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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 6, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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0ne one source describing as responsible for the slow death of his country. the prime minister will be in scotland today after losing a series of crucial votes in the commons. he will announce millions of pounds for the scottish farming industry as he continues to press for a general election. but labour have warned they will block the move until they have made sure good morning. the government can't leave the eu without a deal. welcome to breakfast, withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today: the government in the bahamas has you should be in brussels, negotiating! warned of a staggering death toll yes, we have been negotiating. from hurricane dorian. you are not. 23 people have been confirmed dead, but that number is expected to rise you are in morley, in leeds! substantially because of the devastation caused in parts a prime minister under pressure of the country. the hurricane has moved after his brother quits on and is battering the coasts borisjohnson‘s hopes of a snap of south and north carolina. tens of thousands of election hang in the balance. aid starts arriving in the bahamas, amid warnings that the death toll homes are without power. from hurricane dorian could be staggering. how to tackle the wildfires as one roof blowed off, destroying large parts of the amazon we ran to another house, that blowed off. rainforest will be discussed at a presidential summit there were vehicles in colombia today. it will be attended by a number blowing in the background. it was just horrific. of south american nations. the brazilian government has come failing to stop fake reviews. under widespread criticism for its handling of the crisis,
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tripadvisor is accused of not although brazil's president won't be tackling fake entries at the meeting in person due on its website. i'll speak to its uk boss a little later. australia in control in the ashes again. steve smith hits a double century to a scheduled operation. to leave england's hopes hanging by a thread. reality tv starjamie laing has been forced to pull out of this year's strictly come dancing after injuring his foot. and i am at the classic boat it happened during the recording of a group dance for the new series, festival at saint catherine ‘s dock which is due to start tomorrow night. in london. it is dry in london but the made in chelsea star posted a video online saying he was devastated. rain elsewhere across the country. it is not yet clear if he will be it will be cool and blustery this weekend. i will have all the details right here in breakfast. it is friday 6 september. replaced in the line—up. our top story: the prime minister will be in scotland today after losing a series of crucial votes in the commons. he will announce millions of pounds for the scottish farming industry as he continues to press he is kind of irreplaceable. totally for a general election. but labour have warned they will block the move until they have made sure the government can't leave the eu irreplaceable. we are absolutely gutted by this. i only met him for without a deal. the first time a few weeks ago, and our political correspondentjessica
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i feel like i have the first time a few weeks ago, and ifeel like i have known him for parker has the latest developments. yea rs. ifeel like i have known him for years. he was the life and soul of this year's strictly group. he had so much insight into all of these thank goodness it's friday — catchphrases, bringing so much that might be what borisjohnson sunshine to the group. we should is thinking after what has happened this week. explain that you are a remaining member of the cast. all the poorer do you think we should get out on 31 october? yesterday, his own brother announced for lacking jamie now. we will so he was quitting as a minister and mp, torn between family loyalty miss him. was gutted yesterday to and the national interest. it's been an honour to be mp for orpington and a minister under read that news. he was a great three governments, but it's time dancer, as well. it is great to to move on, and i've got to get to work. sorry, i beg your pardon. reporter: are you completely at odds with your brother, mrjohnson? the prime minister made a speech where he seemed somewhat distracted. watch, but it is physically tough. you have no idea how extreme dancing hang on, let's get this right. can be as a sport, i would say. are you alright? really? how are you bearing up? then one of the police well, the hard work really starts on trainees behind him, apparently feeling monday. more of that to come. he has faint, had to sit down. but he did deliver a clear message when asked about the idea changed already, hasn't he? slap me of delaying brexit. ifi changed already, hasn't he? slap me if i get like that! let's talk about i'd rather be dead in a ditch. the cricket. what a difference ten days can make. since the euphoria, nice to meet you. the heroics of headingley and
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england rescuing the ashes. they get brexit done, mate. need another rescue mission. they need another rescue mission. they need the rain which could fold this morning and they need ben stokes to put off another miracle. but he has it has been a bruising few days. successive defeats, a sore shoulder, so it will be a losing his parliamentary majority. tall order. but if they can get a draw in this match, they have the today borisjohnson heads to scotland, pledging more cash to farmers. perhaps it will be seen as a man 0val to try and win it back. steve in campaign mode for a snap election mps have not yet approved. they are set to be asked again on monday. jessica parker, bbc news. the former conservative prime minister sirjohn major has launched smith returning after concussion. he a public attack on borisjohnson says england made it easy for him. and urged him to fire steve smith hit a double century his top advisors. we have seen over—mighty as australia dominated the second advisors before. day of the fourth it's a familiar script. test against england. it always ends badly. the tourists declared on a97/8 at old trafford. so i offer the prime minister england will resume on 23/1. some friendly advice. andy swiss reports get rid of these advisors. from old trafford. he is australia's get rid of them before they poison the political atmosphere remarkable run machine. beyond repair, and do it quickly. was this the day steve smith batted england out of the ashes? smith had started it on 60, our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. and wouldn't have got much further chris, can the opposition parties had jofra archer not spilled an early chance. stop borisjohnson from having but by lunch, smith a general election reached his century, his third of the series. he'd only just begun.
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when he wants one? england were starting to unravel. i guess it boils down to the fact more dropped catches, and then this. on 118, smith finally that the prime minister is on the seemed to have gone, road and effectively fighting a only for replays to show general election campaign. can the jack leach had overstepped. could you believe it? opposition stop him having a general from there, smith piled on the agony, hitting england's election when he wants to have it? bowlers to all corners. the result — a dazzling double hundred. that is the absolute essence of he is the world's number one where we are right now. politics is ultimately the contest for power, batsman for good reason. and the tussle for it right now is over the timing of a general when he was finally out for 211, election, because the opposition parties have clocked that they have even england fans, who had hardly two turbochargers to their own warmed to him after last year's power. normally opposition parties ball—tampering scandal, knew they had seen something very special. can't really wield much power but australia declared on a97. could england's openers this parliament is completely hung, make it to the close? and so they can. why can they? the mechanism for getting a general well, no, they couldn't, election in the fixed term asjoe denly was brilliantly caught parliaments act requires a by matthew wade. two—thirds majority of mps. and secondly, after borisjohnson‘s week a day, then, which belonged where he has been winded by parliament, wounded by his brother, to steve smith and to australia, and it has left england battling to save their ashes hopes. has also seen his majority shrink andy swiss, bbc news, old trafford. evermore, what with a defection to
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the liberal democrats and then those it was a huge moment. mps who were stripped of the web, who were kicked out of the parliamentary party for voting against mrjohnson the other day. so 0bviously — i think that's my third the opposition parties hope that, if now, and my second against england, they can hang together, they can and second time i've gone out dictate the timing of the general election, and potentially put it after the point boris johnson reverse sweeping tojoe root election, and potentially put it after the point borisjohnson has to do the very thing he has said he on 200, so i think i'll put that one away. won't, and delay brexit again. thank you, we will check in with you and but yeah, obviously really proud to score a double hundred oui’ you, we will check in with you and our brussels correspondent later so for australia and put us we can get an idea of what is happening on both sides of the in the position we're now. channel. the government in the bahamas has warned of a staggering death toll from hurricane dorian. 23 people have been confirmed dead, all eyes on the manchester but that number is expected again today as england to rise substantially. resume their innings. the hurricane has moved it is expecting that there could be on and is now battering the coasts some rain before lunch but hopefully of south and north carolina. the rest of the day tens of thousands of homes are without power. tim allman reports. will not be affected. serena will have another chance to win a record—equaling 2a woman: oh, my gosh, things grand slam singles after she cruised through to the final of the us open. are blowing up there... she beat elina svitolina in straight sets. slowly, relentlessly, williams is aiming to equal dorian continues to move up margaret court's total of all—time
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america's eastern seaboard. grand slam singles titles. she will face 19—year—old, bianca andreescu in tomorrow's final. this is charleston, south carolina, underwater. audreescu was born just nine months a deluge of rain turning one after williams won her first title of the city's main streets in new york, in 1999. into a river. in wilmington, in neighbouring north carolina, high winds lead to isolated tornadoes. no—one here is underestimating no final forjamie murray and his doubles partner, the potential danger. neal skupski, though. hurricane dorian is ready they lost their semi—final to top seeds and wimbledon champions to unleash its fury on our state. juan sebastian cabal and robert farah injust over two hours in new york. northern ireland warmed up the storm has regained strength, for their euro 2020 qualifier with germany on monday with a 1—0 friendly victory over it is serious, and it can be deadly. luxembourg in belfast. they won due to an astonishing own—goalfrom by luxebourg's kevin they don't need to be told malget. that in the bahamas, where dorian has already caused what has been described as unimaginable destruction. his sense of direction failed him as he headed the ball into his own net. northen ireland have won all fourof their qualifiers. newcastle's fabian schar put switzerland ahead
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the worst—hit island, against the republic of ireland grande abaco, is said in their euro qualifier in dublin. to be virtually uninhabitable. but a late goal from tens of thousands need help sheffield united's david mcgoldrick and the country's health minister rescued a point for the hosts — says the final death toll will be staggering. the wind just had us fearfulfor our life. it was just horrific. his first international goal, too. gareth bale says his critics do not and to see the devastation now, know what they are talking about. he will lead wales against with all the bodies laying around, azerbaijan in a euro qualifier ifeel that god has turned his back in cardiff tonight, but is having a difficult time at his club side, on the beautiful island of abaco. rescue operations are underway. real madrid. the us coastguard helping evacuate people by helicopter. he almost left real for china after being marginalised under coach and this is dorian seen from the international space zinedine zidane, and has laughed off station. some of his team—mates reportedly nicknaming him the golfer. the giant storm moves on. i wouldn't say it's the worst time, the danger isn't over yet. tim allman, bbc news. but yes, it's been not ideal. but yes, i know. i've been there before, i know how to deal with it, and yes, and some breaking news on the last it's just about keeping your head few moments, because it is being down and keep working hard. and i reported this morning that robert think you always get rewarded with the work that you put in. mugabe, the former president of nicola adams says she hasn't ruled zimbabwe, has died. he was 95, and out a return to amateur boxing to try to win another gold medal he had been ill for some at next year's 0lympics.
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considerable time. we see pictures the leeds fighter became world champion without throwing a punch after arely mucino was unable of him there at the united nations a to defend her crown through injury. few years ago. he was forced from adams will defend her belt against marina salinas of mexico in three weeks' time, office in 2017, but he had been the president of zimbabwe for 37 years. but has one eye on tokyo next year. he was a fixture on the world stage. this it has crossed my mind quite a he was a fixture on the world stage. he was a fixture on the world stage. he was so prominent on news bit recently. i'll just this it has crossed my mind quite a bulletins over so many years, an bit recently. i'lljust have to think about it, see what my coaches irritant for the united kingdom for so irritant for the united kingdom for so long. he had been a fighterfor say, see what the team's saying, and independence for zimbabwe, and he then go from there, really. third spent ten years in prison, as well, gold medal, it does sound really for sedition at one point. and nice. there is a really good place on the mantelpiece, that it could obviously looking back at an incredibly long career. those early just fit right in there. but i will su ccesses incredibly long career. those early successes during his time in office see, we will have to see. we would love to see her back at the of course were then very seriously overshadowed by the significant 0lympics, she brings so much energy. economic decline of the country he that big smile, always. is so intrinsically linked to. we had known he had been ill for some robert mugabe, the former president time. we believe he had been being of zimbabwe, has died. he was 95 and had been treated in hospital in singapore for
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ill for some time. robert mugabe was president from 1987 until he was forced from office in 2017. some time, and the reports that we are getting this morning are coming from there. so just to are getting this morning are coming from there. sojust to remind are getting this morning are coming from there. so just to remind you are getting this morning are coming from there. sojust to remind you of the breaking news that we've had in the breaking news that we've had in the last few moments, that is that robert mugabe has died at the age of 95. he was a notorious figure, he was somebody who gripped onto power, was somebody who gripped onto power, he actually had two spells in charge was hated by many, and yet some thought he was the kind of leader of zimbabwe. a hugely controversial that africa needed. a strong leader, figure. robert mugabe had led the drive for independence, incredibly controversial. we will be serving ten years in reflecting on his life, his legacy, prison for sedition. and bring you more details of his the early successes of his time in office have been overshadowed passing as we come through this morning's programme. in fact, by the economic decline of zimbabwe. passing as we come through this morning's programme. infact, i think we can pause for a moment and and you get an idea of what a reflect on the controversial life of robert mugabe. controversial, notorious figure he was by looking at social media this morning, some of the comments coming out about his life and his legacy. he was once zimbabwe's liberator, the current president of zimbabwe, president mnangagwa, has confirmed leaving a war against white minority rule. but by the end, the adulation that news in the last few days. he
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and love mugabe once enjoyed was says it is with the utmost sadness i announce the passing of one of zimbabwe's announce the passing of one of zimba bwe's founding fathers, announce the passing of one of zimbabwe's founding fathers, former gone. he cemented his power, winning overwhelmingly at elections in 1980. president comrade robert mugabe. he as leader of a new nation, he set dedicated his life to the about creating a better country than emancipation and empowerment of his people. his contribution to the the one he inherited, and for a while he succeeded. there can never be any return to the state of armed conflict which existed before our history of our nation, says the commitment to peace, and the democratic process of election under current president, will never be the lancaster house agreement. forgotten. may his soul rest in eternal peace. of course, he left surely this is now time to beat our zimbabwe a couple of years ago, left office, kicked out of office a couple of years ago after a very, swords into ploughsha res. very difficult few years towards the end, some would say very many surely this is now time to beat our swords into ploughshares. but beneath the veneer lay a dark side. difficult decades during his entire mr mugabe deployed a crack military presidency. so we will reflect on unit to southern zimbabwe to deal his legacy throughout the programme this morning. and we will put his with hundreds of insurgents. between career into some kind of context 1983 in 1990 7,000 were murdered, throughout the morning. and the world turned a blind eye. mugabe was the great hope. but, as wasp 13 b — perhaps not the most the 19905 ended, the economy was exciting name for a planet,
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bottoming out, and a new political but now you could have party was on the rise. seemingly desperate to regain popularity, mr the chance to change that. mugabe played a political hand. land seized by the colonial government was still in the hands of the white please not planet mcplanetface. minority. sensing the frustration, budding astronomers are being gabi encouraged blacks to take back invited to suggest a new name for the exoplanet, which exists their lands, and they did, often hundreds of light years away from our solar system. violently. the western world took it's to mark 100 years of the international astronomical union, which is responsible for officially naming stars, note, breaking diplomatic ties and planets and moons. joining us now is solar physics professor robert walsh imposing economic sanctions. the from the university of central lancashire. good morning to you. this is quite opposition, its leaders, human right5 workers, bore the brunt of an exciting opportunity, isn't it, this anger. in 2008, in the midst of to name an x0 planet? you don't get to name an x0 planet? you don't get to do this every day. it is a 1,000,000,000% inflation and wonderful opportunity, with this widespread unemployment, mr mugabe suffered his first electoral defeat. hundredth anniversary of the iau. it only led to more violence in the second round of voting. britain stripped him of his knighthood and and for young people in the uk in former allies condemned him. we have particular, as we are focusing on it, for them to actually give a name
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to the planets and to the star, that seen the outbreak of violence will be the name by which this star against fellow africans in our own and this planet is known, forever. what is an x0 planet? an x0 planet country, and the tragic failure of is the name we give to an extrasolar planets, a planet with find around a leadership in our neighbouring star that is not our own son, for zimbabwe. but he remained a cultlike example —— exoplanet. 0ut figure among many africans for star that is not our own son, for example —— exoplanet. out to jupiter, these huge gas giants, but daring to challenge western political dominance on the world's we are finding thousands of planets affairs. in retaliation for the around other stars, and we call them measures we took, the black exoplanets planets, short for extrasolar planets. can you choose majority, the united kingdom has mobilised friends and allies in any old name? there are some rules, europe, north america, australia, of course. we don't want planet new zealand, to impose illegal mcplanetface. you can't pick brand economic sanctions against zimbabwe. names, names from the military, and but within his own party, discontent things like that, because of the was rising. many believe he had aspects of this being an opportunity for the world tojoin aspects of this being an opportunity overstayed and needed to hand over for the world to join together under power. his second wife, grace one sky, i suppose, in order to name mugabe, a0 year5 power. his second wife, grace mugabe, a0 years his power. his second wife, grace mugabe, a0 year5 hisjunior, seemed to be gaining power, and she began these planets. but we are looking
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for creativity, we are looking for something may be related to the uk. are you sure about that? but it is accusing the then vice president of for young people to do, so we want trying to oust him. mr mugabe finally fired his long—time aid, accusing him of trying to topple school classes, schools, uniformed him. the vice president, with the help of the military, mounted a organisations, we have joined school classes, schools, uniformed comeback, posting soldiers on the organisations, we havejoined with 5treet5 comeback, posting soldiers on the streets and placing mr mugabe under girlguiding, and foryoung health —— house arrest. ten5 organisations, we havejoined with girlguiding, and for young people to come up with a really creative name. streets and placing mr mugabe under health —— house arrest. tens of an expert panel will filter those thousands of zimbabweans marched, calling on him to step down, and names and towards the end of november there will be a public after the threat of impeachment he resigned. in his last years, mr vote, so people will be able to vote mugabe had retreated to the on five or six names which young seclusion of his mansion. many will remember him as a gifted orator and people have come up with, and visionary, who liberated zimbabwe, whoever wins that vote, they will be the winner of the competition, and but later returned her to the that will be the name of the planet shackles but later returned her to the 5 ha ckle5 of but later returned her to the and the staff. sounds very exciting. any ideas? early thoughts?” shackles of oppression. and the staff. sounds very exciting. any ideas? early thoughts? ithink jon would be good. have you got any reflecting on the life and the ideas. it is quite difficult, legacy of robert mugabe, former really, because you want to come up president of zimbabwe, whose death has been confirmed just in the last few minutes to us here on bbc news. with something that is notjust
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we are hoping to talk to several people this morning who dealt with ordinary but is quite special. there him over the years and had close we re ordinary but is quite special. there were things from literature, for example, that people can look at. contact with him, to look back on but i don't want to put too many his career and the impact he had on ideas and people's heads, because we wa nt ideas and people's heads, because we want people to be creative. if you his career and the impact he had on go to the website, which is exoworld.co.uk, you can see his country. competition rules, and take the lets check in with mike. good opportunity to learn more about astronomy, science generally, and morning. and all eyes on the cricket make a mark on the universe, actually name a planet. remind us again. —— let us check in with mike. again of the website, because there might be teachers and parents the euphoria of headingley, and steve smith was out with concussion. watching. exoworld. co. uk. he is back. and we make that happen ain? he is back. and we make that happen again? everyone is thinking we need might be teachers and parents watching. exoworld.co.uk. 0k, we rain from england fans, and ben will follow that and look forward to finding out what the name is.|j will follow that and look forward to finding out what the name is. i will come back and tell you. stokes, who has a sore shoulder. but if anyone can rescue england, he let's go talk to someone else now can. all that happened at headingley who likes to look at the sky. matt has the weather this morning from st katharine docks in london. has gone out the window again. steve that is so true. i do spend a lot of smith has once again proved what a fantastic regular he is. —— time looking at the sky. we are here at the classic boat festival and cricketer he is. steve smith hit a double century behind me here is the most as australia dominated the second recognisable vessel of the mall. the
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day of the fourth test against england. smith made 211 as the tourists eventually declared on a97—8 royal barge 0riana from the diamond at old trafford. england will resume on 23—1. jubilee in 2012. a british built serena williams cruised through to the final of the us open, beating elina svitolina boat and it is now here to promote in striaght sets. —— straight sets. the terms and the opportunities she will have a chance to win available on the river to young a record—equaliing 2ath grand slam singles title when she faces 19—year—old bianca andreescu people. —— the thames. will also in tomorrow's final. and a calamitous own goal from luxembourg's kevin malget gave northern ireland a 1—0 win have a look at some of the dunkirk in a friendly in belfast. they host germany in a euro 2020 small boats later on. there is a bit ofa small boats later on. there is a bit of a chill in the air but it is dry qualifier on monday. and bright and hopefully it will stay that way all day long because we will have more in the papers in a things are changing. let's look at moment. the forecast for today because at matt has the weather this morning the forecast for today because at the moment we have an area of low from st katharine docks in london. pressure getting close by once again. weather fronts it looks lovely where you are. good pressure getting close by once again. weatherfronts move across scotla nd again. weatherfronts move across scotland and northern ireland morning. good morning to you both. through the night, moving into northern england, north wales and the midlands. we have conditions to not a bad start down here at the start the day with cloud. wright and moment. it is calm with a gentle showery to the north of that, a breeze. a complete contrast to the bright start across southern parts
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other side of the atlantic. the with hazy sunshine but the clouds moving further south central and southern parts will turn gold. some hurricane was quite remarkable, a rain here and there. not everyone devastating storm in the bahamas. as a note, not only was it one of the will see a. the northern half of the uk will have sunshine this afternoon but a coolum blustery wind bringing quickest strengthening storms on record, it became one of the inafew but a coolum blustery wind bringing strongest storms to make landfall in in a few showers did temperatures today down to where they should be at this time of year, 13— 18 the atlantic hurricane recorded degrees. as we finish the day, history. it also became unbelievably cloudiest across the southern counties of england and again a slow—moving, one of the strongest little bit of rain. a few showers yet slowest moving storms ever further north but during the night recorded. and it was the length of the showers become fewer in number. time it spent in the bahamas that some will be centred around caused the devastation we have seen. liverpool to the central midlands since it left it has sped up a and some will drift across scotland little. we look at whether storm is and some will drift across scotland and down the eastern counties. a at the moment, it worked its way much further north. satellite breezy night and that. the temperature from dropping too much imagery shows a swell of cloud but it will be a cool start to the weekend. the weekend for many is offshore parts of north carolina. the centre of the storm with still looking predominantly dry. a few showers around liverpool bay and the having wind of over 100 miles an north—west midlands to start with. hour, close to making landfall again showers down the eastern counties of toa hour, close to making landfall again to a storm surge is still possible england are heavy here and there. a along the coast of north carolina and there will be torrential rain. flash flooding that make will be a chilly and strong breeze on
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saturday. a bit warmerfurther west major issue and plenty of tornadoes is well linked in with the storm. where the wind is lighter and the that will hang around the carolinas sunshine is out. 17— 19 degrees. just through the next 12 hours and thenit where those winds fall light through the night, clear skies could bring a just through the next 12 hours and then it shoots off towards parts of eastern canada, of all places, where cold night. it only for a few. most it could still be a category one hurricane and it will eventually places will be frost free. are pass over to the north of us here in chilly but lovely sunny start for the uk. however, for us we will know sunday, good news for the great north run. and it will stay dry for nothing really about it. no the day with just a couple of different really to what we have seen through the weekjust gone. showers as the cloud starts to that is how it looks on the other increase. a cool weekend at at least side of the atlantic. let's have a it will be a largely dry one. look at ourselves and see what is happening in the uk forecast. we have a low pressure close by and we tripadvisor has been accused by the consumer group which? have a low pressure close by and we have fairly breezy conditions with of not doing enough to tackle fake us. the weather front that you can see there on the chart is pushing southwards through the night with reviews on its website. rain there. narrowing across england what is this about fake reviews? how and wales. the north midlands are do they even get on there? we have talked about it a little bit because likely to see outbreaks of rain through the morning rush hour this is not just talked about it a little bit because this is notjust travel websites but also things like online shopping although a few showers popping across scotland and northern ireland sites. the real issue is whether could see little sunshine did east anglia in the south—east at the those reviews that we put a lot of.
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moment have brightness, a little sunshine to start the friday under we rely on quite a lot, whether they way. sunshine is increasingly hazy are receiving as is suggested. and and the clouds bringing ring ranges southern parts through the afternoon. and with the breeze it it is big business because more than looks to be fairly cool. sticking in half of uk adults use those reviews the teens for all of us, around 18 to determine what they will purchase or19 the teens for all of us, around 18 or 19 at the very highest. we and it will influence about £23 billion worth of spending in the uk. finished the day with rain across southern counties of england were so it really is big business and one showers elsewhere. clear skies that these websites are trying to around for many deny but we will get right. 0ne still see showers here and there that these websites are trying to get right. one of the biggest with north—east england and north problems is hotels. and so the wales down the eastern coast of consumer group look at hotels and scotla nd wales down the eastern coast of scotland and england and as the windfalls light in the west it will bring a chilly night and the breeze the trip advisor reviews on these sites and they found there was making beach bum actualfelt. —— irrefutable evidence, in their words, that some hotels were being making beach bum actualfelt. —— making the chill felt. some showers posted three were being boosted. we found that tripadvisor could be rife here, morning showers across parts of north—west england in the with fake reviews, misleading customers into spending their hard midlands, north wales, they will earned muggy on hotels that do not ease into the afternoon and then in live up to expectation. this is an central and western areas it will be sunny and in the breeze it will be ongoing issue. we flagged this in
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chilly. still a few showers to end the day across parts of the 2015, particularly around tripadvisor and it is still happening today. what did they find south—east. is the windfalls light saturday night into sunday out? are they scouring through and checking? there was a lot they had temperatures will head down to single fingers, some of you two or to get through because the sheer three degrees as we start sunday volume of reviews on the site is morning and idsa a touch of frost on incredible to so they looked at 250,000 reviews and basically looked some cars and well sheltered rural at the top ten ranked hotels for ten areas. are dry and bright start to popular tourist destinations around the world. this is where it gets sunday. a dry day was sunny spell. interesting. they looked at the still feeling a little chilly but in the sunshine throughout this weekend number of 5—star reviews from and out of the breeze it should first—time reviewers, people who had still feel reasonably pleasant. it reviewed nothing else except the one hotel, giving it 5—star dig they compared it to a number of people was almost getting brighter every who had done it on the first time moment as we listened to him. i will but on average gave three star remind you now have the breaking reviews. and that is the suggestion. news we have had here in the last if you only review it once and give few minutes this morning. we heard it five stars, the chances are it is at about seven minutes past six a fake. 17 hotels like that. does tend report that robert mugabe, the former president of zimbabwe has to be that if you review something passed away. '5 death was announced you would think, well, this was fine and this was ok and that. but it a short time ago. he was 95. he had could be improved here. unless you beeniu a short time ago. he was 95. he had been ill for quite some time. he was are easily impressed. and you would
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review other hotels as well. and president from 1987 until he was thatis review other hotels as well. and that is the reason. 0ne review other hotels as well. and that is the reason. one in seven of forced from office in 2017. a hugely controversial figure who has the hotels found had hallmarks of forced from office in 2017. a hugely controversialfigure who has been forced from office in 2017. a hugely controversial figure who has been on the world stage for decades. we being utterly made up. and this understand he spent a lot of time over the last few years since being kicked out of the office in report by which reported 15 of these singapore where he had been in ill cases already to tripadvisor and 1a hills and it seems that is where he of them had already been warned before of fake reviews and the died. we havejust seen in the hills and it seems that is where he died. we have just seen in the last website had done nothing about it. few minutes, actually, that the current president of zimbabwe has tripadvisor dispute some of the put on twitter that it is with the findings saying it is too simplistic and they have been trying aggressively to catch as many fake reviews as they can. but they told maoist sadness i confirm the passing of one of zimbabwe '5 former —— us that after that investigation founding fathers. he dedicated —— it into tripadvisor, suddenly hundreds of reviews had disappeared so clearly tripadvisor is worried about this and there for removing them. is with the utmost sadness i confirm the big problem is how to spot a the passing of a founding father of fa ke the big problem is how to spot a fake review in the first place. and zimbabwe. he says may this soul rest thatis fake review in the first place. and that is a big challenge. it is not that is a big challenge. it is not that easy, it could be that you are easily impressed or excited about in internal peach. and when you look staying somewhere. so what they have at the comments that follow that it
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a lwa ys at the comments that follow that it always does in politics but you are said is that often products or reminded of what a controversial and places that have many positive in some ways much hated figure reviews within a short period of time tend to be fake. also look at robert mugabe was for some people. what else they have reviewed. if you incredibly controversial and this are only reviewing one thing, chances are it is probably a bit legacy is not reflected upon fondly fake. so let's listen to what which at all by many millions of people. said were the top tips. if you want we will reflect on this legacy and to buy anything online looking at this career throughout the programme user reviews, the top tips are to this career throughout the programme this morning. let's take a look at today's papers. look for repetition. often you will most of the papers again lead find fake reviews are uploaded in with borisjohnson's woes. the guardian says the prime bulk with the same words and phrases minister's brotherjojohnson repeating time and time again. you is "putting country before family" should also look at whether the by resigning from the government. reviews all happened at the same the mirror declares "even boris' time. that is often another giveaway that the reviews are not legitimate. own family don't trust him". finally, shop around to just that the reviews are not legitimate. the paper claims, as well as his finally, shop around tojust rely that the reviews are not legitimate. finally, shop around to just rely on a single website for your review. if brother quitting, his sister rachel has told the pm to "climb down many websites tell you the same from the greasy pole". thing it is more likely to be trustworthy. so there are top tips the express focuses on the comments from which. anything written in all capitals tends to be fake anything made by borisjohnson yesterday with weird grammar off punctuation
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tends to be fake. and in the next that he would "rather be dead in a ditch" than delay brexit. the times reckons there'll be no hour we will speak to tripadvisor election until brexit is delayed. themselves. and we will find out and, look at that cute picture what they are doing to because so of princess charlotte on her first many people rely on sites like this day at school, being looked and if you have been subject to any after by her big brother prince george. of these false reviews, get in touch with us. and we will put that to trip advisor. he looks like a happier big brother than maybe borisjohnson was we broke the news a short time ago yesterday, reflecting on this own about the fact that robert mugabe, sibling issues. that does look the former president of zimbabwe had rather harmonious. died and joining us now is the former liberal party minister, a more black, asian and minority ethnic people are donating prominent critic of mist mugabe over their organs than ever before, but could long—held beliefs in some communities be stopping many more from giving decades, peter rain. thank you very or receiving life—saving treatment? much forjoining us. he is somebody new nhs figures suggest demand for a transplant in minority you fought against and campaigned communities, is still much higher against for many years. how will you than the number of available donors, as brea kfast‘s graham now react and remember him? he was a tragic case study of somebody who i satchell reports. personally supported when he came to power in 1980, having replaced,
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this power on their way to collect overturned, the old white racist their son from this first day at regime of ian smith that repress the school. i can't believe he is in full time school. is a day that i black majority with its racist rule. and mugabe came into power as never thought that we would somebody respected with a history of envisage, especially when we were given 2a hours for him to be either sacrifice and imprisonment in the liberation struggle and we welcomed live or die, essentially. 0h, it. and then i met him in 1999, 19 given 2a hours for him to be either live or die, essentially. oh, my yea rs it. and then i met him in 1999, 19 years later, and he came to visit goodness! hello, my mother. how was london with this wife, grace, who your first day. he wasjust a few was a serial shopper. i met him on a friday evening. we had bad relations weeks old when doctors discovered he had a serious and rare liver with the government because we had condition. they said he has a 50% chance of getting liver cancer by been criticising him for this humid the time this five years old. but my rights record and corruption and so on. anyway we got along well and said that we know your record, that world fell apart. he was in and out you are one of us, let's build a new of hospital with this condition future. next morning, a gay rights
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getting worse as this mother and the activist committed a citizen '5 arrest on him for this homophobia family waited and waited for a donor organ. it was becoming desperate to they gave us 2a hours to find a and mugabe went absolutely mad. he donor and that desperation as a blamed me for the process although i knew nothing about it and started parent. you will never know that denouncing me as the wife of the desperation until you go through that, as we were. we were beside protester which was news to peter, to me and my wife. relations went ourselves. they said just be downhill after that. he started prepared. you may have to wait longer on the chance land lift seizing farms and committing terrible violence on the white because we don't get many donors from ethnic minority groups so be farmers and seizing those farms, prepared. but that weight was destroying the jobs of hundreds of agonising. she is a gp. and her black workers on each farm and things went into a terrible downward spiral. how did he stay in power for father is the imams of a local so very long? because he made sure mosque. someone's limbs believe organ donation is not allowed in their faith so this pair have been that he warm elections, even when he lost them. there was a good example working hard to change hearts and minds. if i can working hard to change hearts and minds. ifi can get working hard to change hearts and minds. if i can get the conversation in the mid—20005 of losing an started in our community to discuss election to the opposition leader
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things like this. we must, as a faith and a community, and as a and he clearly lost the election in the first round and would have lost culture to be able to develop with it in the second round quite clearly the technological advances that are coming about in medicine. people because it was a run—off and so he from a minority ethnic background are more likely to need a trans started to violently attack the plant because they are more prone to opposition to the point where the leader said he cannot take this conditions like diabetes but they wait longer because there are not people, this party and this enough donors. after an agonising followers into an election where they will be beaten and killed and wait, the young boy eventually had a intimidated and so he conceded the young —— liver transplant and as you result to mugabe. gabi then took him can see he is doing well. 0rgan donation is anonymous. all this in as this own deputy but it was not mother knows is that this new liver came from an eight—year—old boy who satisfactory in the country continue died after falling off this to deteriorate. i'm afraid we have came from an eight—year—old boy who died afterfalling off this bike. how those parents found that courage to deteriorate. i'm afraid we have to leave it there but for now, thank you very much indeed. the news today in the darkest of times to say yes, it is ok. you can have our organs. that the former president of zimbabwe, robert mugabe has died. now, let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. asa it is ok. you can have our organs. as a mother. i don't think i can
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good morning from bbc london, ever comprehend. to be able to do i'm victoria hollins. a woman from london who is campaigning to protect victims of so—called revenge porn — after her friend became a target — that shows me that there are good is calling for more regulation of websites that show pornographic material. people, there is kindness and humanity. their baby is with me bbc london has spoken a number of women who say explicit every day and i am looking after him images of them posted online without their consent has and this legacy is definitely living ruined their life. now kate isaacs wants the law in this country changed to give on. my goodness. what an incredible women, like herfriend better protection. story. and so wonderful to see the how was this porn website child so well. thank you to him and allowed to host the content without her permission? this family for sharing that story. graham satchell reporting. time now to get the news, anything in place at the moment is not working and we know that so it is time for the government to step in and start regulating this massive industry. dashboard and head camera footage has helped the met police travel and weather where you are. take action against more than 2,000 people in the first six months of this year. the footage— from both cars and cyclists— can be uploaded and sent directly to the force. a,000 people sent material between january and june.
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60 years ago, the river good morning from bbc london, thames was declared biologically dead — i'm victoria hollins. but today it's thriving, with many species of fish, a woman from london who is campaigning to protect victims of so—called revenge porn — after her friend became a target — sea horse, porpoise and even sharks. is calling for more regulation of websites that show pornographic material. a new virtual reality experience is opening by london bridge to show people exactly what's living bbc london has spoken a number in the river. of women who say explicit it's part of a new campaign by zsl to get people to think images of them posted online without their consent has about the importance of the thames. ruined their life. now kate isaacs wants the law in this country changed to give women, like herfriend let's take a look at the travel situation now. better protection. there are currently severe delays on the metropolitan line between how was this website allowed to host wembley park and aldgate. that is the content without her permission? due to a new signalling system. that what we have in place at the moment is not working and we know onto the roads: in lewisham there's one lane closed for gas mains work that so it is time for the on a20 lee high road westbound government to step in and start near the junction with belmont hill. regulating this massive industry. dashboard and head camera footage and the a10 kingsland road has helped the met police is closed in both directions between philip street take action against more than 2,000 and nuttall street due people in the first six months to an incident being dealt of this year. with by the police. the footage — from both now the weather with cars and cyclists— can be uploaded and sent elizabeth rizzini. good morning.
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directly to the force. it will feel a bit more like autumn at times today. nothing too dramatic in the forecast a,000 people sent material but a few weather fronts are likely between january and june. to give us some wet weather through the afternoon with outbreaks 60 years ago, the river of light and patchy rain. thames was declared biologically dead — a lot of cloud and still a brisk but today it's thriving, with many species of fish, sea horse, porpoise and even sharks. north—westerly wind blowing as well. a new virtual reality experience it is a chilly start to the morning is opening by london bridge to show particularly for south—eastern areas where the cloud is likely to thicken people exactly what's living in the river. through the morning. it's part of a new campaign by zsl to get people to think a grey and dull day with outbreaks about the importance of the thames. of rain wet weather particularly let's take a look at through the afternoon and some late brightness developing for more the travel situation now. northern areas especially. tops between 16 and 18 degrees it is ok on the tubes but there are and it will feel windy at times severe delays on the metropolitan with a chilly north—westerly wind. line because of the new signalling system. overnight tonight we will see a lot 0nto the roads: in lewisham there's of that cloud break up with good one lane closed for gas mains work clear spells around and temperatures on a20 lee high road westbound near the junction with belmont hill. will drop back to single figures. and the a10 kingsland road is closed in both directions again, a cool start to the weekend. between philip street and nuttall street due to an incident being dealt with by the police. it will feel chilly at times this weekend with a northerly wind
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now the weather with blowing although that will lighten on sunday. should be dry with a lot of sunshine elizabeth rizzini. although we mayjust catch a few showers on saturday afternoon. i'm back with the latest good morning. it will feel a bit from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. more like more automatic times plenty more on our website at the usual address. today. nothing too dramatic in the bye for now. forecast but a few weather fronts are likely to give us some wet weather through the afternoon with outbreaks of light and patchy rain. a lot of cloud and still a brisk good morning. north—westerly wind blowing as well. welcome to breakfast, withjon kay and sally nugent. it isa north—westerly wind blowing as well. it is a chilly start to the morning our headlines today: particularly for south—eastern areas robert mugabe, the former where the cloud is likely to thicken president of zimbabwe, through the morning. a grand old day has died aged 95 after a long illness. with outbreaks of rain wet weather particularly through the afternoon you should be in brussels, negotiating! and some late brightness developing yes, we have been negotiating. for more than areas especially. tops you are not. you are in morley, in leeds! between 16 and 18 degrees and it a prime minister under pressure. will feel windy at times with a chilly north—westerly wind. after his brother quits, 0vernight tonight we will see a lot borisjohnson's hopes of a snap election hang in the balance. of that cloud wake up with good aid starts arriving in the bahamas, clear spells around and temperatures amid warnings that the death toll from hurricane dorian will drop back to single figures. a could be staggering. cool start to the weekend again. it spotting a fake review. will feel chilly at times this a which investigation claims tripadvisor is failing to stop some weekend with a northerly wind lowing
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of its hotels from being artificially boosted by bogus although that will lighten on and suspicious ratings. sunday. should be dry with a lot of and coming up in the sport: sunshine although we mayjust catch a few showers on saturday afternoon. michael owen will be here to tell us i'm back with the latest about that goal he scored from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. against argentina. and i am at the classic boat hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and sally festival at st katharine docks in nugent. london. a gentle breeze, dry at the moment but some rain around across the uk. i will have the full details we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. right here on breakfast. but also on breakfast this morning: michael 0wen's autobiography has caused a bit of a stir since its publication last week. the former england footballer will robert mugabe, the former president tell us all about it after 7:30am. of zimbabwe, has died. he was 95 and had been can you trust the online ill for some time. reviews of the hotel you are looking to book? mr mugabe was president from 1987 until he was forced from office in 2017. as sites like tripadvisor are accused of not doing enough to take down fake reviews, we will hear from the company's uk the early successes of his time in office have been overshadowed director about the by the economic decline of zimbabwe. action he is taking. and later, how the power shingai nyoka looks of music can help people
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through difficult times. back at his life. the broadcaster mark radcliffe will he was once zimbabwe's liberator, leading a war be here to share his experience. against white minority rule. good morning. but by the end, the adulation here is a summary of today's main president robert mugabe once stories from bbc news: enjoyed was gone. robert mugabe, the former president he cemented his power winning of zimbabwe, has died. he was 95 and had been overwhelmingly at elections in 1980. as leader of a new nation, ill for some time. robert mugabe was president he set about creating a better from 1987 until he was forced country than the one he inherited, from office in 2017. he had earlier been prime minister and for a while, he succeeded. of zimbabwe for the first seven years after independence in 1980. robert mugabe had led there can never be any return the drive for independence, serving ten years in to the state of armed conflict prison for sedition. the early successes of his time in office have been overshadowed 00:31:44,043 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 by the economic decline of zimbabwe. which existed before our commitment to peace, and the democratic process of election under the lancaster house agreement. surely this is now time to beat our swords into ploughsha res. but beneath the veneer lay a dark side. mr mugabe deployed a crack military unit to southern zimbabwe to deal with hundreds of insurgents.
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between 1983 and 1987, thousands were murdered, and the world turned a blind eye. in 2008, in the midst of billion—percent inflation and widespread unemployment, mr mugabe suffered his first electoral defeat. it only led to more violence in the second round of voting. britain stripped him of his knighthood. but he remained a cultlike figure among many africans for daring to challenge western political dominance on the world's affairs. but within his own party, discontent was rising. many believe he had overstayed and needed to hand over power. his second wife, grace mugabe, a0 years his junior, seemed to be gaining power, and she began accusing then—vice president emmerson mnangagwa of trying to oust him. mr mugabe finally fired his long—time aid, accusing him of trying to topple him.
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mnangagwa with the help of the military mounted a comeback, posting soldiers on the streets and placing mr mugabe under house arrest. tens of thousands of zimbabweans marched, calling on him to step down, and after the threat of impeachment, he resigned. in his last years, mr mugabe had retreated to the seclusion of his mansion. many will remember him as a gifted orator and visionary, who liberated zimbabwe, but later returned her to the shackles of oppression. robert mugabe died in singapore overnight. a hugely controversial figure and a man who had been on the world stage for decades. we were
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joined a few moments ago by a former labour politician now in the house of lords for labour, and anti—apartheid campaigner who was born in africa himself, and he was talking about how robert mugabe began his career feted as a world leader, as an emancipator, as a war hero, and yet ended up being so notorious as someone who wrecked zimbabwe's notorious as someone who wrecked zimba bwe's economy, trashed notorious as someone who wrecked zimbabwe's economy, trashed human rights, ended up being kicked out of office a couple of years ago, and now dies in singapore. fascinating to hear the reaction from zimbabwe and other parts of africa and around the world to the news this morning that robert mugabe has died at the age of 90 five. we will of course have much more analysis of his life and career, what happened, how the path of his career change so significantly, throughout the programme. now we will bring you up—to—date on the latest... i almost wa nt to up—to—date on the latest... i almost want to say general election news. he would like to make it an
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election, but can he? the prime minister will be in scotland today after losing a series of crucial votes in the commons. he will announce millions of pounds for the scottish farming industry as he continues to press for a general election. but labour have warned they'll block the move until they've made sure the government can't leave the eu without a deal. joining us from westminster is our political correspondent chris mason and our brussels reporter adam fleming. they are normally not allowed to be seenin they are normally not allowed to be seen in the same place together. good morning to you. good morning. what do you talk about when you're not talking about brexit, so let's talk about brexit! where do we stand this morning? chris, to start with, talk of a labour party opposition meeting or phone call today. is that right? to try and nail down their position? yes, there will be a conference call in a couple of hours' time, jeremy corbyn will host
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it and have other opposition parties on the phone. they are realising there is a wounded prime minister as a result of what has happened in parliament, winded by what has happened with his brother yesterday, and they have him in a bit of a corner. if they act together, they have a majority and borisjohnson doesn't and they can shape when that general election is, and they hope increasingly they can force the prime minister against his will to have to ask for another delay to brexit and have a general election after that point rather than before it, as mrjohnson wants. that he said only yesterday he would rather die ina said only yesterday he would rather die in a ditch then do that. well, this is exactly the bind the opposition parties want to put the government in. government sources are saying we will not break the law, because the opposition wants to put him in a blind where he either breaks his promise or he breaks the law. the government has said they are not going to break the law. how do you square that circle? do you spend somebody else —— send somebody else to brussels? if you do that,
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they are acting on the authority of they are acting on the authority of the prime minister. it would be deeply awkward and we don't know how that would play out. that is exactly the bind the opposition party is increasingly attempting to force the prime minister into. they have to hang together. remember, the opposition parties oppose each other, normally, as well as opposing the conservatives, so holding together is not easy. and a flying visit to westminster for you. what do they make of the last few days in brussels? they have a lot of questions about what it means, michel barnier, the chief negotiator for the eu, was in a meeting with ambassadors from the eu 27 and he posed questions about what this talk would mean. what does it mean for the process happening now where david frost is in brussels talking to them about revising the deal? would that stop if there was a general election, because normally most government business grinds to a
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halt when there is an election campaign on, and then michel barnier said hang on, if we in the eu agree anything with the uk now in this pre—election period, would it survive in the post—election period. but in the short term what they are getting their teeth into is the changes the uk wants to the withdrawal agreements, and the brexit agreement. david frost was in brussels on wednesday for an initial meeting with the eu team. we got a of that meeting yesterday from diplomats who were briefed on it, and it turns out the uk is really serious about getting rid of the northern irish backstop, do you remember the insurance policy for making sure there was an open border between northern ireland and ireland, whatever happens in the future. the government has said we wa nt to future. the government has said we want to strip out this bit, this bit, this bit, this bit, and this bit, this bit, this bit, and this bit, leaving only the bare essentials. the eu are not happy about that. they say that amounts to the withdrawal agreements with the unpopular bits crossed out but with nothing to replace them. so we'll david frost, who is having a meeting in brussels today, present some
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alternatives to that! the eu is not sure there are any alternatives that can be presented, or that could ever work. biggest part of me wonders whether the eu will be enjoying the discomfort or the unravelling of westminster. but i suppose it makes the eu's own position much more complicated, doesn't it, because they don't know what they are dealing with or what the parameters are. yes, enjoying it is definitely not the word diplomats were using with me yesterday. exasperation, disastrous, fluff was one of the words to describe what the uk is presenting. the eu will have to sit and waitand presenting. the eu will have to sit and wait and see what happens. i think what they are betting on is that there will be a reaction fairly soon, and will that election be before the brexit date of 31 october and they will be dealing with a similar government or a completely new one, or willie election, after 31 october, in which case they will have to deal with probably an extension to the brexit process to
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allow that election to happen. they are allow that election to happen. they a re pretty allow that election to happen. they are pretty bamboozled about what is going on, to be honest. we are all pretty bamboozled. i am assuming the reason you two are together, face—to—face, is because you are recording brexitcast? yes, and it was being filmed in our radio — tv studio, because we are coming to your television screens in bbc one. it isa your television screens in bbc one. it is a frightening prospect perhaps for viewers, and certainly for us, because normally we are just in a radio studio. should i say this? picking our nose, staring at the floor, and using radio to its advantages, not having cameras. suddenly they will be cameras, and we will have to be very conscious of that. it should be fun. it starts next week. they do make it fun. i have already listened to it this morning on my way to work. blamey, you are dedicated, aren't you? they
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do, they make it fun, they make it interesting —— blimey. the government in the bahamas has warned of a staggering death toll from hurricane dorian. 23 people have been confirmed dead, but that number is expected to rise substantially. the hurricane has moved on and is now battering the coasts of south and north carolina. tens of thousands of homes are without power. tim allman reports. woman: oh, my gosh, things are blowing up there. slowly, relentlessly, dorian continues to move up america's eastern seaboard. this is charleston, south carolina underwater, a deluge of rain turning one of the city's main streets into a river. in wilmington, in neighbouring north carolina, high winds led to isolated tornadoes. no—one here is underestimating
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the potential danger. hurricane dorian is ready to unleash its fury on our state. the storm has regained strength, it is serious, and it can be deadly. they don't need to be told that in the bahamas, where dorian has already caused what has been described as unimaginable destruction. the worst—hit island, grande abaco, is said to be virtually uninhabitable. tens of thousands need help and the country's health minister says the final death toll will be staggering. the wind just had us fearfulfor our life. it was just horrific. and to see the devastation now, with all the bodies laying around, ifeel that god has turned his back on the beautiful island of abaco. rescue operations are under way, the us coastguard helping evacuate people by helicopter.
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and this is dorian seen from the international space station. the giant storm moves on. the danger isn't over yet. tim allman, bbc news. it is quarter past seven on friday morning and let's bring you more '5 news now on the breaking story that robert mugabe, the former president of zimbabwe has died. more reflection now on this life and career from reflection now on this life and careerfrom our reflection now on this life and career from our correspondent who joins us now from nairobi. our correspondent merchuma joins us from nairobi. he was a controversial figure and many people today are referring to him as iconic. he fought against white supremacy in this country and liberated zimbabwe but there is also a negative side that people talk about, he was controversial. people
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talk about how he brought zimbabwe to its knees and in the last stages of this rule with rigging elections. reading through the history of this time in power, obviously you mention the economy of the country. is criticised for basically running the country into the ground. how has the country into the ground. how has the cou ntry recovered country into the ground. how has the country recovered from that time?” think it is too early to say that zimbabwe has recovered from the downfall that it went through economically. because it has only been two years since mugabe was ousted from power and now president mac three is in control. zimbabwe is not where it used to be 30 years ago so it will take a while for it to return to where it is an economic powerhouse, especially considering its position in africa. so zimbabwe
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is yet to recover from the financial and economic crisis that it went through over the last few years of mugabe ‘s through over the last few years of mugabe '5 rule. through over the last few years of mugabe 's rule. someone this morning said he was poisoned by power and ended up being surrounded by people who said yes to him too many times. is that where it went wrong? you remember well that mugabe once said he would rule until god says no. and he would rule until god says no. and he was ousted from power by the military. that the notion of african leaders including mugabe clinging on to power and ruling with a chest thumping is one that is making africa '5 democracy and development not go as fast as it should and, yes, i think that mugabe ‘s not go as fast as it should and, yes, i think that mugabe '5 rain is one of such an example. he was very much of his time. do you think there will ever be anyone like him again? will that be allowed to happen
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ain? will that be allowed to happen again? i am not so sure about that because mnangagwa who succeeded mugabe as only two years into power. the tendency of some african leaders staying in power longer than they are meant to be is a prima donna is there. it is difficult to say whether the current president or any after him would want to hold onto power as long as mugabe did. but his method of delaying things was unique and even if another one comes it will be very much up to his character and how he carries himself and how he manages to rule zimbabwe to make people crowd around him and look at him. thank you very much for that analysis this morning. you can tell from those pictures that very
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clearly show how he was able to make eve ryo ne clearly show how he was able to make everyone look at him. in that conflict between the smiling and sometimes charming, apparently, president and then behind the scenes brutality. there are stories on social media this morning of being beaten up or challenged or human rights being ignored. so a complex task we have this morning of trying to put the legacy and memory of robert mugabe into some kind of context. it is nearly 20 past seven. friday morning. let's go somewhere pretty and see matt who is in london. good morning to everyone at home. i am here at saint catherine docs in london, the only marina and it is the classic boat festival with a lot of lovely vessels, some of them behind me including the dunkirk little ships. they took part in the
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rescue of allied troops during world war iifrom rescue of allied troops during world war ii from the beaches of dunkirk, of course. and that is just some of the boats. over a0 vintage vessels to have a look at including one of the last operating wooden barges here in the uk that will be taking trips under the bridge that is just by us. conditions here almost ideal, just a gentle breeze at the moment so sunshine overhead at the moment and it will stay that way through the day. and if we take a look at the day. and if we take a look at the forecast for today there are changes afoot across southern areas as we go through the day. and through the night, across parts of northern england, north wales and the north midlands, the rain will turn patchy but still somewhat heavy inafew turn patchy but still somewhat heavy in a few spots. clearing away hopefully from old trafford by the end of the morning. a few showers later on but it does mean the cloud and outbreaks of rain are heading toward southern counties as we head into the afternoon. this afternoon,
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sunshine and a few showers but quite blustery and fairly cool and temperatures are well down where they should be at this time of year. 13- 18 they should be at this time of year. 13— 18 celsius for the vast majority as we finish the dated as we finish the day there is still cloud four she rain across the south of england, clearing this evening to a few showers tonight across the likes of northern and eastern scotland pushing into the east of england. and with clear skies in between and winds falling light in the west, temperatures will drop to the cool side but the breeze should keep them up side but the breeze should keep them upfor many side but the breeze should keep them up for many as we head to the start of the weekend. if you have plans this weekend, there is some good news with a lot of dry weather around but a few exceptions on saturday around liverpool bay, north—east wales and the midlands there will be a few morning showers. and towards east anglia during the afternoon. cold wind down those eastern coasts of scotland and england with temperatures at 13, 1a celsius at as. better further west with clear skies, sunshine and light
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wind. with client —— clears guys taking us into sunday night, so will feel chilly. a touch of frost in well sheltered rural areas. sunshine for the morning, a bit more cloud in the afternoon, possibly a few showers in scotland and northern ireland but most will stay dry on sunday. a little on the cool side outside the sun but in the sun, wherever you are this weekend it should still feel pleasant. overall, it's temperatures heading down from where they should be. there is plenty to do this weekend here. a few activities that i will show you in the next hour. will you be heading up the mast? maybe in theresa may's final days as prime minister, she vowed to introduce a new law, which would transform the protection available to victims of domestic abuse. but a few months later, it's feared
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the suspension of parliament, and the possibility of a general election, could see the bill lost before it's had the chance to be approved by mps. joining us now is charlotte kneer, a domestic abuse survivor and campaigner. thank you for talking to us today. asa thank you for talking to us today. as a survivor, someone who has lived through it and someone who now helps people who are going through domestic abuse to go to court, how important is this bill? i cannot even begin to describe how important it is that this does not get dropped. so many thousands of survivors have contributed to this bill, so much work has gone into it. it absolutely must not get dropped. what are the nuts and bolts of it? there are some elements, some great and some little bit unusual. but the great bits must remain and i think one of the main things is that
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survivors being cross—examined in court by their perpetrator is absolutely horrific, something that most of us could not even begin to comprehend. that is brilliant but thatis comprehend. that is brilliant but that is in the bill. there is a definition of domestic abuse which is including coercive and controlling behaviour which has not beenin controlling behaviour which has not been in there before. and that is great because it improves everybody‘s understanding of what domestic abuse is. there are just so many good things about it and it has taken so much work. it has been going on for a good few years now and it has had delay after delay. and to now be in a position where the new prime minister has not committed. we heard rumblings of hopefully he will continue it all we will look into it. what we want is simple. one sentence, yes we are definitely committed to continuing with this bill. to me, that does not seem difficult. i think of the prime
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minister wants to send a strong message to victims, that he cares about them and cares about the two women a week who are murdered in the uk, then all he needs to do is come out and say yes, we will continue. so when you are watching the fallout and the twists and turns in westminster this week and we are talking about brexit and the opposition and general elections, what you think about, i guess, is very different. is your heart sink when you think, my goodness. this bill could go. it is. obviously! when you think, my goodness. this bill could go. it is. obviously i am as addicted to the news as everyone is at the moment. it is just a matter of what will happen next, what is the next twist and turn. but for me, obviously, my priorities standing upfor for me, obviously, my priorities standing up for the of domestic abuse and this will is something that so many of us worked so hard to get. obviously i'm interested in the rest of it for me and other survivors this is the most important pa rt survivors this is the most important part about what is going on at the
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moment. and itjust cannot slip away. we cannot let this chance slip away. we cannot let this chance slip away. too many victims for too long have felt that we are not being listened to, that not enough has been done. this was, oh my god, is finally someone is listening when theresa may made it a priority. so, you know, it just theresa may made it a priority. so, you know, itjust needs to happen. it has been cold a once in a generation opportunity and that is how you are describing it. even now, is this right? 12% of prosecutions fail after a fit and changes their mind because it isjust fail after a fit and changes their mind because it is just too difficult to even take the prosecution further. how do you reduce that percentage? speaking as someone who has been through the criminal justice someone who has been through the criminaljustice process as a victim, ican criminaljustice process as a victim, i can tell you it was one of the most difficult experiences of my life. it was horrendous. i com pletely life. it was horrendous. i completely understand why many
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prosecutions fail and i would support any woman who felt she was unable to go through with it. i know how hard it is. we try our best to support women if they decide that they want to go through with a criminal prosecution but it is harder to imagine the stress that it causes you to have to go through that. thank you so much for coming in this morning. we will follow and be across what is happening in westminster over the next few days and hopefully you will get some clarity. we tried to get a statement from the home office but did not get any detailfrom from the home office but did not get any detail from them. the queen '5 speech, which boris johnson any detail from them. the queen '5 speech, which borisjohnson wants to have announced after a prorating of parliament would set out, he says, a bold new agenda and it could be that there is legislation announced to support the victims of domestic abuse. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins.
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a woman from london who is campaigning to protect victims of so—called revenge porn — after her friend became a target — is calling for more regulation of websites that show pornographic material. bbc london has spoken a number of women who say explicit images of them posted online without their consent has ruined their life. now kate isaacs wants the law in this country changed to give women, like herfriend better protection. there has been a decline in pet owners getting their pets vaccinated. only 66 of young pets have received their primary vaccinations this year. some owners say that the jabs are too expensive and the charity says it puts the animals at risk of developing a serious disease. the royal horticultural society says it has seen a rise in londoners wanting to learn how to use gardens to boost their mental health and well—being.
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there is growing evidence that gardening can help reduce stress, depression and anxiety. the rhs says it has seen more community groups approaching them for funding and support to create their own green spaces including at this psychiatric unit. definitely at times during the day when people get very upset and they have confrontations in conflict, to be able to come out into an area like this and just, you know, listen to sounds or notice little things. let's take a look at the tubes — there's severe delays on the metropolitan line between wembley park and aldgate due to the new signalling system. cues are building on the a 13. and the a10 is closed in both directions between philip and nuttall street
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due to an incident being dealt with by the police. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. it will feel a bit more like autumn at times today. nothing too dramatic in the forecast but a few weather fronts are likely to give us some wet weather through the afternoon with outbreaks of light and patchy rain. a lot of cloud and still a fairly brisk north—westerly wind blowing as well. it is a chilly start to the morning particularly for south—eastern areas where the cloud is likely to thicken through the morning. a grey and dull day with outbreaks of rain wet weather particularly through the afternoon and some late brightness developing for more northern areas especially. tops between 16 and 18 degrees and it will feel windy at times with a chilly north—westerly wind. overnight tonight we will see a lot of that cloud break up with good clear spells around and temperatures will drop back to single figures. again, a cool start to the weekend. it will feel chilly at times this weekend with a northerly wind blowing although that will lighten on sunday. should be dry with a lot of sunshine although we mayjust catch a few showers on saturday afternoon.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and sally nugent. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: robert mugabe, the former president of zimbabwe, has died. he was 95 and had been ill for some time. robert mugabe was president from 1987 until he was forced from office in 2017. he had earlier been prime minister of zimbabwe for the first seven years after independence in 1980. robert mugabe had led the drive for independence, serving ten years in prison for sedition. the early successes of his time in office have been overshadowed by the economic decline of zimbabwe.
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joining us on the line is veronia madjen, who worked and lived in zimbabwe during robert mugabe's time in power. thank you very much indeed for talking to us here on bbc breakfast this morning. can you first of all start for us by telling me what happened to you and your family. good morning. my ex—husband and i worked on one of the largest harms in zimbabwe, we fed the nation. and when robert mugabe was threatened with losing that election, we u nfortu nately were with losing that election, we unfortunately were in the middle of it. we were on the second farm that was invaded, and when the farmers we re was invaded, and when the farmers were being raped, the tractors were being burnt, the motorcycles were
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being burnt, the motorcycles were being thrown through the windows, it was very difficult to actually come to terms with what was happening. our workers were as frightened as we were. they wanted to carry on working, and unfortunately this was not possible, in some cases. and as a result of the economy going into decline, my husband did a forecast and he said to me we are not going to be able to survive here. and the farm has slowly been carved into pieces, and now you look at it, where they thought they were going to get land as a supporter of robert mugabe and be able to farm it, look what has happened. from being the breadbasket of africa, we are now a basket case. so the impact on you and your family, you would have to say, at the time it was life changing, wasn't it? it was. our daughter wanted to be there when the
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lights actually eventually went out in zimbabwe. she was an ardent supporter of ndc, and when she realised that she was no longer going to be able to afford to send her children to school, she had to ta ke her children to school, she had to take up her british connections and come back to britain. and what was your reaction this morning when you heard the news that he had died?” was sad for him and his family, because for the first 20 years that he governed that country, he was a good leader. his wife, sally, be beside him, and his mother. he was a very good leader until that threat of losing that election got hold of him, and he turned. thank you very much indeed for talking to us, for giving us your perspective, your background, from your life in zimbabwe all those years ago. thank
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you. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, will host a conference call this morning of opposition party leaders to discuss their approach to the timing of a general election. it comes as the prime minister heads to scotland after losing a series of crucial votes in the commons. he will announce millions of pounds for the scottish farming industry as he continues to press for a general election. but labour have warned they will block the move until they have made sure the government can't leave the eu without a deal. the government in the bahamas has warned of a staggering death toll from hurricane dorian. 23 people have been confirmed dead, but that number is expected to rise substantially because of the devastation caused in parts of the country. the hurricane has moved on and is battering the coasts of south and north carolina. tens of thousands of homes are without power.
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coming up on the programme, matt will have all the weather for us over the weekend. lots of people clinging onto the last rem na nts lots of people clinging onto the last remnants of summer, hopefully the sun will shine for us before autumn fully unleashes. know, england fans, don't we want rain? clutching at straws. that is not sport, mike! i don't think the rain will be enough to save england in the ashes. england need another miracle. steve smith is back, playing again. steve smith says england made it easy for him after he hit a double century, to put australia in control of the fourth test against england. the tourists declared on a97/8 at old trafford. england will resume on 23/1 on day three. andy swiss reports from old trafford. he is australia's remarkable run machine.
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was this the day steve smith batted england out of the ashes? smith had started it on 60, and wouldn't have got much further had jofra archer not spilled an early chance. but by lunch, smith reached his century, his third of the series. he'd only just begun. england were starting to unravel. more dropped catches, and then this. on 118, smith finally seemed to have gone, only for replays to show jack leach had overstepped. could you believe it? from there, smith piled on the agony, hitting england's bowlers to all corners. the result — a dazzling double hundred. he is the world's number one batsman for good reason. when he was finally out for 211, even england fans, who had hardly warmed to him after last year's ball—tampering scandal, knew they had seen something very special. australia declared on a97. could england's openers make it to the close? well, no, they couldn't, asjoe denly was brilliantly caught by matthew wade.
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a day, then, which belonged to steve smith and to australia, and it has left england battling to save their ashes hopes. andy swiss, bbc news, old trafford. serena will have another chance, to win a record—equaling 2a grand slam singles after she cruised through to the final of the us open. she beat elina svitolina in straight sets. williams is aiming to equal margaret court's total of all—time grand slam singles titles. she will face 19—year—old bianca andreescu in tomorrow's final. andreescu was born just nine months after williams won her first title in new york in 1999. northern ireland warmed up for their euro 2020 qualifier with germany on monday with a 1—0 friendly victory over luxembourg in belfast. they won due to an astonishing own—goalfrom by luxebourg's kevin malget. his sense of direction failed him as he headed the ball into his own net. northen ireland have won all four
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of their qualifiers. he was once one of english football's biggest talents. now, michael owen has bared all in a new autobiography, which is already making headlines. hejoins us now. good morning, michael. thank you for coming in. this book is incredible. so honest. why did you feel the need to do this now and address situations in the past, time at newcastle and things like that?” think doing a book at the end of your career is appropriate if you are going to do one. my career more than most has courted a little bit of controversy just because than most has courted a little bit of controversyjust because of the teams i have played for and how it all went about. and of course, when you are a footballer you have to have a lot of respect for the people who are employing you, so you don't say certain things at certain times. of course you have got to do your best at every opportunity, and eventually, when you retire, you
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think i would actually like to write that down. it has been quite a therapeutic process, if i am honest. i have enjoyed doing it. i didn't expect quite the attention it has got. a lot of the attention has been on the end of your time at newcastle and this twitter spat with alan shearer. have you spoken to him since, have you managed to clear the air with since, have you managed to clear the airwith him? since, have you managed to clear the air with him? no, sadly i haven't, because we were great mates. when i first went to newcastle, he was one of the main reasons i signed for newcastle. i stayed at his house when i was househunting. we used to play golf regularly, we had the same agent, same boot sponsor, we had so much in common. sadly alan took over as manager and unbeknown to me, i suppose, and it is obviously all in the book, unbeknown to me, we had a falling out and it was only a year or two after i left newcastle when i was about to pick up the phone to him and he said i wouldn't call, and
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i was like, why not? and then the reason started transpiring. so it is very strange, very sad in a way, but we live at different ends of the country, i suppose, we live at different ends of the country, isuppose, and not we live at different ends of the country, i suppose, and not all is lost. what went wrong? what did you fallout over? well, it's quite a long story. i will try to keep it short. last game of the season we had to get something away at aston villa. i had been injured with a groin problem and was coming back. basically i was still a week or two away from being fit. bear in mind i had a history of muscle injuries, andi had a history of muscle injuries, and i knew my body better than anyone. i knew if i was a day early it would tear or something would go wrong. and on the flip side, i knew when i was right as well. i was quite clearly a week or so away from playing, but last game of the season, we needed to get something. alan wanted me in the team, and i said to him i think if you start me
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iam said to him i think if you start me i am probably going to break as i sprint. i said i am probably going to break as i sprint. isaid if i am probably going to break as i sprint. i said if i were you, i would put me on the bench and if you need a goal, put me on with ten or 15 minutes to go and i will try and stay around the goal, not expose myself to getting reinjured. he took that as it transpired is that i didn't want to play or was scared of getting injured because then i was out of contract, so that it would affect my next club, or whatever. however he took it. that is the crux of it, and it is pretty sad that it happened like that. obviously alan shearer isn't here to give us his version of events, but we do know from a tweet that he put out talking about reaction to your time at newcastle, he said he was wondering why you were unhappy when you are getting paid £120,000 a week. well, i wasn't unhappy. i love newcastle, i love the people, i loved playing there. and sadly, when you say a sentence and someone stops it halfway through and you don't get to mention it in context, it is very difficult. what i said was i didn't
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enjoy the second half of my career as much as the first half. i was a good young player at 18, 19, i was playing for england, i was on the top of my game, i was winning my awards and trophies. the second half of my career, injuries started catching up. if you are not as good at yourjob as you once were, inevitably you don't enjoy it as much. i never said inevitably you don't enjoy it as much. i neversaid i inevitably you don't enjoy it as much. i never said i hate football, i adore football to this day. but i didn't enjoy being what i consider an average joe at didn't enjoy being what i consider an averagejoe at the time. i was just not the player i was, and when you have been at the top, mentally thatis you have been at the top, mentally that is quite hard to take. so of course i didn't enjoy playing the last six years, seven years of my career as much as the first bit. but that included clubs like stoke, manchester united, and nobody from there has complained. so it is not in context to the actual quote i said. talking about the early days, i still enjoy that moment against argentina, one of those incredible
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iconic moments for england fans of all time, really. what goes through your mind when you watch it back? is ita your mind when you watch it back? is it a blur your mind when you watch it back? is ita bluror can your mind when you watch it back? is it a blur or can you remember every second of it? i needed to watch it back to realise what i did. when the adrenaline is coursing through your veins like that, you don't really realise what happened. i was obviously very young and naive and fearless a nd obviously very young and naive and fearless and confident and all of those things are shown in that goal, i guess. is that what it is? the confidence of youth, is that what we are looking at there? if you asked me to do that when i was 28,30, i wouldn't have been able to do it, because they didn't have that fea rlessness, because they didn't have that fearlessness, i didn't have the body that would take me at the speed anymore. and it relates to my previous answer, with the second half of my career not being as good as the first. i am curious about what happened at the end of your career, because he said you really struggled with stopping playing. even though you didn't enjoy the last few years, you got quite frustrated and angry. why was that?
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i think we are all different types of people. in my mind, i have to be...| of people. in my mind, i have to be... i will never play snakes and ladders unless i am going to win. i have to think that i'm the best, or that i'm capable of scoring a goal, in this case. and for the first six, seven in this case. and for the first six, seve n yea rs in this case. and for the first six, seven years of my career, i felt unstoppable. i could score a goal like that and just feel that that was the norm. but then it got harder. my body started letting me down, i was getting muscle injuries and it started me down. the feeling of once being very good at something and then looking at the same players you should be running past thinking i can't do it anymore, or a great player, steven gerrard, getting the ball and thinking i know exactly what to do. no, i can't. i have to come short. i can't expose myself to sprinting. that's turmoil to me, thatis sprinting. that's turmoil to me, that is mental torture. and when you wa nt to that is mental torture. and when you want to do something so bad and when you have done something so bad, so it is fresh in your memory, and you can no longer do it, and it is being
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played out in front of millions worldwide, you are thinking it is not nice. and that's me, and i really admire players who can push that aside and say you know what? we all get older, we all get slower. i will go and play lower—level and i will go and play lower—level and i will enjoy my football. and i really enjoy that, but it's not me. i really struggle mentally with not being as good as i was.” really struggle mentally with not being as good as i was. i struggle with that every day, even when i was young. thank you very much indeed. the book is out and it has caused... may be that fearlessness of your youthis may be that fearlessness of your youth is back on the pages. thank youth is back on the pages. thank you very much indeed. matt has the weather this morning from st katharine docks in london. i believe. what on earth are you up to?! just another day doing the weather. to saint catherine ‘s to?! just another day doing the weather. to saint catherine '5 dock in central london. we are at the 11th classic boat festival down here
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and this is something you can try as well. it is a water bike, available to use and get used to. quite easy although trying to keep still during the forecast may be difficult. so i am in the hands of the cameraman here. there is a lot going on down here. there is a lot going on down here as well is this you can try paddle boarding, there are a0 different vessels to have a look at and you will want something dry and pleasa nt and you will want something dry and pleasant for it and i think the weather will give us that at times this morning. a bit chilly this morning. as i drift away. things are a little breezy across the country. so let's have a look at the forecast across the uk because we do see some rain at the moment heading down from the north. down over northern england the midlands and parts of wales we have great conditions here. patchy rain with the odd heavy burst through the coming hours. will drift towards southern counties of england that are a bit cloudier than they
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we re that are a bit cloudier than they were an audi that make our ago. so sunshine in the south will gradually start to drift away and things will become a little damp through the afternoon. such as showers for the vast majority of the country through the afternoon and there be a cold breeze with it. which is reaching 13-16 in breeze with it. which is reaching 13—16 in the north, 16—18 to south, down on where we should be. through tonight, temperatures will drop back a little bit, particularly in western areas and we will start to see those showers become fewer in number. there will be some in and around parts of the south and east as we go into saturday. saturday is we will see the showers and a cold trees down the eastern coast of england and scotland. there will be a few showers around liverpool bay to start with but they will fade away. for most, saturday afternoon will be dry and pleasant in the sunshine. but chilly down the eastern coast. temperatures only around 13 or 1a degrees with the wind. as the wind is light for all
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into saturday night it will be a cold start to sunday morning and sunday will see temperatures widely in single figures. the good news is that sunday should be dry with sunshine for most places. a bit of cloud building later in the day and across northern ireland and scotland we may start to see one or two showers. other than that, the rest of sunday should be dry and temperatures not dissimilar to saturday. given the fact that there are lighter winds with the sun strong overhead it may feel a little warmer after a chilly start to overall it looks like it will be a reasonably dry weekend for the vast majority. just a few showers around on saturday. now these bikes are very difficult to keep still in one place at any one time so it is time for me to disembark. don't crash! crash! he nearly did.
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you should probably leave now before something happens. look at that! head forwards, head forwards! oh, my goodness. that is a big boat! oh, no. he is going to crash. if you are watching this morning and you own that boat, we apologise and we are fully insured. such a run for this muqqy fully insured. such a run for this muggy there. we're looking at the problem of fake reviews this morning and if websites are doing enough to spot them and remove them. you see holidays or products with 5—star reviews, how do you know it is true? i have some top tips for you and this particularly relates to an investigation into tripadvisor. hotels at the centre of this later in investigation. which has found many fake reviews and is providing advice on how to spot them but it
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also puts pressure on tripadvisor for getting rid of them. with so many choices whenever we buy things online or book hotels and restaurants it can be incredibly difficult to choose. how do you know what is genuine and the best value? lots of us turn to the reviews. trouble is they can be faked to artificially boost products and places or to damage their reputation. it's not a new problem but today which? has released the results of an investigation into the reviews on tripadvisor and they say the website is still failing to stop fake reviews from skewing the ratings of some of its hotels. let's be realistic here. we have found irrefutable evidence of fake reviews on the website. what we need to see is more action from tripadvisor to verify whether the people leaving those reviews are real or not and to make sure they are effectively warning commuters that make consumers when there are concerns about a review and making sure they are taking follow—up action to ensure that these issues do not repeat themselves. that is
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what which says. let's ask tripadvisor themselves. one of their uk directors — james kay — joins me from our london newsroom now. so which saying there is irrefutable evidence of fake reviews on your website. do you agree? not at all. in fact the evidence is quite reputable. they provided no evidence that any individual review was fake and in1afrom that any individual review was fake and in 1a from 15 cases they brought to us, they found that we had already taken action on those reviews to protect consumers. and we have been doing this aggressively and going after fake have been doing this aggressively and going afterfake reviews. last yearin and going afterfake reviews. last year in italy we assisted the prosecution to help send a fake reviewer to jail. so you refute the allegation that there are fake reviews but let me give you an example. this is a hotel that was rated the best hotel in the whole of jordan, a popular tourist destination. the hotels as it did nothing wrong but after you were made aware of these fake reviews you
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removed made aware of these fake reviews you re m oved 735 made aware of these fake reviews you removed 735 star reviews. 730 five reviews. why? our investigators look for suspicious patterns and if we find evidence based on the data we can look at, we will remove reviews. but what is important here is that there was inaccuracy in the way this was reported earlier this morning. it was not the case that we took action only when which got in touch with us. the opposite was true. in most cases we had already taken action. and that is because we have fraud detection tools far more sophisticated than the methodology that which was trying to use. we are looking at a richer volume of data in order to assess whether reviews are genuine or not. in that system works incredibly well.” are genuine or not. in that system works incredibly well. i will come to your response in a minute because thatis to your response in a minute because that is an important response. let's just talk about the 730 reviews for this jordanian hotel.
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just talk about the 730 reviews for thisjordanian hotel. you refute the evidence and yet why were 730 reviews were up there in the first place for people to look at, they then potentially booked thinking it was the best hotel injordan. then potentially booked thinking it was the best hotel in jordan. you misunderstand my point. we refute the evidence that which brought to us, we don't refute the fact that people are trying to get fake reviews on the site. why did it take which coming to you to get those reviews removed? that was not the case. which ‘s thesis is you cannot trust positive first time reviews. most people, if you have left a review on a review site, the chances that the first review you ever left was 5—star. what we are able to do, with the amount of data and analysis that we can do and remember there is
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information we have on every reviewer that nobody else has, that which does not have. we can look at that and analyse and determine whether the reviews are fake or not thing that data at our disposal. and thatis thing that data at our disposal. and that is what we did in this case. our investigators looked at the reviews and were able to identify them suspicious ones and remove them and take action to protect the site. this is something we do every day, we do it more than any other review platform out there in terms of the amount of effort we put in to catch fa ke amount of effort we put in to catch fake reviews. and we are quite successful. we will be releasing a lot of data that shows how we tackle this problem in detail in a few weeks. you are quite right. you may be motivated to leave a review either good or bad if it is a particularly good or bad experience. ido take particularly good or bad experience. i do take the point. but what i want to get to and you talk about this, the action you have taken when things were made aware to you, one case we looked at it said 15 worst—case scenarios. you had already had problems with 1a of
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those hotels before and had warned the hotels. and yet there was still fa ke the hotels. and yet there was still fake reviews been posted about those hotels. how would you stop that from happening? again, that is the evidence we refute. which claim on the basis that we had previously taken action against those hotels they claim they then suppose —— spotted the reviews. when our team looked at the evidence we can gather and we can look a lot more information than which can, we were satisfied that there was no reason to be suspicious that the number of reviews they had flagged. and this is the point. if you look at a first time reviewer, for example, there is a big difference between someone who creates an account and on the immediate day that they do that they then leave a review. compare that to someone who may have registered on the site for some time, maybe photos maybe they used other features on the side and then they go on to leave a review. it does not make sense to be suspicious of those
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people unless there are other signals pointing towards them being suspicious and we look at those other signals. good to talk to you. thank you for explaining that to us. more from me after eight o'clock. coming up in a a few minutes time, john simpson, the world affairs editor will reflect on the life and mugabe, the president of them by way whose debt has been announced in the last hour or so. time now for the news, travel and weather where you wa ke news, travel and weather where you wake up this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. a woman from london who is campaigning to protect victims of so—called revenge porn — after her friend became a target — is calling for more regulation of websites that show pornographic material. bbc london has spoken a number of women who say explicit images of them posted online without their consent has ruined their life. now kate isaacs wants the law in this country changed to give women, like herfriend
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better protection. dashboard and head camera footage has helped the met police take action against more than 2,000 people in the first six months of this year. the footage — from both cars and cyclists — can be uploaded and sent directly to the force. a,000 people sent material between january and june. 60 years ago, the river thames was declared biologically dead — but today it's thriving, with many species of fish, sea horse, porpoise and even sharks. a new virtual reality experience is opening by london bridge to show people exactly what's living in the river. it's part of a new campaign by zsl to get people to think about the importance of the thames. most londoners look at the dirty colour or the brown and assume it is dirty and dead. that could not be further from the truth. the river is a thriving environment. so we developed a virtual reality portal
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and if you look through it you will be transported to a dive under the terms of making the invisible visible. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes — there's severe delays on the metropolitan line between wembley park and aldgate due to the new signalling system. and minor delays for the ba kerloo line. onto the roads: queues are building on the a13 into town through the goresbrook interchange, dagenham. and the a10 kingsland road is closed in both directions between philip street and nuttall street due to an incident being dealt with by the police. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. it will feel a bit more like autumn at times today. nothing too dramatic in the forecast but a few weather fronts are likely to give us some wet weather through the afternoon with outbreaks of light and patchy rain. a lot of cloud and still a fairly brisk north—westerly wind blowing as well. it is a chilly start to the morning particularly for south—eastern areas where the cloud is likely to thicken through the morning. a grey and dull day with outbreaks of rain wet weather particularly through the afternoon and some late brightness developing for more northern areas especially. tops between 16 and 18 degrees
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and it will feel windy at times with a chilly north—westerly wind. overnight tonight we will see a lot of that cloud break up with good clear spells around and temperatures will drop back to single figures. again, a cool start to the weekend. it will feel chilly at times this weekend with a northerly wind blowing although that will lighten on sunday. should be dry with a lot of sunshine although we mayjust catch a few showers on saturday afternoon. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to jon and sally. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today:
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robert mugabe, the former president of zimbabwe, has died aged 95, after a long illness. jeremy corbyn will holds talks this morning with opposition party leaders to discuss the timing of a general election. good morning. failing to stop fake reviews. tripadvisor is accused of not tackling fake entries on its website. its uk bus tells me they are taking action. australia are in control in the ashes again. steve smith hits a double century, to leave england's hopes hanging by a thread. good morning. it's friday, 6th september. our top story. robert mugabe, the former president of zimbabwe, has died. he was 95 and had been ill for some time. mr mugabe was president from 1987, until he was forced from office in 2017. the early successes of his time
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in office have been overshadowed by the economic decline of that country. shingai nyoka looks back at his life. singing he was once zimbabwe's liberator, leading a war against white minority rule. but by the end, the adulation president mugabe once enjoyed was gone. he cemented his power, winning overwhelmingly at elections in 1980. as leader of a new nation, he set about creating a better country than the one he inherited. and for a while, he succeeded. there can never be any return to the state of armed conflict which existed before our commitment to peace, and the democratic process of election under the lancaster house agreement. surely this is now time to beat our swords into ploughsha res. but beneath the veneer lay a dark side. mr mugabe deployed a crack military unit to southern zimbabwe to deal with hundreds of insurgents.
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between 1983 and 1987, thousands were murdered, and the world turned a blind eye. in 2008, in the midst of billion—percent inflation and widespread unemployment, mr mugabe suffered his first electoral defeat. it only led to more violence in the second round of voting. britain stripped him of his knighthood. but he remained a cult—like figure among many africans for daring to challenge western political dominance on the world's affairs. but within his own party, discontent was rising. many believed he had overstayed and needed to hand over power. his second wife, grace mugabe — a0 years hisjunior — seemed to be gaining power, and she began accusing then—vice president emmerson mnangagwa of trying to oust him. mr mugabe finally fired his
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long—time aid, accusing him of trying to topple him. mr mnangagwa, with the help of the military, mounted a comeback, posting soldiers on the streets and placing mr mugabe under house arrest. tens of thousands of zimbabweans marched, calling on him to step down. and after the threat of impeachment, he resigned. in his last years, mr mugabe had retreated to the seclusion of his mansion. many will remember him as a gifted orator and visionary, who liberated zimbabwe, but later returned her to the shackles of oppression. reaction this morning to the fact that robert mugabe, notorious, controversial president of zimbabwe, his death has been announced, he was 95 years old. we understand he died in hospital in singapore, where he had been treated for the last couple of years. and it is fascinating looking at the reaction this morning. once feted as a war hero, a liberator of his country, a pan—
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african leader, the kind of leader african leader, the kind of leader african nations should be aiming for and should be proud of, and then later, his reputation in ruins. his country partly destroyed. his economy in tatters. human rights trashed. and that conflict in the way in which he will be remembered as everywhere this morning. but he was 95 years old and we have reflected on his life here. and on his legacy. people talking about his personal charm, and yet the way in which he sometimes terrorised those who were against him. and the way in which britain, you see where he met the queen, was often caught in this conflicted situation about how to treat him, how to deal with him, particularly in the later years of his rule. the death of robert mugabe announced this morning. it is five per state. —— it is 8:05am. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn,
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will host a conference call this morning of opposition party leaders, to discuss their approach to the timing of a general election. it comes as the prime minister heads to scotland. he's to announce millions of pounds for the scottish farming industry, as he continues to press for a general election. it looks like an election campaign, it feels like a general election campaign. but labour have warned they'll block the move until they've made sure the government can't leave the eu without a deal. evenif even if you are a bit fed up of brexit, it is fascinating! joining us from westminster is our political correspondent, chris mason, and our brussels reporter, adam fleming. good morning to you both. boris johnson. stuck between a rock and a ha rd johnson. stuck between a rock and a hard place. he is a bit, sally. by the way, i think it is possible to be fascinated and bored by brexit at the same time because it matters hugely, but we are all human and even for adam and i, you sometimes think, blimey! no, i never get bored of it! i do. between a rock and a ha rd of it! i do. between a rock and a hard place, yes, he doesn't have a majority and the opposition parties
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realise if they can work together and opposition parties oppose each other as well as opposing the government, then they do have a majority. and they potentially, therefore, can steer when this general election happens. make no mistake, it will happen and pretty soon. but the big decision is whether it happens before brexit is due to happen at the end of next month or after that point, by which time can! month or after that point, by which time can i a delay could have been secured. which is what the opposition parties want. they want it because it could leave boris johnson in a real mess because he would either have to break his promise of taking the uk out by the end of october, may, or he would have to break the law, if it is the law by monday, that there can't be a no—deal brexit at the end of october, so he is in a bit of a pickle. i want to talk about this general election campaign we might be in but we are not in yet, chris. adam, what will brussels be thinking
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about what is going on at the moment? do they even know who they should be negotiating with? they know who to negotiate with at the moment. david frost, a civil servant, the lead brexit negotiator, and he is in brussels today. he was in brussels on wednesday and we have learnt about what he was asking, and it was basically that backstop, the insurance policy for keeping an open border between northern ireland and ireland whatever happens, he wants later that taking out. he said, take out that clause and that article, stripping it back to its bare essentials which the eu is not happy about because they say that does not amount to concrete proposals. they say, say what you want to get rid of, but you have to say what you wa nt of, but you have to say what you want to replace it with. when it comes to an election, they have big questions, does that process of talking to the uk ground to a halt during an election campaign? that is normally what happens to government business during election campaigns. then he wins the election, is it a
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similar government to the one we have now come a completely different, do any of the commitments the uk and the eu sign up to in the talks sign that election? and as chris was saying, when is it, does it require another extension to the brexit process? the eu would have to ask themselves, what terms and conditions do we want to apply to grant any extension, if they want to grant any extension, if they want to grant at extension, because that is not guaranteed either. chris, let's talk about them that general election might be. i know you can't say yet, but prime minister boris johnson was in yorkshire yesterday, is there not a strong tradition of starting election campaigns in yorkshire? there is, yes, god's own cou nty yorkshire? there is, yes, god's own county has a certain appeal for conservative politicians. if you notice adam and i are asking more questions than we are able to answer at the moment because so much is unknown. david cameron started the 2015 general election campaign in a marginal seat in west yorkshire,
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halifax. theresa may did the same in halifax. theresa may did the same in halifax in 2017. on neither occasion did the tories win that seat. yesterday, borisjohnson was in morley, a marginal held by the conservatives, whitefield is next door, marginal held by labour but with a solid vote for brexit 2016. if it looks like an election campaign and it smells like an election campaign, it is an election campaign, wejust election campaign, it is an election campaign, we just don't know yet when it is going to be and there is going to be an almighty fight now, it is going on now, about the exact timing of it, and that will have big implications for brexit and it could have big implications for who wins the election. it is fascinating, thank you both very much indeed and i hope you are getting early nights and taking your multivitamins, you will have a busy couple of months. 0h, will have a busy couple of months. oh, yes! they have already had a busy three years. they are normally separated by the channel, brussels and the uk, but they are recording
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the brexit podcast which is great if you have not found it yet on bbc sounds, and it is good fun, with laura kuenssberg and cathy adler as well. the government in the bahamas has warned of a staggering death toll from hurricane dorian. 23 people have been confirmed dead, but that number is expected to rise substantially. the hurricane has moved on and is now battering the coasts of south and north carolina. tens of thousands of homes are without power. tim allman reports. woman: oh, my gosh, things are blowing up there. slowly, relentlessly, dorian continues to move up america's eastern seaboard. this is charleston, south carolina — underwater. a deluge of rain turning one of the city's main streets into a river.
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in wilmington, in neighbouring north carolina, high winds led to isolated tornadoes. no—one here is underestimating the potential danger. hurricane dorian is ready to unleash its fury on our state. the storm has regained strength, it is serious, and it can be deadly. they don't need to be told that in the bahamas, where dorian has already caused what's been described as unimaginable destruction. the worst—hit island, grande abaco, is said to be virtually uninhabitable. tens of thousands need help, and the country's health minister says the final death toll will be staggering. the wind just had us fearful for our life. it was just horrific. and to see the devastation now, with all the bodies laying around, i feel that god has turned his back on the beautiful island of abaco.
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rescue operations are under way, the us coastguard helping evacuate people by helicopter. and this is dorian seen from the international space station. the giant storm moves on. the danger isn't over yet. tim allman, bbc news. astonishing pictures, nothing quite so dramatic here, thank goodness. i don't know weather we will get a legacy from that in time because that weather is causing absolute havoc on the other side of the atlantic. matt has the weather this morning from st katharine docks in london. a while ago, you are on an aquabike and now you look like you are somewhere more sensible. a little bit more sensible. i am on—board board a little bit more sensible. i am on—boa rd board the a little bit more sensible. i am on—board board the tug boat which i almost had a collision with so i have been making amends. this is the kent. it is retired, 19a8 and it was built. at one stage, it was the
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lagerjust single screw built. at one stage, it was the lager just single screw tug built. at one stage, it was the lagerjust single screw tug on the medway. it is part of the classic vote festival at the st katharine docks. —— marcus —— the largest single screw tug. there are a0 classic vessels including some of the vessels from the dunkirk which took in over 336,000 troops from the beaches of dunkirk and rescued them and brought them back to the uk. as you have mentioned, things have been turbulent to the other side of the atlantic. a bit quieter here. but set to get a bit wetter today. overnight, the weather front across parts of scotland and northern ireland bringing in a rain across northern england, the midlands and north wales. it is grey and damp for many, heavy bursts of rain for many. sunshine in the south early on, but clouding over as i speak and the grey conditions head southwards across southern counties this morning into the afternoon, bringing
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rain and drizzle to some. the northern half of the uk brightens up with sunshine around, showers as well and blustery winds to go with it. a cool feeling day is well, temperatures across the northern half of the country around 13 or 16 degrees. you need to get the sunshine to feel the benefit of the warmth. further south, sunshine to feel the benefit of the warmth. furthersouth, it may sunshine to feel the benefit of the warmth. further south, it may get up to 18, but this afternoon, we won't have the sunshine and it will be much greyer. this evening and overnight, showers and outbreaks of rain. sunshine in merseyside and north east wales and north east midlands and eastern counties of scotla nd midlands and eastern counties of scotland and england. a breeze tonight keeping temperatures up, but it will be a chilly start that weekend. saturday morning, a cool morning indeed. a few showers around merseyside, liverpool bay into the north west midlands. they will fade away and many western areas will be dry with sunny spells, but eastern areas, showers across east anglia and the south east during the afternoon and a cold wind down the
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eastern coast of scotland and england and 13 to 15 celsius is the general high. further west, england and 13 to 15 celsius is the general high. furtherwest, up england and 13 to 15 celsius is the general high. further west, up to 19. the winds following later on saturday night, the skies are clear, a cold start to sunday. sunny start with temperatures in single figures. most on sunday will be dry. more cloud into scotland and northern ireland and showers later on. but if you don't mind the slightly cooler feel outside the sun, it should feel pleasa nt feel outside the sun, it should feel pleasant and it will be a good day for those running the great north run. and we mentioned the legacy of hurricane dorian. it will come our way into next week. it will pass to the north of us. by which stage, it will have gone across the cold atla ntic will have gone across the cold atlantic and undergone massive change. for us, it willjust be a little bit of wind and rain, nothing u ntowa rd. little bit of wind and rain, nothing untoward. that is how it is looking, i will have more in half an hour. that is reassuring, thank you. tripadvisor has been accused —
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by the consumer group which? of not doing enough to tackle fake reviews on its website. yes, that is interesting because it isa yes, that is interesting because it is a spat between two organisations we rely on and this focuses on hotels as you would expect because of tripadvisor. the business of reviews is huge and worth about £20 billion a year given how much we spend based on the reviews we read and which? ? is alleging a spend based on the reviews we read and which?? is alleging a lot spend based on the reviews we read and which? ? is alleging a lot of reviews on tripadvisor are fake for hotels and it says it has found evidence of a number have boosted reviews. using a methodology based on the number of people giving 5—star reviews but who have only left one review and tripadvisor said that looked suspicious and said you probably would find people would leave several reviews. we have spoken to tripadvisor and they reject that and they say, we have much more sophisticated techniques to investigate fake reviews and we are taking action to review it. there are a number of examples highlighted. they looked at 250,000
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reviews. they found one hotel in jordan that they highlighted as being pretty suspicious. this hotel feeling itself as the best hotel in jordan. and when the evidence came to light, 730 reviews that had five stars were simply removed from the website. and so clearly, a lot of issues about weather we can trust reviews we read. i havejust been speaking to one of the uk bosses cold james k, he said, they have sophisticated techniques in place to spot them and take action. sophisticated techniques in place to spot them and take actionm sophisticated techniques in place to spot them and take action. it wasn't a case we had taken no action and only acted once which? got in touch, the opposite was true. in most cases they brought to us, we had already taken action. that is because we have fraud detection tools far more sophisticated than the methodology used by which? . we are using a richer data volume to assess whether the reviews are genuine or not and that system works incredibly well. tripadvisor say their system spot
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them and remove them. it is worth bearing in mind looking around, and this applies equally to shopping websites because they are susceptible to this sort of thing. they say if loads of reviews are posted at a similar time, that is an indication, if there is bad grammar and bad spelling. or if they are written in capital letters. if it is bad grammar, they could be fake. yes, if their english is not necessarily their first language. that might be a highlight. the advice, just do a bit of digging and don't take it at face value, look around, what else have they reviewed, had they travelled elsewhere? that might give you a sense of whether that review is true or not. it is practically a job -- a job in itself going on holiday!m is supposed to make things easier! it is amazing how influential on any website those reviews are on websites. thank you. let's get more now
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on the death of the former our correspondent shingai nyoka joins us from harare. what has the reaction been? i am in the central business district where the central business district where the commerce takes place but you would not think such an important figure in sample —— in zimbabwe's history has died. many people going about their day—to—day chores, selling their wares on the streets and walking around. i think it speaks to the fact that by the time that he had died, which was in the early hours of this morning, robert mugabe had already become a historic figure. he has been out of powerfor two years, but there has been some discussion about the kind of legacy he leaves behind. that many people would agree it is a chequered history. some are conflicted, as he was zimba bwe's liberator and
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history. some are conflicted, as he was zimbabwe's liberator and he was called a founding father of zimbabwe by emmerson mnangagwa. but the oppression is difficult to run away from and the fact he had to be ousted from office after taking zimbabwe from prosperous nation to one that was full of hunger with an unemployment rate of 80%. thank you, for harare this morning. our world affairs editor, john simpson, joins us now. he famously reported from zimbabwe and you smuggled your way and sometimes when you are not allowed to be there. let's deal with robert mugabe the man to start with. on a personal level. what was he like? well, i knew him when he was at the top of his performance really. that is to say in the early 19805, middle 19805. i was never allowed to interview him afterwards because things got too bad and he didn't wa nt to things got too bad and he didn't want to see people like me. but he
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was an extraordinarily clever and sharp tongued character. i mean, i used to see him often with groups of people. often, his own advisers. but sometimes, with western, particularly british officials. and he was the quickest, sharpest, cleverest person in the room. and he knew it, and he could humiliate you terribly on camera, for instance. i mean, asking savage questions of you when you are trying to ask questions of him. and he was a champion at making you look stupid. but he was extraordinarily clever and he didn't do anything, i think, that wasn't thought out properly beforehand. we just had that report from the streets of harare, speaking about how conflicted people there will be over his death. remembering him as a liberator in one way, in —— as an oppressor in another way. what is
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your take, how will this notorious man be remembered? well, i think people will say, yes, of course he liberated the country. i think there isa liberated the country. i think there is a question about some of that as well. but he will have that honour of being the father of the nation, the title that government actually gave to him when he stepped down. but i think most zimbabweans, most of the people i had met and i continue to be in contact with, they will just feel that he continue to be in contact with, they willjust feel that he betrayed the country horribly, that he rubbed it blind, he and his family. his wife, catlike grace. if you remember her. just thieving the wealth of that very wealthy country. taking bribes from the chinese, for instance, he seemed to have paid a lot of his expenses and so forth. and that he
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saw a country which was quite well known in africa for the quality of its education for instance. and indeed, the quality of its economy, and turned it, well, into what we know today, which is a mess. still a beautiful country, still full of highly intelligent, educated people. but economically, a dreadful mess. the bbc was banned from entering zimbabwe, you had to go undercover andi zimbabwe, you had to go undercover and i remember you wearing a disguise to try to suss out what was going on on the streets. that must have been an extraordinary experience for you. we are scared of what would happen if he had got you? i was what would happen if he had got you? iwasa what would happen if he had got you? i was a bit. —— where you scared. i went there three times undercover altogether. and the security police said that i would be sentenced to seven said that i would be sentenced to seve n yea rs
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said that i would be sentenced to seven years jailfor said that i would be sentenced to seven years jail for broadcasting illegally if they caught me. and seven illegally if they caught me. and seve n yea rs illegally if they caught me. and seven years in a zimbabwean jail, not a very nice experience. so, yes, i was quite scared. but i was uplifted. it was extraordinaryjust walking down the street, people would recognise me from the bbc, which was very much watched there. and how people would come up and thank me for being there and thank me for drawing attention to all the terrible things that were going on. so it was a very uplifting experience, it was just one that you wa nted experience, it was just one that you wanted to get out of safely at the end. how do you think we should reflect on britain's relationship with mugabe over the decades? we have seen pictures of him this morning meeting the queen in the past and we have also seen protests on the streets of britain against him and his regime in later years. it has been an intriguing journey, hasn't it, that relationship and the fracturing of it? it has, and a lot
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of zimbabwe and friends of mine feel that the british government, successive british governments, behaved in a pretty cheap way. the fa ct behaved in a pretty cheap way. the fact is that the government of margaret thatcher for instance in 1980, when zimbabwe got its independence, was so relieved to have got an agreement and brought what seemed at that stage to be an end to violence, that they simply didn't want to know what was going on in zimbabwe. and very soon after independence, two years after independence, two years after independence, the north korean army moved in at mugabe's request. together with the zimbabwean army. and they went through the main opposition territory 21's rule. and they murdered at least 20,000
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people. i spoke to people who had seen entire force —— households been forced into houses and they were burned alive. and i don't see any reason to doubt that testimony. we just didn't want to know. zimbabwe had been sorted. please don't tell us it is not going well. and it wasn't until 2008 that robert mugabe's honorary knighthood for insta nce mugabe's honorary knighthood for instance was ta ken mugabe's honorary knighthood for instance was taken away from him by britain. and by that stage, we had had eight or nine years of the invasions of white owned farms and so forth. and all the violence that was going on. john simpson, bbc's world affairs correspondent, joined us from oxford, fascinating to hear your reflections on the life and legacy of robert mugabe who has
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died. time to get the news and travel and weather where it is quite a great start to the day. lots of cloud for many of us, and some outbreaks of rain moving south through the day. many of us at some point today seeing rain. quite windy conditions as well. as the rain spreads into the salvage is very patchy, quite a messy picture, for south wales to southern england the rain continues. showers further north, brighter skies and north wales, northern england, scotland and northern ireland, maximum temperatures into the mid to high teens. tonight, lots of the rain and cloud clears from the showers dotted around but for most it is dry with clear spells, it could turn chilly, particularly towards the north—east.
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temperatures about nine or 10 celsius. for the weekend, temperatures about nine or 10 celsius. forthe weekend, looking dry and bright for many. cerny spells, temperatures in the mid to high teens, feeling chillier along the north sea coast. this is business live from bbc news, with susannah streeter and victoria fritz. robert mugabe, zimbabwe's controversial first post—independence leader,
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has died aged 95. live from london, that's our top story on friday 6th september. we take a look at robert mugabe's impact on the economy of zimbabwe and how that legacy is still being felt today. also in the programme, is the future of smartphones finally about to unfold? samsung's flagship gadget goes on sale after months of delays
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