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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 6, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: opposition leaders agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is delayed beyond the end of october. hello, you're watching afternoon live — the prime minister says i'm martine croxall. he won't contemplate resigning today at two: if he hasn't delivered brexit by the end of october, and says he will get a deal. opposition leaders agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap robert mugabe — the man election until brexit is delayed who delivered independence for zimbabwe but went on to become its dictator — has died at the age of 95. beyond the end of october. we were in agreement that the prime minister is on the run. hurricane dorian has caused boris is broken. "unimagineable destruction" — according to the government of the bahamas. we have an opportunity they've warned the final death toll to bring down boris, to break boris and to bring down will be "staggering. brexit and we must take that. robert mugabe — the liberator of zimbabwe sport now on afternoon who became its dictator — live — with ben. has died at the age of 95. ben — the good news is that play hurricane dorian has caused is finally under way in the cricket, ‘unimagineable destruction', although the bad news is that according to the government of the bahamas. england have lost a wicket? coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with ben. it's been a pretty miserable morning cricket — england faring here in manchester this morning. any better today? constant rain for a few hours mean day three only started at 1:30pm.
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they have already lost a wicket. we some people were joking that at least england didn't lose any wickets in the morning. have some plate at least. england well, it only took about 5 for australia to make the breakthrough with craig overton, may need a bit more of a helping hand from mother nature if they want the nightwatchman, dismissed for 5. to regain the ashes. thanks, ben. england have since snuck on to 55—2 and nick has all the weather — in theirfirst innings. how's the weekend looking? rory burns and joe root are at the crease. the weather is getting into the it'll be a near impossible task for england to win this match now — weekend mood. over the weekend it is the best they can probably hope for is a draw and hope to regain settling down, the focus coming up the ashes in the deciding match plus what is in a name? quite a lot at the oval next week. ifa it's after steve smith's double plus what is in a name? quite a lot if a storm is on the way. the met century in the first innings for australia. office has released its new store there's commentary continuing on 5 live sports extra. names. we looking at those later on. remember — england must avoid defeat to preserve their hopes of winning back the urn. thanks, nick. also coming up — sir philip's green and 20 years on from her first us tophsop empire in trouble, as it plunged to a £170 million open win — serena williams is on course for another? loss last year. and what's all the more remarkable is that her opponent in tomorrow's final is a teenager from canada called bianca andreescu. she wasn't even born
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when williams won the title hello, everyone — for the first time back in 1999. this is afternoon live. opposition parties in parliament andreescu is only playing in this have agreed to stop tournament for the first time, borisjohnson holding an election, and says it's a dream come true until brexit has been delayed beyond the 31st of october. to face williams in the final. the 23—time grand slam champion beat mps vote again on monday elina svitolina in straight on whether voters should go back to the polls. sets in the last four, today the so—called rebel alliance — and remains on course to equal including labour and the snp — margaret court's all—time record decided to either oppose an early of 2a grand slam wins. election or to abstain in the vote. at 37 years old — and after having a baby — some mps say that means an election williams says she's pretty chuffed is now unlikely before november. our political corresponent with her progress. think it's cool that i've been in chris mason reports. trying to strike a deal is rarely easy. £50 perfish. good god! more i think it's cool that i've been in more finals than i think anyone on if this looks like a prime minister tour after being pregnant. that is on the campaign trail kind of awesome, but is currently on that's because it is. hello, good morning. tour. i kind of look at that that borisjohnson started the day in peterhead in aberdeenshire talking fish and talking to farmers, way because it is not easy to go through what i did and come back, and encountering this brute. and so first, and to keep playing the thing is, his campaigning has photo opportunities but there's no and so first, and to keep playing and also not be 20 years old. yes, election date sorted
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because his opponents are saying not yet. i'm pretty proud of myself. there is a contest going on to make the international sure that we come out of the eu fixtures continue tonight with gareth bale and wales taking on azerbaijan in cardiff. on october 31st and there are people the real madrid man says in the parliament who plainly he doesn't listen to critics after a tough few months with his club side in spain. want to block that, and that it's seen the manager not want to pick him, includesjeremy corbyn, the snp. try to sell him and not make him a regular in the side. i think they're wrong, he also laughed off some of some i think people in this country want of his team—mates reportedly us to get on and do it. nicknaming him "the golfer". i'll go to brussels, i'll get a deal and we'll make sure we come out on october 31st, that's what we've got to do. i wouldn't say it the worst time, you keep mentioning october 31st and you've made it abundantly clear but yeah, it's been not ideal. i that it is your line in the sand. if you can't deliver that, have been there before, i know how you are going to have to resign. to deal with it, it isjust about that is not a hypothesis i'm keeping your head down and just keep willing to contemplate. working hard. ithink back here at westminster this keeping your head down and just keep working hard. i think you always get rewarded with the work that you put morning, opposition party leaders got together in person and on the phone to plot a way of leaving boris johnson in a spot and a tight one, forcing him to choose between breaking his promise staying at st james' park — of delivering brexit come what may england's rugby union team by the end of october,
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will play their first ever test or breaking the soon—to—be law match there this evening when they take on italy. preventing a no—deal brexit in just it is theirfinal warm up match before heading to japan a matter of weeks. for the rugby world cup. england forward mark wilson — who is on loan from newcastle what we have agreed is that there are no circumstances to sale this season — in which we are going to give has played more than 200 times for the falcons in nine years. the prime minister the general election he is so desperate north—east fans want to be entertained, i think that's the big for until an extension has been thing. back in the 90s when new football were at their best, they secured and until the risk of no just want to see entertainment. deal has been completely eliminated. hopefully we can entertain them on friday night. it is important that we do what we have been practising i think we've done that. the prime minister is on the run. boris is broken. and get ourselves in the right place we have an opportunity to bring down boris, for the world cup. hopefully, the to break boris and to bring down way that we are shown over the last brexit. and we must take that. three weeks, some pretty exciting we will choose the timing of that election, it is in our interest stuff, hopefully we can entertain that way. england have not lost any in the snp to have the election tomorrow, but it is in the broader interest of all of our nations in the united kingdom to act more wickets in the cricket. together and we will have the that's all the sport for now. election when it is the right time, but i will make you this promise, let's return to brexit — it will not be a long wait. and at the end of a turbulent the resignation of the prime week at westminster, minister's brother yesterday what are voters making of it all? left him winded and this place has in the european election in may, nigel farage's brexit party left him wounded this week. took more than a third of the votes the opposition parties working across the west midlands. together now have a majority our correspondent phil mackie
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reports from there now, where he's been speaking to workers together and they are intent on at an engineering firm in smethwick. making use of it. as westminster tries to engineer an end to the brexit crisis, we can cross to the palace businesses across the country of westminster and speak to our still have high—pressure jobs to do. correspondent jonathan blake. this firm wants to expand, but before it can put plans as far as some of the opposition parties are concerned, it is not in place, it needs an end just about stopping a no—deal brexit to the uncertainty. it's all a bit of a shambles at the moment. and stopping an election. they have hopefully, it'll sort itself out, but i can't see anything happening at the moment. their eyes on bigger prizes, haven't they? they have and that is key to understanding what the opposition what would you like to happen? parties are doing, because they are united ina parties are doing, because they are united in a common aim of bringing down boris johnson's government to get the deal done, and for the country to get back as normal as possible. united in a common aim of bringing down borisjohnson's government and doing whatever they can to avoid a this part of the west midlands, the black country, voted very no—deal brexit. as you suggest. strongly to leave in the referendum beyond that they want different three years ago. it is also a labour heartland, things. the labour party want an so it's places like this election, they will campaign for a that will become key further referendum, the lib dems election battle grounds. wa nt further referendum, the lib dems want a further referendum and cancel but despite the fact brexit and there are differences in they export to europe here,
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and there is a great deal between. it will be tricky for them of uncertainty, nobody has really all to hang together and oppose changed their opinions on brexit. borisjohnson the longer this goes they are making tools and parts for companies like rolls—royce and jaguar land rover, on, but for now they are united and but although he didn't want brexit, the boss thinks it should happen. they are succeeding. in backing borisjohnson into a corner and if we've got to leave. you like turning his own strategy against him because it appears that the level of damage politically downing street, the prime minister caused in this country, and the institutions in this was banking on once the election country, i think will take became an unavoidable prospect that generations to repair. ithink theirfaith, their lack of trust in our elected labour and the other opposition representatives, has been decimated. parties would vote for it because they have been saying that is what parliament has not come out of this they have been saying that is what they want for so long. but they are with glowing colours. using this very tight timeframe to what do i want to happen? their advantage and saying, having passed this law now or very shortly i don't want us to leave, but for democratic reasons, we've got to leave. passing a law which will force the you voted remain, most prime minister to ask for an people in this area, extension to the brexit process if most people who work in yourfactory, voted leave. you can't get a deal by mid—october do you get on? we have to get on. that they are going to hold him to i'm also of a different persuasion when it comes to football teams! that. it is of course something the if you get on at that level, prime minister has categorically you'll get on at this level. ruled out. well, the next logical option for him then will be to
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the only — and it isn't any comfort perhaps resign and he said that is — that i'll have the last word, an idea he is not willing to but if it pans out as i think it contemplate, so it is difficult to will pan out, i'm going to be see a way out for him before saying, "i told you so," a lot. parliament is due to be suspended joe siviter was too next week. we should always be ready young to vote in 2016, although he supported remain. now his opinions have changed. i think brexit has become a sort of broken record for surprises because nobody would have predicted the recent turns of within british politics, events. that is right. you can't and i think if we were to go back predict things beyond an hour by hour basis at the moment here in on it now, our reputation within europe and the rest of the world would be that we are westminster and i would imagine that quite weak and indecisive. before parliament is suspended next manufacturing is all about getting week, we will see further moves by the fine details right. the government to perhaps force a if only they could precision general election by some other engineer a solution to brexit. means. and we will say further moves phil mackie, bbc news, smethwick. perhaps by the opposition parties to a landmark bbc documentary series deny borisjohnson that aim, but on the troubles in northern ireland will we see a fraction of that has made new revelations about two fragile alliance of the opposition leaders who eventually made peace — parties here before parliament the unionist ian paisley and the former ira chief, martin mcguinness. brea ks parties here before parliament breaks for its scheduled suspension next week? all i can say is stay this report from our ireland correspondent, chris page. tuned. wise words! their portraits now hang in stormont as testament to the unlikeliest of political alliances.
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meanwhile, a legal challenge brought over boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament 12 years ago, ian paisley for five weeks has been and martin mcguinness went rejected by leading judges in to government together at the high court in london. the anti—brexit campaigner as the first and deputy first gina miller brought it to court. ministers of northern ireland. her lawyers had argued that the prorogation but the new bbc series — breached the legal principle spotlight on the troubles: of parliamentary sovereignty. she gave her reaction secret history — shows how to today's judgment outside the high court. remarkable theirjourneys were. we are very disappointed in the early 1970s martin mcguinness with the judgment today. we feel strongly that parliamentary sovereignty is was an ira commander in londonderry. fundamental to the stability and the programme makers uncovered this future of our country, and footage of republicans assembling and priming a car bomb. therefore worth fighting to defend. as our politics becomes there is a huge charge there. ever more chaotic, a very dangerous alarm clock timer. we feel it is absolutely vital that parliament should be sitting. we are therefore that could blow them all to hell. pleased that the judges who do you recognise? have given us permission to appeal to the supreme court, which we will who do i recognise? well, there's martin. be doing, and they felt who is the person you are referring to as martin? that our case had the merit. martin mcguinness. so the supreme court has are you certain that's him? pencilled in the 17th of i'm certain that he's filmed at the end there september for appeal hearing. walking across the back
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of the car, yeah. nobody walks like him today, we stand for everyone. with a stoop in his back. we stand for the future generations, and we stand half—an—hour later, this for representative democracy. happened in the city centre. to give up now would be a dereliction the number plate in the wreckage is that of the vehicle of our responsibility. that was loaded with explosives. we need to protect our institutions. it is not right that the man martin mcguinness they should be shut would share power with decades later down or bullied, especially at this was a protestant preacher. most momentous time in our history. ian paisley strongly opposed my legal team and i will not give up plans to give more civil rights to catholics. the fight for democracy. thank you. you are going to hear the marching feet of protestants on the march! our legal correspondent in 1969, the loyalist paramilitary clive coleman is at the high court group the ulster volunteer force in central london — carried out bombings designed to help bring down the leader of the unionist—devolved government so where do we go from here ? and stop the compromises. gina miller has failed, she has the documentary looks at ian paisley‘s alleged role failed to get a ruling that the in this attack on a reservoir advice given by the prime minister, in county down. borisjohnson, to the queen to my memory is very clear from what the district inspector provoke parliament for five weeks, told me — that paisley had that would have been the longest for supplied the money that
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40 that would have been the longest for financed the explosion. a0 yea rs that would have been the longest for a0 years at a time gina miller says of national political crisis, she failed to get a declaration that that was unlawful. but this is far mr paisley always denied any from over. what the court has done involvement in the bombings. today and things are moving so quickly that the court has given a the programme also reveals fascinating documents ruling without giving reasons. the from the former head of the army, hearing only ended late yesterday general sir michael carver. in 1972, he wrote that a lasting and so the judges haven't had time to put together a recentjudgment. solution had to lie to finding a way that will follow in due course but to escape the commitment they have come to their decision, so to the border — in effect, they have come to their decision, so they have come to their decision, so he was advocating a united ireland. they have dismissed her appeal but what they have done is something the courts are allowed to do in cases the violence was to last where they feel there is enough another quarter—century. merit in the case and the time frame this bbc series promises to generate new debates about a long, complex, is small enough to mean that the bitter conflict, which still impacts case can be leapfrogged, it can on the fraught politics of today. lea pfrog case can be leapfrogged, it can leapfrog the court of appeal and go straight to the uk supreme court and and you can watch the first as you heard gina miller say, a in a seven—part documentary series on bbc spotlight at 8:30 hearing is set down to take place at next tuesday on bbc one in northern ireland — the uk supreme court on the 17th of september. there are two other legal and on bbc four. challenges, one in scotland, one in northern ireland. they could also end up at the uk supreme court and i
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don't think it is a surprise to any in a moment, the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines of the lawyers in these cases that on afternoon live: these matches are heading to the opposition parties have agreed not to back a government push for a general election. highest court in the land. so it means a ballot before october momentous constitutionally are these 31st is now unlikely. challenges because in effect what will happen is that if any of those robert mugabe — the liberator of zimbabwe who became its dictator — challenges succeed at the supreme has died at the age of 95. court, and hearings start on the hurricane dorian has caused 17th of september, a baroque in "unimagineable destruction" — according to the government parliament could take place next monday, so the effect could be that of the bahamas. if gina miller is successful or any of the other bringing these here's your business challenges are successful, what we headlines on afternoon live: sir philip green's topshop retail could have is the un—suspending of a empire plunged to £170 million loss last year — blaming a "dramatically" changed retail landscape and increased competition. suspended parliament and what gina miller says is that is critically important because it would allow mps the results are for taveta investments, which owns the arcadia group — to continue to legislate, continue including topshop and the brands, miss selfridge to continue to legislate, continue to react to developments in the lead up to react to developments in the lead up to the 31st of october, the date when the uk is due to leave the eu and dorothy perkins. to do the business of parliament. the business has however, her arguments have failed. since agreed a rescue
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the arguments in scotland have deal with its creditors that triggered a8 store closures. failed thus far. so this has been a british airways has rejected a last—ditch proposal from pilots' union, balpa, to restart negotiations aimed rather good or to very welcome at averting strike action. ba pilots are due to strike decisions because there was a on monday and tuesday decisions because there was a decision in the prime minister's over a pay offer of 11.5% over three years — favour in scotland. this one today, that they say is too low. to welcome victories in what has unions representing cabin crew and engineers have been a bruising week for accepted the offer. him but the legal battle continues. caution is dominating the house market — according to the uk's biggest lender. halifax, part of lloyds banking the chief constable group said house prices rose of west yorkshire police says by a whisker of 0.1%. he's "disappointed" that during the summer, the uk housing his officers were used market remained subdued. as a "backdrop" to a political few properties are changing hands speech by borisjohnson with the political and economic on brexit yesterday. situation leading people john robins says the force thought the prime minister's remarks would be used in connection with the government's police to stay put. recruitment drive and had "no prior knowledge" that it would veer into politics. you've got some news just in about an investigation into the way facebook he was the liberation hero operates in the us? who became a ruthless dictator — eight us states and the robert mugabe, the former president district of columbia have launched an antitrust investigation of zimbabwe has died into facebook, to determine at the age of 95. if the social media giant has stifled competition and put mr mugabe led the independence war users at risk. against white minority rule and then ruled the country the new york state attorney general, letitia james, said that even for 37 years. the largest social media platform in the world must follow the law
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and respect consumers. his regime was one of brutal repression and economic mismangement, which brought zimbabwe to its knees. he was finally overthown in a coup and has now died in hospital in singapore. haven't federal authorites a warning that this report from our correspondent in zimbabwe, already launched a probe? the usjustice department said shingai nyoka, contains injuly it was opening a broad flash photography. investigation of major digital technology firms, focusing on whether they engage chanting prime minister robert mugabe! in anti—competitive practices. he was once zimbabwe's liberator, leading a war the investigation is believed against white minority rule. to target google, amazon.com inc and facebook, and but by the end, potentially apple inc. the adulation president robert mugabe once enjoyed was gone. separately, the federal he cemented his power winning trade commission, which trade commission, which also overwhelmingly at elections in 1980. enforces antitrust laws, is also probing amazon and facebook to determine as leader of a new nation if they abused their massive market he set about creating power in retail and social media, respectively. a better country than no response yet from the company the one he inherited. and for a while he succeeded. to this latest news there can never be any return to the state of armed also — staying in the us — conflict which existed before our commitment to peace and the democratic process of election under and there's a newjobs report out the lancaster house agreement.
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surely, this is now time to beat our swords into ploughshares. yes this is the closely watch3e non farm payrolls — but beneath the veneer a bit of a barometerfor the health lay a dark side. of the us economy — mr mugabe deployed a crack military and the number of new hirings unit to southern zimbabwe to deal ..lets find out more with hundreds of insurgents. detail about that report from samira between 1983 and 1987, hussain from new york. thousands were murdered and the world turned a blind eye. it hussain from new york. does seem to indicate tha jobs mugabe was the great hope. it does seem to indicate that the us jobs engine is killing, to what but as the i990s ended, extent? the us economy added 130,000 the economy was bottoming out and a new political jobs last month. economists expect party was on the rise. it anything up 258,000, say 130,000 seemingly desperate to regain for the last one is certainly less popularity, mr mugabe played a political hand. than what people were expecting. land seized by the colonial that said, if you look at the jobs government was still in the hands of report and how manyjobs are being the white minority. sensing the frustration, added to the economy and overall mugabe encouraged blacks to take back their land. unemployment rate, which has not and they did, often violently. changed, if you are someone who the western world remains quite optimistic about the took note, breaking diplomatic ties and imposing us economy, you can look at this and
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economic sanctions. say, we have still added 130,000 the opposition, its leaders, human rights workers bore the brunt of his anger. jobs and the labour market continues to be strong. we are seeing numbers in 2008, in the midst that we have not seen an almost 50 of billion—percent yea rs. if inflation and widespread that we have not seen an almost 50 years. if you add it with consumer unemployment, mr mugabe suffered his spending numbers, which also can first electoral defeat. continue to be strong, then you will not think that the us is heading for it only led to more violence in the second round of voting. a recession. that said, if you are britain stripped him of his knighthood and former allies someone a recession. that said, if you are someone who is a little bit negative condemned him. on the us economy and worries about the threat of an upcoming recession, nearer to home we have seen you will probably look at this and the outbreak of violence think that this is is a sign that against fellow africans businesses are cooling on employing in our own country. people, therefore, we can probably see a research and is just around and the tragic failure the corner. and that last group of leadership in our neighbouring zimbabwe. includes a lot of researchers? a lot of expectation that the us central but he remained a cult—like bank bought the work rate soon? figure among many africans for daring to challenge western political dominance on the world's affairs. absolutely, that is what a lot of investors are looking at were in retaliation for the measures we took to empower the looking at thisjobs investors are looking at were black majority, the united kingdom looking at this jobs report. the
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federal reserve is looking at all this data to try and make an assessment of what it will do with has mobilised her friends and allies interest rates when it next meets in in europe, north america, australia, september. that said, there is also new zealand, to impose illegal economic sanctions against zimbabwe. a school of thought that the federal reserve has been really laser but within his own party, focused on a few factors, including discontent was rising. many believed he had overstayed thejobs report, but also consumer and needed to hand over power. spending. we are seeing that us his second wife, grace mugabe, consumers are still spending money. a0 years hisjunior, seemed to be gaining power, however, there is something about a and she began accusing then trade war happening between the us vice president emerson mnangagwa and china. now that we have seen a of trying to oust them. whole new round of duties being mr mugabe finally fired his long—time aide, accusing him of imposed on chinese goods, these new trying to topple him. are duties likely to hit the consumer a little bit harder, so i mr mnangagwa, with the help of the military, mounted a think that will play into any comeback, posting soldiers on the decision that the us federal reserve streets and placing mr mugabe under makes on interest rates. house arrest. tens of thousands of zimbabweans marched, calling on him to step down, and after the threat so — what's been happening to on the financial markets? of impeachment he resigned. sterling is continuing its rocky ride on the currency exchanges — earlier in the week it plunged in his last years mr mugabe to three year lows before rebounding had retreated to the
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seclusion of his mansion. strongly after mps voted to block a no—deal brexit. today it's edged a bit lower — many will remember him as a gifted orator and but it's losses have been stemmed visionary who liberated zimbabwe but following that report later returned her to the shackles of oppression. just released in the us. us stocks opened higher as china rolled out a stimulus plan patrick smith is the editor of to shore up its flagging economy the newsletter africa confidentia, which covers politics and economics in africa. and weakjobs data cemented he joins us from paris. expectations of an interestrate cut by the federal reserve later this month. thank you forjoining us. just tell us thank you forjoining us. just tell us what the perspective is from sub that's all the business news. saharan africa on robert mugabe and his legacy and why? i think as many we've been reporting the death of robert mugabe, who led zimbabwe's independence people have said it's a mixed one. movement and became the country's there always has been huge support for his role within the liberation president for 30 years, and the extent to which he divided opinion across africa has been reflected in the way public figures movement in southern africa. it was from across the globe have reacted to his death at the age of 95. mugabe's successor as president of zimbabwe — regarded as the great success story.
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emmerson mnangagwa — has praised him as "an icon of liberation". his campaign to lead for the land but here — the former labour redistribution in zimbabwe and i minister, lord hain, think that has been a source of his said the early promise of his leadership was outweighed by corruption and repression. paul adams assesses reaction to mr mugabe's death. what happened to robert mugabe? great popularity across the continent. set against that is the how did this african liberator, feted around the world, turn into an isolated pariah, situation within zimbabwe itself clinging to power until his former from the early victories in terms of allies decided they had had enough? extending access to education and i, robert gabriel mugabe... health in zimbabwe, we now have seen it started so well. the progressive destruction of the a landslide victory in 1980 zimbabwean economy to the extent and promises of progress that today, you have got an and racial reconciliation, unemployment rate in zimbabwe of 80% that sense of early optimism reflected in some of today's reactions. and all the political repression "comrade mugabe was an icon of liberation," tweeted that has accompanied the attempts by the man who replaced him, "who dedicated his life the regime, the ruling party regime to the emancipation and empowerment of his people. his contribution to suppress political dissent. i will never be forgotten." think that is really the style of and from former fellow revolutionaries in south africa... the reaction to his demise. it's a "the anc mourns the passing
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of friend, statesman very mixed legacy. but in a way he and revolutionary comrade — is regarded as a liberator. how robert mugabe." mugabe started off as a liberation important is it the way in which hero and somebody who was imprisoned by the old racist white minority zimbabwe achieved black majority regime of ian smith, rule compared with other african countries? robert mugabe himself tortured, not allowed to attend his son's funeral, actually said the big mistake in and therefore he suffered a great deal for the cause retrospect was actually going to a of the liberation of zimbabwe. treaty in 1979, the lancaster house conference. he said they should have just pressed on and got total but so too did the country he led. robert mugabe rarely shied away military victory. and then they from the use of violence. it became a hallmark of his regime. could have redistributed the lad at profoundly troubling for opponents and colleagues alike. the point of getting political i'm afraid we have a deeply rooted independence. what he was arguing legacy of violence in this country. you can't just blame was essentially what they got in robert mugabe for that. one also has to blame 1980, a kind of flag political the intransigence of ian smith independence, they didn't get and the rhodesian front in the 1960s economic independence and they had to wait until he pursued land reform and 1970s but certainly robert mugabe perpetuated that in the 2000s. again, that is a view culture of violence. it is now deeply rooted in our that has a lot of resonance today in society and it is going to take probably another generation to rid south africa where you get the
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the country of that legacy. radicals of the economic freedom fighter saying exactly the same. robert mugabe ruled zimbabwe for 37 years. mandela got a political deal in 199a towards the end he seemed frail, remote, exhausted. but he didn't get an economic deal did he simply linger too long? and that is why south africa hasn't been transformed in the way that groups like the eff wanted to be. that is also another important if the late president had been legacy of the robert mugabe era. it a two—term president he would have gone down in history along achieve the political independence with the likes of nelson mandela. i think it was a case but it never got the economic independence the people had been ofjust having overstayed. expecting as well. what are the but on the streets that prospects for zimbabwe now, now that still bear his name, many zimbabweans are inclined he has been out of power for some to be more generous. he was my first president. so, to me, he deserves time? there is a new government in place, how different might things be? speaking to zimbabwean friends a great honour. this morning and getting the reaction, they said if this had it is sad news. happened, if robert mugabe had died 15 years ago, it would have been we have lost a good father. seismic in terms of its political mugabe was all right. importance because they would have definitely been a power struggle when emmerson mnangagwa took over in 2017, within the ruling party, the the country seemed euphoric.
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opposition would have probably been involved in. but what you have got but, less than two years on, hopes have once more been dashed. it is a measure, perhaps, now, it is almost disrespectful to of zimba bwe's desperate position that robert mugabe is once say it is irrelevant, but essentially the political and economic crisis, the depth of that again seen by many as a hero. that zimbabwe is on at the moment, the death of robert mugabe is not going to have an immediate impact on now it's time for a that. it may well embolden the look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to nick. opposition movements to say, well, you can't blame robert mugabe now, which is what some elements within some wet weather around the ruling party have been trying to today, of varying degrees across the uk some of us are seeing a wet spell do, to say, we are trying to fix things up after robert mugabe's for a uk some of us are seeing a wet spell fora time, uk some of us are seeing a wet spell for a time, others, a sprinkle. but mistakes. they can't do that it is clearing southwards. here is anymore, but essentially the fundamental issues now are the economic and the political discord the big picture, this is the cloud and rain making its way southwards, in the country and the failure of behind that, there are brighter the current government to address these issues. i think that is where skies moving in. scotland, northern you will see the focus on. everyone ireland and more than i england may have had a few showers. that will will pay respects to robert mugabe edge further south, and were cleared as the national founding father, but they will quickly move on to by the evening. there are showers moving into scotland, still quite a
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addressing the crisis, the deepening few in the north. for many of us, crisis that the country faces. thank there will be some sunshine to end you very much for your time. there will be some sunshine to end the day, quite a breast and gusty you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: breeze, turning to more of a opposition parties have agreed not to back a government push for a general election. north—westerly. it is not warm out it means a ballot before october 31st is now unlikely. robert mugabe — the liberator of there, temperatures largely in the zimbabwe who became its dictator — mid to high teens. for the cricket, you're watching afternoon live, we have had a wet morning. these are our headlines: conditions have improved since then. hurricane dorian has caused ‘unimagineable destruction', according to the government showers cannot be ruled out for the of the bahamas. week. the weekend is looking fine. a england have lost craig overton after a rain delayed start on the third day of the fourth ashes test. doubting of shallwe is still moving across on the breeze, it hit and they are a9—2 in reply to australia's a97. miss for many, clear spells and temperatures dipping away. into charles leclerc and ferrari were fastest in a rain affected single figures in towns, low single first practice for the italian grand figures in the cold as part of the prix. lewis hamilton was fourth quickest. and serena williams remains on course for a record equalling highlands inn in scotland. saturday 2ath grand slam title at the us open. morning starts as a fairly chilly she's into the final in new york where she'll meet bianca andreescu. start, some sunny spells. if you i'll have a full round up
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showers are angry parts of england in about 15 minutes. and wales, increasing sunshine for the government in the bahamas says hurricane dorian has caused northern england and scotland, sunny ‘unimaginable destruction'. spells in northern ireland. the breeze coming into northern scotland the number of people known to have died has reached 30, at the end of the day, keeping it but officials say the final death toll will be ‘staggering'. dorian — which is now closing down to 12 or 13 degrees. 20 in the in on the coast of north carolina — warmest parts of england. in some has weakened to a catergory1 storm, with winds lowering to some 90mph. sunshine, it may not feel too bad. richard galpin reports. parts of eastern scotland, north—east england could be coded for a touch of frost. part two of it is hard to imagine how anyone can the weekend on sunday, a little sunshine to begin with, patchy cloud survive now. here the ruins of the developing. while most will stay dry, you could eventually start to harbour. dorian, a category five see a bit of light rain and drizzle and it will feel a little bit warmer hurricane hit this island at full force and stayed over it for two across eastern scotland and there is no sea across eastern scotland and there is no sea coasts as the wind changes days. hundreds or possibly thousands of people are missing here and on direction once again. other neighbouring islands.|j honestly other neighbouring islands.” honestly believe it is finished. i think it will not recover until the
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next ten years. like, fully recover because everything is gone, absolutely everything is gone. and that includes food. inevitably, some have been breaking into shops to find something to eat and drink. and supply is becoming increasingly hello, you're watching scarce. small amounts of food are afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 3: being brought in by ngos and the opposition leaders agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is delayed united nations is promising to fly in 85 tonnes of ready to eat meals. beyond the end of october. but when this will arrive is we were in agreement that the prime unclear. so many here are trying to minister is on the run. boris is broken. leave. me, i was we have an opportunity to bring down boris, to break boris and to bring down unclear. so many here are trying to leave. me, iwas supposed unclear. so many here are trying to leave. me, i was supposed to live but i can't. no water, no food. no brexit and we must take that. one can stay there because if you the prime minister says he won't contemplate resigning stay the... if he hasn't delivered brexit by the end of october and says he will get a deal. there is also no power here. generators are needed urgently. by they don't trust the people. the international response to this they want an election. 0k. disaster is only building up slowly. perhaps they don't think they will win.
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fine. whilst airports on the islands are i will go to brussels, i will get a deal and we will make slowly becoming more operational and sure we come out on october 31st. small flights going in and out, the a rebuke to the prime minister — the chief constable of west yorkshire police criticises clea ra nce process small flights going in and out, the clearance process is still going, boris johnson for politicising there are roads that are damaged and the police, by using uniformed we expect it to change rapidly over officers as the backdrop the next couple of days, but it is for a speech about brexit. still a challenging situation. robert mugabe — the man hurricane dorian has also been who delivered independence for zimbabwe but went causing problems at a much schooler on to become its dictator — has died at the age of 95. smaller scale here in the united hurricane dorian has caused states. with high winds and flooding unimagineable destruction, according to the government in south carolina. and although of the bahamas. they've warned the final death dorian has now been downgraded to a toll will be staggering. category one hurricane, there are coming up on afternoon still warnings of storm surges and flash floods. live — all the sport. how are england faring in the according to the international federation of red cross, cricket? which is helping provide relief england's batsman are digging in at old trafford on day three for people affected of the fourth ashes test at old trafford. it rained this morning, they lost an early wicket, matthew cochrane from butjoe root and rory burns are steadily building a partnership as england look to avoid the defeat red crossjoins me now. that would see australia retain the urn.
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just put into perspective the scale thank you very much. and nick has of the casualties and damage that got all the weather. a rather you are having to deal with or are expecting to deal with. the brooding picture you present. and it will all clear for the weekend. the full—scale is only going to become weather getting into the weekend mood as it settles down, just in clear over the next few days. as was time is for a couple of days off and indicated by your colleague. our we ta ke ability to access the areas that time is for a couple of days off and we take a look at what hurricane have been badly affected is still dorian is doing to the usa. what if quite hampered. helicopters, any impact it will have on the uk. airports are still closed, roads are coming up. also coming up- sir still blocked. a colleague was telling me this morning that some helicopter flights have had to abandon trying to land because there philip green's top empire is in is no clear land for them to put the trouble after plunging a £170 helicopter down. we are able to do million loss last year. initial assessments yesterday and i think it seems to confirm our worst fears. almost every building in some opposition parties in parliament have agreed to stop borisjohnson holding an election parts of the islands have been until brexit has been delayed severely damaged or destroyed. on beyond the 31st of october. mps vote again on monday
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grand bahama, that was the island on whether voters should go back to the polls. the storm hovered overfor a couple of days, perhaps some optimism today the so—called rebel alliance — including labour and the snp — decided to either oppose an early because in some areas the impact isn't as bad as initially feared, election or to abstain in the vote. some mps say that means an election although the impact is still bad and people are still going to need a lot is now unlikely before november. our political corresponent of help. whatever the final picture chris mason reports. is, we can say with confidence it is trying to strike a major emergency for the bahamas a deal is rarely easy. and the people of the hamas will need a lot of help over the weeks £50 perfish. good god! and months ahead to recover and if this looks like a prime minister rebuild. how does this then, this on the campaign trail that's because it is. particular weather event compare hello, good morning. with others that you have been involved in? it is hard, it is hard borisjohnson started the day in peterhead in aberdeenshire talking fish and talking to farmers, to compare. if you compare it to the and encountering this brute. the thing is, his campaigning has cyclone in mozambique earlier this photo opportunities but there's no year, there we are talking of a election date sorted because his opponents similarly powered storm. i think are saying not yet. dorian was more powerful but there there is a contest going on to make we re dorian was more powerful but there were more people in central sure that we come out of the eu mozambique and that storm want further inland. we look back to the on october 31st and there are people in the parliament who plainly want to block that, and that
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previous bad hurricane stopped in includesjeremy corbyn, the snp. the americas, 2017. the impact i think they're wrong, perhaps is comparable to the i think people in this country want us to get on and do it. i'll go to brussels, hurricane matthew on dominica but it doesn't need to be compared to stan i'll get a deal and we'll make sure we come out on october 31st, that's what we've got to do. you keep mentioning october 31st in its own right. it is a major and you've made it abundantly clear that it is your line in the sand. emergency, created significant humanitarian needs. how do you if you can't deliver that, approach something on this scale? we you are going to have to resign. that is not a hypothesis i'm have already started. we were willing to contemplate. preparing for this before the storm back here at westminster this made landfall once it became clear morning, opposition party leaders it would hit the bahamas with some got together in person force. we had some experts on the and on the phone to plot a way ground before the storm hit to of leaving boris johnson in a spot and a tight one, support the bahamas red cross. forcing him to choose additional team members have between breaking his promise arrived. we had ourfirst flight of of delivering brexit come what may relief items arrive yesterday that by the end of october, or breaking the soon—to—be law was carrying about 38 tonnes, so it isa preventing a no—deal brexit in just was carrying about 38 tonnes, so it is a start but what is needed. we have two more flights we are hoping a matter of weeks. to land over the weekend and as i what we have agreed is that there are no circumstances mentioned, we have already got teams in which we are going to give
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going out into abaco and the grand the prime minister the general election he is so desperate for until an extension has been secured and until the risk of no bahama to carry out initial assessments and to provide a first deal has been completely eliminated. i think we've done that. wave of assistance. we are also the prime minister is on the run. looking to government and partners boris is broken. around the world to provide we have an opportunity sustained support over the coming to bring down boris, weeks and months. we appreciate you to break boris and to bring down brexit. and we must take that. talking to us. thank you very much. we will choose the timing of that election, it is in our interest in the snp to have the election time for a look at the weather tomorrow, but it is in the broader forecast now and nick has joined us. interest of all of our nations in the united kingdom to act we are obviously still talking about together and we will have the hurricane dorian that is now a election when it is the right time, but i will make you this promise, category one storm but already it will not be a long wait. thought being given to names for the resignation of the prime minister's brother yesterday left him winded and this place has next year. we are familiar with left him wounded this week. hurricane ‘s and typhoons being the opposition parties working given a name. there is a system now. it is coming into its fifth year for together now have a majority ireland and the uk. clearly not with here and they are intent the same degree of impact as the on making use of it. horror of what has happened in the we can cross to the palace bahamas but they can make a big of westminster and speak to our
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correspondentjessica parker. impact on our weather. and so the met office have come up with a new jessica, it is called the rebel list of names for the new storm alliance, it all smacks of star season and that is how the list is wars. how strong is this alliance shaping up for the 2019—20 system. given that they all want something a little bit different? they are it is more on m. it is nowhere for agreed on the initial steps it seems. so come monday, when we understand the government will put n. it is the irish weather service, forward this idea of having a snap election in mid october, the rebel the uk where the service but there is also now the dutch getting alliance, these opposition parties working together will not support involved as well, the royal that motion and that means it would netherlands meteorological pass because borisjohnson knows he institute. all three combined. quite needs two thirds of mps over in that often you have a weather system that place in order to get the snap will move on towards the election that he now says he needs netherlands. there is a dutch to call, because mps are trying to influence in there. with piet. how block the possibility of a no—deal brexit, something he says is undermining his negotiating strategy with brussels. that is what they have agreed on. but you're right to point out that the rebel alliance do they come up with them? people aren't necessarily agreed in terms
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are asked to submit names and i of the longer term strategy. let's guess they choose from people who ta ke of the longer term strategy. let's take for example the liberal have submitted those. once those democrats. they are clear they want to stop brexit altogether, have weather services... some people feel another referendum, what they would call a pupil is a vote. the labour this is trivial but the idea is, it party, the positions are nuanced. there are absolutely labour mps who has been an undoubted success, is if are determined to have a referendum, you give something a name, it raises who want to remain and the leadership has said there will be a awareness of that and therefore people are more likely to pay public vote on any brexit deal, but attention to the potential impacts it is less clear how the leadership coming their way of a storm system will campaign and there is some difference at the top of the party over and above regular weather in terms of how to approach that systems that come in. but it also issue. they might agree for now. it means you can keep them in mind and doesn't mean they can agree forever. know which one you are tracking. absolutely and where it is going what are the options than for boris johnson and the government? because next and particularly across the it looks like the opposition have several countries involved with this. we probably won't get through been outmanoeuvred and out it seems all these names and let's hope we don't in the storm season but we are to have flip. boris johnson and his likely to make some progress into that. it will be a range of impacts. government use some pretty tough tactics this week with the likes of some will have a greater impact on expelling a number of conservative the republic of ireland then they rebels, just over 20 of them. that will across the uk and netherlands. caused a backlash in the party and
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sometimes the other way around as some people think that downing well. or it mayjust blast through street's strategy he has backfired because boris johnson street's strategy he has backfired because borisjohnson is now in a all three places. talk us through tricky position. maybe even today the weekend's weather. first of all this legislation designed to block a i want to show you a couple of no—deal brexit, designed to make him go back to ask for a delay is set to pictures. a treat for you from the pass through the house of lords and sublime to the ridiculous. the story gain royal said. he said he will not of yesterday and today's weather told by animals. a bear in a ask for a delay. does that mean he will ignore the law and that means hammock. sunbathing yesterday at woburn safari park. there were some he is being asked, if that is going to happen, are you going to resign? sunshine. he looks very chilled. if and he says he is not thinking about that possibility at the moment. i could be doing that, i would be. shorter time into boris johnson's we know also that cows are good premiership, he is already being weather forecasters and so today's asked that question. picture has them lying down in a meanwhile, a legal challenge brought over boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament for five weeks has been field. just by complete coincidence rejected by leading judges at the high court in london. the anti—brexit campaigner gina miller brought it to court. we found some cowers in a field in her lawyers had argued that the prorogation suffolk. there is some rain around. breached the legal principle of parliamentary sovereignty.
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the weekend forecast now. let's take she gave her reaction to today's judgement outside the high court. a look at the big picture. this is we are very disappointed the weather system working with the judgment today. southwards across suffolk. behind we feel strongly that parliamentary sovereignty is that it southwards across suffolk. behind thatitis fundamental to the stability and southwards across suffolk. behind that it is brightening up. if you show us around to be had and things future of our country, and are settling down for the weekend as therefore worth fighting to defend. we will see. we will gradually push as our politics becomes further south, outbreaks of rain through england and clearing later ever more chaotic, this evening from the far south. brighter skies elsewhere but there we feel it is absolutely vital that area brighter skies elsewhere but there are a few showers trundling parliament should be sitting. southwards. some of those quite heavy and carried along by fairly we are therefore pleased that the judges have given us permission to appeal risk and gusty winds. more to a to the supreme court, which we will be doing, and they felt northerly as we go to the weekend. don't expect a warm weekend. that our case had the merit. so the supreme court has temperatures in the mid to high pencilled in the 17th of teens. as for the cricket, we have seen a teens. as for the cricket, we have seenafairamount teens. as for the cricket, we have september for appeal hearing. seen a fair amount of rain so far today. brighter skies at old today, we stand for everyone. trafford but still the chance of a few showers this afternoon. a hint, we stand for the future more than a hint of a settled generations, and we stand for representative democracy. weekend as high pressure builds in. to give up now would be a dereliction of our responsibility.
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we need to protect our institutions. into tonight then, if you showers moving south but a lot of dry, clear it is not right that weather out there. notice the wind they should be shut down or bullied, especially at this arrows moving to a northerly. low most momentous time in our history. my legal team and i will not give up the fight for democracy. thank you. single figures in the coldest parts of highland scotland as we start the weekend tomorrow morning. good sunny spells around. england and wales our legal correspondent will see a few showers, but very hit clive coleman was at the high court in central london, and he explained and miss and actually into the afternoon, much of northern england and scotland will see a lot of what will happen next. sunshine. increasing sunshine for many in the afternoon. a cool breeze gina miller has failed. she has failed to get a ruling that the coming into the coast of eastern advice given by the prime minister scotland, north—east england. 19 or 20 the further south in england. to the queen to prorogue parliament pa rt for five weeks, that would have 20 the further south in england. part one of the weekend. into to the queen to prorogue parliament forfive weeks, that would have been the longest for a0 years at a time saturday night, flagged up how chilly it will be under clear skies. that gina miller says is of national a touch of frost. parts of eastern political crisis, she has failed to get a declaration that that was scotland, north—east england. may be unlawful. but this is far from out, even below freezing in the get a declaration that that was unlawful. but this is farfrom over. what the court has done today and cold est out, even below freezing in the coldest spots. sunday, a lot of things are moving so quickly, it has sunshine to begin with. patchy cloud given a ruling without giving
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developing that thicker cloud reasons. the hearing only ended late heading into scotland and northern ireland may bring a bit of light yesterday and so the judges haven't had time to put together a reasoned judgment. that will follow but they rain during the day. warmer on have come to their decision, so they sunday, particularly in eastern have come to their decision, so they scotla nd sunday, particularly in eastern have dismissed her appeal but what scotland and north—east england. they have done is something the that is how your weekend is shaping 00:35:15,330 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 up. more on our website. courts are allowed to do in cases where they feel there is enough merit in the case and the timeframe is small enough to mean that their case can be leapfrogged, it can lea pfrog case can be leapfrogged, it can leapfrog the court of appeal here and go straight to the uk supreme court and as you heard gina miller say, a hearing is set down to take place at the uk supreme court on the 17th of september. there are two other legal challenges, one in scotla nd other legal challenges, one in scotland and one in northern ireland. they could also end up at the uk supreme court and i don't think it is a surprise to any of the lawyers in these cases that these matters are heading towards the highest court in the land. so momentous constitutionally of these challenges because in effect what will happen is that if any of those challenges succeed at the supreme
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court, and as i say, hearings start on the 17th of september, a prorogue in parliament could take place next monday so the effect could be that if gina miller is successful or any of the others are successful, what we could have is in effect the a nswer we could have is in effect the answer spending of a suspended parliament and what gina miller says is that that is critically important because it would allow mps to continue to legislate, to continue to react to developments in the lead up to react to developments in the lead up to the 31st of october, the date when the uk is due to leave the eu, to do the business of parliament. however, her arguments have failed. the arguments in scotland have failed thus far. this has been a rather good or two very welcome decisions because there was a decisions because there was a decision in the prime minister's favour in scotland. this one here today, to welcome victories in what has been a bruising week for him but the legal battle continues.
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the chief constable of west yorkshire police says he's "disappointed" that his officers were used as a "backdrop" to a political speech made by borisjohnson yesterday. john robins had previously said he was pleased his force had been chosen as the focal point for the prime minister's speech. however, mr robins now says he thought mrjohnson's speech would only concern the government's police recruitment drive and he had "no prior knowledge" that it would veer into other issues, like brexit. let's get more on this now with our correspondent mark lobel. what is the background to this? what is the background to this7m started out as a good idea. it was in the number ten diary for weeks about police recruitment, they will get borisjohnson about police recruitment, they will get boris johnson looking about police recruitment, they will get borisjohnson looking at issues that people cared about, police recruitment. and they created this scene recruitment. and they created this scene which doesn't look far off a general election campaign launch. we have heard that is not what is happening at the moment, but perhaps thatis happening at the moment, but perhaps that is the image they wanted to project. here at the police academy in wakefield, 35 uniform officers as
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a backdrop to a speech by boris johnson. it was their understanding it was going to be about recruitment. however when he started speaking, he veered into talking about brexit and calls for a general election and even to questions from the media about the controversial resignation of his brother. immediately there were calls from labour politicians, the shadow policing minister saying the police had been put in an intolerable position, it was called a political stu nt position, it was called a political stunt by the local police commissioner. that meant they issued a statement. they said, minutes before this happened, the plans were changed. they understood there was going to be a speech on recruitment with officers present and then another speech about the other issues. at the last minute, things changed and they ended up with one big speech with it all in. this is what the chief constable said...
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but don't politicians use these sorts of backdrops often? they are often in classrooms or in hospitals, yes. the issue here is there are these very senior, impartial figures complaining they were somewhat misled in some way. also the police federation from england and wales saying he was disappointed, it was the wrong decision to have offices behind borisjohnson when talking about these issues. this is a proper telling off for number ten and it adds to the perception that the number ten say one thing and do another, but in the scheme of things, these police officers and police forces are delighted the police forces are delighted the police numbers will be going up with this recruitment campaign, so it won't damage relations severely. and number ten saying this was a long planned visit, it gave borisjohnson first hand experience to see what his police officers got up to on a
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day—to—day basis and over all, they are happy with the fact there is this large amount of recruitment going on. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: opposition leaders agreed to have... the chief constable of west yorkshire police criticises boris johnson for using officers as the backdrop for a speech on political issues including brexit. in powerfor issues including brexit. in power for nearly four decades, robert mugabe, the man who delivered independence for zimbabwe but went on to become its dictator has died at the age of 95. and in sport at 50, rory burns, england's batsmen frustrate australia on a third day of the fourth ashes test. they are now 92-2. serena williams says she's pretty proud of herself after reaching her 10th us open
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final — 20 years after her first. she'll meet bianca andreescu in saturday's showpiece it's the ferrari's setting the pace in front of their devoted tifosi in practice for the italian grand prix. charles leclerc is quickest so far — just ahead of lewis hamilton. i'll be backjust after 3:30. he was the liberation hero who became a ruthless dictator. robert mugabe, the former president of zimbabwe, has died at the age of 95. mr mugabe led the independence war against white minority rule and then ruled the country for 37 years. his regime was one of brutal repression and economic mismangement, which brought zimbabwe to its knees. he was finally overthown in a coup and has now died in hospital in singapore. a warning that this report from our correspondent in zimbabwe, shingai nyoka, contains flash photography. chanting prime minister robert mugabe!
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he was once zimbabwe's liberator, leading a war against white minority rule. but by the end, the adulation president robert mugabe once enjoyed was gone. he cemented his power winning overwhelmingly at elections in 1980. as leader of a new nation he set about creating a better country than the one he inherited. and for a while he succeeded. there can never be any return to the state of armed conflict which existed before our commitment to peace and the democratic process of election under the lancaster house agreement. surely, this is now time to beat our swords into ploughshares. but beneath the veneer lay a dark side. mr mugabe deployed a crack military unit to southern zimbabwe to deal with hundreds of insurgents. between 1983 and 1987, thousands were murdered and the world turned a blind eye. mugabe was the great hope. but as the 1990s ended,
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the economy was bottoming out and a new political party was on the rise. seemingly desperate to regain popularity, mr mugabe played a political hand. land seized by the colonial government was still in the hands of the white minority. sensing the frustration, mugabe encouraged blacks to take back their land. and they did, often violently. the western world took note, breaking diplomatic ties and imposing economic sanctions. the opposition, its leaders, human rights workers bore the brunt of his anger. in 2008, in the midst of billion—percent inflation and widespread unemployment, mr mugabe suffered his first electoral defeat. it only led to more violence in the second round of voting. britain stripped him of his knighthood and former allies condemned him. nearer to home we have seen
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the outbreak of violence against fellow africans in our own country. and the tragic failure of leadership in our neighbouring zimbabwe. but he remained a cult—like figure among many africans for daring to challenge western political dominance on the world's affairs. in retaliation for the measures we took to empower the black majority, the united kingdom has mobilised her friends and allies in europe, north america, australia, new zealand, to impose illegal economic sanctions against zimbabwe. but within his own party, discontent was rising. many believed he had overstayed and needed to hand over power. his second wife, grace mugabe, a0 years hisjunior, seemed to be gaining power,
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and she began accusing then vice president emerson mnangagwa of trying to oust them. mr mugabe finally fired his long—time aide, accusing him of trying to topple him. mr mnangagwa, with the help of the military, mounted a comeback, posting soldiers on the streets and placing mr mugabe under house arrest. tens of thousands of zimbabweans marched, calling on him to step down, and after the threat of impeachment he resigned. in his last years mr mugabe had retreated to the seclusion of his mansion. many will remember him as a gifted orator and visionary who liberated zimbabwe but later returned her to the shackles of oppression. borisjohnson has announced £50—million for scottish farming on a visit to aberdeenshire today as he continues to press
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for a general election. but the snp insists the money should have been given to farmers and crofters in scotland in 2016. let's talk to charlotte smith, the presenter of bbc farming today. how much of this money is new? the scottish farming community will regard the bulk of this payment which is £160 million as the writing ofan which is £160 million as the writing of an historic wrong. it goes back to 2013-1a of an historic wrong. it goes back to 2013—1a when the european union was trying to smooth out some of the discrepancies in agricultural subsidy payments across member states. it gave the uk government an extra £160 million based largely on the historic underpayment of scottish farmers and crofters. but when the uk government came to pay out that money in 2016, it didn't give it just out that money in 2016, it didn't give itjust to scottish out that money in 2016, it didn't
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give it just to scottish farmers out that money in 2016, it didn't give itjust to scottish farmers and crofters, it sure did among all uk farmers. scottish farmers have been campaigning pretty much since then to get what they regarded as their money and to be honest, they weren't really getting very far. in fact, last year the then defra secretary michael gove ruled out paying the 160 million but he did setup the new review to look at the way money is allocated between the home nations and to try and make it fairer. however this week the government announced it was going to pay the 160 million to scottish farmers and thatis 160 million to scottish farmers and that is why the prime minister has been on a farm in scotland today. here are the winners and losers then? the winners are the scottish farmers in that they will get the £160 million and also if they will get that payment you mention, the £50 million and that is new money. that is a result of the review. what it is trying to do is to tilt subsidy money towards the people that defra says needs it most, that
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is farmers who farm in the most challenging areas which is generally the prince of wales and scotland. what they are doing is taking that money, giving 50 million to scottish farmers, 5 million to welsh farmers. that should have come from other farmers, it should come from the general subsidy part. defra says they didn't want that to happen and so they didn't want that to happen and so the government is pumping £59 million of new money into the system. thank you very much. the government in the bahamas says hurricane dorian has caused ‘unimaginable destruction'. the number of people known to have died has reached 30, but officials say the final death toll will be ‘staggering'. dorian has made landfall over cape hatteras in north carolina and has weakened to a catergory one storm. richard galpin reports. it is hard to imagine how anyone can survive now here in this the ruins of marsh harbour, one of the largest cities in the abaco islands.
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dorian, a category five hurricane, hit this island at full force and stayed over it for two days. hundreds or possibly thousands of people are missing here and on other neighbouring islands. i honestly believe abaco is finished. i think abaco will not recover until the next ten years. like, fully recover because everything is gone, absolutely everything is gone. and that includes food. inevitably, some people have been breaking into shops to find something to eat and drink. and supplies becoming increasingly scarce. small amounts of food are being brought in by ngos and the united nations is now promising to fly in 85 tonnes of ready to eat meals. but when this will arrive is unclear. so many here are trying to leave.
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there is also no power here. generators are needed urgently. but the international response to this disaster is only building up slowly. whilst airports on the islands are slowly becoming more operational and small flights going in and out, the clearance process is still going, there are roads that are damaged and we expect it to change rapidly over the next couple of days, but it is still a challenging situation. hurricane dorian has also been causing problems, albeit at a much smaller scale, here in the united states, with high winds and flooding in south carolina. and although dorian has now been downgraded to a category one hurricane, there are still warnings of storm surges and flash floods. richard galpin, bbc news.
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christy delafield is from the disaster aid organisation mercy corps. she's in nassau in the bahamas. thank you very much forjoining us. a very busy time for you. which are the priority areas of the bahamas for you? we are looking at these two islands, grand bahama and abaco and as you mentioned, we are struggling in any disaster response, a doesn't get to the affected areas as quickly as you want but in this case, it is challenging because so much of the infrastructure has been destroyed. we are hearing the airspace is dangerously overcrowded, so we are prioritising those things which are most needed, starting with search and rescue and then organisations like us are gathering supplies, mobilising our teams, ready to go in and help. we have boxes of solar
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la nterns and help. we have boxes of solar lanterns with phone chargers and we are also looking at tops, jerry cans, water filters. we are also looking at tops, jerry cans, waterfilters. we are are also looking at tops, jerry cans, water filters. we are starting from scratch here, almost everything is needed. the one item that really stood out for me in that list you just mentioned is phone chargers, not something a few years ago would have featured in a disaster response. why are they so important? there are a couple of reasons. certainly there is the emotional pa rt certainly there is the emotional part of people being able to connect with their loved ones, theirfamily members. if you can charge your phone, you can verify so much earlier than you would have been in yea rs past earlier than you would have been in years past where that your family members are ok, where they are. you can also get information from emergency services about resources that are available to you, report illnesses or other needs. there is tremendous benefit to that but then also just having that solar light
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means that you can be a little bit safer in the evenings. as you have heard there is some security concern and that provides greater protection and that provides greater protection and security for people as they wait for more assistance to arrive.” and security for people as they wait for more assistance to arrive. i was looking at your website before we spoke and it says you are a humanitarian organisation that empowers people to recover from crises. how long term is your commitment to them? we were in porto rico two years ago and our team is still there. we had to team members who have joined us still there. we had to team members who havejoined us here in the bahamas. they survived hurricane maria and are here now to help the people of the bahamas. we know this is going to be a long—term situation. there is this immediate emergency face but then the longer recovery, rebuilding the economy, all of this takes time and part of thatis all of this takes time and part of that is really just all of this takes time and part of that is reallyjust putting the power in the hands of the people who know their community ‘s best and so that might take the form of cash
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assistance, so that people can purchase what they need most urgently and infuse caching to local businesses which jump—sta rt the economy and get things moving again. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather. we are talking there about the devastation caused by hurricane dorian. now making landfall in the united states. yes but on a different scale from what they had to endure in the bahamas. not the same beast it was that this is how it looks on the satellite picture. you can see the eye of that, just moving over that very narrow strip of land on the coast of north carolina. it has made landfall there and it has recorded a wind gust in excess of 80 miles an hour. it has a maximum sustained winds near its
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centre at 90 miles an hour, it is a category one hurricane but if you think about the abaco island, winds gusting over 200 miles an hour. we have had tornadoes in the area also and the strong and potentially still damaging winds close to the usa coastline. what can you tell us about the remnants of this stone and how we might be affected by it. there are a number of tropical systems going on in the atlantic at the moment. i want to widen the view across the atlantic so keep your eyes still on dorian there. just look further east, write to the right side of this screen. this is gabriel. there two macro may end up close to the uk at some stage of next week. just want to put this into forecast mode and keep a nigh on the rain associated with these. the bigger system is dorian, it will
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move closer to nova scotia, newfoundland. it is losing its tropical characteristics but it remains a deep area of low pressure that will get caught up in the jet and on the current forecast, follow the timeline getting to tuesday, look at that, very close to iceland and there are trailing weather front is coming to the uk. that little blob coming in the centre of the atla ntic blob coming in the centre of the atlantic is gabriel. with what is left of dorian, is there is no need for concern. it will be a regular area of pressure and we have no reason to think it will bring any more significant impacts in any of the other wet and greasy systems coming our way. a spell of rain heading south on tuesday. what is left of gabriel is that comes through load in the week, may bring some heavier rain, some stronger winds but none of that is set in stone just yet. the winds but none of that is set in stonejust yet. the main message is keep across the full cost. nothing to worry on the scale of the awfulness which has happened across
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the bahamas and the strong winds and heavy rain in the eastern usa. we are very heavy rain in the eastern usa. we are very fortunate. tell us about what is coming our way in the next couple of days. do you want the bear ain? couple of days. do you want the bear again? by popular demand. sunbathing bear yesterday and how conditions have changed to the cows in suffolk, laying down in the fields because they knew rain was coming. i would like to think it is because they check the forecast first. let's get on to how things are shaping up into the weekend. things will be settling down. low pressure in charge at the moment. we have seen some cloud, rain moving south across the uk. rather patchy in nature. it is brightening up behind that. a few heavy showers, quite a clump going through the midlands. all of that is pushing southwards. the rain pulling away from some parts of england as we go deeper through the afternoon and into the evening. fairly windy out there. they will push to a
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northerly direction as we go through tonight. not a one direction and temperatures in the mid to high teens. a wet morning at the cricket, that did for the start of the day today at the fourth test. it has brightened up since then. could be a shower later today. it is looking fine over the weekend. anyone wanting rain will be disappointed. tonight, if you shower southwards and look at the wind arrows, more to and look at the wind arrows, more to a northerly direction. fairly chilly out there, temperatures dipping away to single figures. parts of highland scotland, the coldest spots. low single figures tomorrow. tomorrow, it will be a dry day with a mixture of cloud and sunny spells, although still a chance of one or two showers across parts of england and wales. for northern england and scotland, plenty of sunshine in the afternoon. that breeze will be noticeable across the east coast of scotland, north sea coast of england, around 12 degrees for some of us, close to
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20 in the warmest parts of southern england. saturday night, if you are out and about you will notice temperatures dropping away quickly. there may be a touch of frost to parts of eastern scotland and north—east england, some spots at or below freezing. plenty of sunshine on sunday to start with. some cloud developing whilst most will stay dry. the thicker cloud coming into western scotland and northern ireland, that may stop to produce some light rain or drizzle. warm up on sunday, especially in eastern scotla nd on sunday, especially in eastern scotland and north—east england. that is how the weekend is looking. enjoy the fairly settled weather. wet again on monday. more on our website.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: opposition leaders agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is delayed beyond the end of october. the prime minister says he won't contemplate resigning if he hasn't delivered brexit by the end of october — and says he will get a deal. a public rebuke — the chief constable of west yorkshire police criticises boris johnson for using uniformed officers as the backdrop for a speech on political issues, including brexit. robert mugabe — the man who delivered independence
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for zimbabwe but went on to become its dictator — has died at the age of 95. sport now on afternoon live with ben. have you got some good news for english cricket? i haven't lost any more wickets since about 5 minutes after the start of play. it's been a pretty steady afternoon for england's batsmen so far. the bowlers toiled yesterday and australia's steve smith scored that double century. well it's england's turn to frustrate today. winning the match is probably beyond them but saving it will keep alive their hopes of regaining the ashes. play didn't start until 1:30pm thanks for the manchester weather. craig overton lasted all of 5 minutes, but captainjoe root has built a useful partnership with opener rory burns. burns has past 50 for the third time in the series, root is on 36. england now 109—2 — in response to australia's first innings of a97. much of this match has seen the fans have some fun too.
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wednesday saw a beach ball fly across the pitch, yesterday we had an inflatable melon. today's offering? a unicorn and a t—rex, too. you can take the ashes but you'll not take away our blow up animals. only in cricket! one way of distracting your attention off what is happening out in the middle. and serena williams‘ remarkable longevity is continuing at the us open? in 1999, serena williams won herfirst grand slam title in new york — she wasjust 17. 20 years later — 22 more grand slams later and having had her first child two years ago — she‘s still going strongly. into the us open final for a 10th time. victory would see her equal margaret court‘s all time record for major wins. i think it‘s cool that i‘ve been in more finals than i think anyone on tour after being pregnant.
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that is kind of awesome, that‘s currently on tour. i kind of look at it that that way because it is not easy to go through what i did and come back, and so fast, and to keep playing and also not be 20 years old. yeah, i‘m pretty proud of myself. williams‘ opponent on saturday will be bianca andreescu — at 19, she wasn‘t even alive when williams first lifted the trophy in flushing meadows. the canadian won the last five games in a row to see off belinda bencic. she‘s described it as a dream come true to face williams in the final. ferrari‘s charles leclerc is the man to beat once again at the italian grand prix — fastest in both practice sessions on friday. following his maiden win in belgium last weekend, the frenchman set the pace, just ahead of lewis hamilton in his mercedes. it was an encouraging second session for the briton — who leads the drivers‘ standings by 65 points. michael owen says he has no problem with alan shearer, despite a very public argument they‘ve had surrounding the publication of owen‘s new book. the former england strikers
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fell out when newcastle were relegated in 2009 — owen was playing under shearer as temporary manager. shearer accused owen of not wanting to start in the final game of the season against aston villa. i had ihad run i had run through a brick wall to play in any game in football, i never bottle any game. i scored in every single one of my most important games, in every derby, every big game. i'm certainly not going to bottle a game against aston villa. it's very sad for me because it is obviously him that has a gripe with me, i would love to be mates with me, i would love to be mates with him again. he obviously has this problem, he didn't succeed as newcastle manager, he has his own reasons for why that didn't happen, andl reasons for why that didn't happen, and i think he blames me for that. england play their final warm up match before the rugby world cup tonight. it‘s at st james‘ park in newcastle — the first time they‘ve played there — italy are the opponents.
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it‘ll be a special night for mark wilson — who‘s made over 200 appearances for newcastle falcons in the premiership. north—east fans want to be entertained, i think that‘s the big thing. back in the 90s, when newcastle football were at their best, they just want to see entertainment. hopefully we can entertain them on friday night. it is important that we do what we have been practising and get ourselves in the right place for the world cup. hopefully, the way that we‘ve shown over the last three weeks, some pretty exciting stuff, hopefully we can entertain that way. that‘s all the sport for now. just before you go, 109—2, driven by 300 runs. let‘s return to brexit — and at the end of a turbulent week at westminster, what are voters making of it all? we have just had we havejust had up we have just had up years we havejust had up years in the house of lords have approved legislation which is aimed at
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blocking a no—deal brexit. u nless unless an agreement is approved or permanent agrees to the uk living without a deal, which as we now, many mps are opposed to. the brexit minister in the lords said that the government could not support the bill which was introduced after backbench mps seize control of the orders come on paper earlier this week. borisjohnson has described the measure as a surrender bill, saying that it means that britain will have no negotiating power with the eu if no—deal is taken off the table. he set out leaving the eu at the end of october was a matter of do or dry. the end of october was a matter of do ordry. on the end of october was a matter of do or dry. on wednesday night, a result many amendments tabled in the lords to try to derail this effort,
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but it now looks like a royal assent will be given on monday and will become law before parliament is prorogued, which we are expecting next week. so peers having approved legislation blocking a possible no—deal brexit. what are voters making of it all? in the european election in may, nigel farage‘s brexit party took more than a third of the votes across the west midlands. our correspondent phil mackie reports from there now, where he‘s been speaking to workers at an engineering firm in smethwick. as westminster tries to engineer an end to the brexit crisis, businesses across the country still have high—pressure jobs to do. this firm wants to expand, but before it can put plans in place, it needs an end to the uncertainty. it‘s all a bit of a shambles at the moment. hopefully, it‘ll sort itself out, but i can‘t see anything happening at the moment. what would you like to happen? to get the deal done, and for the country to get back as normal as possible.
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this part of the west midlands, the black country, voted very strongly to leave in the referendum three years ago. it is also a labour heartland, so it‘s places like this that will become key election battle grounds. but despite the fact they export to europe here, and there is a great deal of uncertainty, nobody has really changed their opinions on brexit. they are making tools and parts for companies like rolls—royce and jaguar land rover, but although he didn‘t want brexit, the boss thinks it should happen. we've got to leave. the level of damage politically caused in this country, and the institutions in this country, i think will take generations to repair. i think the faith, the lack of trust in our elected representatives, has been decimated. parliament has not come out of this with glowing colours. what do i want to happen? i don't want us to leave,
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but for democratic reasons, we've got to leave. you voted remain, most people in this area, most people who work in yourfactory, voted leave. do you get on? we have to get on. i'm also of a different persuasion when it comes to football teams! if you get on at that level, you'll get on at this level. the only — and it isn't any comfort that i'll have the last word — but if it pans out as i think it will pan out, i'm going to be saying, "i told you so," a lot. joe siviter was too young to vote in 2016, although he supported remain. now his opinions have changed. i think brexit has become a sort of broken record within british politics, and i think if we were to go back on it now, our reputation within europe and the rest of the world would be that we are quite weak and indecisive. manufacturing is all about getting the fine details right. if only they could precision engineer a solution to brexit. phil mackie, bbc news, smethwick.
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hong kong police have fired rubber bullets, tear gas and pepper spray to clear protesters outside a subway station in kowloon. hundreds of protesters took cover behind umbrellas and barricades made from street fencing. hong kong‘s leader, carrie lam, announced measures this week to try to restore order in the city, including the formal withdrawal of the controversial extradition bill that triggered the demonstrations fourteen weeks ago. in a moment, the latest business news. first — a look at the headlines on afternoon live: opposition leaders agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is delayed beyond the end of october. a possible no—deal brexit. the chief constable of west yorkshire police criticises boris johnson for using uniformed officers as the backdrop for a speech on political issues including brexit. in power for nearly four decades, robert mugabe — the man who delivered independence
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for zimbabwe but went on to become its dictator — has died at the age of 95. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: sir philip green‘s topshop retail empire plunged to £170 million loss last year — blaming a "dramatically" changed retail landscape and increased competition. the results are for taveta investments, which owns the arcadia group — including topshop and the brands, miss selfridge and dorothy perkins. the business has since agreed a rescue deal with its creditors that triggered a8 store closures. british airways and its pilots have been urged by number 10 to "sort out" the dispute which will see pilots walk out next week in a row over pay. "the unions and ba need to get round the table and sort this out. "the public would expect nothing less," it said. ba pilots are due to strike on monday and tuesday over a pay offer pilots‘ union, balpa, says is too low.
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caution is dominating the house market — according to the uk‘s biggest lender. halifax, part of lloyds banking group, said house prices rose by a whisker of 0.1% during the summer the uk housing market remained subdued. few properties are changing hands with the political and economic situation leading people to stay put. so, susannah, fears about the impact of the us—china trade war have on the global economy have weighed on markets — but some relief today? yes — those fears started to ease mid week — after beijing and washington announced a fresh round of trade talks to try and break the impasse. and today — some relief that the effects announced by china — its central bank cut the amount of cash that banks must hold as reserves, to encourage lending.
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we‘ve also had a jobs report in the us out — that although was lower than expected — added to expectations the us would cut interest rates to stimulate its economy. that also cheered investors somewhat. we have had my pens in the uk this week, talking trade? yes, he spoke to business leaders on thursday night, he was pretty upbeat about a relationship between the us and the uk. he said the us was ready to quit a trade deal imminently after brexit, but he doubt there might be some issues around coordinated chicken. lets find out more from allie rennison — head of trade police at the iod. you have been covering all of this very closely, let me talk very briefly about what you think about
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the easing of tensions between the us and china? do you think there is a softening of stand there?” us and china? do you think there is a softening of stand there? i think there is always scope for softening, but does it translate to reality? two months ago, we had beijing and washington effectively agree to commitments on all sides, china was going to bite more soybean purchases from the us. the us was potentially going to grant a security exception is to allow huawei to continue operating in the us. these things have not happened. talking about words, we have had a lot of discussion here in the uk as far as the us and uk relationship trading relationship is post—brexit. mike pence says he is ready to act when the uk leaves the eu, however, that are still so many questions remaining for a futures trade
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relationship? certainly, we note the us is keen to do an agreement. the uk as well. but unlike the us government, there are still a lot of filling in the blanks to do on the uk side, we have had a borisjohnson saying that they were not to keen on the chicken. this morning, scotland, he saying that there was potential for britain to expect more beef to the us market. but keeping hormone beef out of the uk market. a pretty ha rd beef out of the uk market. a pretty hard prospect to do in those negotiations. it may be a question of walking before we run, because we need to be sure what those government priorities are before the negotiation. a lot of the chance to where we get to all the brexit as well. mike pence also said in ireland on monday that the us about a brexit plant that keeps a strong foundation followed by the good friday agreement, certainly, other politicians in the us said they would block any future trade deal if
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thatis would block any future trade deal if that is not upheld. from the tips i make to washington, it is set on becoming a much more politicised issue that when the ear was negotiating a trade deal. it was never contentious then. —— the eu was negotiating. it is heating up to bea was negotiating. it is heating up to be a political issue on capitol hill as well. there are issues on both sides, i think everyone is waiting to see what happens next week to see where brexit is going to get to to know what actual wiggle room we had to be forward with the negotiations, and when. so — what‘s been happening to on the financial markets? the ftse 100 just about in negative territory. the dow jones the ftse 100 just about in negative territory. the dowjones has also lost ground, we had those jobs report earlier, hiring is lower than expected. the federal reserve is quickly to cook interest rates.
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berkeley group is up 2%, despite a report out from halifax shown that house prices are stagnating. berkeley group saintly are being pretty resilient in terms of their own business so investors are encouraged by that. we can cross to the palace of westminster and speak to our correspondent, jessica parker. jessica, what have you been watching? i have been watching the last stages of that bill, it went through the house of lords, the last hurdle on parliament. not only is royal assent to actually become law. remember earlier this week when at this bill was being initially presenter, there was a lot of discussion one at the lodge could filibuster it. those against the idea or blocking the possibility of a no—deal brexit could try to top
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the bill out. we even saw members are bringing in duvets because they we re are bringing in duvets because they were talking about all night sit ins, maybe even sitting to this weekend. as it happened, it‘s all wrapped up by apm on a friday. how so? because they reached a deal, essentially. the government decided they would allow the bill to go through, partly, ithink they would allow the bill to go through, partly, i think that would because members of the house of lords, no was clear majority in favour of approving the bill say it would have been quite a tough task for the government to find people to filibuster the bill over a number of days, possibly into the weekend. i think there was also a bit of political consideration at this point because the labour party had said that as soon as this bill got royal assent, then they would be up for a general election, which is of course what borisjohnson now wants to see. he might be disappointed to hear today from the rebel alliance that they are not going to back the idea of a general election when that
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emotion is presented to parliament on monday. the broad picture is that the house of lords have approved this bill designed to block a no—deal brexit, now his a royal assent, i understand it isn‘t mundane that we will probably hear the speaker stand up and say that it has has indeed received royal assent. we are also expecting a suspension of parliament next week? absolutely, this is what axillary does efforts to try and block 8 no—deal brexit when borisjohnson revealed he had scooted pretty councils up to balmoral to ask the queen to suspend parliament. suspended it up to 5 weeks until the government returns to deliver at the queen‘s speech. between now and then, and offer what can happen, not least of all, supposedly brexit negotiations. we have conferences in as well, and borisjohnson and a mighty political bank.
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we do have a weather system and at the moment. we are brightening up behind it. cloud is outbreaks of rain are working for the south across england and wales. a damp afternoon for some of us, brighter for others, but a few showers still through from enough to show off —— north to south on an increasingly cool breeze. we turn that wind direction down to a more westerly. a of rain by the end of the afternoon, brighter skies developing elsewhere, the chance of catching the odd passing shower. that is indication of the breeze, gusts are higher than this, it is to turn round to more of aofa this, it is to turn round to more of a of a northerly, a process which continues into tonight, pegging temperatures back into just the two upper teens. we seen a weight warning at old trafford for the
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cricket, brighter skies this afternoon was still the chance for catching showers. it is looking much quieter and drier, that is what you want, over the weekend. tonight, clear skies for some of us, still a few showers travelling south across the uk though many places will stay dry, the breeze turning round to a more northerly direction, temperatures dipping quite widely into single figures, parts of highland scotland into the low single figures is that the tomorrow. saturday off sunny spells, if few showers, mostly across parts of england and wales, the lion‘s share of the afternoon sunshine will be in northern england and across scotland. note the wind at his coming into the east of scotland, north sea coast of england, this is where we have a cold breeze, to burgess hill back at 1213 celsius, more likely how teams 220 south seas in and wales. saturday night looks to bea in and wales. saturday night looks to be a really chilly at night, it could even be a touch of frost in
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parts of eastern scotland, as the coach was hit close to freezing. one into mist and fog patches around, a lot of sunshine to start sunday, some cloud will build, over the front just snaked its some cloud will build, over the frontjust snaked its way some cloud will build, over the front just snaked its way across western scotland and northern ireland. a lot of cloud in the afternoon, most will have a dry sunday.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m martine croxhall. today at a: peers have approved legislation aimed at blocking a possible no—deal brexit. it is now on course to become law before parliament is suspended next week. meanwhile, opposition leaders in parliament agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is delayed beyond the end of octobe. a rebuke to the prime minister — the chief constable of west yorkshire police criticises boris johnson for politicising the police, by using uniformed officers as the backdrop for a speech about brexit. in power for nearly four decades, robert mugabe — the man who delivered independence for zimbabwe but went on to become its dictator — has died at the age of 95. hurricane dorian has caused ‘unimagineable destruction‘,
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according to the government of the bahamas. they‘ve warned the final death toll will be staggering. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. after yesterday‘s punishment — a good day for england‘s cricketers. joe root and rory burns have thwarted australia on a rain affected day three of the fourth ashes test. they‘re now 118—2 still well behind australia, but doing enough for now to keep the touring side from winning and retaining the ashes. i‘ll bring you the latest at tea at a:30. and the weather forecast this afternoon from nick. most of us have seen some afternoon from nick. most of us have seen some rain today but the weather is getting into the weekend mood and that means it is looking like a fine weekend across much of the uk. just not particularly warm. the full forecast coming up.
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also coming up, sir philip green‘s empire after plunging to a £170 million loss last year. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. in the last half hour, peers have approved legislation aimed at blocking a possible no—deal brexit. it‘s now on course to receive royal assent and become law before parliament is suspended — or prorogued — next week. opposition parties in parliament have also agreed to stop borisjohnson holding an election, until brexit has been delayed beyond the 31st of october. mps vote again on monday on whether voters should go back to the polls. today, the so—called rebel alliance — including labour and the snp — decided to either oppose an early election or to abstain in the vote. some mps say that means an election
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is now unlikely before november. our political corresponent chris mason reports. trying to strike a deal is rarely easy. £50 perfish. good god! if this looks like a prime minister on the campaign trail that‘s because it is. hello, good morning. borisjohnson started the day in peterhead in aberdeenshire talking fish and talking to farmers, and encountering this brute. the thing is, his campaigning has photo opportunities but there‘s no election date sorted because his opponents are saying not yet. there is a contest going on to make sure that we come out of the eu on october 31st and there are people in the parliament who plainly want to block that, and that includesjeremy corbyn, the snp. i think they‘re wrong, i think people in this country want us to get on and do it. i‘ll go to brussels, i‘ll get a deal and we‘ll make sure
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we come out on october 31st, that‘s what we‘ve got to do. you keep mentioning october 31st and you‘ve made it abundantly clear that it is your line in the sand. if you can‘t deliver that, you are going to have to resign. that is not a hypothesis i‘m willing to contemplate. back here at westminster this morning, opposition party leaders got together in person and on the phone to plot a way of leaving boris johnson in a spot and a tight one, forcing him to choose between breaking his promise of delivering brexit come what may by the end of october, or breaking the soon—to—be law preventing a no—deal brexit in just a matter of weeks. what we have agreed is that there are no circumstances in which we are going to give the prime minister the general election he is so desperate for until an extension has been secured and until the risk of no deal has been completely eliminated. i think we‘ve done that. the prime minister is on the run.
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boris is broken. we have an opportunity to bring down boris, to break boris and to bring down brexit. and we must take that. we will choose the timing of that election, it is in our interest in the snp to have the election tomorrow, but it is in the broader interest of all of our nations in the united kingdom to act together and we will have the election when it is the right time, but i will make you this promise, it will not be a long wait. the resignation of the prime minister‘s brother yesterday left him winded and this place has left him wounded this week. the opposition parties working together now have a majority here and they are intent on making use of it. chris mason reporting. let‘s get the latest from our political correspondentjessica parker. where does this lead then these attem pts where does this lead then these atte m pts to where does this lead then these attempts to stop a no till brexit? across party groups have brought
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forward the legislation this week which incidentally has just passed through the house of lords, nowjust needs royal assent. they might be feeling pretty chipper at the moment because they think boris johnson feeling pretty chipper at the moment because they think borisjohnson is going to be legally obligated to ask foran going to be legally obligated to ask for an extension to brexit, a delay to brexit if he hasn‘t managed to get a deal approved or a no deal approved by the 19th of october. we have been hearing from the prime minister and yesterday he said something pretty stark. he said he would be rather dead in a ditch than ask for a delay to brexit. questions now, will he ignore the law? the government said they will abide by the legislation or perhaps there is increasing talk of a loophole that the government could try to find. not getting too ahead of ourselves, looking ahead to monday, this legislation designed to stop a no deal brexit, set to get royal assent over the weekend and we will learn about that on monday when the commons speaker will notify the houseit
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commons speaker will notify the house it has gained well assent and we expect the government to try and bring forward a motion to approve a general election, a snap election for. but most cross party groups making it clear they are not ready foran making it clear they are not ready for an election yet. they want to see that extension set in stone.” know it is difficult to give emphatic replies to a lot of the questions we throw at you, but does that mean no deal is off the table for this government? no. because as i was just saying, it is possible they could try and find some kind of loophole. they haven‘t said that is what they‘re going to do but that is one of the things speculated about. and within the provisions of the bill, borisjohnson technically could get approval for a bill, borisjohnson technically could get approvalfor a no deal from the house of commons. there are various possibilities that could happen over the coming weeks and months but the rebel alliance
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probably feeling pleased with themselves. early in the week there was a lot of talk as to whether the bill could be fully busted out of the house of lords, but as it happens, it is all wrapped up by four o‘clock on a friday afternoon. i wonder why. thank you very much. lord adonis is a labour peer, hejoins me now. how confident are you is that no deal is off the table for this government? it looks as if boris johnson is dead in his ditch. i have come from the house of lords where we passed the bill which makes no deal illegal unless it is specifically authorised by parliament and it will not be authorised by parliament. boris johnson has to obey the law doesn‘t matter what plaster, but he has to obey the law. he has no negotiations under way at the moment for an alternative deal to theresa may‘s and it is impossible to see what the
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terms of it will be because he has ruled out all the things that could make for a deal. he is not prepared to contemplate staying in the single market, all of those things that will avoid a hard border in ireland. as of now, i think he is in a dead—end and though i don‘t relish the prospect because i think it could lead to a third prime minister in as many months, i think that may be the best thing for the country rather than going over the edge of a cliff with boris johnson. just reading some of the reaction on social media. a lot of people saying the lords voting for something, this is about stopping brexit altogether. that is right. we are unelected which is the reason what we did is to follow the house of commons, a large majority pass this bill and what we have done is agree to the will of the elected mps that boris
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johnson shouldn‘t be able to crush the country out of the european union at the end of october, which would mean not enough food supplies, medical supplies being in danger, people not being able to get in and out of the country and a hard border in ireland. all of those things that no one voted for in the referendum and parliament has done itsjob. it has safeguarded the country, safeguarded people‘s livelihoods, safeguarded people‘s livelihoods, safeguarded the position in ireland and that is what we are therefore. what happens if borisjohnson refuses to go and ask the eu for an extension to article 50 beyond october the 31st? he has to obey the law. he is the prime minister and if the government doesn‘t obey the law, how can it expect anyone else too. if he isn‘t prepared to obey the law, he has to resign. if he doesn‘t resign, i think parliament at that stage would have to debate a motion of no confidence in him and it is unlikely, given the views that have been expressed in parliament over
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the last three days and in particular his shameful treatment of conservative mps, including two former chancellors of exchequer, it is very unlikely that they will give him the time of day if he goes to the house of commons again and says he intends to break the law in order to force a no deal brexit that will wreck the country. at that stage they will be a motion of no confidence. there will be some kind of emergency government and the first thing it would do would be to avoid no deal and then probably call avoid no deal and then probably call a referendum to put an end to this whole brexit catastrophe. we have seen whole brexit catastrophe. we have seen all sorts of inventive measures by some large brains over the last few weeks. what is to stop the government finding a loophole, a way around what has just been agreed in the house of lords today regarding to stop a no deal brexit and getting it through without leaving you time next week, pick a suspension of parliament? i think the way ahead is
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now very clear. parliament reassembles in the middle of october. two weeks before the 31st deadline so in the event that boris johnson does try some fast business and johnson and his adviser dominic cummings are wellup and johnson and his adviser dominic cummings are well up to trying to find some clever ruse to disobey the law, in the event of that happening, parliament will regroup. we have those two weeks with the queen ‘s speech and plenty of opportunity at the end of october and he is not going to be able to get away with it and one of the things people have seen and one of the things people have seen is they have watched boris johnson acting unconstitutionally, forcing the queen to suspend parliament in a way that is absolutely unconstitutional for five weeks without precedent in a period of national crisis. parliament has lost patience with borisjohnson. he has only been prime minister for aa days but he has destroyed trust between number ten downing st and parliament to agree to did you ——
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degree than anytime in the last century. the legal challenges have not gone anywhere now because we are still some way away from the end of october. but if borisjohnson tries to the law, i will be confident the supreme court would oblige him to obey the law and if he then won‘t do so, ithink obey the law and if he then won‘t do so, i think he will lose a motion of no confidence in the house of commons and there will be a new government. there is no willingness whatsoever in parliament to put up with any more nonsense from boris johnson, no more of his lies, no more of him ordering the cream to do things that are unspun to choose your. —— things that are non—constitutional. people have had enough of boris johnson non—constitutional. people have had enough of borisjohnson already. to all intents and purposes, his premiership is now over. meanwhile, a legal challenge brought over boris johnson‘s decision to suspend parliament for five weeks has been
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rejected by leading judges at the high court in london. the anti—brexit campaigner, gina miller, brought it to court. her lawyers had argued that the prorogation breached the legal principle of parliamentary sovereignty. she gave her reaction to today‘s judgement outside the high court. we are very disappointed with the judgment today. we feel strongly that parliamentary sovereignty is fundamental to the stability and future of our country, and therefore worth fighting to defend. as our politics becomes ever more chaotic, we feel it is absolutely vital that parliament should be sitting. we are therefore pleased that the judges have given us permission to appeal to the supreme court, which we will be doing, and they felt that our case had the merit. so the supreme court has pencilled in the 17th of september for appeal hearing.
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today, we stand for everyone. we stand for the future generations, and we stand for representative democracy. to give up now would be a dereliction of our responsibility. we need to protect our institutions. it is not right that they should be shut down or bullied, especially at this most momentous time in our history. my legal team and i will not give up the fight for democracy. thank you. the chief constable of west yorkshire police says he‘s "disappointed" that his officers were used as a "backdrop" to a political speech made by borisjohnson yesterday. john robins had previously said he was pleased his force had been chosen as the focal point for the prime minister‘s speech. however, mr robins now says he thought mrjohnson‘s speech would only concern the government‘s police recruitment drive and he had "no prior knowledge" that it would veer into other issues, like brexit.
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you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: peers have approved legislation aimed at blocking a possible no—deal brexit. opposition leaders in parliament agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is delayed beyond the end of october. the chief constable of west yorkshire police criticises boris johnson for using uniformed officers as the backdrop for a speech about brexit. and in sport... joe root and rory burns put on a hundred partnership as england claw their way back into the fourth ashes test at old trafford. 125—2 approaching tea on day 3 serena williams says she‘s pretty proud of herself after reaching her 10th us open final — 20 years after her first. she‘ll meet bianca andreescu in saturday‘s showpiece. in their home race ferrari are setting the pace at the italian grand prix. charles leclerc was fastest in both practice sessions
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ahead of lewis hamilton and sebastian vettel i‘ll have all the details and more just after a:30. he was the liberation hero who became a ruthless dictator. robert mugabe, the former president of zimbabwe, has died at the age of 95. mr mugabe led the independence war against white minority rule and then ruled the country for 37 years. his regime was one of brutal repression and economic mismangement, which brought zimbabwe to its knees. he was finally overthown in a coup and has now died in hospital in singapore. a warning that this report from our correspondent in zimbabwe, shingai nyoka, contains flash photography. chanting prime minister robert mugabe! he was once zimbabwe‘s liberator, leading a war against white minority rule. but by the end, the adulation president robert mugabe once enjoyed was gone. he cemented his power winning
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overwhelmingly at elections in 1980. as leader of a new nation he set about creating a better country than the one he inherited. and for a while he succeeded. there can never be any return to the state of armed conflict which existed before our commitment to peace and the democratic process of election under the lancaster house agreement. surely, this is now time to beat our swords into ploughshares. but beneath the veneer lay a dark side. mr mugabe deployed a crack military unit to southern zimbabwe to deal with hundreds of insurgents. between 1983 and 1987, thousands were murdered and the world turned a blind eye. mugabe was the great hope. but as the 1990s ended, the economy was bottoming out and a new political party was on the rise.
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seemingly desperate to regain popularity, mr mugabe played a political hand. land seized by the colonial government was still in the hands of the white minority. sensing the frustration, mugabe encouraged blacks to take back their land. and they did, often violently. the western world took note, breaking diplomatic ties and imposing economic sanctions. the opposition, its leaders, human rights workers bore the brunt of his anger. in 2008, in the midst of billion—percent inflation and widespread unemployment, mr mugabe suffered his first electoral defeat. it only led to more violence in the second round of voting. britain stripped him of his knighthood and former allies condemned him. nearer to home we have seen the outbreak of violence against fellow africans
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in our own country. and the tragic failure of leadership in our neighbouring zimbabwe. but he remained a cult—like figure among many africans for daring to challenge western political dominance on the world‘s affairs. in retaliation for the measures we took to empower the black majority, the united kingdom has mobilised her friends and allies in europe, north america, australia, new zealand, to impose illegal economic sanctions against zimbabwe. but within his own party, discontent was rising. many believed he had overstayed and needed to hand over power. his second wife, grace mugabe, a0 years hisjunior, seemed to be gaining power, and she began accusing then vice president emerson mnangagwa of trying to oust them. mr mugabe finally
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fired his long—time aide, accusing him of trying to topple him. mr mnangagwa, with the help of the military, mounted a comeback, posting soldiers on the streets and placing mr mugabe under house arrest. tens of thousands of zimbabweans marched, calling on him to step down, and after the threat of impeachment he resigned. in his last years mr mugabe had retreated to the seclusion of his mansion. many will remember him as a gifted orator and visionary who liberated zimbabwe but later returned her to the shackles of oppression. the government in the bahamas says hurricane dorian has caused ‘unimaginable destruction‘. the number of people known to have died has reached 30, but officials say the final death toll will be ‘staggering‘. dorian has made landfall over cape hatteras in north carolina and has weakened to a catergory one storm.
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richard galpin reports. it is hard to imagine how anyone can survive now here in this the ruins of marsh harbour, one of the largest cities in the abaco islands. dorian, a category five hurricane, hit this island at full force and stayed over it for two days. hundreds or possibly thousands of people are missing here and on other neighbouring islands. i honestly believe abaco is finished. i think abaco will not recover until the next ten years. like, fully recover because everything is gone, absolutely everything is gone. and that includes food. inevitably, some people have been breaking into shops to find something to eat and drink. and supplies becoming increasingly scarce. small amounts of food are being brought in by ngos and the united nations is now promising to fly in 85 tonnes
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of ready to eat meals. but when this will arrive is unclear. so many here are trying to leave. there is also no power here. generators are needed urgently. but the international response to this disaster is only building up slowly. whilst airports on the islands are slowly becoming more operational and small flights going in and out, the clearance process is still going, there are roads that are damaged and we expect it to change rapidly over the next couple of days, but it is still a challenging situation. hurricane dorian has also been causing problems, albeit at a much smaller scale, here in the united states,
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with high winds and flooding in south carolina. and although dorian has now been downgraded to a category one hurricane, there are still warnings of storm surges and flash floods. richard galpin, bbc news. sarah dickson is britain‘s high commissioner to the the bahamas. shejoins me now from nassau. thank you for giving us your time this afternoon. what contact have you had with the bahama government so you had with the bahama government so far? we are in fairly regular contact with them. daily meetings, both morning and later on in the day so we can both morning and later on in the day so we can keep updated with the situation. we have had people on the ground here ever since the beginning of the assistance response. the uk tea m of the assistance response. the uk team in abaco are the first people to arrive to provide aid in abaco.
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what help has the government asked for? the immediate response that we are involved in is in marsh harbour which your reporter was talking about, providing shelter, water and in fact, i understand that there will be a team helping to clear marsh harbour today. we have been positioned in the area and we have been providing that hope. they have been providing that hope. they have been working in the smaller islands in the harder places to get to like cooperstown in abaco, to help people and provide them the shelter and immediate response they need. stop white how big a response is this on the part of britain and what sort of kit and equipment are we providing? it is up to £1.5 million of assistance that has been authorised at the moment. obviously because it is still very new and that access is difficult, we are doing a needs
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assessment to see what is required but the response by rfa has been incredible and i know they have been able to get into some of those ha rd est able to get into some of those hardest hit areas that your reporter was describing. with the bahamas being part of the commonwealth, what extra assistance might that mean that britain will be able or expected to give? one of the reasons that i am here as british high commissioner is because the foreign office and commonwealth office is opening a new embassies and high commissions across the commonwealth and here in the bahamas, our newly opened office will try and provide that closer link with the government and people so we can see where we can add value and help in this terrible time. our thoughts are with the families, thousands affected, you will have seen the images in the report there. what support do you give to uk nationals are there?”
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have a consular team that have arrived. if you are worried about people here, do contact us and we are doing our best in quite a difficult communication situation. as the comms come back online, we are finding people who were worried we re are finding people who were worried were missing, but you can call if you‘re worried about a family member caught up in the situation. we do have teams here and across the caribbean, supporting and answering those calls and helping to find people. more information on your website no doubt. thank you very much forjoining us. borisjohnson has announced £50—million for scottish farming on a visit to aberdeenshire today, as he continues to press for a general election. but the snp insists the money should have been given to farmers
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and crofters in scotland in 2016. earlier i spoke to charlotte smith, the presenter of bbc radio a‘s farming today programme, who told me the scottish farming community will see the money as righting a historic wrong. it all goes back to 2013—1a when the european union was trying to smooth out some of the discrepancies in agricultural subsidy payments across member states. it gave the uk government an extra £160 million based largely on the historic underpayment of scottish farmers and crofters. but when the uk government came to pay out that money in 2016, it didn‘t give itjust to scottish farmers and crofters, it shared it among all uk farmers. scottish farmers have been campaigning pretty much since then to get what they regarded as their money and to be honest, they weren‘t getting very far. in fact last year the then defra secretary michael gove ruled out paying the 160 million but he
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did set up a review to look at the way money is allocated between the home nations and to try and make it fairer. however this week the government announced it was going to pay the 160 million to scottish farmers and that is why the prime minister has been on a farm in scotla nd minister has been on a farm in scotland today. who are the winners and losers? the winners are the scottish farmers in that they will get the 160 million and also they will get that payment, the £50 million and that is new money. that isa million and that is new money. that is a result of the review. what it is a result of the review. what it is trying to do is to tilt subsidy money towards the people that defra says need it most, that is farmers who farm in the most challenging areas which is generally the opulence of wales and scotland. what they are doing is they are taking that money, giving 50 million to scottish farmers, 5 million to welsh farmers. that should have come from other farmers, the farmers. that should have come from otherfarmers, the general
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farmers. that should have come from other farmers, the general subsidy part. defra said it didn‘t want that to happen and so the government is pumping £59 million of new money into the system. time for the weather. our weather is settling down in time for the weekend. it will not be warm but still fairly present when the sun makes an appearance, as it will at times. not much sign today, certainly through england and wales as rain moves southwards. for many of us, ending the day with sunny spells but also if you heavy showers out there. a breeze turning increasingly northerly. still with a fuchsia i pushing their way southwards but many places will be dry and quite widely we are heading into single figures. pressure building into the start of the weekend. one or two showers around england and wales, very hit and miss. a lot of sunshine for northern england and scotland. a breeze coming into eastern scotland,
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north sea coast of england, keeping temperatures down to 12 or 13 degrees. most of us will see some sunshine on a dry sunday. increasing cloud in western scotland and across northern ireland. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: peers have approved legislation aimed at blocking a possible no—deal brexit — it‘s now on course to become law before parliament is suspended next week. meanwhile, opposition leaders in parliament agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is delayed beyond the end of october. the chief of west yorkshire police criticises borisjohnson for politicising the police — by using uniformed officers as the backdrop for a speech about brexit. robert mugabe — the man who delivered independence for zimbabwe but went on to become its dictator — has died at the age of 95. the government of the bahamas warn the final death toll from hurricane dorian
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will be "staggering". sport now on afternoon live, with ben. two and a half hours on air today, ben, and no england wickets? i think we can take most of the credit. yes, joe root and rory burns might have some site as well, but the only wicket to fall for england today happen before we were on air. may be some wickets will fall before we go off air. nearly perfect for england this afternoon after rain ruined the morning session at old trafford. yes they lost craig overton but he‘s mainly a bowler. rory burns and joe root have been leading the fightback. realistically, england are unlikely to win the fourth ashes test but if they can draw it — they can still win the ashes. play didn‘t start until half1 due
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to rain in manchester. it‘s now tea with england on 125—2. burns is on 62, root a7 not out. they‘ve added exactly 100 for the third wicket. they still trail by 372 but they‘re bringing themselves back into the match. a vital evening session ahead of us. you can follow it all with the test match special team on 5 live sports extra. remember — an australian win would see them retain the ashes. in tennis, serena williams continues to shine at the age of 37? it‘s astonishing for one player to stay at the top of her game for so long. even more remarkable when you consider that two years ago, williams had just given birth to her daughter. now, 20 years on from her maiden grand slam victory in flushing meadows, she‘s favourite for number 2a. ten times now in the final in new york too. it‘s after her straight sets win
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over elina svitolina in the last four. she‘ll now aim to equal margaret court‘s record of 2a grand slam singles wins. i think it‘s cool that i‘ve been in more finals than, i think, anyone on tour after being pregnant, that‘s kind of awesome... that‘s currently on tour. i kind of look at it that way because it‘s not easy to go through what i did and come back, and so fast, and to keep playing. and also not be 20 years old! yeah, i‘m pretty proud of myself. williams‘ opponent on saturday will be bianca andreescu. at 19, she wasn‘t even alive when williams first lifted the trophy in flushing meadows. the canadian won the last five games in a row to see off belinda bencic. she‘s described it as a dream come true to face williams in the final. ferrari‘s charles leclerc is the man to beat once again at the italian grand prix — fastest in both practice sessions on friday. following his maiden win in belgium last weekend,
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the frenchman set the pace, just ahead of lewis hamilton in his mercedes. it was an encouraging second session for the briton — who leads the drivers‘ standings by 65 points. the international fixtures continue tonight, with gareth bale and wales taking on azerbaijan in cardiff. the real madrid man says he doesn‘t listen to critics after a tough few months with his club side in spain. it‘s seen the manager not want to pick him, try to sell him and not make him a regular in the side. he also laughed off some of some of his team—mates reportedly nicknaming him "the golfer". i wouldn't say it's the worst time, but yeah, it's been not ideal. i have been there before, i know how to deal with it, it isjust about keeping your head down and just keep working hard. i think you always get rewarded with the work that you put in. sheffield wednesday have named garry monk as their new manager. he comes in after steve bruce left to join newcastle in the summer. monk had previously been in charge of middlesbrough and birmingham city
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and managed swansea in the premier league. wednesday are 11th in the championship. you‘re up to date. jane will be back with more after five. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide, and see what‘s happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to east midlands today‘s health correspondent, rob sissons, in nottingham who is talking about an increase in mumps cases at universities. and, north west tonight‘s roger johnson is in salford, and is talking about the latest in their series on farming. so first, rob, i gather you have been chatting to one of the students caught up in that outbreak? that‘s right. in fact, across england, there was the highest
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number of mumps cases confirmed by public health england between april andjune, public health england between april and june, that‘s over 2000 cases. i can tell you that 15% of those in the east midlands. so what‘s happening at the start of term is that houses of students are getting ready with all of their gear to head to university, many for the first time, public health england are really stressing to people make sure that you are up—to—date with your vaccines, particularly in nr, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella. what protection is available that public health officials are trying to promote? children are supposed to have two rounds of mmr, but you will remember there was a lot of controversy about it in the 1990s, it really is one of the reasons for one of the highest number of rise in cases in 10 years.
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they reckon it is the lower than expected uptake of mmr years ago, partly because of the fallout of what his now discredited evidence. i have been talking to one student, his name is book, he finished university in the summer and it is now back home in northamptonshire. he got rubella, a nasty rash on his arm, and he felt absolutely dreadful, he hadn‘t had the mmrjab. then his face swelled up, that classic look with mumps where your saliva gland as well, he says it was terrible. having rubella and len mumps, it really was a tough time for me, my family. it was severe pain on both occasions, it really affected my lifestyle at an important time of night life, and i do believe it was down to not being vaccinated when i was younger. that significantly increase my chances of
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getting laid by the seas, but i definitely would say if i was in at position, i would definitely vaccinate. so how much production do these jabs offer, it is not complete, 100%? that's right, no jab gives you 100% protection. we are to by public health england, it is the best protection we have a gaze at these viruses, which can cause, in rare cases, some severe complications. so when it comes to mmr, the advice from the experts is get protected now. lots of students are returning to university and they are returning to university and they are redoubling their efforts, settle here in nottingham, to warn people to check with the gp that they are up to check with the gp that they are up to date, make sure they have that vaccine. i had been chatting with a co nsulta nt vaccine. i had been chatting with a consultant who has this advice. the best protection against these diseases is to have the vaccines, so students should check with their
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gps, make sure they have had to do says of the mmr vaccine. also, the pit the vaccine which protects them against meningitis. you might be thinking, why is it students are particularly vulnerable to mumps? the answer, i‘m told, is that stu d e nts the answer, i‘m told, is that students live in close proximity one another, they go to bars, can‘t hear each other speak because of the music, get up close and personal. you can get it through kissing as well, it is spread through saliva, and is quite contagious. it is unpleasant, there is no real treatment, you just have to sit through it. students will be students! roger, good afternoon to you. and, roger, why has north west tonight been out for the harvest? trying to! would have been doing a series all year looking at the agriculture industry and rural life in the north—west. the north west of
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england has some pretty big cities, greater manchester, merseyside, lancashire. there are, however, some real pockets of rural life, a couple of national parks, teak and lake district. we decided we were going to follow 3 farmers through the course of the year, looking at the issues that affect them, things like market prices, the weather, and brexit, of course. this is all they, the arable farmer, he is in prescott, on the edge of liverpool, you wouldn't know to look at these pictures. we have been withjames robinson, a daily format near kendal. and richer, and upland sheep farmer in cumbria. we have been out for public harvesting, the trouble is, the summer has been so wet. all they says he is struggling to get his crops in. basically, it is
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entirely on renewable energy, we are using wood chips to prove eyed the heat source, and we are using electric to provide it is entirely on renewable energy, we are using wood chips to prove eyed the heat source, and we wood chips to prove eyed the heat source, and we are wood chips to prove eyed the heat source, and we are using electric to provide dfu every few the moisture rise out couple more... we can dry wet grain, but it can't —— the combine count work in the rain. wouldn't directly overhead. we need to get the harvest in. this is a pa rt to get the harvest in. this is a part of a series for the north west tonight? yes, something we have been running throughout the year. brexit, of course, on the screen, boris johnson announcing money for scottish farmers. it is a big issue for agriculture itself. interestingly, of the three farmers we are featuring, their views are split on brexit. the sheep and dairy farmer, upon the north of the patch, thatis farmer, upon the north of the patch, that isjames farmer, upon the north of the patch, that is james and farmer, upon the north of the patch,
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that isjames and richard, both are worried about the prospect of tariffs. ollie harrison has the problem with the which fields and drying his grain, he says that he mainly services the domestic market, he just wants it sorted one way or another, because stability will be the most important thing. you need to know what the landscape looks like. more on those stories in their respective programmes at half past six this evening. roger and rob, thank you both. let‘s return to brexit — and at the end of a turbulent week at westminster, what are voters making of it all? in the european election in may, nigel farage‘s brexit party took more than a third of the votes across the west midlands. our correspondent phil mackie reports from there now,
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where he‘s been speaking to workers at an engineering firm in smethwick. as westminster tries to engineer an end to the brexit crisis, businesses across the country still have high—pressure jobs to do. this firm wants to expand, but before it can put plans in place, it needs an end to the uncertainty. it‘s all a bit of a shambles at the moment. hopefully, it‘ll sort itself out, but i can‘t see anything happening at the moment. what would you like to happen? to get the deal done, and for the country to get back as normal as possible. this part of the west midlands, the black country, voted very strongly to leave in the referendum three years ago. it is also a labour heartland, so it‘s places like this that will become key election battle grounds. but despite the fact
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they export to europe here and there is a great deal of uncertainty, nobody has really changed their opinions on brexit. they are making tools and parts for companies like rolls—royce and jaguar land rover, but although he didn‘t want brexit, the boss thinks it should happen. we've got to leave. the level of damage politically caused in this country, and the institutions in this country, i think will take generations to repair. i think the faith, the lack of trust in our elected representatives, has been decimated. parliament has not come out of this with glowing colours. what do i want to happen? i don't want us to leave, but for democratic reasons, we've got to leave. you voted remain, most people in this area, most people who work in yourfactory, voted leave. do you get on? we have to get on. i'm also of a different persuasion when it comes to football teams! if you get on at that level, you'll get on at this level. the only — and it isn't any comfort that i'll have the last word — but if it pans out as i think it will pan out, i'm going to be
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saying, "i told you so," a lot. joe siviter was too young to vote in 2016, although he supported remain. now his opinions have changed. i think brexit has become a sort of broken record within british politics, and i think if we were to go back on it now, our reputation within europe and the rest of the world would be that we are quite weak and indecisive. manufacturing is all about getting the fine details right. if only they could precision engineer a solution to brexit. phil mackie, bbc news, smethwick. a couple of lines of news that have just come in, this is the conservative party responds to that pa ct by conservative party responds to that pact by the so—called rebel alliance toa snap pact by the so—called rebel alliance to a snap election, and also the
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legislation to prevent a possible no—deal brexit. the deputy chairman of the conservative party said that much this week, general copy ready for the british, to surrender is negotiating position and delay again. now he has broken his promise to stop a election, and supping routers and deciding who goes to brussels to negotiate. labour are blocking this country and refusing to be held to account for it. the letters means more to other, more delay and not getting brexit done. brexit will be forced to endure once more of a zombie parliament with nothing to show for it at the end. he says the prime minister trust the people and believes the referendum should be respected. just a quick word about that speech about boris johnson made yesterday in west yorkshire in front of those police recruits, he is being criticised for
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that today. the chair of the home affairs committee, yvette cooper, has written to the cabinet secretary to complain. she says, i‘m writing to complain. she says, i‘m writing to complain. she says, i‘m writing to complain about the extended participation of police to your officers in a speech which contain considerable political content unrelated to police recruitment. she says, among other things, the prime minister refer to calling for an election and a choice between him and the leader of the opposition. as you will be aware, there is clear guidance prohibiting the involvement of police in politics. ministers and mps routinely meet police officers in other words, the guidance is clear on the need for impartiality at about any interaction that could be used to support show support for one particular candidate. she says ministers should respect the impartiality of the police and not asked them to do anything that would go against their guidance are put their impartiality under question. a very lengthy letter from the chair
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of the home affairs threat committee, yvette committee. —— home affa i rs committee, yvette committee. —— home affairs select committee. in a moment, the latest business news. first — a look at the headlines on afternoon live: peers have approved legislation aimed at blocking a possible no—deal brexit. opposition leaders in parliament agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is delayed beyond the end of october. the chief constable of west yorkshire police criticises boris johnson for using uniformed officers as the backdrop for a speech about brexit. this here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: facebook is under investigation in the us to determine whether it has "stifled competition and put users at risk". the new action was announced by new york state attorney general on behalf of representatives from several states. facebook said people had "multiple choices" when it came to using online services. british airways and its pilots have been urged by number 10
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to "sort out" the dispute which will see pilots walk out next week in a row over pay. ba pilots are due to strike on monday and tuesday over a pay offer pilots‘ union balpa says is too low. caution is dominating the house market — according to the uk‘s biggest lender. halifax, part of lloyds banking group, said house prices rose by a whisker of 0.1% during the summer the uk housing market remained subdued. few properties are changing hands with the political and economic situation leading people to stay put. we‘ve heard a lot about how the retail is struggling but now topshop once a star of the high street has also seen a fall in profits? yes, quite a dramatic fall for sir philip green‘s retail empire, which plunged to £170 million loss last year, blaming a "dramatically" changed retail landscape and increased competition. as you say, it has been at the start
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of the high street. they blame a dramatically changing retail landscape and increase competition, coming mainly from online. the results are for taveta investments which owns the arcadia group, including topshop and the brands miss selfridge and dorothy perkins. so any indication about how the business is coping this year? well, it‘s since agreed a deal with its creditors that triggered a8 store closures. in an update provided in the latest results, the directors say they are "confident that we will deliver on our plan, improve the way we work and win the hearts and minds of more and more of our customers". the business has not been alone in finding the going tough on the high street. marks and spencer has also illustrated the woes facing traditional retailers, falling out of the ftse100 index this week amid competition from firms such as primark on the high street and boohoo online.
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that is so much competition, the fast fashion still extremely popular on the high street despite all these calls for fewer clouds to be bought. —— fewer clouds. and the rest of the market moving news today, let‘s talk to paola binns, senior fund manager at royal london. lets talk about topshop, what has gone wrong? sir philip green indicated that he was perhaps a little bit slow to get all the changes that were seen on the high street. i think in the uk, there is a big problem because the proportion of cells done through the internet is higher in the uk than any other country in europe. —— sales. even compared globally, a lot of sales are coming through e—commerce in the uk, this is a problem for all retailers, especially things like clothing. they have to improve the
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experience that people have when they enter shops, it has been pretty pure for the last few years, they are pure for the last few years, they a re really pure for the last few years, they are really struggling with trying to improve the customer experience and stopping them from just going online. a number of different jobs reports there, in the uk, one issue that the number of permanent positions been taken on has dropped, but in the us, another report out looking at the broader context, and actually, there were disappointing numbers as far as investors were concerned, a rise in the us non—farm payroll numbers. but not as much was expected? why do you think that is? the number in the us was disappointing, but the data at the beginning of the week has pointed to some slowdown in the manufacturing sector in the us, in particular. there wasn‘t really a big surprise. what you did see no more positive
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side was that unemployment rate was sta ble side was that unemployment rate was stable at 3.7% and a small increase in wage inflation, so that was all positive. the market didn‘t really react, the market is pricing in a slowdown in the us economy, not a recession. the expectation is that the central bank will cut rates in september. very briefly, what has been is happening to stirling today? it has been a roller—coaster ride this week. those job it has been a roller—coaster ride this week. thosejob numbers help support the pound, didn‘t they? this week. thosejob numbers help support the pound, didn't they? yes, i think what is really making the pan is expectations on brexit. we saw a big meal at the beginning of the week when the markets are pricing in a departure from the eu without a deal. —— e—book made. stirling, as weak know, is one of the most underrated currencies, anytime you see a big move down, the temptation from the trading side is to cover those short positions.
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until we get more clarity on brexit, i think that will be the biggest influence on where sterling goes. thank you forjoining us. quick look at the board, the ftse100 has moved into positive territory. the dow jones is also up in the us, partly due to expectations that the federal reserve is likely to decrease interest rates much more quickly to try and support the economy in light of that jobs try and support the economy in light of thatjobs report. the city of bilbao in spain is taking a proactive approach to supporting its elderly residents, by launching various cognitive games in two of its parks. the aim is to help preserve people‘s memory, and also to fight loneliness. rachel stanton reports. this is a park in spain, but it is no ordinary park. elderly people can often feel lonely, but this park in bilbao is trying to change that. not only is the idea to get elderly people together, but to stimulate their minds, as well. various games here have been
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designed to help with memory, and a chance to exercise too. translation: by creating spaces where people can do notjust physical, but also, cognitive exercises, we are also making people interact with each other. and all this connects to the issue of loneliness. so we look for spaces where there are ways to be able to talk and also exercise your mind. according to spain‘s national statistics institute, more than 2 million people over the age of 65 live by themselves in spain. and the country is set to have the world‘s second oldest population, just behind japan, by 2050. translation: at least you can have places where you can go as an elderly person to meet up, make friends, and aside from that, well, activate the mind. still being tested, user satisfaction is being monitored.
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but this idea offers hope, some fun, and an escape from any troubles elderly people may face in their daily lives. rachel stanton, bbc news. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. our weather is settling down in time for the weekend, but we do have a weather system that has to clear out of the way before that happens. we are brightening up behind it, across parts of scotland and northern ireland, cloud and objects of rain is working for the south across england and wales. they don‘t have them in for some of us, brighterfor others, but a few shall were still looking through from north to south on an increasingly cool breeze, as we turn that wind direction more ground to a north—westerly. still cloudy across southern england, a bit of rain by the end of the afternoon, brighter skies developing elsewhere but the chance of catching
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the odd passing shower. that is indication of the breeze, gusts are higher that is, it is due to round two more of a normally, a process continue onto tonight, that is paying temperatures back to just the mid to upper teens. we are seeing a wet morning at the cricket at old trafford, brighter skies or not the this afternoon, stood a chance of catching a few showers, it is a look at much quieter, more importantly, driver. this is the picture at this evening and tonight, clear skies for many of us. still a you shall travel across the south of the uk, many places then dry, the breeze turning round to more northerly direction, temperatures dipping quite loudly into single figures, parts of highland scotland into a low single figures as we sat there is a tomorrow. saturday offers sunny spells, if you showers, mostly across parts of england and wales, the elyshah of the afternoon sunshine will be in northern england and across scotland. there is a cool
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breeze, temperatures held back about 12 or 15 degrees for some of us, more like the high teens to 20 celsius the most of you are in england and wales. saturday night looks like a really chilly night, even could be a touch of frost into eastern scotland. the coldest what head close to freezing, if not a little below, one or two mist and for patches around. some cloud to start on sunday, with different snakes its way across western scotla nd snakes its way across western scotland and northern ireland, a lot of cloud with it, perhaps a bit of light rain and drizzle developing in a few spots but most will have a dry sunday.
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today at 5pm: pressure on the prime minister as opposition parties agree not to back his demand for a snap general election in october. the rebel alliance will vote against the government or abstain in monday‘s vote. we are in agreement that the prime minister is on the run. boris is broken. we have an opportunity to bring down boris, to break boris, and to bring down brexit, and we must take that. as many of that opinion will say content. the contents have it. and the bill which aims to block a no—deal brexit
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has now been approved in the house of lords. the stakes are high for borisjohnson with
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