Skip to main content

tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  September 5, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

7:00 pm
is easing down, but it will went is easing down, but it will still be quite chilly. accent in the whole of the uk. is that the accent? i think it is. do you have a greeting? yeah, hello. and i think if people really think that this country should stay in the eu beyond october 31, then that really should be a matter for the people of this country to decide, because at the moment what parliament is voting for, or what parliament is voting for, or what parliament voted for yesterday, was a system by which the eu itself would decide how much longer we had to remain in. and i, for the life of me, cannot think that borisjohnson says that if there's going to be a brexit extention, jeremy corbyn will have have to request it — not him. i'd rather be dead in a ditch. the prime minister loses his own brother from his government — jojohnson says he's stepping down, torn between family loyalty and national interest. also on the programme: a paradise turned to ruin. hurricane dorian ripped a path of destruction through the bahamas. we're in some of the worst hit areas. record—breaking winds and massive storm surge flipped cars and even
7:01 pm
shipping containers far onto the land, but all around here is an area that's been totally levelled. the loch ness monster gets some scientific backing — a team says they could explain the nessie sightings. hello and welcome — i'm christian fraser in westminster, michelle fleury is in washington. borisjohnson has told the country he would rather be "dead in a ditch" than ask the european union for another brexit extension past october 31st. it should be, he said, the choice of the british people in a general election. ahead of his speech at a police college in west yorkshire the prime minister's brother, jojohnson a government minister and mp, said he was standing down because he could no longer choose between family and the national interest. downing street said borisjohnson regarded today's speech as the opening gambit
7:02 pm
in a five week election campaign — the only problem is, it is an election he hasn't yet been able to call. we are told he will ask mp‘s again on monday to vote in favour of that general election. but labour have said they won't agree until they are sure a no—deal brexit is off the table. let's listen to some of what borisjohnson had to say a little earlier. and i think if people really think that this country should stay in the eu beyond october 31, then that really should be a matter for the people of this country to decide, because at the moment what parliament is voting for, or what parliament voted for yesterday, was a system by which the eu itself would decide how much longer we had to remain in. and i, for the life of me, cannot think that is the right way forward. so all i can say, and i hate banging on about brexit, i don't want to go on about this any more, and i don't want an election at all! i don't want an election at all, but frankly i cannot see any other way.
7:03 pm
our political correspondent, jessica parker, is in westminsterfor us. that was quite an unusual setting there, you still borisjohnson flanked by police cadets in west yorkshire. i was curious what you thought of his performance. yeah, it was a strange delivery from him. we seem borisjohnson was a strange delivery from him. we seem boris johnson make was a strange delivery from him. we seem borisjohnson make a lot of speeches over the years, he can often be quite bombastic, really ta ke often be quite bombastic, really take the crowd with him, one of the reasons a lot of people got behind him in the leadership contest for the conservative party was that they felt he was really good at rallying the troops. of course, he wasn't speaking to the party membership today, but he did seem a little bit distracted, a little bit hesitant. and perhaps it might have had something to do with the news you are mentioning just a moment ago, that his younger brotherjojohnson quit earlier today, notjust as a
7:04 pm
minister but also will be standing down as an mp at the next election, saying he is torn between the national interest and family loyalty. and of course boris johnson's speech, which happened a little later than planned as well, very much overhanging what he was saying, he was talking about wanting election, talking about his domestic priorities as well, of course the journalists really only had one question for him which was if your brother isn't behind you, why would the country get behind you? and we understand boris johnson is the country get behind you? and we understand borisjohnson is saying he and his brother have had differences over brexit and we knew that already. he will try, i think, to suggest, as were downing street, that it to suggest, as were downing street, thatitis to suggest, as were downing street, that it is not personal, but of course to a lot of people it will appear deeply personal. course to a lot of people it will appear deeply personallj course to a lot of people it will appear deeply personal. i was thinking earlier there has been an awful lot that's gone wrong but maybe this is the worst event of the week the boris johnson, maybe this is the worst event of the week the borisjohnson, the timing of it, and the fact that a little bit like the ed miliband, bacon
7:05 pm
sandwich, or the two kitchens story, this is the sort of thing that cuts through to the electorate, it's the sort of thing that hangs around. you are right. i think a lot of people who may be over the week haven't possibly been following the end and outs of business motions and second readings on bills designed to stop an ideal brexit, they will certainly understand and perhaps be interested in this idea that the prime minister pass my cone brother has left his government because of clear differences, whether on policy or the handling of the party. so i think you are right, it will have a cut through, and the timing was very interesting as welcome as you suggest. so boris johnson interesting as welcome as you suggest. so borisjohnson has had this very tough week where he has suffered successive defeats in parliament, this morning we were hearing the words he was going to say about how jeremy hearing the words he was going to say about howjeremy corbyn was running scared of an election, how borisjohnson has this big plan for
7:06 pm
the country, how he regards this as day one of an election campaign, that obviously an election campaign isn't even happening yet and then... mid—morning, here's the news that his younger brother is out, is leaving the government and quitting as an mp. it rather took the wind out of the sails, i would say, of downing street. thank you. joining me now is george parker, political editor at the financial times. and the daily telegraph columnistjuliet samuel. george, i thought he had forgotten his speech today. this to all intents and purposes was the starting gun of an election campaign, there was no talk about what policing was going into west yorkshire, there was nothing about the cadets who were standing behind him, there was no prepared speech, it sounded rambling. it was one of the most extraordinary press conferences i've seen. it was a purely party political speech using the police as a backdrop, that was extraordinary itself. presumably at the end of this week he was
7:07 pm
intending to convey a sense of authority, he turned up late, gave a rambling speech, set off on a joke which he could remember, lost his way halfway through, ended up with an awful sight seen with a policewoman who'd been kept waiting foran hour policewoman who'd been kept waiting for an hour almost fainting behind him. it was catastrophic. it is somewhat like the parallel universe we exist in that we have an election speech with no election. well, it was clearly boris trying to move the attention onto the agenda he wants to talk about, or at least wants to look like he wants to talk about, which is his spending pledges and domestic issues that people care about. because they are sick of hearing about brexit. but i agree it was a very strange sort of lacklustre tone he took, and he seemed a little lost. and i think pa rt seemed a little lost. and i think part of that is that he has a more natural sort of approach to doing the set pieces, he doesn't want to
7:08 pm
look like he's reading a script, but at some point he looks like there is no script at all. it's very different, standing there as the prime minister. do you think you made it very clear today that if labour pushes for an election date, thatis labour pushes for an election date, that is after activity first, that he will effectively resign, because he will effectively resign, because he won't be the one to rip quest the extension. he said he would rather be dead in a ditch then seek the extension. we have a strange situation when mps are asked to vote on monday, where the opposition parties can effectively trap him and force him to do what he does not wa nt force him to do what he does not want to do, and then what does he do that resign? i'm sure much water will pass under the bridge, lots of different races will be explored by numberten, different different races will be explored by number ten, different ways of triggering the election, but putting ina triggering the election, but putting in a difficult position. jo johnson could have gone on sunday, they could have gone on sunday, they could have gone on sunday, they could have buried it somewhere in the election campaign, he goes on the election campaign, he goes on the day that he knows his brother resolve to make a set speech in west
7:09 pm
yorkshire. having said all that, if you were to look around the cabinet table and say which of these ministers is most likely to resign over brexit, jojohnson would be one of them. it was always pretty weird he was in the cabinet given he resign from the previous one over theissue resign from the previous one over the issue of wanting to have a second referendum, which boris johnson, if he is for anything, he is sticking with the previous referendum. so i suppose he offered him thejob because he is his brother. but i agree it was a rather pointed way of resigning. but i think it has been massively overplayed by the westminster bubble, because we are obsessed with the people know each other and personalities and suchlike, and personality does matter but i think most people outside of this place think, i didn't even know he had a brother, and i don't think... sibling rivalry... i have to take issue with that. the fact that a few
7:10 pm
people haven't heard ofjojohnson, he is boris's brother. surely... he stabbed his brother in the back. if anything that will blow back on him. people don't like... they didn't like ed miliband stabbing his brother... does it reflect the broader scheme of the week, that one nation tories don't feel at home in this new party. and that the conservative party is becoming a brexit party. yes, and that is what boris said he would do. he has to because there is absently no point in going into a general election which he didn't really want to have to do, but he is a campaigner and he likes elections, so there's no point him winning a majority if he can do that and then finding he gets back to parliament and half his mps aren't happy with the manifesto they stood on. so it seems to me perfectly reasonable to say this is a confidence issue, this is a
7:11 pm
central pledge that this party has said it will deliver, and if you can't get behind it then there is no point in you standing as an mp and undermining the government from within. let's talk about the labour, the snp said today as soon as the bill is three wish to have an election. so it is labour standing on the way now. i've given the people of britain a choice of what they want to do. this is downing street plasma calculation that eventually labour will have to buckle to pressure. downing street will keep calling on labour to go for the election, and putjeremy corbyn under huge pressure to do it. and accuse him of running scared of the british people, giving them a choice. the question is whether the labour party, which is deeply divided on whether the election should take place, whether it should be before brexit day or make the premise to stay in downing street, secure the delay and then have the election in november, there is a big division of the labour party, it isn't yet resolved. thank you, both.
7:12 pm
i thinkjuliet makes very good point. if you look at where the government started, it had a majority, working majority ofjust one, and a significant minority within the party who clearly did not like his brexit policy. what is trying to do is impose some discipline and that might have backfired, but in his own words, extension is extension, so if he does explore request the extinction when extension then really the election campaign is up in smoke. so he won't do that so that's why the next few days will be so fascinating. i think anyone watching anywhere in the world right now wondering how is brexit going to move forward, is still none the wiser. we hear a lot of talk about tactical efforts, but not much about the central question which is how do we resolve brexit, what are the hard choices that do need to be made? elf that there has been little talk of the last few days. there was one thing that struck me today, you could have a vote of no confidence,
7:13 pm
the government calling for that, jeremy corbyn not getting the confidence of the house, and ken clarke, the father of the house, the arch european sitting there as ca reta ker arch european sitting there as caretaker prime minister, who said today we need a brexit solution, we need a deal. wouldn't it be ironic if it is actually ken clarke, the europhile, it takes britain out of the eu? that segues perfectly into our next discussion, which is the disconnect we are seeing between the eu and the uk but when it comes to brexit negotiations. they can't even agree on what they've agreed on. borisjohnson claims the talks are "making substantial progress" — but the bloc‘s brexit negotiator says they are in a state of paralysis. not exactly one and the same. let's pick this up with our correspondent in brussels — damian grammaticas. borisjohnson said boris johnson said tonight borisjohnson said tonight he'd rather be dead in a ditch then call for a further extension. the reality is, if we got the 15th of october and he came to the eu council, even if there was negotiation going on,
7:14 pm
evenif if there was negotiation going on, even if he could get a deal, there would still have to be an extension, wouldn't there? absolutely, their word. because the timings of this just don't work. so what you would have to have, and we've been talking to eu sources here, if you had an election middle of october, two days later the summit here, first of all there is no time for a new prime minister or borisjohnson to come up with a new plan, get it through here, drafted, signed off two days later, that isn't going to happen. all the other alternative is there is no clear outcome from the uk election, in which case there is an equally difficult problem because there is no direction for the uk and a ticking clock towards the end of october. so all those cause big problems. the even bigger problem right now is there is nothing happening in the negotiations him at the forward. in fact, moving backward, because we are hearing today misha barnier saying its
7:15 pm
deadlock, others have been saying to us deadlock, others have been saying to us that the uk is not acting in good faith, it's just window dressing here, details coming out of what the uk is putting down is trying to strip away things that have already been agreed with theresa may and the eu side saying that is exasperating because that is going to make basically mean the uk wants to gut their irish body provisions, got things that would make a free trade agreement easy to do, and basically complicating the whole thing is the time window shrinks. we've been hearing a lot about trust issues between labour, not trusting the tories, not trusting borisjohnson when he says the election will be on october 15, is there a that there are also track state issues growing between the eu and the uk? you can't negotiate if there isn't any sense of good faith between the two.|j think that's a very valid point. and i don't think its growing issue, i think it is an issue that sits right
7:16 pm
now. we heard today from one of the senior members of the european parliament on their brexit committee, he just been parliament on their brexit committee, hejust been briefed about what was happening in the talks here and he came out and told us talks here and he came out and told us he thought borisjohnson had been lying about what was going on in the negotiations, lying at the g7 summit in biarritz when he said progress was being made, because this member of the steering committee said that simply isn't true. so yes, very difficult to build anything on that, but even more difficult for the eu i think is the fact that if an election looks like it's about to be called in the uk, why would they negotiate anything here because they know whatever is discussed could all be thrown out by a new prime minister injust a be thrown out by a new prime minister in just a few weeks' time? damien, thank you. hurricane dorian is making its way up the east coast of america, with storm warnings in place for north and south carolina having wrought devastation in the bahamas where the united nations arrived today and immediately pledged $1 million in emergency aid.
7:17 pm
the death toll is now 23, but that is expected to rise. it's caused the worst damage and loss of life on the abaco islands, where its estimated that at least 70,000 people require aid. from there aleem maqbool sent this report. treasure quay was one of the most popular resorts on these islands, torn apart by the brute strength of the storm. tourists who tried to whether it, left shell—shocked. but these were the sturdiest buildings in a place that wasn't even the worst hit. elsewhere, the picture is even more desolate. well, this was marsh harbour port, where hurricane dorian made its first landfall, and those record—breaking winds and massive storm surges flipped cars and even shipping containers far onto the land. but all around here is an area that's been totally levelled. thousands had lived in a huge shanty
7:18 pm
town that had been here, but there are few signs of the structures they left him, and people are left to pick through what's left of their belongings. it is a desperate situation for those who survived. no house, no food, no water, you know? so... i think, people... no life, you see? for me too. everyone here talks of those they know who are still missing. many sheltered in churches, but in the heat here there is the unmistakable smell of death. aleem maqbool, bbc news, on the abaco islands of the bahamas. right now, hurricane dorian is bearing down on the coastline of carolinas with warnings of dangrous storm surge. the bbc‘s gary o'donoghue is in charleston, south carorlina and joins us now. gary, it's not looking too bad right now where you are standing, but what
7:19 pm
is expected, how far away is dorian from where you are now? about 70 miles off the coast, perhaps a little north of where we are here. and you are right, it isn't perhaps as wet as it was earlier, the winds are still blowing but they are not particularly severe here on shore right now. the category two status of the hurricane does mean at its co re of the hurricane does mean at its core there are still winds of the hundred and ten mph, and that will bea hundred and ten mph, and that will be a factor if it does make landfall, which is a possibility still. either in south carolina, the northern part of the state, or in north carolina tomorrow. flooding is still an issue here, we have a high tide happening right this minute, and if that overspill is the barriers at the beach and comes into the city, there will be significantly more flooding that there is already. and presumably thatis there is already. and presumably that is the key worry, it is this idea not so much the storm itself
7:20 pm
but the surge that is associated with it, that wall of water. yes, and in charleston where i'm speaking from, they've had this problem for yea rs, from, they've had this problem for years, it has been flooded on numerous occasions, it has been hit by hurricane matthew, if you remember, and hurricane irma as well. so this isjust remember, and hurricane irma as well. so this is just the latest. and quite a lot of people have left the city to get away from it and left the whole coastal strip, some 300,000 left their homes. but a lot still state. and now it is too late for them to get out, they will have to ride this when out until it passesin to ride this when out until it passes in the next 2a hours or so. and they must be looking at these pictures in the bahamas that we are seeing and they must be thanking their lucky stars that they won't be hit with something of that magnitude. when you think, there's been a lot of debate here as you know about donald trump smack interesting maps about the
7:21 pm
hurricane's original path. one thing thatis hurricane's original path. one thing that is true about the original path is that it was headed for florida, it was headed for a direct landfall and it was at that kind of category five level, before it swung around, stayed still, then moved north along the atlantic seaboard, rather than coming ashore in miami or somewhere just north of there. if it had come ashore there, despite the fact the us obviously has a much bigger, stronger infrastructure than the bahamas, nature is stronger than most things, and it would have done enormous damage. there are already here in many ways it's a miracle i think there are no real reports of any injuries or, god forbid, any fatalities at this stage. that is a miracle. yes, a lucky escape. gary, thank you. i was just looking at the damage in the report, and there were reports dictate that they will need billions in aid to put the bahamas back together, and apparently the american administration say they are
7:22 pm
quite concerned that maybe china will rush in and start investing in an area which is only about 100 miles from the florida coast. imean, you miles from the florida coast. i mean, you already have china investing huge infrastructure projects and i guess the concern is that they could under that banner provide some aid money to the bahamas. the question is, does this become a bit like three—dimensional chess where you see the relationship between the us and china shift from issues of trade and national security to also who is going to end up security to also who is going to end up providing the most assistance to the bahamas? yes, they are in the conflict between withdrawing from the national and international stage, america first, and resisting chinese expansion at the same time. meanwhile, you'd think he'd have other things to worry about, but the president has sparked controversy with this, christian — a black marker pen. remember earlier this week when donald trump got into a spat with his own national weather service? he said on sunday that the hurricane was going to hit alabama. the original course was dead
7:23 pm
into florida, now it seems to be going up towards south carolina, towards north carolina. georgia is going to be hit. alabama is going to get a piece of it, it looks like. and they said, "not so fast", tweeting minutes later: "alabama will not see any impacts from #dorian." i sense a pattern here. rather than retreat, the president doubled down. he shared a map of an old hurricane dorian forecast, that was altered with a permanent marker. yes, it appears he used a sharpie to extend the path into alabama. when asked about it by a reporter, trump said he didn't know who had changed the map, and he continues to insist alabma was going to be ‘hit or grazed'.
7:24 pm
this hasn't stopped plenty of people having fun with this on social media. check out this doctored image of president trump's inauguration celebration. it may not be fine art, but someone has drawn little figurines in the crowd. that's just one of a slew of memes that's popped up. i know i'm a big fan of a sharpie. i would have been proud of the alabama coma. they tell me it's illegal, actually, to alter a weather map, so it would be ironic after all these investigations if the reason the president goes to jail is for defacing one of his own weather maps! given his protest, it remains a big mystery as to who altered the map. here is another mystery. nessie, the loch ness monster, was just given some scientific backing today — a team carrying out dna tests in the scottish lake says the existence of the monser remains plausible. they do say their research has ruled out most theories
7:25 pm
about nessie, but leaves one possibility — giant eels. now their research might not explain images such as these ones of the loch ness monster. but it's plausible for images such as this one — back in the 1930s this image helped start the loch ness story — although, sadly, it later proved to be fake. i don't know where they got that picture. i'm still a believer, the scientist said, the absence of evidence is not necessarily the absence of evidence. that'll do for me. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — can century—old democratic institutions bear the strain put
7:26 pm
upon them by twitter—era political crises? we hear from constitutional experts on both sides of the atlantic. working alongside your sibling in politics can have its advantages, but as boris johnson found out today, also its challenges. we'll be speaking to a us congresswoman to hear how she's found serving alongside her sister. that's still to come. it looks like the weather will settle down a bit for this evening. it will still be chilly. —— this weekend. temperatures 20 degrees across southern england, with lighter winds at public felt warmer in the sunshine. we've seen some cloud across northern parts of the uk bringing showers earlier. those will move away but then we look to the north—west and we find the next weather front moving down and bring in wet weather into scotland and northern ireland. rain will work its way down into northern england and north wales later. the winds will pick up as well, especially around the area of rain, so as a result of the area of rain, so as a result of the cloud and rain and stronger wind it should be warmer than last night, temperatures generally in double
7:27 pm
figures. tomorrow the rain moves away from scotland and northern ireland, heads into the england and wales. arrives across southern parts of england for the afternoon. further north we will see behind the rain band some sunshine and showers following. some of the showers could be quite heavy at times across scotland. the northern parts of the uk temperatures similar to today, further south because of the cloud and rain and stronger winds temperatures will be lower. there is a chance of a shower or two at old trafford tomorrow, i think the risk is greatest for the start of play. it should stay dry after that. but it will still feel quite chilly, temperatures only 16. and we probably have a strong and gusty wind as well. the wind direction probably changing from this west to south westerly to something more from the north, around an area of high pressure drawing down cooler airfrom the north high pressure drawing down cooler air from the north of the weekend. the high pressure building on all the while, should settle things for most. and most places dry on saturday, some spells of sunshine, after a chilly sunny start there
7:28 pm
will be a few showers may be across northern scotland, one or two developing in central and eastern areas, but few and far between. still a keen wind blowing down the coast, that makes it feel chilly. highest temperatures in the south west of england and south wales. a cold start to sunday, as sky is clear it will start chilly on sunday. lots of sunshine, away from the north—west. the cloud will build up the north—west. the cloud will build up it should stay dry. more cloud across the north west, the rain holding off until after dark. and temperatures of 16 to 18.
7:29 pm
7:30 pm
this is beyond 100 days — with me, michelle fleury, in washington. christian fraser is in westminster. our top stories: the prime minister repeats his determination to leave the eu by the end of october — saying he'd rather be "dead in a ditch" than ask brussels for an extension. borisjohnson's own brotherjo resigned today as both an mp and a minister. the prime minister said his family, like many others, was divided over brexit. coming up in the next half hour: is it better to be the master of one trade, or more of an all rounder? we'll get the expert view. plus the case of four—year—old maurice — the rooster who has been fighting in a french court for the right to have his voice heard.
7:31 pm
there have been few moments in british parliamentary life where the unwritten constitution of the uk has been tested as robustly as it is being tested right now. last night opposition parties took control of the house and passed a bill a minority government didn't want. and then refused the prime minister an election. we even had a vote on one amendment, which went through, because even though the no lobby was full, there were no tellers to count the vote. and so it passed. is it time for the british consitution and all its arcane rules, procedures, standing orders and precedents to be codified into a written constitution such as we have here in the united states. or, as chaotic as brexit looks from this side, is the british system working just fine? it might be straining, but a democratically elected parliament is having its say and the executive is being held
7:32 pm
to account. with us is catherine barnard a constitutional law expert at cambridge university. and in washington elizabeth wydra, president of the constitutional accountability center. then, so many times this week i have been left scratching my head, there have been convention spoken, presidents have been set, is it time, perhaps in all this is over, for us to get down, refined, reform and enshrined the rules of our unwritten constitution in a document? well, lots of people say yes, should be, because at the very reason she had given, it is very difficult to find out what our constitution actually says. the living the unique times and it is not clear that a written constitution which have provided sensitive footprint for what should happen next. so, what we're actually seeing is attempts to use every bit
7:33 pm
of the constitutional machinery looked at and studied to try and work out what can be done. but ultimately what you're saying is parliament is holding the executive to account with or without a written constitution. elizabeth, obviously in the united states, you have a written constitution. the words either, but feeling that congress right now, in many ways they not willing their power whether that is to pass legislation or civil depository account. absolutely, we are same tests on both sides of the parliament of written constitution and of unwritten constitution. ce rtainly and of unwritten constitution. certainly there are benefits to having a written constitution, the words are there for the people to read, peruzzi debate exactly what those words mean and importantly there are some rights, equality, equal citizenship, write celebrity that output in the constitution so that output in the constitution so that they are not up for a boat in the next election. they are too
7:34 pm
important for that. that being said, it does require, just as we're seeing right now in the uk, a commitment from the people and from those in power to really be faithful to the constitution, whether it is written or not and we're seeing right now in the us a real problem. when you have a leader he is willing to test the limits of the constitution, potentially to its destruction. you know, we had for example constitutional prohibitions on the president accepting... he has been brazenly bore about two and a happier doing so. of course, there are those of us including myself as are those of us including myself as a lawyer in court trying to invoice those parts of the constitution, but it is really up to the court and congress to make real the protections in our written constitution. so, there are challenges certainly are both sides and it requires engagement and accountability. i want to return to
7:35 pm
the side of the courts in a moment. but catherine, here you have members of congress perhaps not using the full might of their powers, in parliament it seems the opposite. that's when challenged by boris johnson and efforts to prorogue parliament, they have definitely come in that case, taken back control and if anything is more of their powers than what we would expect. absolutely, you are seeing parliamentary sovereignty in the role. because what you're seeing is the parliament executive to control over the executive and it is parliament to ultimately in the real crunch situation through the standing order 2a emotion took back control of the order book and actually lead to adoption of legislation, which will tell the executive what to do. this is where the crunch point comes, because of course parliament cannot act in the sense of going to brussels itself to ask for an extension. what happens
7:36 pm
at the executive, in the embodiment of the prime minister, says no, we are not going to follow the order of parliament? that is when you have a constitutional crisis. that is wasted the pilot of the us, because ultimately, whether you have a written or unwritten constitution, those in possession of responsibility have to play ball. what we are saying about sides is straining at the sinews to really try to test what are the outer limits of the documents that we do have. elizabeth, if you have a written constitution then you can go to the court. in your case to the supreme court. here today, they have been testing prorogation in the high court and whether boris johnson been testing prorogation in the high court and whether borisjohnson was right to call it. but we frown on the quotes getting involved in our parliamentary life. so, if you have a written document, doesn't open the way to test the document in the legal system? that has certainly been the way that it has been practised here in the us. by the court will hold back they built like
7:37 pm
an issue as completely political issue, then they will decline to get involved. and we had seen some difficulties in terms of finding who can really enforce these particular political constitutional protections in our written document. but the courts play a crucial role, we had a three part checks and balances system, with the judiciary, legislation and executive being equal. we do not have parliamentary savagery idea here. but in both by nations, the people are sovereign. —— parliamentary nations, the people are sovereign. — — parliamentary sovereignty nations, the people are sovereign. —— parliamentary sovereignty idea. for the people to put into place leaders who will respect the constitution's tax and values and, you know, iwill say, while it is good to have stability of having elected terms being next in the constitution, i am sure there are ple nty of
7:38 pm
constitution, i am sure there are plenty of people who would like to be able to hold an election right now to change things. catherine, the other issue is whatever system you have you have to have somebody speaking. if we had a quite systematic supreme court in america, that gets political, too. absolutely, we are already seeing, as in the us, we have three limbs to our structure, the courts, the legislature and the executive and the court, generally in this country, i doubt... the courts are not democratically elected. nevertheless, when people do not get what they want or do not think that the actual limits of the constitution i respect they will go to the courts. we have seen that in the past and we see it again in the case in the scottish court yesterday
7:39 pm
and again back in the chords of england and wales today. so, the essence of the fight there is is this questionjudicial essence of the fight there is is this question judicial bill? essence of the fight there is is this questionjudicial bill? legal speak forward to the courts have the right to hear this? it is also about conventions, the prerogative and if they can intervene in respect of the prerogative powers, to what extent? the courts are usually very wary. catherine and elizabeth, thank you both very much. borisjohnson failed get enough mps to support an early general election in wednesday's vote — but sources close to the prime minister say he regards today as the first day of an election campaign. the government will give mps another chance to vote for an early election on monday. what do the public think of the prospect of another nationwide vote? our special correspondent lucy manning has been to crewe, to hear the thoughts of people there. crewe and nantwich, a leave seat, a marginal seat.
7:40 pm
if borisjohnson is aiming his brexit and election strategy anywhere, it's at the voters here. as the prime minister hopes to rebuild his majority, they are making ice cream vans to export across the world. tommy francis voted leave, and has always backed labour. i'll vote conservative this time — and it will probably be the first time in all my family's history — because, at this moment in time, borisjohnson is the only person that i can see wants to push through leaving europe. crewe and nantwich is one of the conservatives' top target seats, and with tory fears support is melting away in scotland and in remain areas, the prime minister needs labour leave areas, especially in the midlands and north, to back his brexit strategy. michael flood voted for the first time ever the referendum — to leave. it would be pointless having an election if you wouldn't take my first vote seriously. i voted out, and i think we should go out. so will you be supporting
7:41 pm
the prime minister? i'll vote him all the way, if we leave the eu. even labour remain voter emma now just wants britain to leave. what do you think of the fact that mps have blocked the prime minister's wish to have an election? i think it's a bit strange, because i would suspect that the labour mps would want to vote for that so that they could get the labour prime minister in place. the end of october is when we need to be out, we should be out. just let boris get on with it. table tennis is the prime minister's favourite, but mps have batted away his election plans — for now. david hands is a labour and remain supporter. well, i don't think there's anything wrong with having another election. it might clear the air a bit and give people a chance to reorganise. i wouldn't particularly vote for borisjohnson's side, because i think their side have landed us with the problem. but the alternatives are equally problematic. barbara shaw is a tory remainer. i think it'sjust
7:42 pm
a complete and utter mess. i'm ashamed of our government, really ashamed. i would swap to labour, if it wasn't corbyn. if and when an election comes, it's clear some party loyalties will shift to brexit ones, and that is why the prime minister's determination to leave the eu whatever happens appears so crucial to winning here. lucy manning, bbc news. well, jojohnson's departure today has certainly sent shock waves through westminster but it has also raised questions about what it is like when the political and deeply personal collide. that's a situation our next guest knows well. loretta sanchez served in the us congress with her sister linda for over a decade. shejoins us now from california. when you hear something like this today, jojohnson basically coming
7:43 pm
out saying he had to make a difficult choice between country and family. what is it like when you see something like that, given that you serve alongside your sister? something like that, given that you serve alongside your sister7m something like that, given that you serve alongside your sister? it is very difficult, to tie the truth. i really feel forjo, because he was staying in the eu and his brother was one of the leaders to get out. it has really come to a head of stea m it has really come to a head of steam right now and so conflicted that he had to, you know, basically stepped out, step down. i have had situations with my sister where we have been on different sides of an issue or sometimes something that was going on in the congress where i was going on in the congress where i was trying to help her, but she did not understand the strategy to move whatever it was that she had going on and sometimes that can cause real problems in a personal relationship.
7:44 pm
you mentioned there that there are times when you have had disagreements, differences over policies. how do resolve that? is there, does it help, the fact that you are related ? there, does it help, the fact that you are related? you could perhaps have more open conversation or does that bleed over into the dinner table where things get a bit tense and problematic? well, i will tell you first about that i have many siblings and so all who are very smart and active in community, had their opinions, some in the opposition party, as you would say, in england. and so, our dinner table conversations are always very heated. my mother always is the talus you have to keep a smile in your voice when you talk to each other when you talk to someone who disagrees with you. and so, we try to do that, but i do recall several meals in particular with my younger sister who is linda, the
7:45 pm
congresswoman now, there have been family meals which she has left the dinner table and left the house. for good. over different issues. dinner table and left the house. for good. over different issuesm dinner table and left the house. for good. over different issues. it is difficult. i would have liked to have been at some of your thanksgiving dinners. i see this mit children, i love them both equally andi children, i love them both equally and i telnet every day. however much i tell them, there is always this one—upmanship. then try to get something over the other. does that carry on into adult life? i ask this as an only child. as a sibling, the a nswer as an only child. as a sibling, the answer is no. not in ourfamily. in ourfamily we answer is no. not in ourfamily. in our family we really do try to help each other. for example, when i am running for election, which i am now, my brothers will call an stable say ok, we can put out signs
7:46 pm
tonight. but my having to call them or they will call my other brother usually calls and says i had some businessmen who i do work with who i wa nt to businessmen who i do work with who i want to put on an event and throw some money into your campaign. that is without asking, so even though on issues very family oriented issues, like my mother is now 83, what are we, how are we going to help her with her health? what is the family plan for her as she ages? we are definitely commie many others have different ideas and we are on opposite sides. how you work through that despite difficult. i usually find myself as the eldest girl in the family being sort of the one who tries to everybody together. with my younger sister in the congress, of course when we were there, you know, sometime she honestly would just ignore me for a month or two at a
7:47 pm
time. loretta, very good if you to come on and share your thoughts on your primary and we wish you the best with your election. i am still trying to imagine borisjohnson and jojohnson on the campaign trail together. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — wwy becoming the absolute best at one thing might not serve you well in today's world of work. we'll explain all in a few moments. britain's leading children's hospital has been strongly criticised over the death of a teenage girl. 14—year—old amy allan was transferred to great ormond street hospital last year — but died from complications following an operation. michael buchanan reports. she just had an attitude to life we all envied. you know, she always had a smile on herface, she did not let anything get her down. amy allan was born with a genetic
7:48 pm
condition called noonan syndrome, which left her with lifelong heart problems. as she aged, she developed a curve in her spine that left her in constant pain. the 14—year—old from ayrshire was sent to great ormond street hospital, as they were the only centre that could do both the spinal surgery and had life—saving system called ecmo on site, should she suffer any complications. but while the operation was a success, amy's condition deteriorated in the intensive care unit when a doctor removed her ventilation tube. we watched it all. we sat at her bedside, watching her panic in front of our eyes. i have been doing first aiding for a year now... what amy herself had learned when she needed urgent care was not there. the life support team had not been told amy was in hospital and took hours to assemble. she struggled on before dying
7:49 pm
of multiple organ failure. the family came to court today to find the coronary find that great had failed to properly plan. they found the problems had not caused her death. we know they did not deliberately try to kill amy, but they try to hide what they done. that is what makes asset. in a statement to knightley hospital said they are sorry that amy's care had fallen short. —— the hospital said. imagine two young boys — one starts using a golf putter before he can walk, by the age of two is hitting golf balls on tv, and by four is spending eight hours a day on the golf course without any parents. the second boy just loves ball games — tennis, football, basketball —
7:50 pm
it doesn't really matter which. without any real parental influence, he ends up favouring tennis, although playing with his friends is always his priority. those boys are tiger woods and roger federer. both titans in their respective sports, but both with very different journeys to success. it is roger federer‘s journey that our next guest argues is the most common — arguing that, contrary to what we've been told, specialisation is a drawback. david epstein is an investigative reporter at propublica and the author of ‘range'. he's with us now. i think bands of books like outliers, the tiger mum, although seem to advocate specialisation. we have been told we have to be hyper focused, very concentrated, your m essa 9 es focused, very concentrated, your messages completely different. focused, very concentrated, your messages completely differentm those books the most resonant exa m ples those books the most resonant examples are sports and music. the
7:51 pm
first page of the tiger mother the mother talks about assigning her daughter by lynn and making her practice for hours. they do not remember the point where her daughter says you picked it, not me and she quits. in research on musicians and athletes who go on to become elite, what scientists tend to see is a sampling period early on. they do a wide variety of activities, gain broad skills and learn about the interest and abilities and systematically delay specialising then later than their peers. what is your advice then? in my own experience, if you look at the uk, many get to the university are totally specialised. it seems she would be better served by trying a range of things. if you have specialised, what can you do?|j a range of things. if you have specialised, what can you do? i am glad you mention the uk. i write about a natural experiment in the education systems of england and scotland. what he saw was that the
7:52 pm
stu d e nts scotland. what he saw was that the students had to specialise earlier and the students in scotland could keep sampling throughout university. he said who wins? the early specialisation jump out in an income lead, the late specialises get to try my things and so they'd pick a better fit for themselves and by your six—day fly—past in income, meanwhile the early specialisation art to drop out of their careers. so early specialisation when in the short—term and lose any log in. so, broaden your tool box, you need to be the later specialisation and abstain in the labour force longer. this is fantastic news. my boss tells the other time that i'm a jack of all chains and master of none, there is hope for me yet. they do not one specialist, they want people who been in a lot ofjobs and can be quite nimble and adapt. absolutely. percival, i think it is culturally telling that that base jack about
7:53 pm
trades, master of none we dropped the end. wejust trades, master of none we dropped the end. we just begot the good part. recent research found that one of the strong as protectors of he would go on to become an executive with a number of differentjob functions that an individual had worked across. i am sure those executives you are talking to responding to what worked for them, because they know that is how it works. even though we were not give people the advice to say start changing job functions a lot. this is fabulous news. an uplifting chance, thank you so much, indeed. the cockerel is the unofficial national symbol of france. but the old rural way of life is of under threat — and so too it seems are the noisy roosters. but there has been a reprieve for four—year—old maurice — a cockerel in rochefort, western france. a court has dismissed a complaint from angry neighbours who say he is too loud. have a listen to maurice...
7:54 pm
rooster crows ..whose crowing crowing irritated neighbor jean—louis biron, who is from the city and had bought a second home next door to maurice's owners. corrine fesseau, who has lived in rochefort for 35 years, would have had to somehow silence the bird, had she lost. but her "save maurice" petition garnered 140,000 signatures from all around the country. and the judge agreed that crowing was an important part of the french heritage. it is said corrine, a victory for the whole of france. just before we go, i was on holiday last week on a regular place i go to implants. the nearby palmer had but a cockerel and i was lying in bed, in the morning, with the window open andi in the morning, with the window open and i heard the cockerel. it was about 5am. i hate this cockerel and
7:55 pm
i thought that is so nice. that is such a rural sound. but, you know what? i am such a clown person that i thought he only did it once. i thought it meant morning has broken, and then over the course of the next two hours take fruit every two minutes and i had gone from this then like state to having the pillow over my head. on the say, i am the quy over my head. on the say, i am the guy from rochefort, i would stick it in the pot. it is not like an alarm clock they do not sound once, they go one—on—one in! in our house, my child always says but, back, back. coming up next on bbc world news — ros atkins is here with outside source and for viewers in the uk — we'll have the latest headlines. we will be back next week, another big week for the brexit story. for now — from michelle fleury in washington
7:56 pm
and me, christian fraser, in westminster — goodbye. hello, good evening. the weather will be settling down a bit for the weekend. still on the chilly side, mind you. today the temperature was about 20 degrees and southern england. it probably felt a bit warmer in the sunshine, as well. some areas of cloud running across northern part of the uk, bring some showers earlier on, take us up they will move away, looking to the north—west we find this next weather front moving down. it brings in wet weather into scotland and northern ireland. the rainbow that worked its way into northern england and north wales later on in the night. the wind is picking up as well, especially around that area of rain. asa especially around that area of rain. as a result of the cloud and rain, stronger wind and a woman night and last night. temperatures generally sang in double figures. tomorrow
7:57 pm
that brain sent moves away from scotla nd that brain sent moves away from scotland and northern ireland and heads into agent and wales. it arrives in southern parts of england for the afternoon. by the north, behind the rain in some sunshine and showers following the the showers could be heavy at times across scotland. the north of the cable has on the temperature to today, by the south because of the cloud and rain and strong wind temperatures will be and strong wind temperatures will be a bit lower. chance of a shower or two at old trafford tomorrow. the risk is greatest for the start of play to stop it should stay dry after that. it is still going to get quite chilly, as temperatures are only 16 degrees. probably a stronger and gusty wind commentary. when direction probably changing to something coming more from the north around an area of high pressure. we will draw down cooler air from the north for this weekend. that high pressure tending to build in all the while and should settle things down for most areas. most places will be trialled saturday, some spells of sunshine. after a chilly and sunny
7:58 pm
start to the mother if you showers and one or two developing in central and one or two developing in central and eastern areas. still quite a keen wind blowing in the north sea coast, making it quite chilly. the highest temperature is much worse was of england and south wales. quite a cold start to sunday, wind will drop out in the skies were clear. there will be lots of sunshine, away from the north—west was not the cloud will belt up, but it should stay dry. mcleod crossed north—western areas. rain holding off until after dark. again, temperatures of 16 to 18 celsius.
7:59 pm
8:00 pm
this is bbc news i'm christian fraser, live here at westminster. the headlines at eight. as the pressure continues to mount on borisjohnson, he insists that whatever happens he will not ask the eu for another extension to brexit. and i would rather be dead in a ditch. the prime minister also paid tribute to his brotherjo johnson who resigned from the government and will stand down as an mp because he is torn between family loyalty and national interest. the government will try again on monday, to get mps to vote for an early general election — but labour says it won't support that. until a ‘no—deal‘ brexit has been ruled out. and the other main stories on bbc news this evening. hurricane dorian is expected to bring ‘life—threatening storm

39 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on