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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 6, 2019 8:00pm-8:46pm BST

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this is bbc news, the high plains at 8pm... —— the hardlines at 8pm... opposition parties at westminster move to block borisjohnson‘s plan for a mid october general election in case it leads to a no—deal brexit. we are not going to help borisjohnson shut down parliament and drives us out of the eu over an election period, that's not going to. they don't trust the people, they don't want an election, ok, perhaps they don't think they can win, i'll go to brussels, i'll get a deal. as many of that opinion say content on the contrary not contend. the contents habit. —— have it.
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meanwhile, the bill which aims to block a no—deal brexit has now been approved in the house of lords. an independence icon and a tyrant zimbabwe's robert mugabe, who led the country for 37 years, has died aged 95. the devastating effect of hurricane dorian in the bahamas the islands‘ government warns the final death toll will be "staggering". more than a hundred parents and pupils stage a protest over gender neutral uniforms at a secondary school in sussex. stephen king's classic work i'm still a creepy conclusion. see what he thinks of that and the rest of the week's releases in the film review.
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good evening and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister's demand for an early general election looks set to be rejected by mps after opposition parties agreed it shouldn't take place until after the eu summit in mid october. labour, the lib dems, the snp and plaid cymru all agreed not to support the government declaring they wanted an extension to the leave date of october 31st to guarantee no brexit without a deal. mrjohnson on a visit to scotland accused them of making an "extraordinary political mistake". it came as the bill to prevent a no deal brexit got its final parliamentary approval in the house of lords. it will get royal assent and become law on monday. here's our deputy political editorjohn pienaar. much easier, this, than leading the country. borisjohnson‘s trying to call an election before brexit to stick to his plan, leave on time deal or no deal. but he's lost control and he wants it back.
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we must get brexit done and that's my message to my colleagues. let's come together, get this thing over the line and unite our country, then get on with defeating the labour opposition. you know, when they finally have the guts to have an election. you can almost smell the election coming but he is having to wait. a spectator, as his opponents try to force him to give up on a no—deal brexit, break his promise, maybe his premiership. you keep mentioning october 31st, you've made it abundantly clear that's your line in the sand. if you can't deliver that, you're going to have to resign. that is not a hypothesis i'm willing to contemplate. i want us to get this thing done. today in the lords, the legislation banning no deal was sent to become law, decreeing there would be no election until brexit is delayed. as many of that opinion will say "content". content! to the contrary, "not content".
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the contents have it. opponents had coordinated their plans. we've agreed that we're not going to give the prime minister the general election he is so desperate for until an extension is secured and the risk of no deal is completely eliminated. the prime minister is on the run. boris is broken. we have an opportunity to bring down boris, to break boris, to bring down brexit. and we must take that. i want an election, the snp wants an election, but we will do that when we have made sure that the security of our citizens is determined. and you want to weaken borisjohnson ahead of that election by making him break his word. well, he has gone out with ridiculous promises of leaving the european union on 31st october. borisjohnson, that's not going to happen. no sight ofjeremy corbyn, though, he gathered opposition leaders by phone. labour's brexit policy is still a work in progress. but the party's joined the alliance that's cornered borisjohnson. and in downing street they're
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searching for a plan, any plan that will somehow help the pm regain some kind of control. he's sworn he will never seek an extension to brexit but now a new law could force him to do just that. he won't break his word, he can't break the law. mrjohnson needs to find a way to force an election, or salvage his to deliver brexit, maybe without reaching an eu deal first, and in there there is no sign they have found one. are you asking for an extension, mr frost? what chance of a last—minute deal? britain's brexit negotiator david frost has been in brussels today but the finnish pm, who is chairing the eu, suggested a no—deal brexit could be close. it seems very obvious that we are not yet in brexit agreement. on with the whites and off to peterhead market, campaigning keeps you busy. haggling is part of the job.
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£50 per fish. good god, expensive fish! boris johnson is famously upbeat but his premiership could still end badly. our political correspondent told me earlier that even if an election does not happen in mid october it is expected pretty soon. it will be interesting to see over the weekend and into monday whether the government and have no reason at the moment that they want, whether the government will press i had come out for a motion calling for an early general election where as it stands it is obvious they will lose because the cross party group of mps in the so—called rebel alliance as we were hearing today, they will not back the calls on monday not because they claim they want a general election but because they want to see the possible extension to brexit set in stone and they want him to go off to
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brussels and ask for the extension and look at the politics of this and perhaps they are accessing that if borisjohnson were perhaps they are accessing that if boris johnson were forced to perhaps they are accessing that if borisjohnson were forced to do that, and then a general election, he would be in a difficult place because he said over and over again it is do or die october 31 and then he said he would rather be dead in a ditch than ask for a delay to brexit. that seems to be the plan at the moment and no sign yet that borisjohnson is the moment and no sign yet that boris johnson is going the moment and no sign yet that borisjohnson is going to ask for a delay no matter what this legislation said sale that is why i think it will move on into whether it can be some kind of legal loophole, is the legislation designed to stop a brexit watertight and they will abide by the law and what he says will be up for debate over the coming weeks. that is boris johnson but what about labour? take us johnson but what about labour? take us through their position at the moment and one of the opposition rebellion? the labour party, it has
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been an interesting journey they have been on over the week because at one point they seem to be saying that as soon as this cross party bell designed to stop a new deal brexit got a royal assent which we expected and at me and they would be up expected and at me and they would be upforan expected and at me and they would be up for an election but there seems to bea up for an election but there seems to be a lot of caution among certain people in the labour party partly because of the idea that they want to make sure that borisjohnson goes off and asks for a delay when they go to the polls partly because of parliament gets resolved and the run—up toa parliament gets resolved and the run—up to a general election and they were worried about what could happen in the absence of expensive backbenchers who thought the labour party would lose a general election at the moment and they did not want to fight one at that stage and i am sure the leadership would push back at that and remind everyone that jeremy corbyn get a lot better than anyone expected in 2017 and they will be keen to get out there and fight again and they think they can runa fight again and they think they can run a strong campaign maybe not on brexit but anti—austerity issues as well but there has been tension in
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the party over at where the election should be but regardless of where you look at the party the likely it is highly likely. the high court has rejected a legal challenge to borisjohnson‘s decision to suspend parliament. the case was brought by the businesswoman gina miller, who argued the move was "an unlawful abuse of power". she has been allowed to appeal that case is expected to be heard at the supreme court on september 17th. a similar legal challenge was rejected at edinburgh's court of session earlier this week, which is also being appealed. afterwards, gina miller told the bbc the fight wasn't over. it was not thrown out or dismissed in the case was not dismissed and we did not get a judgement in our favour so it was not win or lose but what we did get was that the case had serious merit and a referral up to the supreme court on the 17th of
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september and what we have now is an important case especially at this time where it will be back on the table next week, front and centre where we believe this request was a abuse of the prime minister's powers and we are seeing everyday things are changing and parliament should be there and it will be heard in the highest court in the land. in fact we would argue that it is being heard in the right place to be heard in the supreme court. the chief constable of west yorkshire police says he's "disappointed" that his officers were used as a "backdrop" to a political speech by borisjohnson on brexit yesterday. john robins said it was the understanding of the force that any involvement of their officers was "solely" about the government's police recruitment drive and that they'd had "no prior knowledge" the speech would be broadened to other issues. and we'll find out how this story
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and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are the evening standard's martin bentham and bonnie greer from the new european. the president of zimbabwe, emmerson mnangagwa, has declared the former president of zimbabwe, robert mugabe, a national hero after his death at the age of 95. in a televised address, mr mnangagwa said zimbabwe would be in mourning until m mugabe was buried. the death early this morning and singapore of the friend of the nation and iconic leader for national liberation, he leaves a big
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void in our nation. a veteran nationalist and pan— africanist fighter, he leaves a rich and indelible legacy of tenacious adherence to principal on the collective rights of africa and africans in general and in particular, the rights of the people of zimbabwe, who gave his all. earlier, i spoke to milton nkosi injohannesburg in south africa i asked him about reaction to robert mugabe's death. he was viewed and very different ways by many people. they saw a man
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who was a tyrant, who was a dictator and who brought misery to millions of people. remember that south africa that there is an estimated 2-4,000,000 africa that there is an estimated 2—4,000,000 zimbabweans who have fled their own country, the economy declined there, looking forjob opportunities here. that is what a lot of people are talking about today. but there are some who remembera today. but there are some who remember a liberator, the today. but there are some who remembera liberator, the man today. but there are some who remember a liberator, the man who freed them from white minority rule, oppression and remembered that he spent ten years in prison fighting the white minority rule government of ian smith. and he was even denied the right to bury his own son at the time. he became president and set up an amazing education system from which many are still benefiting today. so a mixed bag of the
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reaction to his death today. many people are asking what on earth went wrong and why would he turn on his own people and some analysts are pointing to his treatment in prison and as he said the death of his young son and the refusal to attend his funeral and his treatment in prison, and not spoken of but pretty key and the death of his first wife, what went wrong? he became increasingly better as he grew older and he clung to power for too long. and in the and, he got to a point where he was not making progress, he spent the better part of the first decade of his presidency doing very well in zimbabwe and they were exporting grain and tobacco and many other commodities across the continent and across the world. but he soon got into that land
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redistribution programme after he lost a referendum and he started the campaign of grabbing land from white farmers and from then on, things did not go right for mugabe and he just dug in and that is what really created the situation he ended up and. the very story that he is a former president of zimbabwe dies and a hospital in singapore, that excelled tells you the gravity of what has happened in that country. and finally there has been the accusation that so many key characters from the mugabe error i just turned a blind eye and just thinking about his cause for the liberation, i am thinking of nelson mandela and how did they regard him as things went wrong? people did speak out and i remember the
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archbishop desmond tutu and nelson mandela said there was a lack of leadership in zimbabwe and there we re many leadership in zimbabwe and there were many critics but they were doing it in a very subtle way. when the west was coming out openly and ina more the west was coming out openly and in a more defiant way criticising robert mugabe, there was a time in a co nfe re nce robert mugabe, there was a time in a conference in 2002, when he told the former prime minister, tony blair, keep your england and let me keep my zimbabwe. that gave him a lot of pan— african people, that he was a man fighting for africa's liberation and that is how mugabe is remembered and that is how mugabe is remembered and how he was treated by the leaders that today the official statements claimed that a great man has died and a great leader has died and that is how he is remembered
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officially. the time is 8:16pm. the headlines on bbc news... opposition leaders in parliament agree to stop borisjohnson having a snap election until brexit is until brexit is delayed beyond the end of october. robert mugabe the man who delivered independence for zimbabwe but went on to become its dictator has died at the age of 95. in the wake of hurricane dorian, officials in the bahamas say the situation there is dire and warn the death toll may rise dramatically. sport now and for a full round up we crossed to the bbc sport centre. we will start with the cricket and england are in big trouble after australia took three late wickets on day three of the fourth ashes test. joss thank you forjoining us. he removed three and 200—5 in the
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first innings. still 297 runs behind ina first innings. still 297 runs behind in a match they could not afford to lose if they want to win the ashes. our correspondent was watching. much of the day, they battled back well but today ended with australians feeling very much and —— in control. a century stand between rory burns and joe rude but eventually burns went for a run caught at six and then the wicked started to tumble. joe reed soon followed and lbw for 71. that brought ben stokes to the wicket so a huge ovation from england fans and he was the hero of the last test at headingley. he soon lost his batting partner, jason roy, clea n lost his batting partner, jason roy, clean bold byjosh hazel cell five
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wickets on any huge amount of work to do and still there the fans will believe anything is possible but they face a real battle to save this match and the ashes helps. wales and scotla nd match and the ashes helps. wales and scotland are both in qualifying action night for euro 2020 and he lost two of the first three matches and taking on the bottom of the group, azerbaijan and cardiff and they lead by a goal— zero and it gave whales the lead and scotland are in front as well in level with second—place russia if they could win, they lead at the moment. both 725 pm. kick—off. he comes in after steve bruce left to join newcastle in the summerand steve bruce left to join newcastle in the summer and has been out of work since being sat down next act by bringing in city and hejoins the site at 11th place in the championship. a marker has been laid
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down in the run—up to the weld athletics championships. sheet one 100 metres at the dining league events and vessels, and head of jamaica's two—time champion. she ran it, the fastest time of the season into the overall title with it. obviously i came into the race wanting to win and my coach gave me some very specific things to think about and i was doing that and the race and i managed to put it off and went the line i was like fabulous, i w011 went the line i was like fabulous, i won the race and happy me but then i remembered it was a dining league and a one b dining league, what a great day! chasing his 19th grand slam title, he faces matteo vanity and he has called him the greatest that my fighter ever and that is something that rafael nadal says is not the only reason why the behind
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his success. to pray every point in every set and every match until then and that is one of the keys of the success. and that is one of the keys of the success. he is not everything i think i'm at my success is not only because of fight. it is a lot of things. south africa rugby confirmed that the former legend has passed away at the age of 49 of a sudden heart attack. he was part of this springboks 1995 heart attack. he was part of this springboks1995 well cup winning squad and since retiring and taking up squad and since retiring and taking upa squad and since retiring and taking up a coaching position with the springboks sevens and his death comes springboks sevens and his death co m es less springboks sevens and his death comes less than two months after his partnerjames small died at the age of 50 also of a heart attack. england and scotland are both playing their final matches before the rugby world cup. they are both in front as life takes commentary at the moment on the bbc sport website,
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check out the latest there and i will be back with you in the next hour. we willjoin you then. thank you. the prime minister of the bahamas says hurricane dorian has caused "generational devastation" to the islands. dorian has now been downgraded to a catagory one storm as it moves up america's east coast. but it's left behind what officials say could be a "staggering" death toll although there are only 30 confimed deaths so far mainly on the abaco islands. the focus now is on the aid effort to help those who survived. richard galpin reports. it is hard to imagine how anyone can survive here, in this, the ruins of marsh harbour, one of the largest cities in the abaco islands. dorian, a category five hurricane, hit this island at full force and stayed over it for two days. hundreds or possibly thousands of people are missing here and on other neighbouring islands.
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i honestly believe abaco is finished. i think abaco will not recover until the next ten years. like, fully recover, because everything is gone, absolutely everything is gone. and that includes food. inevitably, some people have been breaking into shops to find something to eat and drink. and supplies becoming increasingly scarce. help is at hand from this british naval vessel which has been in the area on hurricane watch for some time. it has been delivering essential supplies, including hygiene kits and clean drinking water to those most to on this island. other international and local organisations have also been bringing in small amounts of food. and the united nations is now promising to fly in 85 tons of ready to eat meals. but when this will arrive is
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unclear. in any disaster response, aid does not get to the affected areas as quickly as you want but in this case it is particularly challenging because so much of the infrastructure has been completely destroyed. we are hearing the airspace is dangerously overcrowded so we are prioritising those things which are most needed. but for many of the survivors here, conditions are so bad that they are trying to get away from this island as quickly as possible. richard galpin, bbc news. let's speak now to phillip brave davis, leader of the opposition party in the bahamas who joins us from the capital nassau. thank you for speaking to us here at bbc news but first off how our people coping? first evolved let me thank you, bbc for continuing to connect us to the world so that they can understand the plight of our people here in the bahamas. the people here in the bahamas. the people affected here, both in the
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affected areas at south and from other islands, are traumatised because we are experiencing devastation of an and imaginable proportion and the posttraumatic stress brought on by this horrific catastrophe will last with us for quite a while. i understand that the number of dead stands at 38 at the moment and there is a problem of trying to reach some of the outlying islands and described to us what some of the problems are. most of the access to these areas, because roads have been damaged and has become impossible. —— most of the access to these areas is a challenge because the roads have been damaged. and resources, particularly helicopters have been scarce. but
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the people reaching out, helping each other and that is where the resilience comes in because it is the ordinary citizens that are in these communities that are reaching out to help each other and this as i continue to say, it tells us and tells the world who we are as a people. we can see the images on the screen there and you can see that homes are upturned and likely people there are moving, we can see pictures of food and we saw in the report that heat mentioned small amounts of food are coming through and how are people coping with such and how are people coping with such a limited amount to nourishment? again it is challenging for them and all again it is challenging for them and a ll efforts again it is challenging for them and all efforts are being made by ngos
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and friends and family members, who are not impacted by the areas to get the necessary food and other essentials to their loved ones and friends and residents in particular. eight continues to be challenging but as i said before there is darkness out there but we see through the debris and devastation a little ray of hope as each day passes by. and as each day passes by, the relief efforts are becoming more and more effective. how are hospitals coping? how many hospitals are there that people can travel to to treat those that are badly injured? while there isjust the one major hospital in the providence, of the capital of the bahamas. the hospital that was in grand bahama,
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that was severely compromised but there are —— they are using makeshift rooms and areas to accommodate those they can. the effort has been to airlift most of those persons to enter into the capitals to be treated here into the providence and we also have the doctors hospital and out clinics that may house a few of the injured. it is an it is an overwhelming event. the red cross estimated that over half of the homes have been destroyed and we saw pictures of residents reading because they cannot cope and those who are
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staying, where are they staying? they are hunkering with friends and other relatives who have homes who may not have been severely impacted and there is a mass exodus from this to make these areas to the capital. and there are efforts being made to evacuate as many as we can, as quickly as we can to try to bring normalcy to their lives. thank you very much for your time and telling the story of the bahamas. we do thank you for connecting us to the world, to let the world know what is going on. we do need the assistance of the world and i said to someone, the earth is asked by the world is small. thank you very much. stay safe. you're watching bbc news, here
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is the weather. the weather looks much drierfor this is the weather. the weather looks much drier for this weekend but it still will be on the chilli side and a lot of the rain we have seen earlier on is pushing away and showers becoming fewer as we had further into the night. some clear styles a nd further into the night. some clear styles and winds turning more to north or northwesterly and it will be cooler than it was last and temperatures in towns and cities and across northern parts of the uk will fade away and a lot of sunshine actually and further south the odd shower continuing into the afternoon and most places still going to be dry. northerly winds for the most pa rt dry. northerly winds for the most part but is stronger when down the north sea coast will make it feel rather cool and thus temperatures south wales and southwest of england. saturday night into sunday morning where for the most part we start dry and sunny. we will bubble up start dry and sunny. we will bubble upa bit start dry and sunny. we will bubble up a bit of god but not expecting any showers to speak of. across northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland it could be quite a cloudy day. temperatures again 16—18dc.
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this is bbc news, the headlines. opposition parties at westminster move to block borisjohnson's plan for a mid october general election in case it leads to a no—deal brexit. -- until —— until brexit is delayed beyond october. we are not going to help borisjohnson shut down parliament and drives us out of the eu over an election period, that's not going to. they don't trust the people, they don't want an election, ok, perhaps they don't think they can win, i'll go to brussels, i'll get a deal. peers have approved legislation backing an ordeal brexit. robert mcgaughey, the man who delivered independence and zimbabwe went on to become its dictator, has died at the age of 95. in the wake of hurricane
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dorian, they say the situation is dire, and warned the death toll may rise dramatically. 0k, ok, let's return to the news, that the former president of zimbabwe has died at the age of 95, he dominated his country for decades, leading the independents were overweight minority rule, and then himself, ruling zimbabwe for 37 years. a regime marked by violence, corruption, and economic collapse. he was ousted in a military coup in 2017. our correspondent, his report does contain flashing images. he was once zimbabwe's liberator, leading the fight against white minority rule but by the end, the adulation president mugabe once enjoyed was gone. i, robert gabriel mugabe... he cemented his power winning overwhelmingly at elections in 1980. as leader of a new nation he set about creating a better country than the one he inherited.
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there can never be any return to the state of armed conflict which existed before our commitment to peace and the democratic process of election under the lancaster house agreement. surely, this is now time to beat our swords into ploughsha res. he spent massively on education and infrastructural development, building a thriving black middle class and one of the most literate populations on the continent. but there was a vicious, ruthless side to the statesman. between 1983 and 1987, mugabe deployed a military unit trained by the north koreans to deal with his political opponents in the south of the country. thousands were murdered and the world seemed happy to turn a blind eye. but as the 1990s ended the economy was in trouble. facing new political opposition, mugabe made a fateful step. he gave the go—ahead for the seizure
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of white—owned farms. he knew this was a fertile ground. this was the land that the country's wealth was built on. white farmers fled, the western world took note, breaking diplomatic ties and imposing economic sanctions. the opposition, its leaders, human rights workers, bore the brunt of his anger. in 2008 in the midst of a billion per cent inflation and widespread unemployment, mr mugabe suffered his first electoral defeat. it only led to more violence in the second round of voting. britain stripped him of his knighthood. former allies condemned him. nearer to home we have seen the outbreak of violence against fellow africans in our own country, and the tragic failure of leadership in our neighbouring zimbabwe.
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tonight, president emmerson mnangagwa paid this tribute. a veteran nationalist and a pan—africanist fighter, comrade mugabe bequeaths a reach and indelible legacy of tenacious adherence to principle on the collective rights of africa and africans in general and in particular the rights of the people of zimbabwe. in harare, many people chose to remember the liberator. he was my first president. so, to me, he deserves a great honour. this is sad news. we have lost a good father. mugabe was all right. but the truth of his last years in power was that his country was collapsing around him, he could no longer hide his frailty
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and lent increasingly on his younger wife grace. she had ambitions of her own but the rising discontent in the party he dominated for over a0 years led to them both being outmanoeuvred by his right—hand man emmerson mnangagwa. in what was effectively a military coup, mugabe was ousted and the country celebrated. there are reminders of robert mugabe everywhere but here on the streets there are no visible signs of mourning. that's because he lived out his last years cut off from public and political life in an opulent mansion far removed from the struggles of many zimbabweans. many will remember him as a gifted orator and visionary who liberated zimbabwe but who turned his back on the high ideals he'd originally believed in. while earlier, the former labour
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minister anti—apartheid campaigner, lord peter hayne, gave his reaction to the death of zimbabwe president. he began well, he promised to bring everybody together after a racist white minority rule in the old regime that he helped liberate. so i and many others were thrilled when he was elected, but then later, he became corrupt, self—serving, despotic, unleashing violence and terror against anybody who didn't agree with him. rigging elections, and at the same time, bankrupting his country, and ruining a rich agricultural sector to the point where they had to import food. a really disastrous record. that was lord peter hayne there. well, the zimbabwean author, douglas rogers, joins us now. he wrote two books about the zimbabwe president, and also experiences, his experiences of the country. thank you for speaking
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to us this evening here on bbc news. what did you think when the news first broke? well, it wasn't much of a surprise, he was 95 years old, very frail, and he was running out of time for the last number of yea rs, of time for the last number of years, but neither am i dancing on anyone's grave. i think that's... not the right time for that. it's worth bearing in mind that he was at a state of the art hospital in singapore, getting the finest medical treatment in the world, and back home, his country is on life support. i wonder if you could explain to viewers, douglas, you have lived in the country, you understand the ways, why there has been so much respect that's been given to a man who has been described as a deft swat and a dictator. we are hearing a lot about this phrase... he of course was the leader of the
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liberation movement that won independence from minority white rule. for a number of independence from minority white rule. fora number of years, independence from minority white rule. for a number of years, for the first decade, i would say 15 years, he did impressive things in zimbabwe, the record is patchy, but zimbabwe's zimbabwe, the record is patchy, but zimba bwe's literacy had zimbabwe, the record is patchy, but zimbabwe's literacy had a driving economy, a good health care system, and was for many years the model post—colonial african country. and i think the memory of that your memoirs were called the resort, they have been described as a moving testa m e nt to have been described as a moving testament to the love and support, why do you think there was and still is toa why do you think there was and still is to a certain degree, a great love for zimbabwe, tell us about the potential that the country never quite reached? well, he died in
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singapore, and zimbabwe could have been the singapore of africa. it has far greater resources than singapore does. it has come as i mentioned earlier, highly literate population, very educated. and anyone who visits zimbabwe falls in love with it. obviously, it's a beautiful landscape. but if you were to go to zimbabwe now, you would struggle to get electricity, obviously the economy is in shambles, and the country is incredibly fractious and divided in a way that it wasn't 15-20 divided in a way that it wasn't 15—20 years ago. divided in a way that it wasn't 15-20 years ago. douglas, what was it like in the early days, when he first took power, and at what point did it change, and what did it do to yourfamily? did it change, and what did it do to your family? i was very young, independence in 1980, i was 12 years old. ido independence in 1980, i was 12 years old. i do recall a speech that he made when he won that election in 1980, a lot of... rhodesians fled
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the country fearing the dictatorship, and marxism, and i remember he made an incredible speech on national television, basically about reconciliation, that's one of the reasons why my pa rents stayed that's one of the reasons why my parents stayed in the country, but 20 years later, he turned his... and his political opponents, who after 20 years, had enough of his rule. when when you say that he turned his guns on them, what happened? what was the experience? well in 2000, if you recall, he lost a referendum to change the constitution, but it was the first election, national vote that he had ever lost, and his response, his response was always to find an enemy. he never took responsibility for any problems in the country. for corruption, for miss rule, so he always found an enemy, and in 2000, he found, he
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started using colonial rule, white farmers, white landowners, he started to blame them for the country's problems. really, he was going after black farm workers who we re going after black farm workers who were supporting the opposition. but as you will know, and 2000, it was the beginning of the land invasions, commercialfarms were the beginning of the land invasions, commercial farms were taken, and the beginning of other countries rapid decline, economic decline. the onset of hyperinflation. the collapse of agriculture, and isolation. what hopes do you have for zimbabwe now, would you ever go back?|j hopes do you have for zimbabwe now, would you ever go back? i visit a lot, my father still lives there, i love visiting zimbabwe. the best people in the world. a lot of people say things haven't changed in zimbabwe mugabe was moved from power. ironically by his former cou nterpa rts power. ironically by his former counterparts in 2017. but as anyone
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knows, it's just as divided as ever. we can only hope through people who are generally, like some of the most welcoming and smartest and brightest people can put it back on its feet, but one of the tragedies of course is three or 4 million people live outside the country in south africa and the uk. it's all a great irony of how many zimbabweans work for the national health service in britain. and that's because they can't find jobs, careers and zimbabwe. and that's because they can't find jobs, careers and zimbabwem and that's because they can't find jobs, careers and zimbabwe. it did lose all of its people wealth, didn't it? douglas rogers, thank you very much for your time, and your reflections, thank you. thank you. the time is 843, you are watching bbc news. now, a dispute over new rules for uniform out of the sussex school got so out of hand, that police communities support officers had to be called to
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keep the peace. as more than 40 pupils were turned away for wearing skirts. the head teacher at priory school in lewes told all peoples —— pupils they had to wear trousers come after concerns were raised over the lengths of girls skirts. well, earlier today, and the first day of term, parents and people staged a protest. the local mp, maria cofield, said that she was disturbed at how the situation escalated. peter whittlesey reports. —— only polo shirts where paired co ntroversially —— only polo shirts where paired controversially with the trousers are allowed, whether you are a boy, ora girl. so are allowed, whether you are a boy, or a girl. so what's happening now is that girls are wearing skirts, the uniform that's not allowed, they are trying to get in, it looks like the officials from the schools are trying to close the gate, and say they cannot come in unless they are
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wearing the right school uniform. because we wanted to stand there and protest, but we didn't know whether the police were allowed to push us back, or whether we were allowed to stay on stuff,... we we re stay on stuff,... we were being told we were allowed to stay, so we were holding our grand, the police at first weren't doing much, and then the teachers we re doing much, and then the teachers were going to the police, you need to get them to... you need to get them to stop them and now we are trying to get through reception, because we want to get our education. they are taking away our learning. i have given you a press statement that's very clear. the man saying no comment as head teacher tony smith come at the end of last term, parents were written to about the new school uniform. saying it... but today, the local mp has spoken out against the school for turning children away. to bargirls
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children away. to bar girls from getting an education, simply because they

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