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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  September 11, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me annita mcveigh. the headlines: mixed messages from labour on brexit —, its deputy leader tom watson calls for another brexit referendum before a general election is held. the message puts him publicly at odds withjeremy corbyn, who wants to prioritise a general election. a record number of migrants crossing the channel — we have a problem with the headlines but this is about the home office extending the length of time to two yea rs, extending the length of time to two years, international students can stay in the uk after finishing their
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degree. a record number of migrants crossing the channel. record numbers of stores disappeared from britain's high streets in the first half of this year, according to a report from a leading accounting firm. a 5—3 win for england, who were four goals up at half time but conceded two without reply to kosovo. coming up — a warning from car insurers on driverless cars — they say they'll cause more accidents without proper regulation. good morning and welcome to the bbc news at 9:00.
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labour's deputy leader is to call on the party to prioritise another brexit referendum over winning a general election, putting him in odds withjeremy corbyn. in a speech this morning, tom watson will warn there is no such thing as a good brexit deal, and labour should campaign unequivocally to remain. jeremey corbyn said that the party supports a second referendum with both leave and remain options on the ballot paper if the party wins the next general election. in other brexit developments, borisjohnson‘s brexit negotiator, david frost is back in brussels for talks with eu officials as they look for a way to replace the irish backstop. and, today is the deadline for the government to publish the operation yellowhammer document in full which will outline contingency planning for a no—deal brexit. our assistant political editor, norman smith is at westminster. good norman smith is at westminster. morning normar not good morning norman. labourstill not on the same page on brexit, how
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difficult is this for the party? not on the same page on brexit, how difficult is this for the partwm is profoundly difficult in the sense you have the leader and the deputy leader very publicly and starkly at odds over the great political issue of ourage, odds over the great political issue of our age, namely brexit. with tom watson expected to say this morning that the party should become unequivocally and unambiguously a remain party when mr corbyn has spent the last three years trying to persist with this balancing act, trying to keep on—board leavers and more than that, tom watson also says the party ought to immediately press for another referendum as soon as parliament returns on october the 14th. jeremy corbyn has said no, let's go for a general election as a way to resolve the brexit issue. i think tom watson has pretty much signalled there is no point in labour trying to come up with its
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own brexit deal. mr corbyn has said they will put a credible deal in any future referendum. tom watson saying, there are no good brexit deals. all brexit is bad. his thinking is partly tactical, he ta kes thinking is partly tactical, he takes the view that labour can recover those remain voters, who deserted two other remain parties, the liberal democrats or whatever. he also takes the view that if you just have a general election to resolve brexit, the labour's policies, austerity and other areas just simply get drowned out. and lastly, he argues it is three, going on for years since the brexit referendum and therefore the original referendum, he says, is no longer a solid basis on which to judge what people think. because a lot has happened, we have more information about brexit, we are staring the possibility of no deal
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and in other words, we should have another referendum because bluntly, the old referendum is out of date and that is completely at odds with mr corbyn. let's talk about operation yellowhammer and the other political developments? the yellowhammer documents, they are the no deal preparations, the details of which were leaked several weeks ago and the possibility of no deal, there will be a shortage of food, fuel, medicines, majorsnarl there will be a shortage of food, fuel, medicines, major snarl ups there will be a shortage of food, fuel, medicines, majorsnarl ups at the dover calais crossing. parliament pressed a motion to force the government to publish those documents by iipm tonight. all the signs are, they are not going to be published. we had from andrea leadsome this morning arguing, in effect that they will not be published because they will cause panic. she said they were a worse case scenario and there was no point concerning people and preparations had moved on and that these were, as
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i say, worst—case predictions. the difficulty parliament has got is parliament is not sitting, so there is no obvious mechanism for parliament to force mrjohnson to comply with its wishes. i suspect that will compound the unease, the anger over mrjohnson‘s decision to force the suspension of parliament force the suspension of parliament for five weeks. at this critical time when we are moving to crunch time when we are moving to crunch time on brexit. 0k, norman, thank you very much for that. let's discuss labour's brexit position in more details with two mps with different views. stephen kinnock supports bringing back a brexit deal which would include elements of theresa may's withdrawal agreement. and also i'm joined from cardiff by owen smith, who supports another brexit referendum. owen smith, should the referendum come before a general election, as tom watson is suggesting, or after one asjeremy corbyn wants?
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tom watson is suggesting, or after one as jeremy corbyn wants?” tom watson is suggesting, or after one as jeremy corbyn wants? i think tom watson is entirely right, the clea nest tom watson is entirely right, the cleanest and most democratic way to deal with the brexit issue, into the fourth year since the referendum, is not to muddle it up with all of the issues, education, health but a general election. not to have a general election. not to have a general election. not to have a general election as a proxy for a referendum but to have a referendum and ask people now they know how deeply damaging to our economy and status in the world, brexit is going to be, to ask people once more whether that is what they want. i said at the beginning of this process three and a half years ago, that was the right thing to do, and this referendum how we began it. tom is right that labour should be pursuing that and unequivocally arguing that there is no such thing asa arguing that there is no such thing as a good brexit, no labour brexit would be better for the as a good brexit, no labour brexit would be betterfor the country, all forms of brexit are worse than the status quo and leave our constituents poorer and at odds with labour's valleys, which is why we
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argue against them. and of our politicians from across the political spectrum the way to get a commons majority on a deal is making elements of theresa may's withdrawal agreement, what you want to see that put to a vote? their way to solve this mess is not through a second referendum or by leaving the european union with a deal, because 5248 was a mandate to move house but stay in the same neighbourhood. that has always been my view that we need to have a compromise that recognises that political upheaval the country has been through and would continue to go through if we have a divisive second referendum or a general election, which would just be a referendum in all but name. so no confirmatory vote in other words? whether we tag a second referendum
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vote to it, it is clearly those colleagues campaigning for a second referendum are very, very welcome to tag confirmatory vote onto a bill thatis tag confirmatory vote onto a bill that is brought forward. the will of the house needs to be tested on that. if we vote in favour of a second referendum than that is what we shall have. if we don't, i hope those colleagues campaigning for a second referendum would then support the bill through its remaining stages so we can avoid the catastrophe of a no—deal brexit that will happen if we don't lead with a deal. more broadly, owen, what do you think this is doing to labour's prospects as being the party that sets the direction of travel at this point, if you cannot agree amongst yourselves what that direction of travel should be? it is damaging our prospects and we risk going into the next election as being the third best party on pro brexit and the third best party on remain and that
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is no way to lead this country. we have been equivocal in trying to face both ways on this now for several years because some at the top of our party have always been in favour of brexit. the majority of labour voters, and the overwhelming majority of labour members do not share the view. we know brexit is at odds with our international values and will make it harderfor any labour government in future to do the things we want to do, invest in schools, hospitals and education, because we will have less money as a result of brexit shrinking the economy. it is bad politics, bad economics and at odds with our values and we should be clear about that. we should have been clear about that in the last three years but we now have another chance as we approach this crunch moment, tell people that brexit is bad for britain and labour should not support it. how do you effectively bring both labour sorry both leave
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and labour voters because we saw labour voters voting in a lib to m, jane dodds in the by—election. she was supported by parties who are taking a remain position. so it seems the lesson of the matter is that voters want a clear message? yes, i agree and we should have stuck to our guns in our 2017 manifesto. my stood for parliament oi'i manifesto. my stood for parliament on the basis of that manifesto, it was very clear we respect the result of that referendum but we never leave the eu without a deal. we should have stuck to that line and the lack of consistency has been very, very damaging to our party. i agree absolutely with owen on that. i think the key point is, if there isa i think the key point is, if there is a general election well we are a member state of the european union,
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thatis member state of the european union, that is a disaster for the labour party because it will benefit the single issue bandwagon jumpers, party because it will benefit the single issue bandwagonjumpers, who thrive on polarisation and division. we are a whole nation party and we need to pull the country back together and our party back together. british politics desperately needs to recover the lost art of compromise and that is what our mps lost art of compromise and that is what our mp5 for a deal group is about. owen smith, when is labour going to do this because there's not much time left? i don't know, we have been prevaricating on this question for a long time. it looks as though we are set to go into an election suggesting there is a good form of brexit that labour is going to try and negotiate and unclear as to try and negotiate and unclear as to whether we are then going to advocate for that position we have negotiated a campaign against it, or worst of all worlds, split in all different directions and allow people to do whatever they want. parties that sit in the middle of the road do get run over at
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elections and labour will go down that route. we will lose the trust of the british people for a long time unless we are true to what we believe in and speak truth to the country. we have got to offer leadership in this country and we have got to tell the truth about how damaging brexit is going to be. there isn't a compromise to be had here unfortunately. it might be electorally expedient in some parts of the country but for the whole nation stephen is talking about, it will ill serve the nation, leave us poor and more isolated in the world. stephen kinnock, does the labour leadership need to get on the same page or make way for another set of leaders who can? well, i would very much like the shadow cabinet to go into a room for a few days and come out when they have one, single position. it has been an absolute shambles over the last few years. we have had more positions on this than the kama sutra, frankly. we should have stuck to our guns, the 2017
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manifesto was clear, the nation is deeply divided, labour is a party that brings people back together. 5248 is a mandate to move house but stay in the same neighbourhood. they are strong lines and the day we start saying compromise is a dirty word and a sign of weakness, it is potentially the end of our democracy altogether. compromise is a sign of strength, as long as it is married with consistency. you have got to stick to your guns, because if you don't you lose your authenticity and thatis don't you lose your authenticity and that is always damaging in any kind of election or any democratic event. stephen kinnock and owen smith, we must leave it there, thank you for your thoughts on this this morning. the government is to allow international students studying at uk universities to stay in the country for two years after graduating. the announcement by the home office reverses a decision made by theresa may as home secretary
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in 2012 which forced foreign students to leave the country within four months of completing their degree. there are currently 450,000 overseas students in the uk. the business secretary andrea leadsom says giving overseas students more time to find jobs in the uk after graduating will help the uk's economy. as we leave the european union, we wa nt to as we leave the european union, we want to attract the brightest and the bass from around the world of this policy sets out to do is give every undergraduate comes here as an undergraduate student the opportunity to find work for two yea rs opportunity to find work for two years after they graduate. at the moment we have record numbers of international students. we hope to increase that and of course, what we find is for lots of students they don't get a job whilst they are studying, they focus on that. when they graduate they then seek a job and may be they get a temporary or a part—time job and may be they get a temporary or a part—timejob to start and may be they get a temporary or a part—time job to start with while they are finding their feet, but the
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idea of giving them two years is it enables them to possibly spend a few months whilst they are filling out job applications and looking for the kind of work that fits the degree they've done, we are seeing more than half of students going into stem subjects. something the skills the uk needs going forward. it is a win for international students and the uk's economy. and in half an hour we'll have rection from the body that represents universities in the uk on the change to the student visa rules. a total of 86 migrants have been picked up by the border force after crossing the channel in small boats, which is believed to be a record numberfor a single day. it's thought calm conditions at sea and a threat by the french authorities to evict migrants from their makeshift shelters may be partly behind the increase yesterday. simonjones has the details. risking their lives crossing the busiest shipping lane
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in the world in small boats. and now, in record numbers. nine people made it all the way to the beach in winchelsea in east sussex. witnesses say they tried to escape before the police and the border force turned up. what i saw was them just immediately get out of the boat and run up the beach, all of them ran up the beach, certainly about, what, 50 yards from the sea to — to where we're standing now. and then run across, and they — they ran across into the fields and then just tried to get across over — over the marsh there, which is completely flat. 86 migrants arrived yesterday on six small boats — thought to be a record figure for a single day. last month, 336 people were intercepted by the border force at sea — that is more than in the whole of last year. so far this year, 1,191 people have been picked up. the home secretary, priti patel, is drawing up an enhanced action plan with the french authorities to try to stop people making the perilous crossing, but it's unclear when it will be ready.
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i do know that the border force and the national crime agency are working as best they can with our colleagues in northern france to try to disrupt these gangs and to stop the boats. but essentially, this is a hugely difficult task because we are talking about international organised crime, a significant part of northern france coastline, and a very lucrative business for the smugglers. it's thought calm conditions at sea and a threat by the french to imminently evict migrants in northern france from their makeshift shelters may be behind the rise in numbers, but with two migrants losing their lives in the channel last month, the dangers are very real. simon jones, bbc news. following on from that report we are hearing the dover lifeboat has launched reports of six people in a boat about ten miles off the coast. the weather we are told is pretty grim in the channel today. we are waiting on further details but
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following on from those record number of migrants picked up in the channel yesterday, the dover lifeboat has launched reports of six people in a boat about ten miles the coast. the headlines on bbc news... mixed messages from labour as deputy leader tom watson calls for a referendum before an election, putting him publicly at odds withjeremy corbyn the home office is overturning immigration controls introduced by theresa may, to allow international students to stay longer in the uk after finishing their degree a record number of migrants crossing the channel — border force picked up 86 people yesterday. and 86 people yesterday. in sport, england continued their and in sport, england continued their march to the euros next year with a 5—3 victory over kosovo. jamie sancho scores his first international goals for the senior side. two late goals had the friendly in
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dublin to continue mick mccarthy's unbeaten run in his second reign in charge. three goals for great britain in the powell world championships including a first world title for paralympic champion bethany five. a growing number of children are being approached online for sex in england and wales, that's according to the nspcc. police data obtained by the charity found that the number of sexual communication offences with a child rose by a third in a year — prompting warnings socil media firms are not doing enough to tackle the abuse. our reporter dan johnson is at scotland yard with more detail on the figures. the nspcc contacted all the police forces across england and wales to ask how many of these crimes they had recorded. the charity refers to this as effectively online grooming,
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but being done mainly now through social media apps and they say a lot of this still goes unreported. now the figures show that in the last 12 months to april this year, there were more than 4000 recorded offences of sexual communication with a child, as it's known, across england and wales. and that's compared with more than 3000 offences in the previous year. in cases where the age of the victim was given, the results show that one in five of them was younger than 11 years old. now, apps that are owned by facebook, things like messenger, whatsapp and instagram and snapchat were used in 70% of cases over the last two years. well, speaking here earlier this morning, the nspcc said it really needs a collective effort to tackle this problem. we know children are using these sites at younger and younger ages, age 11 is the peak age for getting one of these accounts in the first place.
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we know that children can be groomed at any age, but what's important is making sure that parents and children understand how to keep themselves safe but also now the government steps in and forces these companies to take the action that we need. facebook says it will not tolerate any child exploitation and that it is using technology to try to remove online threats and the home office also told us they plan to take more action and that will include developing artificial intelligence tools to try to block harmful content. bbc news has discovered that the proportion of prosecutions for homophobic hate crimes has fallen in england, wales and northern ireland over the past five years despite a big rise in the number of complainants coming forward. the national police chiefs' council says cases often don't make it to court because of a lack of witnesses and evidence. our lgbt correspondent ben hunte reports. lily is 17 and already she's
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a victim of homophobic hate. how often do these kind of homophobic incidents happened to you ? i would say its two or three times a week, out in public. she has reported abuse to south yorkshire police. i feel like the police are not doing as much as they can to prosecute the people. it's a hate crime, it is illegal. this summer, rainbows filled every uk city with many hosting their biggest ever pride events. on the surface, it seems like society is much more accepting of lgbt people living their lives, but in reality people are contacting the police every single day about the physical and verbal abuse they experience just because of their sexuality. bbc‘s five live investigations has found crimes recorded by police at more than doubled in five years. attacks have rocketed from 5800 in england, wales, northern ireland, to more than 13,500. five years ago, 20% of these hate crimes resulted in a prosecution. overall, this has fallen to just 8%.
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and in west yorkshire crimes have risen five—fold, in five years with nearly 1000 crimes recorded last year compared to under 200 five years ago. we need to learn all the time around how we investigate some of these reports. south yorkshire police say they have investigated lily's case, but no suspects were identified. lily says she won't give into hate. ben hunte, bbc news, sheffield. with me now is liam beattie who is an lgbt activist and blogger. tell us about your experiences with hate crime? i was walking to my local gym just after 6am in the morning and there was a chap trying to get my attention. i quickly turned round and he went into a tie rate of homophobic abuse. i don't know how he decided to use that type of language, maybe it was because of the way i was dressed and by
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mannerisms, but it left me really shocked. i am mannerisms, but it left me really shocked. iam not mannerisms, but it left me really shocked. i am not a person who would wa nt to shocked. i am not a person who would want to get involved in any confrontation so i quickly ran away to my local gym. it took me a few hours to process what happened. i was lucky that i put on social media what happened and i had an outpouring of support. it reiterated to me the fact we need to be more open and proud as to who we are. picking up on that point, does it make you change your behaviour, does it make you behave differently around your partner, for example?” am single at the moment, so that doesn't necessarily impact me, but it made me change my behaviour. it made me feel scared about going out on my own and perhaps unconsciously i was changing the way i was dressing, as to not want to draw undue attention to me. did you report this incident to anyone?” did,i report this incident to anyone?” did, itook report this incident to anyone?” did, i took a bit of time to reflect as to what i should do and the
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overwhelming consensus from people online who have had similar experiences, that i should report it to the police. i did and i chose to report it anonymously. i know that may be not the best thing to do in some opinions, but i was concerned i might bump into this individual again. do you think that might happen ina again. do you think that might happen in a lot of instances, how do you explain the disparity of the number of hate crimes going up in the number of convictions going down? it is concerning the number of prosecutions are falling and is not keeping up with the rate of the number of people coming forward to report a crime. it is an issue police need to take more seriously and it is encouraging the statements which say they do take it seriously. but they are not seeing these prosecution three. lgbt plus people need to feel more confident in reporting it. whilst it is encouraging we are coming forward and when they see reports such as this that it doesn't necessarily end
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in prosecution, it makes people feel very frustrated that they may want to come forward and it might not result in anything further. do you think people, perhaps if they suffer from verbal abuse, they develop in a way, it is hurtful, but they develop a thick skin and they don't think they will report this because literally somebody has shouted at them, they haven't been physically attacked, but do you think that might be behind it as well? to a certain extent, but it is important to any form of hate crime... that can clearly be just as damaging as a physical attack? absolutely. lgbt plus people often experience high rates of mental health issues, for yea rs i went rates of mental health issues, for years i went to a lot of internalised homophobia, so when you hear the abuse hurled at you on the street it does have an significant impact, the same way a violent attack does. we saw that in london over the summer, the two girls on a
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bus who were brutally attacked and there was an outpouring of support for that. this is happening all across the country. just this week, across the country. just this week, a woman committing hate crime at waltha mstow a woman committing hate crime at walthamstow proud and she has been prosecuted for committing that a crime. —— pride. prosecuted for committing that a crime. -- pride. the message i'm getting from me today, communication, people need to talk to the police and obviously the police need to listen and you want more resources put into policing this sort of crime, but there needs to be that communication? social media companies also have an important role. a lot of hate crime is reported through social media sites. friends of mine have experience homophobia online and they report it to the site and they receive an automated message. there is not enough resources but in and following up these crimes taking place. thank you for coming along to talk to us.
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a record number of chain stores disappeared from britain's high streets in the first half of this year, according to research. the report by the accountancy firm pwc and the local data company, shows that on average, 16 stores a day closed and more shopping moved online. our business correspondent emma simpson reports. we have lost some big names on the high street, and many others are in retreat, as our shopping habits change. the first half of this year saw almost twice as many stores close as open. so what is the net effect? today's research shows, 1234 chain stores disappeared. fashion was the hardest hit with a net decline of 118 stores, mainly midmarket chains, followed by casual dining and restaurants, with the loss of 103 outlets. a wave of administration and restructurings across the high street are mainly to blame. effectively, it is this structural change we've seen in the retail market where shops are just becoming less profitable so, in a number of areas,
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to actually reach the consumer, you do not need as many shops as you used to need so they are closing them and using the mixture of shops and online. but new players are filling some of the gaps. for instance, free takeaway is opening on average every week, sports and health clubs as well as pet shops are also on the rise. a sign that some businesses are taking advantage of the current turmoil on out high streets to open new space. emma simpson, bbc news. in a moment the weather but first let's here's victoria derbyshire with what she's got coming up in her programme at ten. two former chelsea youth football italia programme they were suspected to horrific racial abuse in the 19905. i to horrific racial abuse in the 1990s. i was coming in scared to make a mistake. even on the pitch it affected me because i couldn't relax. i thought if i had a bad game people would be saying you black
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this, you black that. i didn't enjoy my football and i was in fear of everything. those words spoken by an actor. the players have said they wa nt actor. the players have said they want a face—to—face apology from the club. join us on the bbc news channel and online. let's catch up with the weather forecast. fairly blustery day today, reasonably mild, once you have the sunshine, but the thing is, the day has begun a little bit on the grey side. let's look at the radar chart, chiefly across england and wales. this bit here stretching across the north midlands into wales is a cold front, working south, introducing brighter weather, scattering of showers, if you heavy ones north and we st of showers, if you heavy ones north and west of scotland. some good breaks in the cloud, most will see some sunshine. thick cloud across england and wales will be confined to the channel islands. some drizzle, for most of us, finishing the day on a bright note. they are false in places, in the north and west, 14 to
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21 celsius. into tonight, pick a cloud hangs on, channel islands, devon and cornwall, turning humid, turning wetter into northern ireland and western scotland, coolest of all into russia were, in the eastern counties. for tomorrow, some into russia were, in the eastern counties. fortomorrow, some rain, scotland and northern ireland. —— coolest of all into. most places will be dry, sunny, for england and wales. —— coolest into rush—hour. mixed messages from labour on brexit, its deputy leader tom watson calls for another brexit referendum before a general election is held the message puts him publicly at odds withjeremy corbyn, who wants to prioritise a general election. the home office is overturning immigration controls
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introduced by theresa may, to allow international students to stay longer in the uk after finishing their degree a record number of migrants crossing the channel. border force picked up 86 people yesterday coming up, a warning from car insurers on driverless cars, they say they'll cause more accidents without proper regulation. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. let's start with brexit — because as ever, the topic is one of the most read and shared on the bbc news website. as we've been hearing, britain's brexit negotiator will meet his eu counterparts in brussels today, for theirfirst official meeting since a law was passed to prevent a no—deal brexit. so what will both sides be hoping to achieve? the daily telegraph's brussels correspondent, james crisp, has been speaking to dan walker on bbc breakfast and dan started by asking him what the feeling is, among political leaders out there.
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the feeling from brussels has been up the feeling from brussels has been up until extremely recently that things have not been going particularly well, we have had a slight improvement in the mood music and language, with the appointment of the new trade commissioner, phil hogan, who has suggested that the penny might be dropping, with boris johnson, and that we might be moving towards a northern ireland only backstop. that is an offer that the european commission made to theresa may, two years ago, in fact, and theresa may negotiated that to be a whole uk backstop. just simply, that is not acceptable to borisjohnson. the eu is making an offer it has already made and we will see where that leads. whenever we do research about what viewers understand about
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brexit and these negotiations, the backstop comes quite high in terms of trying to get a grip on what it means. explain the difference between essentially wear out the border would become of the border would be in the sea, wouldn't it, as opposed to where it would be across northern ireland and the republic. yes, borisjohnson northern ireland and the republic. yes, boris johnson is northern ireland and the republic. yes, borisjohnson is now seems to be supporting an idea of an all ireland zone for food, agriculture, and there would be checks on boats travelling from mainland britain to northern ireland which would mean you do not necessarily need to have checks on the border itself but it is important to understand even if this zone was agreed, it is by no means a full solution. to prevent the need for these checks, there are other issues which must be taken ca re other issues which must be taken care of. and of course, the more you get into that, the more you talk about sort of a special area for northern ireland, the more that is likely to anger the dup, it does not
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wa nt to likely to anger the dup, it does not want to be hived off from britain. let's go to another of our most read stories on the bbc news website today and fresh concerns are being raised about the influence of human trafficking gangs in northern france, after a record number of migrants were picked up trying to cross the english channel in a single day. border force officials intercepted six boats travelling towards the uk yesterday, with a total of 86 people on board. john vine, the former independent chief inspector of borders and immigration, told the bbc‘s radio 4 today programme what could be driving the rise in crossings. i think this is an attempt by organised crime to get enough people across as they can before autumn and winter, which makes it more perilous. organised crime based in northern france? yes, and the british authorities, the national crime agency working hard, with french counterparts, but the effort must be redoubled, these people are
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being exploited by very serious criminality. presumably it is now more difficult to get across hiding in lorries, that is the kind of thing that was happening a huge amount. does that explain the increasing number? partly, there has been suggesting that perhaps the facilitators of this trade are using the brexit issue as a way of spreading misinformation to migrants about the possibility of getting a cross before the 31st of october, so i think there are a range of things that may be happening, the onset of autumn and winter, which makes the crossing more perilous, the fact that border false are more efficient in detecting people in the backs of lorries, it is interesting to see that the spread of migrants across the south coast is much broader now than dover to calais. calais to dover, i should say. and i also think that one of the issues that we
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must bear in mind, although these are the figures we know about, it is possibly likely that there are other people crossing who we do not know about. i was going to ask you about that, obviously, in one day, 86 is a large figure, compared with the sorts of migratory movements we have seen, illegal migration, it is pretty modest. still modest in comparison with other countries in europe, yes, we do not know if this is an accurate figure. two things need to be done, better sharing of intelligence to tackle organised crime and stop people setting off from northern france in the first place if possible but also resources available to border false to patrol the waters in what is one of the biggest shipping channels in the world. let's take a look at some of the stories and conversations being shared and discussed by social media audiences today. the news — as we've been reporting this morning — that international students will be able to stay in the uk for two years after graduation
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has gone down well with many overseas media outlets. the times of india's facebook post — which you can see now on your screen — had more than 4,000 reactions in two hours, and over a thousand comments. many of those commenting, have welcomed the prospect of indian graduates being able to stay in the uk for two years, to find work after they finish their degrees. another of our top stories today, the news that labour's deputy leader, tom watson, is expected to call for another eu referendum ahead of a general election, is also getting plenty of reaction on social media. tom watson's name is trending on twitter this morning. some positive, like this one from chris brosnahan, who says he welcomes the idea of labour being unambiguously pro—remain, as mr watson suggests. ian norton tweets that tom watson is "once again the voice of reason within labour." but ben rist tweets that as a party member,
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he is proud ofjeremy corbyn's position on brexit. he adds "tom watson really needs to start supporting our party policies or get out of the party, he is undermining us at every opportunity." worth also mentioning, it's 9/11 today, the anniversary of the terror attacks in the us in 2001 and the hashtag #september11 is a top trend on twitter. it's also the third—most searched term on google trends this morning. let's look at what you are reading and watching on the bbc news app, most and watching on the bbc news app, m ost rea d and watching on the bbc news app, most read stories, the story about the change to the rules on foreign stu d e nts the change to the rules on foreign students being able to stay for longer in the uk, after they graduate, at number two, it is the news of the death of a 55—year—old british man, who was taking part in a tandem skydive, near the grand canyon, he was killed, the other person, who was skydiving with him, has survived. at number three,
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today's main politics story, about the difference of opinion between the difference of opinion between the labour leader and deputy leader over the path ahead for the party on brexit. going down to the most watched, this is a story about self driving cars and what happens, is the question, if you fall asleep in a self driving car? that is at number one. stay with us, we will show you the report in full. for the moment, that is it for the morning briefing. lets catch up with sport. good morning. there you are! i watched a bit of the football last night, and when i looked, england were co mforta bly when i looked, england were comfortably ahead, and later on i saw the score and i thought, what has happened ? saw the score and i thought, what has happened? what has gone wrong, my advice would have been to switch off after half time, all going swimmingly up to that point, some defensive problems but the good news is that england have kept up their 100% record in qualifying for the european championships.
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but they got a scare from kosovo. a frantic match in southampton finished 5—3. kosovo are ranked 120th in the world but they got a dream start when valon berisha scored after just 35 seconds. raheem sterling soon equalised then set up harry kane to put england ahead. an own goal made it three before jadon sancho scored his first two senior goals for england. they led five one at the break but wobbled in the second half as kosovo scored twice. the outstanding features and the poor features are apparent to everybody. we don't need to get the video out and go back through it. poor individual mistakes, poor start to the game, i like the way we showed the composure to recover from the initial mistake and our use of the initial mistake and our use of the ball through the first half was
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excellent right the way through the team. he was happy with what he saw in the first half but he has banged on about sloppy mistakes, we keep giving teams goals. we have got to make them earn their goals by scoring good goals. but we gave them three of their goals. one man who has become a bit of an online sensation — is kosovo's swiss manager bernard challandes. he was understandably rather frustrated to be 5—1 down at half time. here he is, coming through the tunnel — seemingly incensed with the decision to let jadon sancho's second goal stand. but then he notices the television cameras. to speak with the players in the dressing room at half—time at 5-1, in the dressing room at half—time at 5—1, very hard, but the team has
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shown a good reaction, and we as a side decided to continue to play, to ta ke side decided to continue to play, to take risks, to keep the ball, also, and to try anything for the offensive. and it was good, i can congratulate the players. we can be proud with these players. keep on smiling! and this is how the fans reacted back home in kosovo to that surprise early goal. many here in pristina might not have made it to their seats before their team scored after 34 seconds. it wasn't to last, england equalised seven minutes later. let's have a look at some of this morning's back pages and it's that game in southampton last night that takes centre stage. starting with the telegraph — with the three goal scorees featured they highlight england's "world class" attack but contrast it with what they're calling second class defending last night.
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you've also got jadon sancho and raheem sterling on the back of the express, again questions being raised about the england defence. and finally the sun has more on jadon sancho's achievements and how he dedicated his two goals last night to his late grandmother. elsewhere a second—string republic of ireland beat bulgaria in a friendly in dublin. the two sides were level at 1—1 until the 83rd minute when a goal from kevin long put ireland ahead. they then sealed the 3—1win with a debut goal from james collins as manager mick mccarthy's unbeaten run continues in his second irish reign. at the para swimming world championships, northern ireland's bethany firth finally claimed her first gold medal. she took victory for great britain in her classification 100 metre backstroke final. she's already won four paralympic gold medals but had missed out on world title
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glory until yesterday. another gold for gb as tully kearney stormed to victory in the 200 metre freestyle for her second gold at this event. and the hat trick for great britain yesterday — as alice tai claimed her second this week, this time in the 100 metre backstroke, and she broke the world record in the process. britain's megan richter came third. coming up today we'll be keeping across the world para swimming championships which continue in london today. we'll also be hearing from both captains ahead of the fifth and final ashes test in sportsday at 6:30 plus we'll be live at gleneagles ahead of the solheim cup which gets underway on friday. that's all the sport for now. more from the bbc
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sport centre at 11:15. returning to the top story, divisions in labour over the party position on brexit. —— labour. labour's deputy leader, tom watson has called on the party to focus on another referendum over winning a general election. in the last few minutes, the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer has been speaking as he arrived at the tuc conference in brighton. do you agree with your colleague, tom watson, that labour should campaign for remain a second referendum no matter what? we have just had a very good week, defeating the government six times, we are united around the idea that there should be a referendum on any outcome this government puts forward , outcome this government puts forward, and that we should have a referendum in our manifesto, and that remain should be one of the options in that referendum. there is a good discussion going on, we are united in having that discussion, unlike johnson and cummings, we do not shut down discussions in our party and we certainly don't want to
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shut down parliament. referendum on any deal, now, and referendum on the manifesto, so that is an important and united position. the government is to allow international students studying at uk universities to stay in the country for two years after graduating. the announcement by the home office reverses a decision made by theresa may as home secretary in 2012 which forced foreign students to leave the country within four months of completing their degree. there are currently 450,000 overseas students in the uk. vivienne stern is the director of universities uk international, the body that represents universities across the uk and joins me now from birmingham. unsurprisingly you are pleased about this, you have been campaigning for this, you have been campaigning for this for a long time, what does it do to make the uk a top choice
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destination for overseas students? we are absolutely delighted with this announcement, a long time coming, all credit to the home office and to priti patel and to the government. particularly to the last universities minister, joe johnson, for securing the change. universities in the uk are widely recognised for offering really some of the best higher education in the world, that is the fact, and we are pretty much the first choice destination for international stu d e nts destination for international students when they are thinking about quality. but we have been holding ourselves back by presenting a visa policy that is not competitive with the other major economies that attract international graduates. i think we have been tripping over our own feet and today's announcement allows us to get out there, and make sure those stu d e nts get out there, and make sure those students who want an absolutely outstanding higher education also have the opportunity to get work experience alongside that. putting that into context, the four—month
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policy, having to leave the uk within four months of graduating, to what extent is there evidence that was deterring students from coming to the uk? very clear evidence, when we look at the way the uk fortunes in attracting international students have compared with places like the us or canada or australia, which allowed graduates to stay for a little bit to get work experience and develop professional networks, we have been bumping along pretty stagnant, in terms of international student number growth, other economies have been doing very much better. the important thing to say is, this is notjust good for universities, it is good for the whole country, everywhere from paisley to plymouth there are international students and graduates contributing to economic growth. it is really important, this step. with the introduction, the extension of the introduction, the extension of the time that students can stay after graduating, you say they can gain valuable work experience, but, evenif gain valuable work experience, but, even if they go back to their home
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countries, to what extent is that an advantage for the uk, are they simply taking valuable skills and removing them from the country? one of the brilliant things about taking someone from another part of the world at an early stage in their career, and giving them the outstanding education is they tend to be lifelong ambassadors for the uk, we conducted a study of graduates of uk universities and, 88% of them wanted to come back for tourism, over 77% wanted to retain business and professional links with the uk. human bridge, we can retain links, notjust at university level but businesses throughout the country. there are links being formed between people who met in universities, that is good for everybody. thank you very much. insurers are warning that there is a risk of more road accidents, as we make the move towards driverless cars. the motor insurance research body
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is calling for regulations to make cars safe, as automated systems gradually take over from human drivers. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones has this report. imagine you fell asleep in an automated car, and the system brought it to a stop in the fast lane of a motorway, this kind of accident could become common unless there are new safety regulations, insurers are warning. driverless ca rs insurers are warning. driverless cars could be on uk roads as early as 2021 but can't insurers say at first they will be limited in what they can do and they want new rules for how they should operate. during automation, it indicates green and you can safely do other things. now, what this car really needs —
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and has — is a driver monitoring system, to actually watch what i'm up to. the car's got to be able to monitor whether you're paying attention, and if you're not paying attention, the system must automatically try to wake you up. one rule would see motorists forced to watch a safety video before using an automated system the first time. driver monitoring would be an essential feature. and at first, automated cars will only be able to operate on motorways. automated drive not available. please take over. but they will also need be able to deal with situations where the motorist cannot take over the wheel. so what's happened is, i disobeyed the car, i did not take over when there were roadworks, and it came to a halt automatically, parked us in the lay—by. but that has got to be mandated in these new autonomous systems, according to the motoring industry's insurance research body. vehicle manufacturers, at the moment, are advocating that it is fine for the vehicle to stop in lane. we simply don't think that's safe. we say that vehicle manufacturers mustn't leave a vehicle in the middle of the lane. if the driver does not respond, pull the vehicle over,
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out of the running traffic. cars are getting ever smarter, but the insurers warn that dangers lurk on the road to the driverless future. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. the search for those killed by hurricane dorian in the bahamas continues. hundreds if not thousands of people are still missing. international teams with specially trained dogs are working to find the remains of those killed by the storm. at least fifty people are so far, known to have died. catherine karelli has more details. searching the ruins for the remains of those killed by hurricane dorian. this is mud, a shanty town in the abaco islands destroyed by the storm. life here replaced by the sickly smell of death.
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a team from canada with dogs specially trained to find bodies, scour through the rubble. we have not seen anything like a debris field like this, there are multiple areas that are impassable. we have a difficult time because, of course, we have to find — make sure that our dogs are ok. there are multiple hazards here. it's from the air that the true scale of the challenge becomes apparent. more than 90% of buildings have been damaged or destroyed. some 70,000 residents across the bahamas are in urgent need of food and shelter. working from house to house, rescue teams undertake the grim task of removing the bodies of those who lost their lives two weeks ago, killed by the most powerful storm the region has ever endured. officials have denied accusations from residents of covering up the number of deaths. but the figure is likely to rise as hundreds, possibly thousands of people, are still missing. catherine corelli, bbc news.
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let me tell you, simon king will be here ina let me tell you, simon king will be here in a couple of minutes with the latest weather forecast. just before that... if you're a fan ofjames bond, you might want to take a look at this. it's eyewitness footage of a dramatic car chase being filmed in southern italy for the latest 007 film, no time to die. the iconic bond aston martin was seen speeding through the streets, while a helicopter followed above. the film is also being shot in london and norway. what a treat to catch a glimpse of that. now, let's look at the weather forecast. not as fun as that, lots of cloud, outbreaks of rain, it has been a bit ofa grim outbreaks of rain, it has been a bit of a grim start to the day for some of a grim start to the day for some of us, that is a scene from one of the weather watchers in devon. the clouds and the rain that we have had ourcoming
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clouds and the rain that we have had our coming from ex—hurricane dorian, moving out of iceland but these weather fronts, the isobars are quite close together, breezy conditions, rain clearing the away to the south and sunshine coming through. nice rainbow in sheffield. the rain will continue to spread into the south of england, where it will linger on into the afternoon. elsewhere, sunny spells developing, some showers coming into western parts of scotland during this afternoon. even by this evening's rush hour, at the end of the day, very cloudy, quite wet at times. light and patchy rain across southern parts and windy conditions, wherever you are , southern parts and windy conditions, wherever you are, really, southern parts and windy conditions, whereveryou are, really, gusts southern parts and windy conditions, wherever you are, really, gusts of 20 to 30 to 40 mph, higher than that in the far north—west. not cold, temperatures around 17 to 21 degrees. now, through into thursday, ex—tropical storm gabrielle is moving in, pushing rain into northern areas and bringing with it,
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as the name might suggest, some tropical warmth. warm air moving in from the south—west but there will be rain as i mentioned across northern ireland into scotland, perhaps a bit of rain into northern england and wales, quite a bit of cloud, brighter skies, and down to the south—east of england. we will see temperature contrast, for northern parts, 15, 16 degrees. up to 24 celsius in the south—east, humid weather for many of us on thursday. as we going to friday, that weather system will move away, then high—pressure starts to build m, then high—pressure starts to build in, and weather system here that moves into the west of scotland, bringing other rain. quite breezy conditions. elsewhere, like to win, ple nty of conditions. elsewhere, like to win, plenty of sunshine, during friday, with maximum temperatures getting to 18 to 21 degrees. a little bit lower than thursday. those temperatures will rise again over the weekend. high—pressure largely in charge of the weather, and with that, plenty
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of fun in dry conditions with sunshine, and temperatures, well, sunday, 25, 20 6 degrees celsius, across south—east of england. —— sunday could see temperatures as high as 25, 26 sunday could see temperatures as high as 25,26 degrees celsius across the south—east of england.
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hello it's wednesday, it's 10:00. i'm victoria derbyshire. in exclusive interviews, two former chelsea youth footballers tell this programme they were subjected to horrific and sustained racial abuse in the 1990s. i was coming in scared to make a mistake. even on the pitch it affected me because i couldn't relax. i was thinking if i have a bad game and i come in everybody walking around saying, "you black this, you black that". i didn't enjoy my football and i was in fear of everything. what's going on at the top of the labour party? yesterday the boss jeremy corbyn said this: we are ready for that election. we
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are ready to unleash the

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