next, we are addressing the mystery of something else this morning. a theory on the existence of the loch ness monster "remains plausible", according to scientists. teams have carried out a dna investigation in the water and are due to unveil theirfindings later this morning. our reporter, iain macinnes, has been down to the edge of the waters. it‘s a mystery which endures — just what exactly lies beneath the murky waters of loch ness?
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and that's what you actually saw? yes. how big was it? from here to the tail, oh, as big as a bus. the sightings of nessie stretch back hundreds of years but, as yet, no definitive explanation has been found. a team of scientists led by new zealand‘s 0tago university has been testing water samples and collecting environmental dna from all forms of life in the loch, including plants, fish and mammals. you basically take a litre or two of water and you filter it out, and in the stuff that‘s filtered out will be dna. and using that dna, you can then sequence it, and on the basis of the sequence, identify types of organisms that are present in the water. the scientists say their research discounts most theories, but details of one which they claim remains plausible will be revealed later, as the search for nessie goes on. we have to wait for that until later this morning.
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but we have other things to entertain you with or entreat you with in the meantime. because on the edge of the banks of the river thames, we are looking for not nessie, but answers this morning about what will happen next with brexit. let‘s talk about this. despitejeremy corbyn saying he wanted a general election, last night, the labour party decided against the idea. the prime minister accused the opposition of "running scared". i know he is worried about free trade deals with america. but there‘s only one chlorinated chicken that i can see in this house and he‘s on that bench! will he confirm again... will he confirm... will he confirm that he will let the people decide on what he is doing to this country‘s negotiating position, by having a general election on october 15th? that was the prime minister. let‘s find out why labour rejected the chance of a snap election with the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell.
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and you will be very familiar, you will have been there when the prime minister cold jeremy corbyn chicken can make your response? it is a bit demeaning of the prime minister. he sort of modelled himself on trump so we expected that sort of language. anyway, let me give you with the reality of what happened last night. he brought forward the legislation under the fixed—term parliaments act. i am sorry if this is a bit complicated. no, we are trying to get clarity today. he brought it forward and on that, the problem we have got to come if we voted for it, he then has the power to choose the date. and that means he could for example, what people are worried about, he could for example even push that general election beyond october 31st. we could be in a situation where he bounces us into a no—deal brexit. situation where he bounces us into a no-deal brexit. the black toe might be confused and they see your leader and yourself calling for an election. we are up for it. you vote against it, it is about times. we are upfora against it, it is about times. we are up for a general election, i
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wa nt to are up for a general election, i want to get rid of this government as soon as possible because i am really worried about what they are doing to the future of our economy and country but it is about timings and country but it is about timings and there are prime objectives. in our last manifesto, we said we wa nted our last manifesto, we said we wanted to prevent a no—deal brexit because of the damage it could do to the country and the economy. give us a time, when? this legislation going through to prevent a no—deal brexit, we will look at when that gets royal assent and consult the other opposition parties and our party itself and we are taking legal advice on this. how do we maximise our chances of preventing a no—deal? that could be for example, the prime minister says he wants to negotiate a deal with other european partners we have got. the economic council is coming up in may to mid—october. that could be around the time we wait for him to see what deal he has got. at the moment, the problem we haveis got. at the moment, the problem we have is he tells us he is negotiating a deal but european union has said, he has never put proposals to us. people watching
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this will say, labour have all the cards in the hands right now. you have been calling for an election for years. this is your moment. i ask you, when she won that election and you can‘t give us an answer! because we are doing what we have done until now to win, we have held the opposition parties together, our own party together. this prime minister has been defeated four times, he has not won a vote in parliament yet. why? we have been using the right strategy. now we are ina using the right strategy. now we are in a situation where we bring people with us and we maximise the date to protect against no—deal. with us and we maximise the date to protect against no-deal. that is what we will do. can we go back? you are being clear but i need to be clear for the are being clear but i need to be clearfor the audience as are being clear but i need to be clear for the audience as well. let‘s say for example it gets royal assent early next week, and that could happen, and the prime minister buts another motion down for a general election. we are looking to see whether we can amend that to get the date career in law, and we are taking legal advice about whether that will stick. the reason we are
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doing that is because we cannot and his own mps cannot trust boris johnson to stick to a date we have agreed on. you mention today, so give us a date, is it in october or november? in my view, later rather than sooner, so that could be late october. after the date? after october. after the date? after october 31st? possibly. one october. after the date? after october31st? possibly. one of october. after the date? after october 31st? possibly. one of the arguments that has been put forward as borisjohnson says he wants a deal, let‘s see what he gets at the european council because then people canjudge whether or european council because then people can judge whether or not the deal is satisfactory or not, or whether they do support no—deal. you can see the way the argument and sequencing is going. the most important thing for me and! going. the most important thing for me and i am the shadow chancellor, myjob is to look after the economy, i will not allow him to smash our economy with a no—deal. i will not allow him to smash our economy with a no-deal. that is extraordinary for you to be saying you want a general election later rather than sooner. no, you want a general election later ratherthan sooner. no, not you want a general election later rather than sooner. no, not at all. you will should want one as soon as
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you can possibly get it.” you will should want one as soon as you can possibly get it. i want one as soon as we can get it but i am trying to be the adult in a room. dealing with borisjohnson is like being an adult dealing with a toddler, i want this. we want a deal as well, but we want a general election that doesn‘t jeopardise as well, but we want a general election that doesn‘tjeopardise our economy. if i allowed borisjohnson to get away with a no—deal brexit, i would have constituents coming to meet in 12 months‘ time saying they had lost theirjobs. i am making sure we protect the economy. this is about putting the country before party interests. i desperately want a general election, but at a time when i have protected the economy overall. as it stands, and i know things are changing really fast, you talk about looking at it legally. if there were a vote on monday, you would vote against a general election again? i hope we will be in a situation where we can amend that legislation and secure a date that protects against a no—deal and gives the certainty of labour going into power. what you say to people who within your own party say that just doing this kicks it again into the
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long grass, why does delay make any difference? i people understand that if our prime objective is to prevent our economy being smashed by a no—deal, look after the national interest before you look after the party interest, so the first thing is to protect the country and then go for that election. that is the objectives and i think people understand that. you talk about your constituents coming up to you, there isa constituents coming up to you, there is a danger for you constituents coming up to you, there is a dangerfor you and labour they could be coming to you in a few weeks‘ time and say, you promised as an election. and i will be able to say to them, you will get that election on the state and we will go for it. but it might come too late in your terms. no, i don't think so. we are talking about a matter of weeks, additional weeks. we are talking about a matter of weeks, additionalweeks. every day counts, doesn‘t it, on your timetable? but every day camps to protect against a no—deal brexit. we have prevented borisjohnson, we are voting and defeating him time and time again, we are preventing him
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getting his way. why does he want a no—deal? the extreme right have taken over the no—deal? the extreme right have ta ken over the conservative no—deal? the extreme right have taken over the conservative party, it is disintegrating in front of us. he sat to church help us make rants on the other day. there is a group of them so extreme right —— he sacked winston churchill‘s nephew the other day. the only way he can get a deal with nigel farage is if he gets a no deal no—deal. —— no deal brexit. this is about the interests of borisjohnson‘s deal brexit. this is about the interests of boris johnson‘s faction of the conservative party, we are looking up to the country. john mcdonnell, thank you for your time and we will speak to you again and we will speak to nigel farage in the next 25 minutes. thank you. breaking news from westminster, it is getting a bit warmer, isn‘t it? new line of morning! bit of a breeze blowing across cornwall and a brighter start compared to yesterday. it is breezy but nowhere near as windy as we saw
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yesterday afternoon. but it is a little chilly. temperatures dropping well down into single figures across the northern half of the country. just above in the south. but a bit breezy down the eastern coast and towards wales and the south—west. most of you starting the day drake with cloud and outbreaks of rain in western scotland that pushes across scotland. very fragmented as it works east through the morning. damp weather initially in northern ireland and brightening up in the afternoon. northern england and north wales and north midlands could see rain or drizzle at at times in the afternoon. even that will not affect everyone, many places stay dry today. staying fairly sunny to the south and a bright and warm day in western scotland and northern ireland compared with yesterday. compared with yesterday, it at old trafford, not quite as windy. and most of the time is dry but there is a chance of interruptions this afternoon with rain and drizzle going through the area, so fingers crossed it won‘t last too long.
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tonight, scotland, northern ireland, more rain and more wind to take us through the night. by the end of the night into the morning‘s rush hour, northern england and wales get ready for morning rain. it won‘t be quite as chilly tonight in the northern half of the uk, slightly colder in east anglia and the south east where you start your friday morning dry and bright with sunshine. the rain in northern england and north wales, moving southwards into southern counties for lunchtime and beyond. many other places see sunshine in the afternoon, a scattering of showers here and there and a lot of dry weather. still feeling rather fresh in that breeze, temperatures 14 to 18 celsius for the most part. it should be around 16 or 21 degrees this time of year. we are down on what we should be and the cooler weather continues into the weekend. if you have outdoor plans, keep an eye on this area of high pressure, it isa eye on this area of high pressure, it is a sign of something drier over the weekend. it will take some time on saturday so showers across england and is, particularly east anglia and the south east. down
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these eastern counties, a stiff northerly wind that keeps temperatures pegged back at a chilly 13-15dc. in the temperatures pegged back at a chilly 13—15dc. in the west, dry and sunny spells, it will feel pleasantly warm. but as we go into the night, temperatures will drop. sunday, a fresh start, but most of you on sunday will have a guy and bright day with good long sunny spells. the breeze picks up in western scotland later. temperatures up a little bit for some of you compare to saturday. but overall, back in westminster, the weekend is looking dry, even if it isa the weekend is looking dry, even if it is a bit chilly at the moment. new line but the sun is shining and the skies are blue. it is clear and, i think. and we are trying to clear things up for you because so much is happening and every morning, we wake up with a brexit hangover. it is 23 minutes past eight. mps in that building voted against snap
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general election last night but everybody seems to agree it will not be long before the country goes to the polls. so, what sort of government are we likely to be left with afterwards? and what will happen with the timing? political analyst john cu rtice joins us from glasgow. just talking to john just talking tojohn mcdonnell from labour about the town think —— timing ofany labour about the town think —— timing of any election that follows, that will be crucial to the result. yes, let‘s go through this because it is quite important and none of the politicians want to be clear about it. build the government is saying will be allowed to go through not on its own rule out a no—deal brexit —— the bill. it gives the house of commons the opportunity on the 19th of october to rule out no—deal if the prime minister comes back from the european council and says, i haven‘t got a deal. so the argument is whether or not you need to delay the election so that the
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house of commons is still sitting on the 19th of october and the provisions of the bill could be used to stop a no—deal brexit. in that event, you are talking about an election not taken place earlier than five weeks after that, so you are looking towards the tail end of november. so that is the argument inside the labour party and inside the snp for delaying. the argument on the other side, of course, is that if borisjohnson does come back from the european council with a deal and can get it through the house of commons, and that is not necessarily guaranteed, and you would be giving an opportunity to have an election just after having had his success in getting is outside the european union. it is the tension between those two things, the opposition is trying to work out. the safest thing for the opposition is to say no to an election now and wait to see what happens on october the 19th and then facilitate an election if it seems to be in their interests. it sounds as though john mcdonnell to be in their interests. it sounds as thouthohn mcdonnell is accepting if they can find a way to
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agreeing to an election now that ta kes pla ce agreeing to an election now that takes place in late november, they might take that. there is one other issue, because the house of commons dealt with this issue yesterday, there is a question about whether or not the government will be allowed to bring the same motion back again on monday or tuesday because the convention is that you cannot deal with the same issue inside the house of commons in the same session, and that may mean the government is indeed forced to go through the other possible way of calling an election, which is rather than using the fixed—term parliaments act, to try to pass a bill that says notwithstanding that fixed—term parliaments act, we will have an election on the state. then the potential problem is because the government have said they are proroguing polymers next week is their time to get such a bill through? —— parliament. so this is the government —— difficulty facing the government —— difficulty facing the government. this is an unfair question but the question everybody wa nts to
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question but the question everybody wants to know, what is going to happen, how do you see this shaping up happen, how do you see this shaping up in the next few weeks? well, let‘s start from where we are at. the conservatives have made considerable advances in the polls. compared with where they were at the end of may. they are now at 34%, still well down on where they were in 2017. that puts them nine points ahead of labour. and they look set to gain seats. in scotland, the snp are well ahead, tory losses likely, the liberal democrats are stronger than they were two years ago and liberal democrat gains are likely. so the question is whether the gains from labour are sufficient to compensate for losses to the liberal democrats and the snp. the crucial thing here is the battle between the conservatives and the brexit party. because the gains the conservatives have made in the polls in recent weeks have come from the brexit party. boris johnson weeks have come from the brexit party. borisjohnson we want to be able to squeeze that brexit party further because on the figures we have at the moment, we are looking ata
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have at the moment, we are looking at a 50% chance the conservatives will get a majority and a 50% chance they would not. he wants to squeeze that vote down. the difficulty he faces with an election on october 15th is nigel farage and the brexit party will probably stand and as a result of that, maybe he isn‘t able to squeeze the brexit party vote as much as he wants. the advantage potentially to the prime minister of late november is if he has delivered brexit, nigel farage says, well done, iam brexit, nigel farage says, well done, i am not going to stand against you. it depends on this battle within the leave camp and borisjohnson battle within the leave camp and boris johnson and nigel battle within the leave camp and borisjohnson and nigel farage. battle within the leave camp and boris johnson and nigel farage. we have to leave it there, john curtice. and we will be interviewing nigel farage in a couple of minutes to get some answers to those questions. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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after yesterday‘s blustery day it is going to be a quieter day across the uk. still some showers in the forecast but not as many as there we re forecast but not as many as there were yesterday and the winds are not as strong. i mention some sellers. those across western scotland. by this afternoon there will be transforming into the north—east of scotland. a few showers in the north midlands. for most of us the day is going to be largely dry with sunny spells. temperatures mid to high teens. we may get 20 celsius in the south of england. rain is going to spread through scotland and northern ireland and northern england and north wales into friday morning. temperature staying into double figures. throughout friday the rain will sink southward giving a spell of rainfor will sink southward giving a spell of rain for many of us. sunny spells
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and showers developing the further north you are. this is business live from bbc news with victoria fritz and ben bland. as manufacturers warn industry is in a "nosedive" — uk recession fears grow. live from london, that‘s our top story on thursday 5th september. warning clouds grow over the british economy — and brexit forecasts are still unclear — yet the governor of the bank of england revises down his assessments for the impact of a no—deal brexit.

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