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tv   Monday in Parliament  BBC News  September 10, 2019 2:30am-3:01am BST

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the headlines: in britain, mps have again rejected government efforts to call a snap general election. it's the sixth defeat for the prime minister, borisjohnson, in little over a week. parliament is now set to be suspended for five weeks. authorities in the bahamas have defended their response to hurricane dorian. aid still hasn't reached tens of thousands in the worst—hit area. people who've remained in marsh harbour in the abaco islands say there hasn't even been a concerted attempt to recover bodies. president trump says us talks with the afghan taliban are "dead". the decision to scrap negotiations came in response to last week's militant attack that killed 12 people, including an american soldier. the taliban said americans will "lose the most" for cancelling. those are the headlines.
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it's 2:30am. now on bbc news: monday in parliament. hello and welcome to monday in parliament. the main news from westminster: parliament is suspended for five weeks after another day of defeats and dramas. the commons rejects the prime minister's second was for a general election. let the people decide. let the people decide if they want to delay or not stop though labour leader urges johnson to end speculation that he wants to get around laws to stop a no—deal brexit. the prime minister could sort this out very quickly if he just had the courtesy to come to this house and confirm he will
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acce pt this house and confirm he will accept all the provisions of the act that this house hasjust passed. here, here. and emotional scenes as john bercow announces his plans to stand down as speaker. john bercow announces his plans to stand down as speakerlj john bercow announces his plans to stand down as speaker. i wish my successof stand down as speaker. i wish my successor in the chair the very best fortune in standing up for the rights of honourable and right honourable members individually and for parliament institutionally, as the speaker of the house of commons. thank you. (applause). parliament certainly went out with a bang. the last sitting day for five weeks included emergency debates, government defeats and a resignation. let's
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start with the emergency debate called by the labour leaderjeremy corbyn. he was worried about suggestions that the government could try to find a way around legislation approved by mps last week designed to prevent a no—deal brexit on october 31. parliament has passed a law to ensure that the will of parliament is upheld. the fact that parliament is compelled to pass a law to ensure the will of parliament is upheld shows what extraordinary times we now live in. the house has rejected no deal. businesses and trade unions are united in rejecting no deal. and, there is no majority for it across there is no majority for it across the country. the prime minister seems obsessed with this hyperbole and aggressive language, surrender bill, do or die, or rather, be dead
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ina ditch. bill, do or die, or rather, be dead in a ditch. the list goes on. mr speaker, we are supposed to be having negotiations with our european partners. and he accused mr johnson of threatening an assault on the rule of law. the prime minister because of this are very quickly if you just had the courtesy to come to this house and confirm he will accept all the provisions of the act that this house has just passed. usually, there was no minister to respond to mr corbin's remarks. usually, there was no minister to respond to mr corbin's remarkslj respond to mr corbin's remarks.” seek an honourable or right honourable member, but it is not immediately obvious that anyone wishes to contribute. i don't see why that is a source of such hilarity, i am why that is a source of such hilarity, iam making why that is a source of such hilarity, i am making a why that is a source of such hilarity, iam making a rather prosaic, actual observation. conservative backbencher stepped in i don't welcome the passage of a bill that is rusted through this house in a totally outrageous manner
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without proper scrutiny. i have no idea whether it has received royal assent or not, and if it has, it is the law of the land. it still doesn't make it a good law, and i say, with all sincerity to the lead of the opposition, that if he sits in this site as prime minister, he will regret that constitutional upgrades. let me be absolutely clear. the prime minister is not — not ever above the rule of law. the prime minister says he would rather die ina prime minister says he would rather die in a dead van right to seek an extension to protect our economy from falling off a cliff edge —— die you need it. if that is the case, then the prime minister must resign —— in a ditch was not undermining democracy at every turn, the prime minister simply cannot be trusted.
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the rulebook has been well and truly ripped up, and with it, democracy and decency, shredded by a cult of brexit fan boys that in number ten unfit to govern, i'm willing to govern. the lib dem leader was scathing about mrjohnson. the prime minister is on a power trip, but the truth is he doesn't have unfettered power, as much as he would like to. there is a sense of arrogance and entitlement about this action, he a cts entitlement about this action, he acts like rules and conventions amply do not apply to him. he will stand in front of the bliss —— simply do not apply to him, in front of public servants and make apolitical speeds talking with a p pa re ntly apolitical speeds talking with apparently no sense of irony about how he would rather die in a ditch than obey the law —— in front of the police. there was a minister available to respond to the debate. this government will always respect
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the rule of law. that has been our clear position consistently, and frankly, it is outrageous that that is even in doubt. but he said the country was appalled by what was going on in parliament. they are appalled because honourable members voted for a referendum, they promised repeatedly to respect the result of that referendum, and yet now they see the leader of the opposition and others, have repeatedly tried to frustrate brexit. and the right honourable gentleman has now made it clear that thatis gentleman has now made it clear that that is labour party policy. the ballot paper in 2016 didn't say leave if and only if brussels gives a deal, it didn't require us to seek permission from brussels before departure, it did not give the eu a veto over brexit. and the foreign secretary dismissed the legislation as flawed, and insisted it was right
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to call it the surrender bill. but, in the end, the labour motion was passed without a vote. well, issues around the rule of law will also braised with britain's most senior civil servant, mark said well —— mark sedwill. it's a civil servant can't break the law, but if bill is ignored and the anti—no deal is ignored, civil servants could then be in that conflict of interest that that conflict of loyalty, they could be within their rights to refuse working with a tory government to... to enforce analytical no—deal brexit stop what would you do in that circumstance? i think that is, with respect, piling a series of hypotheses together. every minister asked with this said the government would comply with the law, including
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senior members of government. we've been getting mixed messages coming out of that. you would understand as cabinet secretary, as an interested in reading and attributable —— unattributed comments as much as anyone else, i am a political junkie. every minister who has been asked about this has been clear that the government will complete —— comply with the law. i have denote the house in accordance with the royal assent act of 1996, the her majesty has provided royal assent to the following arcs. european union withdrawal number two act, 2019. water. the prime minister started the day in dublin, holding his first thoughts with the irish prime minister commonly override car. borisjohnson said he believed a
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brexiteer was still possible in time for terminating —— irish prime minister lee override leo varadkar. we know why labour don't want a general election. we know why they don't want a general election under his leadership. most of them — most of them don't want a general election because they fear that their party will lose. but there is a small, small, terrified minority of labour mps who don't want an election because they actually think you might win! —— he might win! the leader of the opposition himself is entitled to over £1a0,000 of taxpayer's money and yet today we
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have the extraordinary aspect of the entire opposition collectively deciding to abrogate their most fundamental responsibility. if you really wa nt fundamental responsibility. if you really want to delay brexit beyond october the 31st, which is what you seem october the 31st, which is what you seem to want to do, then vote for an election and let the people decide. that the people decide if they want to delay or not! this is a very serious issue, the prime minister is running away from scrutiny. running away... running away from scrutiny with his brother and his shouting. i wa nt with his brother and his shouting. i want to turf out this reckless government. —— lather and shouting —— blather. this government which is
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driving up poverty, deepening inequality, scapegoating migrants, whipping up divisions and failing this country. a general election isn't something for the prime minister to play about with four propaganda points or even his very poor quality posts on social media. this parliament is not a platform for the prime minister's games. no, it's a chamber in which the elected representatives of the people hold the executive to account. that is why parliamentary democracy is about. the snp wants a general election. we want the opportunity to bring this government down, and we're going to take it. we want the opportunity for the people of scotla nd opportunity for the people of scotland to have their voices heard, to make their choice over their futures. and mr speaker, we want the opportunity to stop this prime minister from opportunity to stop this prime ministerfrom ripping us out of opportunity to stop this prime minister from ripping us out of the
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european union. we want an election, but we don't want it on the prime minister's terms stop boris is a prime minister obsessed with running down the clock. a prime minister who cannot be trusted. a prime minister who is seeking to hurt parliament tonight so he can drive us off the cliff edge. well, mr speaker, we are not falling for it. for an election to be approved, two—thirds of mps have devoted in favour. mrjohnson did not get enough votes. the ayes to the right, 293. the noes to the left, 46. that is less than last time. you're watching monday in parliament with me christina cooper. the speaker, john bercow is to stand down after ten years in the role. he will quit on october 31, the day
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britain is due to leave the european union or before, if there is an early election. mps lined up to pay their tributes, but his time in office has been controversial. mr burka, once a conservative mp has faced fears criticism from brexit supporters who questioned his impartiality —— ms deborah carl —— mr bercow. at the end of the 2017 election i promised my wife and children that it would be my last. this is a pledge that i intend to keep. there was a robust defence of his record. throughout my time as speaker, i have sought to inquiries the relative authority of this
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legislature, for which i will may absolutely no apology to anyone, anywhere, at any time. to deploy a perhaps dangerous phrase, i have also sought to be the backbencher‘s backstop. he said he couldn't have done it without colleagues, friends and family. and above all, my wife, sally, and oui’ and above all, my wife, sally, and our three children, oliver, and above all, my wife, sally, and ourthree children, oliver, freddie andjemima. applause i wish my successor in the chair the
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very best fortune in standing up for the rights of honourable and right honourable members individually, and for parliament institutionally, as the speaker of the house of commons. thank you. applause applause a standing ovation, mostly from the opposition benches, ahead of cross— party opposition benches, ahead of cross—party tributes. opposition benches, ahead of cross-party tributes. in your role of speaker, you have totally changed the way in which the job has been done. you have reached out to people across the whole country. you visited schools, you visited factories, you visited offices, you have talked to people about the role of parliament and democracy. have talked to people about the role of parliament and democracym have talked to people about the role of parliament and democracy. it is the case this evening that i shall vote with many of my colleagues for an early general election, i hope
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you won't take that personally, mr speaker. because i have no wish to prematurely truncate your time in the chair. because it is the case, however controversial the role of the backstop may be in other areas, your role as the backbenches' backstop has certainly been one that has been appreciated by individuals across this house. we will be sad to see your leaving the office at the end of october. i think it is fair to say that you have shown considerable grace of purpose not just to us but to members across this house, and we are eternally grateful for the way you have conducted yourself, particularly over these last few months, at a time of, let's be honest, constitutional crisis for all of us. even backbench critics found warm words. you have been an extraordinary speaker and an outstanding speaker. over the last few weeks, i have disregarded... i very much disagree with your interpretation of certain standing orders. but for 14 years you have transformed this place, while i have
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been here. others paid tribute to the changes he had made to how westminster works. through the parliamentary nursery, babies being able to be in voting lobbyists, and indeed your forbearance in able to be in voting lobbyists, and indeed yourforbearance in not asking me to leave when i brought ab gabriel into this house. and indeed, the proxy voting reforms which have already made such a difference for members with small babies during these rather intense few months of parliamentary debate. those reforms have been truly important and you have been truly important and you have been truly important and you have been a truly modernising speaker. john bercow paid a tribute of his own to the speakers' chaplin, someone of his own to the speakers' chaplin, someone he said he appointed despite opposition from bigots. they hadn't met rose, they didn't know her, they couldn't form a view. they had a stupid, dimwitted, atavistic, racist and rancid opposition to the reverend rose. i was right, they
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we re reverend rose. i was right, they were wrong. the house loves her. applause john bercow, insisting he was right all along. now, mps john bercow, insisting he was right allalong. now, mps have john bercow, insisting he was right all along. now, mps have backed the motion designed to force the government to release internal communications on the decision to suspend or provoke parliament for five weeks —— prorogue parliament. they also demanded the reason of documents on operation yellow hammer. the emergency debate was granted by the speaker and backed by mps. dominic grieve said the government didn't appear to be giving a consistent account of its reasons for prorogation. we have seen documents which show that although on 23 august this year number ten downing street and the prime minister denied considering the idea of proroguing at all. in
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fa ct, the idea of proroguing at all. in fact, internal government documents reveal that this matter was under consideration some ten days before. and he said a remarkable memo had shown the prime minister was happy with that and thought the idea of mps sitting in september unnecessary and contemptible. it's also rather noteworthy that when we found what was under the red action, it turned out he condemned mr david cameron's belief in having a september setting as being a girly swot, which i suppose was meant to be contrasted, mr speaker, with his manly idleness. democracy requires a certain commit and to the truth, and there is a reasonable expectation that we have had to date in our country that, when asked questions, the government will not actively liar, and it will actually tell the truth, and that
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this loosening of the current administration's moorings from a commitment to tell the truth is a direct threat to democracy. yes, the right honourable lady is right, and it is this which concerns me so much. but the government did have supporters. having been a minister himself, is he not worried about the collateral damage that this humble address is creating? it is important that civil servants have space and safe s pa ce that civil servants have space and safe space to speak truth to power, andi safe space to speak truth to power, and i think that, by his actions today, he is damaging the civil service's ability to communicate and discuss freely matters with ministers. does he not see the damage he is doing? surely the only thing that matters is what was in the prime minister's mine. what were his reasons for making the decision he made? you cannot work that out by asking for the personal testimonies of lots of officials, some of whom
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met the prime minister on this and some of whom didn't. one mp worried that the government wouldn't release either set of documents regardless of how the commons voted. the daily mailjust of how the commons voted. the daily mail just reported right of how the commons voted. the daily mailjust reported right now, downing street not in any move to bow to grieve's demands. quote, under no circumstances will staff comply with grieve's demands, regardless of any vote in parliament. labour reckoned there we re parliament. labour reckoned there were two key questions. why now? why prorogue now, at such a key time? what is wrong with november, when we know the outcome of negotiations and have a decision. why now and not in five years? i have asked the parliamentary library to give me an indication of what will be in the green speech. this year the house of commons library have replied that they are not able to give me any
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information of what might be in it because they haven't detected government announcing anything in relation to what is going to be in the queen speech. if the purpose of proroguing isjustified on the need to pass a queen speech, how on earth does the government now think it can achieve that? a reminder, the government has now got a majority of -40, government has now got a majority of —40, and with cabinet ministers and even the prime minister's family resigning, the tory weapon every day can only wonder what number will be by the time this house returns. so surely the government should just give up on the idea of a queen speech and drop prorogation altogether. the snp spokesperson revealed what her sources had told her. what has been going on is that key figures in number ten and the government have been communicating about the real reasons for prorogation, not through the official channels of government e—mails or government memos, but using personal e—mails, whatsapp and burner phones, which of course are
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phones which are normally used by people who are involved in a criminal enterprise, in order to avoid being traced. that the minister describe what was being asked for as a troll. it is unprecedented. it takes a coach and horses through our data protection legislation. it is questionable in the right of the article eight writes that individuals have under the echr, and it would, for the first time, say that this house of commons, by a simple majority vote, can say that any individual‘s communications should be rendered transparent. the members realise what they are doing? but when it came to the vote, the motion calling for the release of documents was approved by 311— 302. now, downing street announced early on in the day that parliament would be prorogued at the end of the setting. that
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required some formalities. mps were invited to the lords to hear a message from the queen. there are usually five commissioners, but because this prorogation is so controversial, two didn't take part. iam controversial, two didn't take part. i am perfectly happy, as i have advised others, to play my part. but ido want advised others, to play my part. but i do want to make the point that this is not a standard or normal prorogation. it is... i don't require any assistance from you, mr stevenson. you wouldn't have the foggiest idea where to start in seeking to counsel me. i require no response from you. i require no response from you. i require no response from you. my lords, and members of the house of commons, by virtue of her majesty's commission, which has been now read, we do in her majesty's name and in obedience
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to her majesty's commands, prorogue this parliament to monday 14 october, to be then here holden, and this parliament is accordingly prorogued to monday the 14th day of october. well, that's it from monday in parliament, and that's it from parliament until it returns on monday 14 october. bbc parliament will still be up and running, though, showing some of the parliamentary highlights of the last few months, and with live coverage of the scottish parliament and the welsh assembly. and there will be comprehensive coverage of the party conferences, as well. but from me, goodbye for now, and see you in october.
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hello. weather—wise, yesterday certainly wasn't the most shining of starts to the new week. it was cloudy, it was pretty wet for many of us, and also it felt on the chilly side. today, we flip the coin. it's much drier, it should be much brighter, and consequently, it will also feel warmer. this area of low pressure is the area responsible for the wet weather yesterday. that's off into the continent. today, we have a little ridge of high pressure. we start off with quite a bit of cloud around, perhaps some patchy mist and fog. could be a problem through the morning rush—hour across the midlands, but that will lift and there's a lot of sunshine to be had in the afternoon. however, you don't need to look too closely to observe there's quite a significant change approaching northern ireland come the end of the afternoon. this weather front is part of an area of low pressure that is actually ex—hurricane dorian. so it is nowhere near hurricane—strength as it makes its way to the uk,
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let's be clear about that. but it will be a very windy night, as that deep area of low pressure rolls across us, there'll be weather fronts, which will slide their way southwards. rain around, but mild into wednesday. through wednesday day, the centre of the low stays to the north of the uk. the isobars stay closely packed together. much of the rain will sweep away south—eastwards. we should actually be left with quite a bit of sunshine by the time we get into the second half of the day, but the strong westerly wind will feed quite a few showers into western scotland. and the wind will be particularly gusty, so potentially even disruptive, as gusts could touch up to 40—45 mph for exposed areas to the north and west of the uk. but the temperatures already starting to look healthier than they did at the start of the week. we're into the low 20s in the south—east. wednesday into thursday, we get another little area of low pressure running across us. this is ex—tropical storm gabrielle.
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again basically quite a deep area of low pressure. it will bring some windy weather perhaps to the south and west in western exposures for a time. the biggest difference, though, is the tropical area it pulls up to the south of it on thursday. so wet for northrthern ireland, wet for scotland, windy potentially, especially for the likes of wales and south—west england. but look how the temperatures get bolstered as we pull in the warm, humid air from the south. that then sets us up for the remainder of the week and to take us into the weekend, with high pressure building from the south—west. we feed the warmer air north across the uk, settling the weather down nicely. friday into the weekend, dry weather around, some pleasant spells of sunshine, and a return as well of some warmer weather.
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welcome to bbc news. i'm reged ahmad. our top stories: the ayes to the right, 293, the noes to the left, 46. britain's parliament defies borisjohnson, again blocking his call for a snap general election. it's the sixth defeat for the prime minister in little over a week. parliament has now been suspended for more than a month. this parliament is accordingly prorogued.

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