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tv   Newsday  BBC News  September 10, 2019 12:00am-12:31am BST

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sensible deal. got in the way of a sensible deal. and the final point is i think in terms of brexit perfection. there are 10% of the colleagues on this side of the house that for whatever reason thought the deal was too hot oi’ reason thought the deal was too hot or too cold, we did not vote for that deal. it was not seen as the goldilocks deal. some people said it wasn't brexit. some people voted for a clean break, they said. studio: we are live in the house of commons where politicians, the prime minister has asked politicians to back a general election. let's listen to the debate. when we when we leave when we leave we when we leave we will when we leave we will be when we leave we will be part when we leave we will be part of when we leave we will be part of it. when we leave we will be part of it. it is quite reasonable that people would expect that when we leave there would be a deal. and that is why the prime minister put her red
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lines, set out her red lines, and brought back the deal she did, which i think brought back the deal she did, which ithink did brought back the deal she did, which i think did respect the terms, the promises that were made prior to that referendum. so the question being, then, to settle this issue, the members opposite are often asking for a people's vote. surely now is the right time for a people's vote. happy to give way to my honourable friend. the only sadness about broking is that we will not be having the chosen select committee elections. is it not confusing for the public that many of them are opening their doors and binding on their doormat a labour leaflet that says on it we want a general election —— finding. isn't that confusing for the public. i regret we're not here on wednesday to go through that election process. nevertheless, surely now it is the
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perfect time. yes, the members opposite, if the public does not wa nt opposite, if the public does not want no deal surely they will vote in their favour. they will return a coalition government or a government that will take their way forward. if they also feel they do want to go down this track of deal or no deal, surely for this side of the house and delivering brexit on the 31st of october of this year, surely now is the right time to trust the people to make that choice. is it not simply political advantage that is getting in the way of that situation? now there is an imperative for keeping the deadline, the 31st of october, two imperatives. one is getting the deal with the european union, the fact that there is the deadline in time of the 31st october, but also imperative in this house at that
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point in time when they deal comes back, which they believe the prime minister can deliver, that deal comes back to this house, members across the south, members across this house will have a choice either to vote for a deal or to vote for no deal and then, surely, they will choose a deal and we leave on the sist choose a deal and we leave on the 31st of october. mr speaker, first of all canjust 31st of october. mr speaker, first of all can just say 31st of october. mr speaker, first of all canjust say i'm sorry 31st of october. mr speaker, first of all can just say i'm sorry to see you go because they know you stood up you go because they know you stood up for backbenchers in the last ten years and you have integrate respect of the chamber. i wish you and your family all the best for the future. i don't intend to speak very long, but suffice to say i actually agree with the prime minister. he uses the same language i do when he says put it to the people. the people should be engaged in a final say. so let them have the final say in a confirmatory ballot on the issue of
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brexit and a people's vote. mr speaker, it is wrong to conflate brexit, which is a decision for a generation, with a general election campaign, which is meant to decide a programme of government or a maximum of five years. i think the prime minister knows that. i'm not going to give way. i'm not going to speak for very long. but he also think he has been found out. it is about eight weeks until october 31, but the prime minister wants to take the next four or five weeks with electioneering rather than going to look for a deal. so have some words of advice for the prime minister. go to brussels and start negotiating. bring back the deal. ideally you have promised this country and put into this house. i will help facilitate its passage through parliament selling it is put back the british people for them to decide whether they want to go ahead with it or stay within the eu in a confirmatory ballot. mr speaker, the prime minister has lost the father
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of the house, winston churchill's grandson, his own brother, and i believe the duke of wellington has left the conservative party. the prime minister has actually met his waterloo. but it is a conservative party now that can change of mind or i'io party now that can change of mind or no deal, but refuses to allow the british people to do the same on brexit, it needs to have a final say oi'i brexit, it needs to have a final say on brexit, on the issue. and after three and a half years, the will of the people will and the generational decision brexit, of the right to be asked again, in the light of the fa ct asked again, in the light of the fact this government is hellbent on moving towards the eu exit door without a deal. the government will say it will be a betrayal of brexit and the british people if they do not deliver on brexit. actually, what is a betrayal of trust is leaving the eu without a deal and not telling the british people that it isn't a clean break, but like any
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brexit deal would lead to years of uncertainty, economic wars, for the majority of people in this country. the main threat of brexit is not for those who will not be losing their jobs. we need to have the confirmation of the british people. that is how began in 2016. and it should be brought to a conclusion. the people will have the right to compare the facts today with what was promised to them three and a half years ago. exit started with the people and it should end with the people and it should end with the people and it should end with the people stop prime minister, resolve brexit first and then let's have a general election. so william cash. thank you, mr speaker. the fundamental question that faces us today about whether or not we should have an early parliamentary election is really the same question that we have been debating now for many, many years,
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in particular the last three years, in relation to the referendum results. and the question is who governs this country? that is the key question. that is the issue which is before us tonight. and they have to say, with the greatest concern, that the labour party, the opposition, have taken the view that they should run away from the very question that they know they will not be able to answer unless they when i general election —— i have to see. and they also know that i'm not going to win the general election on all the present estimates. that is the real reason why they will not a nswer the real reason why they will not answer the question who governs this country. that is the real reason they will not, apparently, i'd assume, tonight, vote in accordance
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with the question of who governs this country to give us a general election. and the other point is, of course, the leader of the opposition kept on saying that he would only allow a general election if the bill, which is being given royal assent today, was passed. and of course that bill has been passed. but, ironically, it still hasn't a nswered but, ironically, it still hasn't answered the question, which a post at the beginning, about the law of the land and who governs this country. because there is nothing in this bill to actually repeal section one of the withdrawal act itself, which says, as the law of the lands, that october 31 is exit day, as we speak in this debate, and that the section one also says that the european communities act 1972 is repealed and, furthermore, the
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commencement order has already been made. there is nothing in that bill with which anybody can properly accuse the prime minister of not complying with the rule of law, because the rule of law is the 31st of october. that is the law of the land and there is nothing in this bill that says otherwise. so, very briefly, mr speaker, isay bill that says otherwise. so, very briefly, mr speaker, i say this, this is a dereliction of duty by the party opposite. they are refusing to allow the british people to decide who governs this country and they are running away from the fact that under the european communities act 1972 and the european union we are governed by majority vote by the other countries of the european union and that that is the way in which they are themselves letting down the very people they represent and in those leave constituencies on the other side of the house there
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are people all who know very well what is happening and they are not interested them increasingly, according to the opinion polls, in supporting the labour party because they are running away, they are running away from the one central question, who governs britain, and the democracy that lies behind it. give the people the freedom. give the people the freedom to enable them to be able to decide instead of them to be able to decide instead of the rabble on the other side. mr speaker, this house is lost the respect of the country are made itself a laughing stock around the world. prolonged uncertainty, as much as no deal, can tip us into recession with disastrous consequences forjobs recession with disastrous consequences for jobs and recession with disastrous consequences forjobs and for living standards. i hear high—minded speeches about protecting the constitution and the proprietary expectation of government and they
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acce pt expectation of government and they accept there are a small number of members who are vehemently opposed to no deal but would support brexit with a to no deal but would support brexit witha fair to no deal but would support brexit with a fair deal stop they also regret the fact that the government decided to prorogue this house, which was unnecessary as it was undesirable. but, mr speaker, the vast majority on the opposition benches, when they claim support for an affirmative referendum and/or opposition to no deal are determined to overturn the result of the referendum. they have displayed an increasing contempt for our as democrats to respect and implement the result. they lead to others about democracy, accountability, and our national interest, yet they are hellbent on frustrating the will of the majority of the people as expressed in that referendum. mr speaker, they should be honest. it is their objective to thwart brexit in whatever the circumstances, whatever the deal is put to the house there are many, many people
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will do will vote against it because they want to thwart the will of the people in terms of that referendum result. and it is many of the so—called progressives in this house who are fuelling right—wing extremism by showing contempt for the result and the majority voted to leave. we asked the people and they gave us their decision to leave the european union. i'd say that, mr speaker, as they remain. one cannot bea speaker, as they remain. one cannot be a selective democrat who only respect democracy when it delivers your preferred result. and this goes to the root of the leader of the opposition's decision tonight. he demands an election time and time again, but now, given the opportunity, he vetoes an election. not because of the national interest or sloppy no deal, but because he knows he would lose that election. not because of the vast majority of
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the values of decent labour mps and many labour party members, but because as a lifelong eurosceptic leading a party of remainers he has been caught out trying to have it both ways on brexit time and time again. because he does not have the leadership skills required at a time of so many challenges facing our country and because his leadership has led to the party of antiracism and equality becoming the party of institutionalised anti—semitism. so much so, so much so, mr speaker, that the majority ofjewish people in this country feel that they would not be safe in the event of him becoming prime minister. mr speaker, this house cannot stand off on the public interest or break its stalemate for over three years. therefore the national interest demands a general election. there
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may be —— then maybe, mr speaker, a new house which show the leadership that this country needs and deserves, to begin the process of rebuilding trust in this place and healing the scars of division in our society. and i hear some of my honourable friends are saying what about a by—election? because that is what the momentum tides in my constituency keep saying running away from the electorate by not having a by—election. i am voting for a general election tonight. i am willing to face the people in my constituency, unlike too many other people on these benches. i would like to add to that the work you did for children with speech and language difficulties, which changed the lives of many families. but when i heard the speeches earlier and they talked about how proud they we re of they talked about how proud they were of this house of commons, they're not living in the real
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world. my voters, my constituents, are not proud of this house of commons. they think we've entirely lost the plot, mr speaker. so the time has come for people to be honest with the british people, and that honesty means that we need to respect the result of that referendum otherwise the alternative will be to fuel right—wing populism like we've never seen in the history of this country. cheering order! order! ms cass and nobody can argue that tonight we're not facing something that reflects the question of our relationship with europe at the constitution of our country —— mistress, . the constitution of our country —— mistress,. this question is notjust
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one question, it is every question —— ms cass. the only way to do this is to ask the british people who they want as advocates in this house and who do they want speaking for them not just on this issue but every issue. who will stand up to the british people, will stand up to the british people, will call an election and will ask them who governs britain. order! mike gapes. order! i've never known a situation where mr gapes can't be heard. if there is some private span taking place then it should take place outside the chamber, not in it. very unsatisfactory. mr speaker, firstly cani unsatisfactory. mr speaker, firstly can i pay tribute to you and what you've done to stand up for representative parliamentary
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democracy against an arrogant and overbearing executive. i don't have long. i want to make two points. firstly, there's an old adage, neither washington nor moscow. and i say neither uxbridge nor islington. in this time of national, this country's in a very dangerous place, and it's time for all the moderate social democrats and one nation conservatives and liberals came together to stop the extremism which is going to damage our country for decades to come. we have two stop this process, and the best way is to recognise a general election will not resolve it as the member for rutland made clear. what we have to
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do is put their issue back to the people, as others have said, we need a people's vote, which is a choice, an informed choice. we should pause this process, stop the no—deal brexit, defend the people in ireland and in gibraltar... the question is... thank you. the question is there shall be an early parliamentary general election. those in favour say aye. on the contrary saying no. studio: you are watching a bbc news special, where parliamentarians will be voting on whether to have a snap election. borisjohnson again calling for that snap election but expected... that's
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expected to be rejected given opposition mps have confirmed they will not back the push for an election on the 15th of october, insisting a law blocking a no—deal brexit must be implemented first. politicians there going off to vote. of course, this comes ahead of a five—week suspension of parliament that will begin a little later on. the prorogation that will continue for five weeks. the suspension of parliament until the 14th of october will begin at the end of monday's sitting. what we are watching live now is politicians going off to vote. and the moment we get that vote. and the moment we get that vote we will bring that to you live. but under the fixed—term parliaments act, the government needs three quarters to vote in favour. given what happened last week in this
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vote, it's very unlikely that will happen. with me is our news reporter gareth barlow. it's been a long day in parliament today and the culmination... the second time boris johnson today and the culmination... the second time borisjohnson is asking for a snap election. as i was saying, very unlikely to get it. incredibly unlikely. we've often accused politics of being lacklustre and lacking the passion we see in other countries, but this evening, very different to that. rambunctious at best, sometimes worse than that, especially when the prime minister and leader of the opposition were talking, jeremy corbyn. the opposition are saying they won't fall into the trap, in their words, ofa fall into the trap, in their words, of a general election. this has thrown up these two issues running side—by—side. the issue of solving brexit and going about finding a deal or no deal, and now also the looming general election an opposition parties won't give in. it
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doesn't seem they will give into calls for a general election. we will get in and have a listen because the speaker of the house of commons is on his feet. in shorthand, a brake and a lake. studio: we are waiting imminently for that vote to come through. the speaker making an announcement, a personal announcement earlier, that he is standing down. he's been a centralfigure of he is standing down. he's been a central figure of notjust brexit but parliament for the last ten yea rs but parliament for the last ten years also, and he decides whether the rules are being followed and the progression of the minutes and meetings and debates are following the rule of parliament, which is a long and historic thing and has been in place for hundreds of years —— yea rs or in place for hundreds of years —— years or $0. in place for hundreds of years —— years or so. he's been seen as a villain and a hero on both sides. some, especially in the conservative party, say he's been guilty of
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trying to push through bills and debates and motions that will stop the uk leaving without a deal. that he's decided perhaps on the side of the opposition parties. opposition parties will say all he's doing is following due process. he's been a centralfigure and following due process. he's been a central figure and a figure whose gained a lot of prominence around the world with his characteristic style a nd the world with his characteristic style and his shouts of "order", and we've heard a lot of that this evening as he tries to control parliament, which is tricky when you've got 600 mp5 trying to get their voices heard and the prime minister trying to get his points across. he has said he will step down but the twist is he will carry on until a general election, that looks unlikely in the short—term, but it will happen at some point, and if not a general election on the sist and if not a general election on the 31st of october, the date the uk is due to leave the eu at the moment. it's important to state that as president, as uk law stands, the uk
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is due to leave the european union on the 31st of october regardless of whether a withdrawal deal has been agreed with brussels or not. of course, we've got the new legislation, which was granted royal assent earlier on today. explain the changes that will bring. -- royal assent. the prime minister has said he will never ask for an extension and will leave on the 31st of october, do or die. he has used a lot of strong language, saying he would rather die in a ditch before asking for an extension. some politicians in his own party, 21 of them, who were removed from the conservative party have passed a law that means he is forced to seek a delay until the 31st of january, 2020 unless he can find a deal or u nless 2020 unless he can find a deal or unless there is some progression with the european union with all of those periods and spells of
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desperate negotiation to try and find something beyond these impulses we're seeing. this has created this tricky situation because the prime minister has said he won't seek an extension and go to brussels for october and seek more time. if he doesn't do that some say he will be breaking the law. the prime minister won't want to be seen to be breaking the law and could he resign? who knows? we are in this spell of so many question marks, and this bill passed by politicians, given royal assent at the beginning of the week, throws in an extra question. the government insisting it's not looking to break the law but saying they will examine ways of getting around it. there are some options possibly that the government government has. what are they? the government has. what are they? the government government technically controls the debates in the house of
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commons, but it's not got the majority at the moment so that makes it more difficult to control the direction. of course it does have options available to it. it can force things through if it gets enough people on site, but that will be tricky with it not having the majority and the full control of the house —— onside. there are things the prime minister might do to make progress, but with the increasing opposition with politicians in scotla nd opposition with politicians in scotland and the supreme court in england going to get caught cases to force the prime minister to stick to the law, it will be difficult for him to have an awful lot of wiggle room. gareth, thanks so much. you will be here with me through the evening, gareth barlow. british politicians have been debating in parliament for the second time about whether to hold that early general election next month. but as we were saying with gareth, opposition politicians confirming they will not be backing that push for an early election. we
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are awaiting the result of that vote. the moment that comes, we will bring that to you on bbc news. hello. weather—wise yesterday certainly wasn't the most shining of sta rts certainly wasn't the most shining of starts to the new week. it was cloudy, pretty wet for many of us and also felt on the chilly side. today we flip the coin. it's much drier, should be much brighter and also consequently will feel warmer. this area of low pressure is the area responsible for the wet weather yesterday, that's off into the continent ‘s. today we have a little red of high pressure. we start with a little bit of around, perhaps mist and fog, could be a problem for the early rush—hour in the midlands but that will lift for sunshine in the afternoon. however, you don't need to look too closely to observe there isa to look too closely to observe there is a significant change in northern
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ireland by the end of the afternoon. this weather front is part of an area of low pressure that is ex— hurricane dorian, nowhere near hurricane strength as it makes its way to the uk, no doubt about that, but it will be a windy night as the low pressure goes across as an weather fronts will go south, rain around, but mild into wednesday. through wednesday day, the centre of the low stays to the north of the uk. isobars are closely packed together. much of the rain will sweep away south—eastwards and we should be left with quite a bit of sunshine into the second half of the day. but the strong westerly wind will feed quite a few showers into western scotland. the wind will be particularly gusty, so potentially even disruptive as gusts could touch up even disruptive as gusts could touch up to 40 or 45 mph to exposed areas in the north and west of the uk. temperatures already starting to look healthier than they did at the start of the week, we are into the low 20s in the south—east. wednesday
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into thursday, we get another area of low pressure running across us and this is ex—tropical storm gabrielle. again basically quite a deep area of low pressure bringing some windy weather perhaps to the south and west in western exposures for a time. the biggest area is the tropical area that pulls up to the south of it on thursday. wet for northern ireland and scotland, windy especially for the likes of wales and south—west england but look at the temperatures being bolstered as we pull in the warm, humid airfrom the south. that then sets us up for the south. that then sets us up for the remainder of the week and to ta ke the remainder of the week and to take us into the weekend with high pressure welding from the west. we feed the warmer airfrom pressure welding from the west. we feed the warmer air from the north into the uk, settling the weather down nicely. friday into the weekend, dry weather around with pleasa nt weekend, dry weather around with pleasant spells of sunshine and the return as well of some warmer weather.
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welcome. i'm kasia madera with bbc news. our top story: the british parliament's voting for a second time on the government's wish to call a snap general election. in a stormy final debate before parliament is suspended for five weeks, the prime minister, borisjohnson, said he wouldn't ask the eu for an extension to the date of brexit, in spite of a law passed by mps compelling him to do so. president trump has declared us talks with the afghan taliban to be dead. he said he had decided to scrap the talks in response to the killings by the militants of 12 people in afghanistan last week, including an american soldier. and this video is trending on bbc.com. the author margaret atwood has told the bbc that her best—selling book the handmaid's tale has got "a lot closer to reality" since she wrote it 30 years ago. the sequel, called the testaments, is due to be published on tuesday.

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