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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 5, 2019 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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sunday. warm in the sunshine and a chilly feel nonetheless in the mornings and evenings. the weather front and north—west brings the rain and then it tumbles down towards the uk. that it brings showers and longer spells of rain down from the north—west across many parts of the country. we really get a proper clea ra nce country. we really get a proper clearance in scotland and northern ireland until later on in the day when we break up the cloud more and get some sunshine but look at the temperatures. 15, 16 degrees. and that rain across southern parts of the uk this could come as a shock to the uk this could come as a shock to the system. it will feel chilly. that weather front will weaken, getting ‘s wheezed. —— getting squeezed. wanted to show is left overfor squeezed. wanted to show is left over for east anglia in the south—east otherwise a sunshine for most areas before those atlantic winds coming in again and we pick up the cloud in the far north—west. those temperatures holding steady for northern areas, lifting a bit towards the south. let's move into
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the atlantic and pick up on two tropical systems. hurricane dorian, thatis tropical systems. hurricane dorian, that is the forecast track along the eastern seaboard and tropical storm gabriel, more out into the mid—atlantic. gabriel, more out into the mid—atla ntic. if we gabriel, more out into the mid—atlantic. if we move things through to tuesday we can pick up roughly where there. the low the re m na nts of roughly where there. the low the remnants of dorian, this little load the remnants of gabriel. we get some wet around the middle of the week from what is left of dorian and a speu from what is left of dorian and a spell of rain on thursday from gabriel. but still that area of high pressure is seeking to the south—west of the uk. dry across the southern half, whether across northern areas but still in the cooler side as we head into next weekend.
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hello, this is bbc news with lu kwesa burak. we will be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first the headlines: the prime minister's brotherjo johnson resigns from the government and will stand
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down as an mp because he is torn between family loyalty and national interest. boris johnson acknowledged that they had disagreed over the eu. he's been a fantastic minister for science and for the universities, and i think that, you know, we certainly haven't seen eye—to—eye for a long time about the uk and the european union. you should be in brussels, negotiating... on a visit to yorkshire today, the prime minister repeated his call for an election, and said he would rather be dead in a ditch than ask for another extension to brexit. 70,000 people need urgent help in the bahamas, where hurricane dorian has cut across the islands. after a teenager dies following surgery at great 0rmond street, a coroner criticises the hospital's aftercare. and double trouble for england,
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as australia's steve smith scores 211 in the fourth ashes test. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are westminster editor of the daily record torcuil crichton and deputy political editor of the daily express sam lister. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in, with fallout and reaction to the resignation of borisjohnson‘s brotherjo johnson making most of the front pages. the guardian calls jo johnson's resignation an extraordinary blow which sent shockwaves through the conservative party. jo johnson blames unresolvable tensions for his decision to quit. according to the metro,
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the prime minister begged his younger brother to stay on during a late—night phone call. the independent reports on the backlash the prime minister has faced following a speech about police recruitment, with mrjohnson accused of politicising the police force. the prime minister's plans for a general election fade, says the times, as labour and the snp agree to block any poll until the prime minister has secured an extension to the brexit deadline with the eu. and the daily express has borisjohnson‘s declaration that he would rather be dead in a ditch than delay brexit. the daily telegraph says three senior labour ministers are plotting to delay a general election until november. and first day at school. the daily mail has a picture of a smiling princess charlotte with her older brother, prince george, as shejoins her sibling at lower school. the duke of cambridge told reporters his daughter was very excited.
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those are the front pages. we are going to start off, and really there is only one story. it isjojohnson, and we are starting off with the guardian. i quit. what a week it has beenin guardian. i quit. what a week it has been in politics, talk of the day from hell for boris johnson. 0vernight he had to surrender in the lord's 0vernight he had to surrender in the lords and see this bill that would extend brexit and extend article 50 go through. he then tried to launch what he wanted to be a general election campaign. the general election campaign. the general election campaign. the general election campaign has been denied to him bya election campaign has been denied to him by a vote in the commons, which he lost. he was humiliated in that vote, and then today his brother walks out, just as he is getting ready to tour the company and try to
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p9p up ready to tour the company and try to pep up the vote. what has done more damage? jo johnson has really done it. we know they have had long—standing differences about brexit for quite some time. we know that, that is not new. but the fact that, that is not new. but the fact that he chose today to do this, he knows the impact it will have. he could have been much more helpful to the prime minister, his brother, by doing it perhaps when an election is finally called. he could have quietly said i am standing down, i think it is the right time to go into something else, but he didn't. he made a point of coming out today and it is over, i am walking out despite the prime minister begging la st despite the prime minister begging last night to stay. the timing most awfulfor his brother, but he must have struggled, as the tory party has been rent asunder by this brutal sacking of 21 rebels by a cabinet thatis sacking of 21 rebels by a cabinet that is full of serial rebels who voted the deal down, theresa may's
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brexit deal down. i think when people see philip hammond and nicholas somes, churchill's grandson, going under the wheels of this government, they are thinking i can't live with it —— nicholas soames. should jo have had such a senior role, having known that they stood on different sides of the brexit debate? yes... well, he is a remainer, he quit over the second referendum, but he has been loyal to his brother, his brother invited him to the post. it would have been embarrassing at the time if he turned it down, i guess. he stuck with it, he is a well—regarded minister, he has served in three governments. hejust gets minister, he has served in three governments. he just gets on with thejob, almost governments. he just gets on with the job, almost submarine like. governments. he just gets on with thejob, almost submarine like. he is not showy, unlike his brother.
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and labour's line from this morning, even boris's own family don't trust him, which echoes the snp line from last week when ruth davidson resigned, although it seems a long time ago. if ruth davidson doesn't trust boris johnson, time ago. if ruth davidson doesn't trust borisjohnson, why time ago. if ruth davidson doesn't trust boris johnson, why should time ago. if ruth davidson doesn't trust borisjohnson, why should you? labour just echoing trust borisjohnson, why should you? labourjust echoing that line today. the lines keep coming for labour. they have their own issues with the miliband brothers, it seems small fry in comparison with this. again, it always comes out, if you are prepared as a family to fall out like this, it raises questions in voters' mines. obviously rachel johnson has jumped in voters' mines. obviously rachel johnson hasjumped in on the act as well —— voters' minds. we know that she is a big remaineras
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well —— voters' minds. we know that she is a big remainer as well. well —— voters' minds. we know that she is a big remaineras well. she says borisjohnson is the only one who thinks brexit is a good idea, so there are deep divisions in that family. we are staying with boris, but let's bring it back to brexit and come away from the family. we heard you say just and come away from the family. we heard you sayjust now he has had a day from hell. so today he said i would rather be dead in a ditch than delay brexit. that was the lifeline he was thrown today. jojohnson resigned, boris appeared in west yorkshire in front of these serried ra nks yorkshire in front of these serried ra n ks of yorkshire in front of these serried ranks of police cadets. he kept them waiting for an hour, to the degree that one of them fainted behind him and live television, which is incredible. he was grilled about his brother repeatedly, but one question was thrown at him, would you go to brussels if the law compel you to do it, if this act going through parliament compels you to go to brussels and ask for an extension. he said no, i would
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brussels and ask for an extension. he said no, iwould rather brussels and ask for an extension. he said no, i would rather be dead ina ditch. he said no, i would rather be dead in a ditch. he showed defiance, strength, the macho, strong man image he wants to take around the country for this election, which inevitably will happen at some stage. that is the kind of image he wa nts to stage. that is the kind of image he wants to project. but he looks very frayed at the edges today, very kind of taken apart either by the events of taken apart either by the events of this morning, when his brother resigned, or something else we still don't know about. but clearly for an hour today in yorkshire the prime minister was fire fighting something, putting some fire out somewhere, because he kept these people waiting for an hour, and when he appeared, he made a complete mess of it. he did start off talking about portion. he started making a gag, and the borisjohnson persona, the stick, relies on him making a joke and people reacting from that joke and people reacting from that joke until the whole room loves him —— schtick. but you can't do this in
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front of people who can't really act, police officers standing at attention, and it showed in the commons this week. you could get off with a joke and stuff like that, but when an mp wearing a turban stands up when an mp wearing a turban stands up and called him a racist, he didn't have an answer. he didn't have an answer. so he can't do the shtick something so serious. how do you see his position? his next big vote is possibly monday. how is boris johnson's vote is possibly monday. how is borisjohnson‘s position looking at the moment? well, we are in an almighty mess at the moment, because parliament is essentially failing. there is absolute deadlock, complete stalemate, and when that happens in parliament, the only option is an election. mps can't agree on anything, but they also won't agree to go to an election. so what are we left with? we just in this kind of weird limbo. and it is crazy that opposition mps would block an election, but that looks like what
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they are going to do on monday. they are going to vote down, again, a second time, even thoutheremy corbyn said this week he would back an election if the no deal legislation goes through, which it is going to do tomorrow. we will get onto that, but very quickly, let's turn to the independent, because this is an unofficial kickoff of an election campaign, this image at the training centre in wakefield. what did you make of that performance, and that image? such a powerful, stark image? obviously this was supposed to be the election launch, and it wasn't. but you know, he specifically chose this police backdrop because yesterday the government had a spending review in which it announced a significant amount of money for police and the home office, the biggest increase in spending for at least 50 years. £750
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million extra for the police, an immediate recruitment drive to get 2000 in by march and then... sorry, 2000 in by march and then... sorry, 2000 quickly in the first year, these 20,000 extra police officers that boris johnson these 20,000 extra police officers that borisjohnson has promised. so it is more money than has been put into the service for quite some time, and that is why he chose this backdrop. obviously you can see it is quite unusual to have a prime minister in front of rows of police officers like that. but it was specific extra funding for the police, so i don't think it is com pletely police, so i don't think it is completely out of order to go and do something like that. and the conservatives have strategies, they have a focus group this, they know people want to hear about government getting on with things, —— they have focus—grouped this. but he floundered badly on his brexit message, and the police cadets who
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had to wait in the blazing sunshine foran hour had to wait in the blazing sunshine for an hour floundered in front of the cameras. one of them fainted. what did you make of the huge backlash online to bringing police into politics? certainly after that image came up of him presenting himself as a strong and a police cadet fainting in the background, yvette cooper was out very quickly, the chair of the select committee was out, the police commissioner was out, the police commissionerjumped in. you would expect labour people to... public sector workers, journalists often battling to get to these events. and the options open forjeremy corbyn. these events. and the options open for jeremy corbyn. well, these events. and the options open forjeremy corbyn. well, you know, jeremy corbyn has called for an election for two years. even on monday he said in all circumstances he backed election. by tuesday, it has to be pegged to this no deal legislation. by thursday, the
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legislation. by thursday, the legislation is going through tomorrow. actually, now we might not back it when that goes through. so every day we are getting a different position from jeremy corbyn on an election. he has a strong message, vote labour, just hold on. and there are tensions within labour, and these are kind of drawn out in this telegraph story about whether to go early or late, whether to grant boris johnson's wish and early or late, whether to grant borisjohnson‘s wish and have an election, becausejeremy corbyn and his ilk still think they can smash johnson, and the other side of the shadow cabinet, the starmers and the mcdonnell, saying let him go beyond 31 october, and then they are dead. and all the attention is on the snp, on whether they grant him his wish and go early. because in an election
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in scotland, they are quite co mforta ble in scotland, they are quite comfortable with that. jeremy corbyn is then confident that once you have delayed rex that he has a better chance of winning the election but what about the threat of the brexit party? i think that is a threat to labour and the tories. borisjohnson needs some way a threat to labour and the tories. boris johnson needs some way of neutralising the party otherwise he will get a hammering. but labour in the north and the midlands, brexit party are in there as well. but there seems to be a large section of there seems to be a large section of the labour party who are almost pulling away from being the traditional labour hartland is. that is all over. it's now about london and left—wing voters, not the northern working—class ones. and left—wing voters, not the
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northern working-class ones. and that's what the 2016 referendum showed. and there was a split between provincial and metropolitan england. you are following all the remainer ‘s but if you go into the midlands it changes. depending on how the votes go it would mean installing jeremy corbyn as a temporary... on monday, the government will come up again with a fixed term parliament act and we need two—thirds of mps to vote for parliament to be dissolved. labour could abstain, the snp and the lib dems could abstain. there is an option of putting on a single line bill through to get rid of fixed term parliament at but labour could amend that. it could get messy. the
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prime minister could resign, i guess. hold a vote of confidence in himself. and his options are limited. labour ‘s himself. and his options are limited. labour's might himself. and his options are limited. labour ‘s might have better options. we could be in a strange scenario where we have a prime minister trying to lose a confidence vote and in opposition voting to provide confidence in the prime minister. i think you have summed up brexit effortlessly there. it will be interesting to see what comes out over the weekend in the build up to monday. let's turn the corner. the greed of pilots wrecking holidays.
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sometimes between now and christmas there will be a general election but if you are flying next week you may be in trouble because the pilots are ready to strike for ba. for better wages. these things normally go to the wire and then i pulled back but it is in the times as well and perhaps only 10% of flights for get off the ground. can i direct you back to the daily telegraph. send on a happy note. an exciting day for an excited princess. yes. her first day of school with her big mother george. she was settling in 0k,
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quite a happy little picture there. nice to see at least one set of siblings getting along.|j nice to see at least one set of siblings getting along. i tried asking a 13—year—old for a this sort of photo and i got a rude gesture in return. it is nice to see george smiling but this is away from the crowds, the photo was taken at home. that's it for the papers tonight. thank you torcuil and sam. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers — and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer.
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good evening. here's your latest sports news. let's start with cricket — where england yet again, struggled to find an answer to steve smith. a double century from the australia batsman put the tourists in prime position to retain the ashes and left england demoralised after day two of the fourth test at old trafford. smith made 211 as australia declared on a97 for eight. andy swiss has the story of smith's day he is australia's remarkable run machine. was this the day steve smith batted england out of the ashes? smith had started it on 60 and wouldn't have got much further had jofra archer not spilled an early chance. but by lunch, smith reached his century, his third of the series. he'd only just begun.
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england were starting to unravel. more dropped catches and then this... on 118, smith finally seemed to have gone, only for replays to show jack leach had overstepped. could you believe it? from there, smith piled on the agony, hitting england's bowlers to all corners. the result — a dazzling double hundred. he's the world's number one batsman for good reason. when he was finally out for 211, even england fans, who'd hardly warmed to him after last year's ball tampering scandal, knew they'd seen something very special. australia declared on 497. could england's openers make it to the close? well, no they couldn't, asjoe denly was brilliantly caught by matthew wade. a day then which belonged to steve smith and to australia, and its left england battling to save their ashes hopes. andy swiss, bbc news, old trafford.
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it was a huge moment. obviously i think that is my third now and my second against england and the second against england and the second time i have gone out on a reverse swee p to second time i have gone out on a reverse sweep to joe root second time i have gone out on a reverse sweep tojoe root on 200 so i think reverse sweep tojoe root on 200 so ithinki reverse sweep tojoe root on 200 so i think i will put that one away. obviously really proud to score a double hundred for australia and to put us in the position we are now. obviously yesterday was a tough start with the weather and then today, we turned up and it was a decent day and fair play to the way that smith came out and played. he obviously has the bit between his teeth and is in great form. you must give him credit for the way he has applied himself and gone out to score the runs he has. northern ireland warmed up for their euro qualifer against germany on monday with a 1 nil win over luxembourg this evening.
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but the goal itself was quite bizarre — luxembourg defender kevin malget getting confused — and headed it into his own net. the victory stretches northern ireland's winning run to five matches after they won all of theirfour opening euro 2020 qualifiers. newcastle's fabian schar put switzerland ahead against the republic of ireland in their euro qualifier in dublin. but a late goal from sheffield united's david mcgoldrick rescued an important point for the hosts — and stay top of the group. also in that group are gibraltar and denmark. the danes comfortable winners, two goals from tottenham's christian erisken. —— christian eriksen. england's paul casey shot a six under par round,
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to go top of the leaderboard — at the german open in hamburg. casey posted a 66, including seven birdies despite strong winds on the course. he leads by a shot, ahead of austria's matthias schwab. that's all the sport for now. this week has been quite changeable from one day to the next. high pressure trying to and bring fine days and then we will see bringing wet and windy conditions. friday looks like being an unsettled day, thanks to low pressure. we will have abandoned rain spreading south and india than thursday. low pressure to the north of scotland means windy conditions and you can see the isobars close together on this rain band will continue to move southwards and eastwards. it is a cold front so behind it it will introduce colder air. that will go through central parts of the uk on friday morning thinking into central and southern areas as we head on into the afternoon to heavy burst of rain. hi did it brightens up nicely with plenty of sunshine around but also blustery showers, some heavy on
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the north and west and the wind will make it feel cooler. 1a, maybe 17 or 18 are best. the rain band clears away during friday evening and then overnight it will be clearer still. a few showers remaining across eastern areas but elsewhere the wind will start to fall light and with the cool air will start to fall light and with the coolair in will start to fall light and with the cool air in place, clear skies, it will turn chilly with temperatures in single figures. for the weekend it is not that bad. we have a ridge of high pressure building infor have a ridge of high pressure building in for debt saturday and sunday so it does mean we will see dry weather with plenty of sunshine. saturday starts of chilly, still a couple of showers with a bit of wind. elsewhere the wind will be light with sunny spells around. fair weather cloud as well but on the whole, dry and temperatures ranging from the mid to high teens for many, could be 20 degrees and the warmer spots in the south. the ridge of high pressure is still with us on
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into sunday with light winds for all. it does mean that sunday will start off quite chilly indeed. it should be right with plenty of sunshine. fair weather cloud building through the afternoon. the front could encroach into the north—west corner of the country bringing cloud.
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i'm nuala mcgovern in london. the headlines: britain's prime minister says he would rather be dead in a ditch than ask the european union for a further delay to brexit. it for a further delay to brexit. cost £1 billion a monti achieves it cost £1 billion a month, it achieves absolutely nothing. what on earth is the point of a further delay? and brexit divisions get personal for the prime minister. his own brother quits the government over political differences. i'm rico hizon in singapore. also in the programme: the devastation of hurricane dorian in the bahamas. at least 70,000 people need urgent help. countdown to india's moon mission.

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