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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 9, 2019 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

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i'm christian fraser at westminster, where mps are set to vote again later this evening on borisjohnson's plan for a snap general election to break the brexit deadlock. today's other political developments... the prime minister holds talks in dublin with his irish counterpart and insists he wanted to avoid a no deal brexit. an emotionalfarewell from the speaker of the house of commons, john bercow, as he announces he'll step down at the end of october. this has been — let me put it explicitly — the greatest privilege and honour of my professional life, for which i will be eternally grateful.
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the bill aimed at delaying a no—deal brexit has officially become law. and in the past half an hour, mps have voted to force the government into publishing all documents concerning no—deal planning. i'm ben brown — the rest of this evening's headlines... almost all of british airways flights are grounded as pilots walk out over pay at the start of a two day strike. bullied online — the little mix starjesy nelson reveals how years of nasty comments almost drove her to take her own life. and the extraordinary surgery that means this man — blinded in one eye by acid 20 years ago — can finally see again.
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good evening and welcome to westminster. in a few hours time, parliament will be shut down for five weeks, until a fortnight before the uk is due to leave the eu. first, mps will be asked to vote for a second time on the government's call for a snap general election — but that looks set to be rejected again. let's take a look back at the key developments on a busy day at westminster — and what we can expect over the course of the evening. the prime minister spent this morning in dublin. he met the irish prime minister leo varadkar and said that a no—deal brexit would be a failure that both the british and irish governments would be responsible for. meanwhile — this afternoon a law designed to prevent the uk leaving the european union without a deal came into effect as it was given royal assent. also this afternoon, there were emotional scenes in the house of commons as the speakerjohn bercow announced he was standing down from the role
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on the 31st october. this evening — mps have voted to force the government to publish its correspondence over suspending parliament — and it's no—deal planning documents. later — we expect not until around quarter—to—midnight — mps will vote again on the government's motion to hold a snap general election. and after the vote — at the close of business in the house — parliament be will prorogued — suspended — for five weeks. our political editor laura kuenssberg has this report — which does contain flash photography. that's some guest book. michel barnier has been here... borisjohnson turn to put his name on the taoiseach‘s visitor list. donald trump! goodness! he might be more at ease with the small talk than his predecesor, but the problem is much the same. what to do about the irish border if there is no brexit deal? although this week the prime
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minister sounded more committed to trying than in recent days. i want to find a deal. i want to get a deal. like you, i have looked carefully at no—deal. i have assessed its consequences, both for our country and yours, and yes, of course we could do it, the uk could certainly get through it, but be in no doubt, that outcome would be a failure of statecraft for which we would all be responsible. awkwardly, the irish leader made it plain he has seen no new solution from the uk yet to the backstop, the controversial insurance guarantee against bringing back a hard border, that theresa may agreed but parliament hated. i am ready to listen to any ways we can achieve our agreed goals and resolve
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the current impasse. butu what we can not do and will not do is agree to the replacement of a legal guarantee with a promise. we are open to alternatives, but they must be realistic ones, legally binding and workable, and we haven't received such proposals to date. no sudden breakthrough in dublin today, or at home, where parliament's passed a law to try to make it impossible for the prime minister to take us out the eu without a deal, which borisjohnson wants as an option. there is no more of a symbol of parliament's right to resist downing street than the speakerjohn bercow. i would like to make a personal statement to the house... who in this long running drama had a scene of his own. my tenure as speaker and mp will end when this parliament ends. in classic fashion, mr bercow, who has infuriated the government
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and was at the the centre of serious bullying allegations which he denies, will go, but only after this latest round of brexit controversy is done. we degrade this parliament at our peril. applause that blast aimed at borisjohnson. and he was applauded — but look where the clapping comes from. all too obvious, this is a house profoundly divided. and later tonight, the commons will pack up for a few weeks, the government calling an early halt. we will do everything we can to prevent the crashing out on 31st october and will support an election when that is clear that we are not doing that crashing out. the opposition might block them, but right now it's the tories who are in a hurry to get to the ballot box, and for a government with no majority, a parliament where there is no agreement, sooner oi’ later we are
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all heading there. we all heading there. are not likely to get to the proroguing we are not likely to get to the proroguing until midnight or afterwards. this is the scene in the house of commons, where mps are debating a motion from labour leaderjeremy corbyn that calls for the government to comply with legislation that was passed to prevent a no—deal brexit. this is the bill which got royal assent today, passed by backbenchers last week. will the government uphold it? suggestion they will test it in law as far as they can. we will bring you updates on events in the commons throughout the course of the commons throughout the course of the evening. john redwood is currently on his feet. our political correspondent jessica parker is in the houses of parliament this evening. borisjohnson has boris johnson has been borisjohnson has been in dublin today and he must know he will not get his vote through on a general election this evening. step—by—step the options are narrowing? yes, it would be a momentous day for the
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prime minister, in dublin earlier today and then he will stand in front of mps in the next few hours and again ask them to support the idea of a snap election in mid—october, we know opposition mps have agreed they are not going to support it. why? they say they don't trust him and that under the fixed—term parliaments act he could change the date of the election and that could allow him to dissolve parliament in the run up to brexit which means parliament loses control to stop a no—deal brexit. as you mentioned, jeremy corbyn‘s emergency debate now in the chamber and this is about calling on the government to comply with the rule of law and this is because this bill designed to stop a no—deal brexit to compel the prime minister to ask for a delay to brexit became law today but an issue of trust has arisen. mps are worried that this government could somehow ignore the law and indeed they have said they will try
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to test it. what you can see in both of those things we are talking about, an issue of trust between the government and mp5. on a cross—party basis. a word on the speaker, because we saw the pictures in the report of conservatives sitting on their hands and the applause from labour. he has been a divisive figure and he has managed to poke the government on his eye on the way out. he will go out before or on the sist out. he will go out before or on the 31st of october and that will allow this parliament to decide who is successof this parliament to decide who is successor will be. he was pointing out as he made this quite long speech, he is known for making long speeches, but he wanted mps and backbench mps to have a strong say and not to feel bullied into choosing a speaker that might be favourable to the government. not exactly making yourself the favourite of this conservative government, on his way out, but as for his legacy, the way the applause
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oi’ for his legacy, the way the applause or lack of applause demonstrated itself in the commons this afternoon, one side of the house the labourmps, afternoon, one side of the house the labour mps, the afternoon, one side of the house the labourmps, the snp, afternoon, one side of the house the labour mps, the snp, the greens and plaid cymru, applauding the speaker after he announced he would be departing, and then you could see on the other side of the chamber, quite a lot of conservative mps sitting on their hands. that will tell you that their hands. that will tell you that the story we have seen especially in the story we have seen especially in the last year or so, thatjohn berger has been seen by some as a hero for the backbenchers, standing up hero for the backbenchers, standing upfor hero for the backbenchers, standing up for backbench mps —— john bercow. and he has been seen by others who have —— as someone who has defied convention and has damaged the credibility of the speaker. thanks for joining credibility of the speaker. thanks forjoining us. at the centre of those talks between boris johnson and leo varadkar in dublin today was the so—called irish backstop — the controversial arrangements in the withdrawal agreement which are aimed at preventing a return to hard border
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on the island of ireland. the backstop would see the uk remain aligned to eu regulations, until a trade agreement was reached, so goods could move freely across the irish border. critics fear the uk could be trapped in the arrangement indefinitely. recently there've been suggestions that the backstop could be made to applyjust to northern ireland — creating a border in the irish sea. our europe editor katya adler is in brussels this evening. this idea of a northern ireland—only backstop. what's the reaction in brussels? does the eu think this is a serious possibility? it is the eu's idea, this was their original backstop plan. just a reminder, the backstop is intended not to be used, it is a fallback position, guarantee that whatever happens between the eu and the uk, after brexit, that the border
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between ireland and northern ireland will remain open and the initial proposal from the will remain open and the initial proposalfrom the eu will remain open and the initial proposal from the eu was for a northern ireland only backstop, but theresa may insisted on the backstop applying to the whole of the uk. the eu thinks the northern ireland only backstop ticks boxes for both sides, it would allow it to protect member state ireland and the single market, and protect the northern ireland peace process, and it believes for the uk it offers an opportunity for great britain to go ahead after brexit and make whatever trade deals it once without being tied to the eu's customs union and it would allow northern ireland to benefit from the advantages of both sides. while politically not changing its relationship with the rest of the uk. opinion polls in northern ireland suggest a majority there are in favour of the backstop and recently we heard the prime minister say he was open to northern ireland
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aligning with ireland when it comes to agricultural products, if you like, and the eu says if you are open to that for agricultural trade, why not be open to that with all of trade and go back to the northern ireland only backstop? but even if the prime minister is open to that idea, he needs the numbers in parliament and he will face certain unionist opposition, can he make up the numbers before a general election? after a general election? it is that possibility which is one of the options of why the eu is open to an extension regarding brexit if the prime minister asked for one. to an extension regarding brexit if the prime minister asked for onem would be a difficult sell back here. if borisjohnson would be a difficult sell back here. if boris johnson comes would be a difficult sell back here. if borisjohnson comes back to ask foran if borisjohnson comes back to ask for an extension of the 19th of october, given his reluctance and the rumour that he might even try to attach a letter to it saying he doesn't want it, what would the reaction be in europe? the french
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have said there would have to be a point to it. what would be the reaction? let me give you the reaction? let me give you the reaction of a diplomatic contact of mine from northern europe who was referring to what you were saying, that the french foreign minister said, do not take the extension were granted, the diplomat said this is the usual french blah blah, and all of my contacts in the rest of the eu say that if the prime minister asks for a brexit extension they will be open to it. every single eu leader has a veto so the french could veto evenif has a veto so the french could veto even if all the others said we want a brexit extension, but they are unlikely to do that. that is generally not how they work and ireland has so much to lose politically and economically in terms of the peace process and if they say they really want the extension, france is not going to say no. france has form. as emmanuel
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macron said, he is very happy to play the bad cop when it comes to brexit and in a way it solves... it serves the purpose of other leaders for the eu because they want to keep up for the eu because they want to keep up pressure on mps to not only decide what they don't want, they don't want a no—deal brexit, but what they actually do want, because it is only then that we eu can get through and get past the brexit process. i would like to keep the pressure on mps and they want the uk to deciding what direction —— they would. but really it is massively unlikely that you will see one eu country france or otherwise using its veto to block an extension if the other eu leaders are in favour and at the moment they are. thanks for joining and at the moment they are. thanks forjoining us. the speaker of the house of commons, john bercow, has confirmed that he will stand down by the end of october and won't stand as an mp at the next election. in an emotional speech, he said it had been "the greatest
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privilege and honour of his professional life to serve as speaker. but his role in the chair hasn't always been smooth, as john pienaar reports. the referee who became a player. loving every minute, as much as many conservatives hated him. trying to challenge him at election time for siding with the commons against a no—deal brexit. march on our way. speaker! but today he told them come brexit day he would be off. i have sought to increase the relative authority of this legislature for which i will make absolutely no apology to anyone... he'd stay in the chair and in charge until then. not much joy on the tory benches at that, but this was the speaker's moment, an emotional one, as he thanked colleague, friends...
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and above all, my wife sally, and our three children, oliver, freddie and jemima. john bercow seemed to revel in the dignity of his office, sometimes enjoyed putting mps in their place. i don't require any comment from the honourable gentleman. i am giving a ruling. the honourable gentleman will listen to it and he can like it or lump it. be quiet. if you can't, get out. you're adding nothing, you're subtracting a lot. it is rude, it's stupid, it is pompous and it needs to stop. hosting world leaders goes with thejob. the chinese leader was welcome, but not donald trump. i would not wish to issue an invitation to president trump. quite a career from fiery young conservative... i may be an old fashioned 21—year—old, conference, but i make no apology... to grand office...
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lots of people are annoyed at this decision. what would you reply? to man in the news for defying a tory government... i wish you a good day. he will likely make another headline before he's done. john pienaar, bbc news, westminster. i'm joined by bobby friedman who's written a biography onjohn bercow. rowdy living in the tory party, it has been quite a rocky ride forjohn bercow? it has never been easy for him, even for the first day he took the speakership, he was already facing people saying he had been elected with almost no conservative votes at all. from the first day the conservatives have wanted to get him out of the speakers chair. one of the most amazing things is that he made it to ten years before he finally was forced to jump before he was pushed, which is what we saw today. the reason being that over the weekend the conservatives have said they would run a candidate against him in his buckingham constituency at the upcoming general election whenever that is held. it
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left him with no choice and what he did do today was to go on his own terms. it allowed him to set the agenda and it was a shock announcement, there was very little briefing and people did not know it was coming, and of course because he has chosen how to do it he has made sure that his replacement is going to be selected by this parliament and he hopes that will mean there is and he hopes that will mean there is an anti—no deal brexit speaker chosen in his place. when he came to the chair there had been two labour speakers before him, david cameron did not really wantjohn bercow and he was almost forced upon him? that is right. david cameron used to spit blood when people mentioned john bercow‘s name the day he was elected, david cameron was in the toilet at the house of commons and someone toilet at the house of commons and someone said, i voted conservative for the first time in my life and david cameron so, john bercow doesn't count. —— david cameron said. it is quite extraordinary that john bercow was elected, with very
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few conservatives supporting him and the support came almost exclusively from the other side, labour mps in particular. they have been the constituency which has kept him in the chair and you could always see when he's in the house of commons, he gives a quick glance to his left which is where the labour and snp benches are, that is where he gets his support. you saw that today, after he gave his announcement, the mps on one side rose up, the labour and lib dems and snp mps and on the conservative side, they were not many people standing up. —— conservatives. when you said he had been here for ten years, you are suggesting he was lucky to survive that long? incredibly lucky, because circumstances conspired to make getting rid ofjohn bercow which was a long—standing objective of the conservatives, he always pushed it down the agenda. david cameron, when
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he was first elected, he was in a coalition so he did not really have the political capital to do that, william hague on his last day in parliament tried to get rid ofjohn bercow but it was a botched attempt. and after the 2015 election, we were leading up to the referendum vote, and ever since brexit, that has taken the focus of getting rid of john bercow and theresa may did not have the ability to do that. you have the ability to do that. you have to remember, last yearjohn bercow was the subject of extremely serious allegations which he denies, relating to bullying, you might think another time, that would have been enough to make sure he would 90, been enough to make sure he would go, and he even let it be known through friends that he was going to stand down and he then carried on for a while longer. this is a man who came into the job of pledging that he would not stay longer than a maximum of nine years and are because we are at about ten years and three months at the moment and it is only now that he has said he will stand down. so very lucky indeed. they can't have been anyone
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who has occupied thatcher as fla m boya ntly as who has occupied thatcher as flamboya ntly as john who has occupied thatcher as flamboyantly as john bercow —— who has occupied thatcher as flamboyantly asjohn bercow —— who has occupied that chair. you would have to say he has opened the door to the house of commons and he has explained the procedure and some of the arcane proceedings, ringing the house of commons to the rest of the world. he has done a lot of good in that role and he has stood up for backbenchers, and even before brexit, it was clear to people generally that he was doing the right thing by backbenchers, asking and allowing more urgent questions to be asked of the government. he has taken on this ambassadorial role, so the speaker, ironically given the role, is not meant to speak very much, they are meant to bea speak very much, they are meant to be a neutral umpire like a bbc reporter or presenter, not having any opinions, butjohn bercow does not like that side of the job. he has brought more opinion to it and become an ambassador flying all over the world and going to meet other speakers and addressing other
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parliaments and speaking to schools, this is positive and i hope, there needs to be a resetting of the role of the speaker and i hope the next speaker will be someone more neutral and less divisive, especially in the rhetoric, and that they will take the best ofjohn bercow which is someone the best ofjohn bercow which is someone who helps to put parliament on the map and makes it entertaining and is an ambassador for parliament, not just and is an ambassador for parliament, notjust in this country but across the world. does he have to go back and forth, does he have to be a conservative and then labour speaker? the convention is that it swa ps speaker? the convention is that it swaps backwards and forwards but conventions are there to be broken. betty boothroyd and michael martin the previous speakers were both labour speakers. i imagine the previous speakers were both labourspeakers. i imagine it probably will be a labour speaker, harriet harman has been talked about. lindsay hoyle is the clear favourite at the moment. he wins support from across the house so he is the man to beat, but as is the way with these contests they take a
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bit of momentum and a life of their own and against the brexit backdrop it is very hard to know which way this will go because i'm sure that many mps, lindsay hoyle would be a very neutral umpire, but there will be some who won't want a neutral umpire and they will want more of the same, someone who takes a particular side in the brexit debate and then will bend convention depend how you look at it in order to achieve a political aim. lindsay hoyle is of course the deputy speaker at the moment. thanks for joining us. i'll be back with more from westminster later this evening. this is the scene in the house of commons, they are discussing jeremy corbyn‘s emergency motion regarding the rule of law and whether the government should abide by it. we have a brief discussion or debate on northern ireland and the stormont
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issue and then after that we will have a vote on the general election which we expect the government to lose before we get to the ceremony of proroguing. i will guide you through that this evening. now back to ben in the studio. around 200,000 passengers have had their travel plans disrupted by the biggest strike in the history of british airways. almost all of their flights have been cancelled. the two—day stoppage is over conditions and pay. pilots have walked out after rejecting an 11.5% pay deal spread over three years. our transport correspondent tom burridge has the story. planes, but no pilots. so, a fleet of aircraft grounded. normally, 800 british airways flights in a single day. today, just five ba planes flew out of uk airports. expect something similar tomorrow.
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should be travelling tomorrow but now we're travelling on the wednesday, the following day. a week—long holiday in malta for adrian knott and his partner, cut short. we're going to lose money unless we get it back from ba. we're going to lose time, holiday wise, which we can't get back even now from ba. it's going to be a shortened holiday, we'll try to get as much out of it as possible but it's ruined. would i fly with ba again? wouldn't be first choice. the dispute between ba and its pilots is principally about pay. the average salary for a ba pilot is around £100,000 a year. ba has offered an 11.5% pay rise over three years. pilots are pushing for a deal which would give them a greater share of the airline's profits. last year ba made a very healthy pre—tax profit of nearly £2 billion. pilots are also unhappy that british airways has become more of a no—frills airline. the fact is that british airways has lost the trust and
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confidence of its pilots, through its cost—cutting, through its bad management, through the way it's dumbing down the brand because pilots don't want see that, they want british airways to be the best airline in the world. ba's terminal 5 at heathrow, today very quiet. there are plenty of ba staff here but virtually no customers. these two strike days are going to cost the airline around £80 million. normally, at heathrow, a bustling operation. the airline says its pay offer is generous and fair. it is by all accounts, an own goal. it's going to punish customers, it's going to punish our brand, it's going to punish the rest of the colleagues. one former british airways pilot will travel air france tomorrow for triple the price of his cancelled ba flight. but he doesn't back the airline's pilots of today. most of the general public think that the pilots are being greedy, and i think i have to agree with them, this time. but ba has faced criticism,
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including from the civil aviation authority, for not re—routing passengers on some rival airlines. and its expensive aircraft will be going nowhere again tomorrow. well, let's speak now to one family who have been affected by these strikes — georgina and andy chapman are in cyprus. tell us how the strike has affected you? four days into our holiday and we received an e—mail from you? four days into our holiday and we received an e—mailfrom british airways saying our flight had been cancelled and my wife called many times to contact them in order to organise a way back home, basically. after around 300 times i got a response, to say there is no way we can help you, we have given you 14 days' notice and you are not entitled to any compensation at all.
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which basically means you have got to find your own accommodation, more extra spending money, extra car hire, my husband is losing out on work he was going to go back to, on the 11th of september, his twin brother is also missing out on work. it has affected more than just ourselves. on paid leave for me and also i have an autistic child, she requires certain types of food, milk, so they have left us stranded over here and they don't want to help. it hasn't been good enough. you are pretty angry? absolutely, no compensation at all because they have given us 14 days notice, but we are over here and so that is not giving us notice, we are over here for the time we needed, you know. it is not good enough. they offered a pa rt is not good enough. they offered a part refund but if you try to book
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another flight the cost was going to be over £1000 just to get on a flight be over £1000 just to get on a flight back, so we did not make sense. we felt their customer service was poor, they did not want to speak to anybody, no one got through to them, i don't think. what about the pilots who are on strike, do you have any sympathy with them? i understand they did have a pay cut before and they want to get that money back from years ago. it is difficult to say. ijust think it could have been done another way and why, you have to think about families like us. we are out here celebrating the wedding and it is supposed to be a good feeling holiday and from early on in the
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holiday and from early on in the holiday we were on the back foot and worrying about what was going to happen. we could not enjoy our holiday. it has just been on our minds and they have not been very helpful. they are a huge company and not willing to help us in any way to ease our worries or to listen to how it has affected us. so yes, disappointed. would you put with british airways again in the future? no way, no way, not after this customer service, no way. just shocked the weight they have handled not just ourselves but shocked the weight they have handled notjust ourselves but all the other thousands of people affected by this. a huge company like ba, i expected more. we just this. a huge company like ba, i expected more. wejust felt this. a huge company like ba, i expected more. we just felt deserted in the end. good view to join us and thank you very much and i hope get back eventually safely.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. it was a cloudy and gloomy monday. sunshine certainly at a premium but the weather front that brought that cloud and rain is starting to ease away. but we have wet and windy weather arriving again on tuesday evening. she was late starts with some early mist and fog and then some early mist and fog and then some sunny spells coming through. the wind is set to strengthen and some heavy rain returning to northern ireland and scotland. this is the remnants of hurricane dorian bringing some wet and windy weather through the night. by dawn on wednesday morning there will be a blanket of cloud and some outbreaks of rain but temperatures remaining in double figures. the weather front
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moves south and east, brightening up behind it. top temperature 17, 201 degrees. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. mps are set to vote again later this evening on borisjohnson's plan for a snap general election to break the brexit deadlock. already tonight, mps have voted to force the government into publishing all documents concerning no—deal planning. and there was an emotional farewell from the speaker of the house of commons, john bercow, as he announced he'll step down by the 31st october. earlier in dublin, the prime minister held talks with his irish counterpart and insisted he wanted to avoid a no deal brexit. almost all of british airways flights are grounded as pilots walk out over pay at the start
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of a two day strike. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane. good evening. two of the home nations are in action tonight in euro 2020 qualifiers. at windsor park northern ireland are taking on germany. and at hampden, scotland are playing world number ones, belgium where the scots must win if they're to hold any hope of qualifying. but it's not looking likely — belgium are 3—0 up. the first from romelu lukaku, set up by kevin de bruyne in a counter attack after 9 minutes. then thomas vermallaen got on the end of a de bryune cross to make it two and after 30 minutes, toby alderweireld made it 3—0 to belgium. in belfast it's german keeper manuel neuer who's been the busier goalkeeper, with a paddy mcnair free—kick forcing neuer to punch clear. two calls for penalties from germany — neither given. craig cathcart getting hit
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on the hand in the box and johny evans charging down a shot with his chest, but his hands were on it and the ball did hit them. it's 0—0 after 45 minutes. meanwhile gareth bale has started on the bench for wales in their friendly against belarus. but it's not hampered wales who're1—0 up — and it's danieljames who's put wales ahead at the cardiff city stadium. not a big crowd to watch the 21 year old. there's momentum in the side after wales's euro 2020 qualifying win over azerbaijan. england have named an unchanged 13 man squad for their final ashes test at the oval but ben stokes is an injury worry. he'll be assessed over his fitness to bowl after struggling with a shoulder problem, which he picked up during the fourth test. jason roy has also been named in the squad, despite struggling for runs during the series so far. so here is the squad in full. if stokes isn't able to bowl, he'll play as a specialist batsman with england able to call on chris woakes or sam curran to come in as an all—rounder. england can still level the series, even though australia have
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already retained the ashes. england haven't lost an ashes series on home soil since 2001. there's been british success on day one of the para world swimming championships in london. reece dunn broke the s14 200 metres freestyle world record to lead home a british clean sweep of the podium. thomas hamer and jordan catchpole took silver and bronze respectively. in the women's race, 4 times paralympic champion bethany firth took silver ahead of jessica jane applegate. firth wasn't even sure she'd make it to the championships after recovering from a shoulder injury. iamjust so i am just so happy to be here coming back from injury. i was not sure a few months ago if i would be able to make it and getting the injection in the shoulder was tough. i'm so glad to be here. five time paralympic champion
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ellie simmonds won bronze in the s6, 400 metres freestyle, finishing just ahead of her british teammate maisie summers—newton. china'sjiang yu—yan took gold, setting a new world record. great britain's tayo geoghegan hart finished second on stage 16 of the vuelta a espana. it was another tough day in the asturian mountains, with the finish near the top of the alto de la cubilla. the team ineos rider crossed the line 22 seconds after the stage winnerjakob fugl—sang. primoz roglitch still leads the race overall. meanwhile, dutchman dylan groenewegen has won stage three of cycling's tour of britain, it's his second stage win but matteo trentin keeps the leader's green jersey. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in sportsday at half past ten. officials in the bahamas have defended their response
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to hurricane dorian — saying they are dealing with the disaster. at least 45 people were killed last week. aid agencies say tens of thousands of residents still have no access to food or clean water. aleem maqbool reports now from the abaco islands — one of the worst hit areas. with little left to stay for after the hurricane, there's a clamor now to get off this devastated island. the airstrip's opened on abaco, and though the planes keep coming, theyjust can't match demand. there's not enough. there's nothing to do, so... all you can do is try. marsh harbor close by though, is now just and obliterated and empty town. people who were here during the hurricane say, those shipping containers were lifted up by the winds and the powerful tidal surges, and smashed into people's homes,
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and pushed further and further back. and the stories of loss and of those who are missing are everywhere. around here was the home of ebma francoise, we were going to accompany him back to the spot for the first time, but when we got to the edge of the town, he froze. you don't want to go there? no. why don't you want to go there? because you see how i smell? you see how it is. you could smell, you don't know what you smell there. it looks like something, people are still in there i know, so there are plenty of people dead. plenty people dead. among the ghosts here for ebma is that of his girlfriend, lisa. her body was found, but the stench ebma talks of, suggests many still haven't been. eva survived with her children, but three of her cousins are still missing. she's reluctant to fly out
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to the bahamian capital, nassau. they tell people to go nassau, i don't know nothing about nassau. because i ain't got no family in nassau there, because my kids need to go to school. i ain't got nothing, i lost all my things. i ain't got nothing in my life. it is the poorest who have been affected most by the hurricane, mainly from abaco's haitian community. many of them feel the prospects are bleak, whether they stay or go. aleem maqbool, bbc news, on the abaco islands of the bahamas. the uk's economy grew faster than expected in july, easing fears of a recession. it rose 0.3%, helped by the growth in the service sector according to the office for national statistics. it also said growth flatlined over the previous three months tojuly on average, with falls in construction
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and manufacturing. three people have been killed and a fourth seriously injured in a shooting in the city of dordrecht in the netherlands. local news reports said a policeman had shot and killed family members before killing himself. local police say there are no suggestions that the shooting, which took place around five thirty gst this evening, was a terror attack. the little mix star jesy nelson has revealed that being the victim of constant online bullying drove her to try to take her own life. the singer says she was deluged with cruel comments about her weight and apearance after winning the reality show x factor eight years ago. she's been speaking to our entertainment correspondent chi chi izundu. the winner of the x factor, 2011 is... the other three girls were literally living their dream, and i was living my worst nightmare. little mix! from the minute i won x factor, i was different girl. i wasn'tjesy, the barmaid, like,
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the happy, confident girl that i used to be, i was this vulnerable, nervous wreck the whole time. and it was because of the abuse she was receiving on social media. there were so many messages, nasty ones. people saying, like, my face was deformed. but the one that was at the top was from, like, a random man. yeah, hejust was, like, saying how disgusting i am and that i don't deserve to be in the girl band and i deserve to die. jesy fell into depression and started skipping public appearances. i just became obsessed with reading stuff about myself. it was just like i wanted to hurt myself. i'd just go to work, i'd come home, i'd lock myself away in my bedroom and i'd just, like, cry myself to sleep. four years ago, the online abuse affected her so badly, she attempted suicide. now, when i look back on that, i can't believe i ever did that. but, when you're in that state of mind, you don't think about, like, what you're going to leave behind, or, like, the people
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you're going to affect. you just want to take that pain away. that's all you care about. i mean, don't get me wrong, i still get it now, but now, mentally, i know how to deal with it but back then i didn't. but cyberbullying doesn'tjust happen to those in the public eye. a report from the media watchdog ofcom in 2018 found one in five 12 to 15—year—olds had experienced some sort of online bullying. this is not only about celebrities, it's about everyone, which is why we need a collective response because we have young people, who are unable to go to school, young people who are changing school, young people who are missing out on education, who have long—term mental health impacts because of bullying. as a child, growing up, i never had social media. i got it when i was 20 and that affected my confidence, just me as a person, so much. so for a 12—year—old, a 13—year—old, who does have social media, god knows what that's doing to them and their confidence? are you scared about the reaction
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of what you've revealed in this documentary coming out? no, i'm just being honest. you're never going to stop people from having an opinion, you're not. but, if i can't turn this negative experience into something positive then, what did i go through it all for? that was chi chi izundu reporting. and jesy‘s documentary is called "odd one out". it's on bbc one at 9 o'clock on thursday, and you can watch it on the bbc iplayer. let's speak now to helen westerman, who's the head of safeguarding in communities in the nspcc. thank you for being with us. we all know online bullying is pretty prevalent these days, how common is it for people as someone said to wa nt to it for people as someone said to
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want to make the pain go away by considering taking their own life in response to those kind of negative comments, those threats and insults? sadly, we hearfrom children and young people who contact childline all the time about issues relating to cyber bullying, children feeling vulnerable, isolated from their friends. sometimes unable to talk to friends. sometimes unable to talk to friends and family and many children, it affects their mental health and drive some to self—harm or indeed take their own lives. health and drive some to self—harm or indeed take their own livesm really is the dark side of the internet. what is your advice to those young people reading this kinda comments and also to their families, parents and loved ones?m is so tricky for young people because they desperately want to fit in and for parents, it is their worst nightmare and for parents it is to have that any conversation with children as soon as they start to use tech independently. what they do at they experience these things online and letting know they can
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come to you at any time to share what is happening. and for young people to always believe it is never theirfault, so they people to always believe it is never their fault, so they could report or block the person to this, they could come off that site for a period of time or tell a trusted adult about what is going on because then things can change. we heard from jesy with that interview which i'm sure in some ways will be comforting to many people out there who have been through the same thing. part of the advice is that people who are victims of this should talk about this with their families and friends? we would urge any child or young person experiencing bullying either in the real world or an online space to talk to anyone that they can and that could be childline. children may feel isolated and internalise what is going on and in some way believe they are responsible and therefore do not have the confidence to share,
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hoping it will go away. but for many of the situations it does not go away until the situation has to change and a parent or adult gets involved. we have talked about regulating the online world, is there more in this regards you would like to see happen to mug with a call on the government to introduce an independent regulator to hold social media companies to account. we regularly hear that younger children are going on these platforms and regularly exposed to this type of bullying. that simply is not ok and social media companies need to do more to keep children safe. thank you so much for your time. and if you've been affected by any of the issues we've discussed, you can find support, advice and links on the bbc‘s action line website — bbc.co.uk/actionline. the headlines on bbc news.
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mps are set to vote again later this evening on borisjohnson's plan for a snap general election to break the brexit deadlock. there's been an emotional farewell from the speaker of the house of commons, john bercow, as he announced he's standing down. almost all of british airways flights are grounded as pilots walk out over pay at the start of a two day strike. now, as we've been hearing, around 200,000 passengers have had their travel plans disrupted by the biggest strike in british airways' history, with almost all their flights cancelled. but what rights do passengers have to compensation? we can get more on that from hugh morris who's travel news editor at the telegraph. thank you for being with us, we just
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interviewed a couple in cyprus who are furious because they are not getting any conversation with british airways. what are peoples rights if they have been affected by the strike? good evening. the problem with cancellations in terms of compensation is normally you are not entitled to any in the first instance. your options are to rebook, or a refund. instance. your options are to rebook, ora refund. so there instance. your options are to rebook, or a refund. so there are variations, if you have not received that much time or notice before your flight that much time or notice before your flight has been cancelled you may be able to get compensation but otherwise they're looking at firstly a refund and then alternative flights. what you think generally about the way british airways have handled this from the customer point of view in terms of information? many people have complained they had not had enough information. british airways think right from the get go try to make a as clear as possible but the strike was going to be disruptive and they were telling people who are booked to travel
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today and tomorrow and wednesday that they were not likely to fly. so they did not try to hold on to give they did not try to hold on to give the impression that the flight might go ahead and in some respects you could say that as a positive way of dealing with it. but obviously it is understandable that customers are upset about their plans being disrupted. we have this two-day strike now but another in the pipeline? september the 27th and british airways have yet to say what they have planned for that day. that will be a single day, just over two weeks away now but they say they will be in touch and make sure if you are flying at that point that you are flying at that point that you have the correct contact details with the airline. this looks like a pretty intractable dispute with both sides really digging in? yes it does seem unpleasant and you have all these consumer rights issues around
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these consumer rights issues around the strikes but it is not nice for an airline to be publicly in an argument with their pilots. so you do think one of them will have to give and there will be a resolution hopefully before the next strike. thank you very much. a man who lost his sight in one eye after an acid attack more than 20 years ago has undergone pioneering treatment to try to restore his lost vision. james o'brien has become the first nhs patient to have stem cell surgery to replace the scar tissue over his eye. a success would mean the breakthrough surgery is offered to others. oscar duke reports. james has been blind in his right eye since he was 18. i was walking home from the cinema one night when i was approached by a couple of teenagers, and one of them tapped me on the shoulder, and as i turned round he sprayed a liquid in my face.
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i thought i was going to die. i woke up the next morning to find i no longer had proper vision in the right eye any more. james never imagined that he would ever get his sight back until last year, when he was offered a new stem cell treatment to repair the scar tissue in his eye. what we do is we can take a small biopsy of about one to two millimetres from the healthy eye, and we remove the scar tissue from the blind eye and repopulate it with this stem cell transplant. this pioneering procedure has taken 20 years to develop and james was the first nhs patient to receive it. how did it all go, as far as you're concerned? really well. quite happy with that. pleased? yeah. he's got at least a 75% chance, if not higher, more likely that it's going to work than not. 14 months afterjames' operation and the stem cell transplant has been successful. james can now have the final part of his treatment.
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what we are doing today, because it's worked so well, is doing his corneal transplant. the scar issue injames' eye which obscures his vision is removed. james is given a new healthy cornea from an eye donor. it's all gone really well. he's about to discover if his sight‘s been restored. that's it there. i'm just taking the amniotic membrane dressing away. how is it? oh, wow. can you see this? yeah. yeah, i mean i can see, i can see everyone in the room. i can see you! not only has james' sight been restored, but he's also got the colour of his eye back. what are you most looking forward to being able to see now? we found a chinese lantern that my daughter edie had made earlier this year, and she'd written a little wish on it and it said "i wish my daddy's eye will get better soon", and it has, so i'll be able to tell her that her wish came true, yeah. james o'brian ending that
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report by oscar duke. and viewers in london can see more on this story on inside out tonight on bbc one at 7.30. the programme will be available across the uk on the iplayer shortly afterwards. let's go back to the house of commons, where mps are debating a motion from labour leader jeremy corbyn that calls for the government to comply with legislation that was passed to prevent a no—deal brexit. let's just listen for a moment. let'sjust listen for a moment. we will then be very happy to debate all of their policies in the general election including ending austerity and the poverty and misery his government has brought to the people of this country. i look forward to that occasion and that opportunity. but the priority is operations in hospitals will be damaged, the
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supply of medicines will be damaged, the supply of food will be damaged, for supply to manufacturing industry will be damaged. and if all this is a lot of scaremongering then why was the government so not keen on presenting operation yellowhammer and documents which will show the truth to be the case? if they have nothing to hide then why are they hiding it? this house has forced them to bring these documents out of them to bring these documents out of the public but of course the house will not be sitting. how convenient is that! so i say to the government do not go ahead with the prorogation of parliament, do not go ahead with your threat of no deal. instead look after the interests of the people of this country which will not be served by crashing out unless of course there is another agenda which is to rush into the arms of donald trump and all the trade deals they wa nt trump and all the trade deals they want to make with him. that is
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jeremy corbyn in the chamber of the house of commons this evening. our political correspondent jessica parker is in the houses of parliament this evening. just exa ctly just exactly what is happening this evening? jeremy corbyn just wrapping up evening? jeremy corbyn just wrapping up on this debate there that he brought forward earlier with an emergency motion basically pulling on the government to combine with the will of law. he is doing that because as you will have heard since that bill became law supposedly compelling the government to ask for a delay to brexit if they do not manage to get a deal through by the 19th of october there have been questions as to whether the government will try to find a local. dominic raab indeed spoke about testing the bill to its limits and he was just responding for the government a moment ago and called it the surrender bill. the government, their view is that it undermines their negotiating strategy with brussels by taking no deal off the table. we are still waiting to see if they will be a
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vote on this. we will find that out ina vote on this. we will find that out in a short time and then there will be some debate around northern ireland legislation and the restoration of parliament act and then we expect the prime minister to be opening the debate on his call for a strap on action a little later on this evening. ijust saw for a strap on action a little later on this evening. i just saw the prime minister in fact walking past so he is in the house of commons and getting ready to do that but of course he is expected to lose because opposition groups have pledged not to support the call for a snap election on this occasion. and of course this is the last day of parliament. parliament is wrapping up either later tonight or in the small hours of the morning depending on how long proceedings go on. and then suspended for five weeks. what on earth is going to happen in the meantime, whelp downing street insisted today that brexit negotiations will continue. of course they're working up to the eu council summit on the 17th of october. the queen's speech that is due to occur on the 14th of october and in the meantime as well mps
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might head back to their constituency but it is a party conference season so you will see the various parties gathering in places across the uk and meeting with the party faithful and setting out policy pledges. big speeches from majorfigures in the party and to some people of course give the situation were in at the moment that my seem slightly bizarre but that is as tradition dictates at this time of year. and the prime minister of course did decide to send some privy counsellors after balmoral in order to suspend parliament as of tonight. and that debate has just been wrapped up and the motion was passed without delay we are hearing. much more throughout the evening but first a weather update. it was a cloudy and gloomy monday. sunshine certainly at a premium but the weather front that brought that cloud and rain is starting to ease
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away. but we have wet and windy weather arriving again on tuesday evening. we start with some early mist and fog and then some sunny spells coming through. the wind is set to strengthen and some heavy rain returning to northern ireland and scotland. this is the remnants of hurricane dorian bringing some wet and windy weather through the night. by dawn on wednesday morning there will be a blanket of cloud and some outbreaks of rain but temperatures remaining in double figures. the weather front moves south and east, brightening up behind it. top temperature 17, 21 degrees.
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are you hello, i'm christian fraser, you're watching a bbc news special. mps in westminster are due to vote again on holding a snap election, before parliament is suspended. this is the scene live in the house of commons where mps are once again debating brexit, the vote on an election is due to take place close to midnight. de ayes to the right, 311, the noes wrote to the left... earlier the government sufered another defeat,

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