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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 12, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. our headlines today: riots, shortages of medicine and rising food prices. the government publishes its worst—case scenario for a no—deal brexit. cancer survival rates in the uk are improving, but they still lag behind other rich countries. saving the high street — another new report suggests radical changes to the way our town and city centres are run. i'll look at whether it really can make a difference. england drop batsman jason roy for the final ashes test, which starts this morning. after failing to regain the urn, they say they're already planning for the future. finding love isn't easy, but if you have a learning difficulty it can be
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almost impossible. we'll find out why campaigners want more support to give everyone the chance of building a loving relationship. that's what kills people, it's being lonely. so having a good relationship, it's important. i found ifound a i found a little oasis of calm in central london. a warm day to the south and east of the country, but if you're starting your day in scotla nd if you're starting your day in scotland and northern ireland, a bit of damp weather around. i'll have your full forecast on breakfast. good morning. it's thursday the 12th of september. our top story: less fresh food, an increase in prices and the chance of riots — examples of the kind of disruption the uk could face in the event of a no—deal brexit. the government has given into pressure from mps with the publication of operation yellowhammer, the papers that set out contingency plans for what the government calls a reasonable worse—case scenario based on the assumptions of theresa may's administration. chris mason reports.
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parliament forced the government to publish this document which, until now, was categorised as official, sensitive. ministers insist it's not a prediction but what they'd call a reasonable worst—case scenario, a deliberately stretching context to ensure that we are prepared, and they insist we are now vastly better prepared. but make no mistake, this is stark stuff. certain types of fresh food supply will decrease, it says, which will cut choice and put up prices. it also suggests there could be riots. protests and counter protests will take place across the uk, it says. lorries could have to wait more than two days to cross the channel. passengers could be delayed on the eurostar at st pancras in london. some businesses will go bust.
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there'll be a growth in the black—market. some providers of adult social care could fail because it says the sector is already fragile and there could be an increase in staff and supply costs. it is extraordinary that these are consequences that could flow from the government's own policy. normally when you're protecting against something like this, it's natural disaster, the action of others you don't control. it is government policy if no agreement is reached with the eu to inflict a no—deal brexit, and this is what the government says could happen. the document does, though, say demand for energy will be met and there will be no disruption to electricity or gas supplies. the key thing now is the extent to which this shapes or changes public attitudes to the prospect of a no—deal brexit. chris mason, bbc news. let's get more on this now with our political correspondent jessica parker, who is in westminster this morning.
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so, jessica, as we absorb what's in yellowhammer, we are trying to also get our heads around what is happening with the suspension of parliament and the scottish court involvement. bring us up to date. lots going on at the moment. with regards to the yellowhammer documents that everyone is getting their heads around, lots if not all of that material was leaked to the sunday times last month, it's pretty identical to then. there's a difference to something being leaked toa difference to something being leaked to a national newspaper and something being printed in black and white for all to see on a government website. what i would say about the release of the yellowhammer documents, we were hearing in there, it could lead to ramped up calls for parliament to be brought back. of course, yesterday we heard from the highest civil court in scotland, ruling the suspension of parliament was unlawful. interestingly, there was unlawful. interestingly, there was a request also for
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communications from senior downing street aides around the suspension of parliament to be released. they've been blocked. cabinet minister michael gove has said that request was unreasonable and disproportionate. but i think when parliament returns, you may well see a renewed attempt to see those documents published as well. jasika, thank you very much that. we will speak to you later on through the morning. and we'll speak to the secretary of state for defence, ben wallace, about this at 8:30am this morning. new figures show cancer survival rates in the uk are improving but still remain below those of other wealthy countries. a study in lancet oncology found rates were worse than australia, canada, denmark, ireland, new zealand and norway. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. for some years foi’ some years now, for some years now, the uk has lagged behind other developed countries when it comes to treating cancer. the gap is closing, with definite signs of improvement. but
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the latest research shows there is no room for complacency. the latest data looks and survival rates for seven of the most common cancers in seven of the most common cancers in seven high income countries with similar healthcare systems. the uk was at the foot of the league in five of the seven cancers, including pancreatic cancer, with less than 8% survived five years after diagnosis. in australia, the five year survival rate was close to 15%. the government points to significant increases in survival rates over the past 20 years. after diagnosis and swifter treatment are the key to better results. cancer charities say to achieve that, more staff specialising in cancer care are needed right across the nhs. dominic hughes, bbc news. the number of people investigated for rape, and were subsequently convicted, has fallen to its lowest level since the compilation of records began more than a decade ago. this was in spite of allegations of rape reaching a high of 58,000.
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campaigners say the cps has changed its decision—making policy on rape cases, which it denies. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. phone messages and social media have become a big part of rate enquiries. complainants are being asked to hand over their phones as the police search for digital evidence stop a soa search for digital evidence stop a so a huge change in investigations, but there's also been a significant drop in rape prosecutions. new figures show that last year in rape investigations in england and wales, under 1800 cases resulted in charges. the smallest number for more than a decade. atjust over 1900, convictions were also down to record low levels. meanwhile, rape complaints recorded by the police went up to 58,000, an all—time high. so, hard evidence that fewer
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suspects are being brought to court by the crown prosecution service. campaigners are accusing prosecutors of screening out the tougher cases. there's a huge justice for complainants of rape, and what that also says is that if you're a rapist, you can continue your offending within punitive because the likelihood of you being held to account in the courts is minuscule. it is centres like this which help complainants when they first come forward. the crown prosecution service denies a change of approach in dealing with rape cases. june kelly, bbc news. police are continuing to question a 22—year—old man following the death ofa baby... 22—year—old man following the death of a baby... we've got more information on that. the boy is believed to be almost 12 months old and it happened in greater manchester yesterday. he was recovered from water by firefighters who attended the scene. he died later in hospital. eunice muller has
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this report. flowers have been left here and candles have been lit after what officers describe as an incredibly tragic incident in which an innocent baby boy has died. officers were called here along with emergency services after reports of a child was in the water. that they be boy, said to be around 12 months old, was taken to hospital in a critical condition but later died in hospital. now, we don't know for sure how that baby ended up in the water. detectives say they've launched a murder investigation. they are supporting the baby boy's family at this unimaginably difficult time. a 22—year—old man was arrested at the scene. he remains in police custody for questioning on suspicion of murder. the police say they are keen to hear from anyone who might have that vital piece of information that
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could help them with their investigation. children should be banned from buying video game extras under measures unveiled by mps today. there are concerns so—called loot boxes encourage gambling with some gamers spending up to £1,000 a year chasing mystery virtual items, as our technology correspondent, rory cellanjones, reports. three quarters of 5 to 15—year—olds play online games, and mps say the companies behind them depend profits for their profits on keeping those players glued to their screens. they're calling on firms to protect players from the harm caused by excessive time and money spent on games. for video games in particular, there's been a big switch so that a lot of games people play are free to play but then you are encouraged to purchase things as you play the games. a particular concern is loot boxes, where players spend real money on virtual goods, such as packs of star footballers in fifa. one player told the committee they spent up to £1,000 a year on the game.
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the mps want loot boxes regulated under the gambling act, and say they shouldn't be sold to children where there's an element of chance involved. the mps say the companies behind games like fifa and fortnite hadn't even done any research into the potential harm they might cause. they said it was unacceptable that companies with millions of users, many of them children, should be so ill—equipped to discuss the impact of their products. but the games industry insists it hives responsibly. we want players to play safely, we want them to play in a balanced way. we provide technical settings, technical measures. we provide education, robust age ratings and guidance and information sources. the mps say e—sports, where games players compete in professional competitions, is a fast—growing business in the uk, but they call for the same duty of care to protect players as applies in other sports. rory cellan—jones, bbc news.
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the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes could be stabilising or even falling, according to a new study. the research, lead by the baker heart and diabetes institute in melbourne, is based on data from 47 countries dating back to the mid—1960s, but diabetes uk said there are still challenges with obesity and unhealthy lifestyles which are both linked to the condition. top gear presenter freddie flintoff has said he is absolutely fine after an incident involving a three—wheeled motorcycle. the ex—england cricketer is understood to have run out of runway at elvington airfield near york while filming a race for the motoring show. the bbc understands he was unhurt and did not need medical attention. a little confusing, we are watching pictures of him playing cricket there. there's a picture in the papers, i will look for it in a minute. the accident happened while filming elvington top gear.
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minute. the accident happened while filming elvington top gearlj minute. the accident happened while filming elvington top gear. i was worried i had missed my queue! holly is here with the sport. lots of cricket today, the fifth and final ashes test. there's a downside to this. england can't win the ashes, they lost after being beaten in the fourth test at old trafford. they can level the series. the captain,joe they can level the series. the captain, joe root, he's quite optimistic, he's looking forward to the next ashes series. england's captainjoe root has already begun talking about building for the future as they prepare to take on australia in the fifth and final ashes test this morning. they've brought in sam curran and chris woakes for the match with australia leading the series 2—1. that means jason roy and craig overton are out of the side. great britain have won three more gold medals at the para—swimming world championships in london. maisie summers—newton beat her own world record in her 200m medley to take a world title for the first time. in the women's champions league, it was a bad night for hibs as they were beaten 4—1 at home by slavia prague.
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glasgow city, though, did manage to win in moscow. and the italian rider matteo trentin leads the tour of britain after stage 5. the race heads for a 9—mile time trial in worcestershire today. one little sideline away from sports news today, congratulations to former england netball coach tracey neville, who has announced she's pregnant three months stepping aside to start a family. great news. many congratulations to her! so can we expect more warm weather in the run up to the weekend? matt taylor is in london's little venice for us this morning. looking so lovely there this morning, matt. hello. hello. let's try again. it's looking beautiful down there in little venice, a bit of double sunshine. i will fill—in
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in case matt isn't going to do the weather, we've got the shutters on the water, cars in the distance driving past and there is matt on standby for us. or, is that a bunch of flowers 7 yea h standby for us. or, is that a bunch of flowers? yeah no, that looks like a canal boat stop it is lovely there. we understand. the reason we sent him there is that, she will have the details for us, but there will be an event at midnight. i am predicting one of the kind people on the canal boats are offering matt a cup of tea, and he will do the weather later. there is an excellent cafe there, so i think you are spot on. we will talk to him later on. fingers crossed. will do the papers now. dash we will. —— we will do the papers now. first
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we have this sighting of a new planet. yes, that is wednesday's front page. it isjust one of those days, thursday. it happens when you are just backed after your little... joint. my jaunt? lots of politics on the front pages today, and the times leads with the government resisting orders from mps to publish private messages about the suspension of parliament. this looming brexit battle, that is on the front pages a lot. i'll do the front page of the times. this was about what was going on yesterday and so many things going on. a scottish court ruled that proroguing was unlawful, and we've
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seen proroguing was unlawful, and we've seenin proroguing was unlawful, and we've seen in the other papers that mps wa nted seen in the other papers that mps wanted various messages to be printed, didn't they, to be published. but the prime minister block those key memos on the commons being published. —— blocked. and, britain has come down the bottom of the list of cancer survival rates. and there is this one, boris lied to the queen. this will now go on to the queen. this will now go on to the supreme court where we understand we will expect the result of the supreme court's verdict on tuesday of next week. and i think i saw one of freddie flintoff, there it is, this is from the inside of
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the sun as well. ben, what do you have for us? i am not even going to attempt to talk about women's fashion, but the chain is doing really well out of this dress. it is 40 really well out of this dress. it is a0 quid, sold by zara. it has its own instagram with thousands of followers, that has been enough to boost sales around the world are za ra boost sales around the world are zara by 5%. just one dress! once you've seen it, you see it absolutely everywhere. it is worth having a look at this instagram account because it is kind of comical, everyone turning up at work wearing that. ifi knew comical, everyone turning up at work wearing that. if i knew everyone had the dress, who would buy it? on this one in the telegraph, this is perhaps an unusual way of cutting your tax bill. damien hirst‘s drawings of his manager, he did this over breakfast at a restaurant in
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london and he did all of these sketches over a number of years. what he did was then submit them to a museum to reduce his tax bill. his tax bill by £90,000, and that is because they are classed as of important cultural treasure. because they are classed as of important cultural treasurelj because they are classed as of important cultural treasure. i see what you've been doing. really clever. not that my tax bill is worth reducing. and who do you think this is? it's you! ifi give worth reducing. and who do you think this is? it's you! if i give that to you now, how much do you think that is worth? 20 p. 20 p. you're welcome. and we've been talking about operation yellowhammer, the details published about the worst—case scenario. details published about the worst—case scenario. the government's own figures about a no—deal brexit. i really get nervous about tensioning turkey or christmas in september —— mentioning, but
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turkey could be of the menu, there has been a record heat summer and a lot of the meat has spoiled. a bit ofa lot of the meat has spoiled. a bit of a mixed bag lot of the meat has spoiled. a bit ofa mixed bag here, this lot of the meat has spoiled. a bit of a mixed bag here, this last ashes series. if anyone has a teenage son ora series. if anyone has a teenage son or a teenage brother, series. if anyone has a teenage son ora teenage brother, it series. if anyone has a teenage son or a teenage brother, it might remind you of that, he has been dropped from this final test. he hasn't had the best series. it's not going to be a good series for him, no. but they still have the world cup, don't they? trying to be optimistic. we were trying to talk about the weather, matt, are you there in little venice? i am indeed. a very good morning to you. here is a little bit of an oasis of calm here in central london, little venicejust two miles calm here in central london, little venice just two miles away from
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paddington station. in fact the pool behind me was built in 1810, it is where the grand union and regent's canal meat. it's just a perfect little piece of calm this morning. let me ease you into your thursday. if we take a look at the forecast today, for some of you, not a bad day at all. the further south and east you are it is going to be a warm and humid day, while the north and east are going to be quite blustery. northern ireland especially. it is a link into this weather front you can see on the charts. and here is left of what was tropical storm barry, but nothing much untoward. in fact, probably not as much rain or wind as we saw yesterday. but certainly across parts of western and southern scotla nd parts of western and southern scotland and northern ireland, expect outbreaks of rain to come and go at times stop it's a very mild start, temperatures in double—figure is, the teens if not and blue skies in the east. —— double figures. the breeze will steadily pick up, nothing too strong, but the south
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and east should stay dry. temperatures may be 26 celsius this afternoon. or in the lower teens for the north of scotland. as we finish today, you will see some rain in parts of england and northern wales, that will work its way southwards as we go through this evening and overnight. the rain turns later as we go, skies clear across the north of the country and lingers for the morning, so it will be a pretty mild and muggy night. temperatures 15— 16 degrees for one or two places. and a fresh start to friday, a little bit on the cool side for the morning commute but away from southernmost counties of england it will be drizzly, for everyone else, a sunny start. long, sunny spells developing and brightening up across the southern coast as well. it will feel very pleasant in the sunshine with light winds. temperatures where they should be for this time of year,
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mid— high teens or late 20s. so we started the weekend dry and sunny, which it should remain. the cloud may start to push its way in on sunday but foremost a pretty decent weekend in store. that is how it is looking from lovely, lovely scenes behind me here in little venice, i'll hand you back to salford. it's 6:23am. there are growing concerns in the united states about the use of e—cigarettes after a number of vaping related deaths. six people are known to have died afterfalling ill with lung problems according to health officials. president trump says he now plans to ban flavoured cigarettes to protect "innocent children". we have a problem in our country, it isa we have a problem in our country, it is a new problem, it's a problem nobody really thought about too much a few years ago and it's cold vaping. especially vaping as it pertains to innocent children. and
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they're coming home and they're saying mum, i want to vape and the pa rents saying mum, i want to vape and the parents don't know too much about it and nobody knows too much about it but they do know it is causing a lot of problems. let's talk about that now. we can now speak to laura crotty—alexander, an e—cigarette researcher in san diego. just about we talk about —— just before we talk about what president trump said, can you tell us more about these debts and how they are connected to vaping ? about these debts and how they are connected to vaping? as a critical ca re connected to vaping? as a critical care doctor, basically any patient coming in with symptoms of acute lung injury such as shortness of breath, fevers and hypoxia, the doctors are going through a deep dive to make sure there are no other causes that could be responsible for what's going on. so over a50 cases
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have already been confirmed and then those six really certain death. they seem those six really certain death. they seem to be in relatively young people who died, can you tell us anything about them ? people who died, can you tell us anything about them? absolutely. so the cases, the average age of the person affected by this vaping —induced lung injury is 19. so that is the average age, so it is affecting people who are extremely young. in terms of the deaths, those are young. in terms of the deaths, those a re really young. in terms of the deaths, those are really spread out across age groups, and a couple of the ages haven't been released yet. but it might be that young people who get a really bad chemical injury of a long, they can't tolerate it and their body can't sustain them do it if we support them in an intensive ca re if we support them in an intensive care unit. but for older people with additional health problems, they can't tolerate it and that may be why seeing deaths, and people who are over the age of 50. there are so
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many questions. president trump made the point that we don't know very much about the effect of vaping and e—cigarettes. what is the research so e—cigarettes. what is the research so far? i got in the field in 2013, iam six so far? i got in the field in 2013, i am six years in in trying to understand the health effects of using these devices. there are many researchers doing top—notch research across the world and we are learning more almost week by week now. what we do know is that inhaling these chemicals in an aerosol form is detrimental to your health and it affects your brain, your heart, your kidneys, your liver and now most dramatically, your lungs. but in terms of why it is causing this severe epidemic of lung problems right now, we don't yet know. the fda is desperately searching by looking at the e— liquids that
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people affected were using to try and find a common chemical that might be causing this severe lung damage. i just might be causing this severe lung damage. ijust want might be causing this severe lung damage. i just want to make the point from public health england, they say in the uk, health experts said they aren't aware of any similar incidents with uk regulated products, and the uk regulations are much more stringent than those in america? aren't they? they are more stringent and they don't allow as high nicotine doses as in america. so there are significant differences between the countries, but there have been cases in england where people have had lung injuries from e—cigarettes, so it's not only isolated to the us, but this current epidemic might be. ok, doctor laura crotty—alexander, i really appreciate your time talking to us on breakfast —— on breakfast. still to come: why can't more people
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with a learning disability have what andrew and eillien have got? he is the best boyfriend i've got in the world. find out why there are so many barriers facing those looking for love. that is coming up a little bit later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm sonja jessup. police say they'll call in extra officers to prevent any disruption caused by protestors who plan to fly drones near heathrow airport tomorrow. the climate change activist group heathrow pause want to use the devices within the no—fly zone as part of a campaign to halt the airport's planned expansion. police say they're confident that passengers will not be affected.
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a charity in hammersmith says it's had huge success in helping troubled youngsters from falling into a life of crime by introducing them to horses! keyalife, a charity based in hammersmith is using the animals to help change the lives of young people at risk of going to prison, as well as general rehabilitation. and a key part of the programme is to help youngsters find a job, work experience or further training. doing that because, what really stood out for me was being aware of how you're feeling, you know? are not acting off the motion. i have grown up not acting off the motion. i have grown up doing it and it's got me into a lot of trouble. a relatively new london dialect is becoming increasingly popular with londoners under 25, that's acccording to an expert in dialects from the british library. it's been named multicultural london english, or mle and it's mostly heard, in inner london. if you went back 30, a0 years ago, you might have been able to tell whether you are beating to a british caribbean speaker or a traditional london speaker, —— speaking, nowadays those types of speakers are speaking a relatively similar type of language, particularly londoners.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. it looks like the tube is running well so far. no reported problems this morning on any of those lines. on the roads, it's mostly works to tell you about, really. this is the piccadilly underpass, which is closed westbound. you which is closed westbound. may be able to see tha knightsbridge is down to one lane westbound near wilton place. and elsewhere, the usual rush—hour issues. northbound traffic at the blackwall tunnel is slow from blackwall lane. no surprises. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning, it's quite an interesting day of weather today across the capital, it is going to be rather blustery and as always, plenty of cloud but some bright and sunny spells throughout the day as well. it will feel rather humid, some very well. it will feel rather humid, some very warm air well. it will feel rather humid, some very warm air around at the moment, in fact it is a very mild start of the morning. there will be some early—morning brightness some spells of sunshine, but the cloud is never too far away today, perhaps a few spots of drizzle and thickness at times but mostly a dry day. as we
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head to the afternoon, topped images of 23 or 2a celsius in the best of any sunshine but all the while we have a risk westerly wind blowing. through this evening the cloud will thicken and then we will start to see the spots of rain just push down on the weather front from the north—west, that is a cold front and will clear its way south—east eastwards into tomorrow morning. tonight was a temperature still 12— 13 degrees towards northern home counties otherwise a very mild night to come, we'll see lots of sunshine developed tomorrow. but a pressure appeal to things, more sunshine and warming up over the weekend. —— fresher feel. that's it for now. there's more from me in around half—an—hour. there's plenty more news travel and weather on our website at the usual address bbc.co.uk/london. now it's back to charlie and lousie bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. still to come: we'll look at calls to ban children from buying video game loot boxes as a group of mps suggest it could lead to gambling. common, the grammy—winning rapper, joins us to tell us how healing and therapy have influenced his new mature sound.
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can you be sustainable if you're into fast fashion? we'll find out when vlogger grace mandeville joins us to talk about her new bbc series. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: less fresh food, an increase in prices and the chance of riots — examples of the kind of disruption the uk could face in the event of a no—deal brexit. the government has given into pressure from mps and published details of operation yellowhammer. the papers set out contingency plans for what the government calls a reasonable worse—case scenario leaving the eu. the shadow brexit secretary kier starmer is calling on parliament to be immediately recalled so that mps can scrutinise the documents and block no—deal.
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new figures show cancer survival rates in the uk are improving but still remain below those of other wealthy countries. a study in lancet oncology found rates were worse than australia, canada, denmark, ireland, new zealand and norway, which have similar healthcare systems. the government says cancer survival rates are at a record high. a man's been arrested on suspicion of murder after a baby boy died hours after being pulled from a river in greater manchester. the boy, thought to be almost a year old, was recovered from the water by firefighters in radcliffe. officers said it was not clear how the boy came to be in the water. there are calls for video game companies to protect young people from becoming addicted to their products. mps are recommending that a gaming feature known as loot boxes, where players pay cash for the chance of winning virtual goods should not be sold to children. the industry's uk trade body said it would review these recommendations with utmost seriousness.
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the authorjk rowling has donated £15 million to support research into neurological conditions at a centre named after her mother, who died from multiple sclerosis. the anne rowling regenerative neurology clinic at the university of edinburgh was established in 2010, and is named in memory of the author's mother, who died of with the condition at the age of a5. those are the main stories this morning. holly is here with the sport. good morning. the fifth and final ashes test, which is exciting but sadly for england, they can't win the ashes after they lost the fourth test last week and the urn goes back to australia, the first time it has gone from uk soil since 2001. not the best ashes series so far. the fifth and final ashes test gets underway in a few hours' time, at 11am, with a new—look england side hoping for the win that
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would level the series. sam curran and chris woakes come into the team for the match at the oval, with jason roy and craig overton dropped. and whatever the result, captainjoe root insists that after winning the world cup, this should be seen as a successful summer for england. to win the first 50 over world cup isa to win the first 50 over world cup is a huge achievement for english cricket. absolutely should be seen asa cricket. absolutely should be seen as a successful year. but we've got as a successful year. but we've got a chance to level the series and make it a slightly better than it looks right now. so that's the full focus of the group. we've just got to make sure that we win this game. o nto onto another huge event now. final preparations are underway for one of the biggest events in the women's golf calendar — the solheim cup at gleneagles in scotland. the opening foursomes go off around about this time tomorrow, as europe take on the usa hoping to win back the trophy they lost two years ago. the unity that we have in the team is something that's really good, and everyone's really supportive of each
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other, which is, you know, really the best, kind of, situation that you can be in in terms of team golf and everyone's getting along really well. so the team room has plenty of banter, and everyone's having a great time. maisie summers—newton thanked her family for their support after winning herfirst world pa ra—swimming title. she smashed her own world record to take gold in the 200m individual medley at the championships in london, adding to the two european titles she won last year. that was one of three golds for britain on the third day of competition, including a first title for louise fiddes in the 100m breaststroke. she set a new championship record. and alice tai took her third gold of the meet in the 100m butterfly, just holding off the 13—time paralympic champion jessica long. tai is set to compete in eight events this week. another big crowd is expected today
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as the tour of britain cycling race reaches worcestershire, with a 9—mile individual time trial in pershore. there were plenty watching stage five in the wirral, as italy's matteo trentin retook the overall lead, finishing third behind stage winner, dutchman dylan groenewegan. women's super league champions arsenal are back in champions league action tonight for the first time in five years. they're the only english side to win the competition, and they travel to italy to face fiorentina in the first leg of their knockout tie. manchester city take on swiss side lugano later, but last night, hibernian were comfortably beaten by slavia prague in the first leg of their tie. hibs had actually gone ahead early on, but they eventually lost a—1. glasgow city beat chertanovo 1—nil. --1-0. premier league champions manchester city have announced a sculpture of former captain vincent kompany will be built outside their stadium. the club revealed the plans before
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the belgian's testimonial game last night. they have also renamed a road in their training complex after the defender who left at the end of last season to become player—manager at anderlecht. on the pitch, a manchester city legends side took on a team of premier league all stars, mostly made up of manchester legends, all to raise money for kompany‘s homeless charity. it ended in a 2—2 draw. kompany is injured, so he couldn't play, but there were many more legends in action. delighted to be asked really. so many players turned out for him, that shows how highly regarded he is in the circle of football. players are big competitors, lots of manchester united players playing as well stop a good turnout for him, thoroughly reserved and a lot of money will be raised. such a great champion charity, vincent kompany does so much for the charity, a
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manchester —based charity, and he did so much when he was playing. he's doing it with the mayor of manchester. incredible. 51,000 at that match last night stop huge amount of support. lovely. thank you -- 51,000 at that amount of support. lovely. thank you —— 51,000 at that match last night. huge amount of support. many of us will be affected by cancer in our lives. here in the uk, survival rates are on the up but we're still lagging behind other wealthy countries. progress is being made with advances in treatment and surgery, but cancer research uk believes it could improve further. let's speak to sara hiom from the charity. thanks for your time this morning. where do we set relative to other developed nations? this study has shown unfortunately the uk is still lagging behind the other developed countries that we compared ourselves to, such as australia, canada and denmark. this is across seven different cancers we looked at. lung
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cancer, pancreatic cancer and oesophageal cancer, cancers we know are hard to treat and difficult to detect, and therefore have lower survival rates. unfortunately when we look at one—year and five—year survival, britain is near the bottom of the table. looking at australia, someone of the table. looking at australia, someone with cancer in australia and someone someone with cancer in australia and someone in the uk, what is happening thatis someone in the uk, what is happening that is different with the treatment and diagnosis? it's important to stress firstly that the uk treats cancer patients as well as anywhere in the world, but fundamentally the problem is we are under resourced in terms of diagnostic staffing in particular and late diagnosis is therefore a particular problem for us in the uk. u nless we particular problem for us in the uk. unless we can diagnose people at the earliest possible stage, they aren't able to make the best... have the best access to good cancer care.
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this is by far and away the biggest problem we need to address in the uk. it's also important to stress survival rates have improved significantly over the time period, it's just we have a long way to go to catch up with the best. the government is quick to point out the survival rates are improving and are the best ever in the uk. on the issue of the late diagnosis, we co nsta ntly issue of the late diagnosis, we constantly talk about people presenting themselves and try to make sure they get early diagnosis. this isn't to do with people coming forward , this isn't to do with people coming forward, more to do with the resources , forward, more to do with the resources, is that what you're suggesting? well, it's an issue across the whole pathway. it is partly a problem with people coming forward. our uptake of screening programmes, for example, isn't as high as it might be an screening will detect cancers at the earliest possible stage but it's partly a problem of people coming forward. it's also very much a problem of an
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understaffed nhs who is struggling to diagnose people and be able to do the diagnostic tests necessary. we know we don't have enough radiologists, we don't have enough endoscopy, and we don't have enough pathologists that read the test, so we have something of a bottleneck in the nhs to get people through the system and this can make our gps slightly reluctant to refer at the earliest possible opportunity when there's this bottleneck in the system. people will be mindful at the moment, the government is suggesting more money going into the nhs... are you seeing anything that might change in the nearfuture in relation to the issues you're talking about? yes, there is real hope, and! talking about? yes, there is real hope, and i think it's important to reflect that what is really significant at the moment is that the nhs and the government are really recognising this issue of late diagnosis we have in the uk and are absolutely determined to address it. we have a fantastic ambition in the nhs's long—term plan of
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achieving three and four people being diagnosed at an early stage within the next ten years. so that's fantastic to an cr uk is working very closely with the nhs to help support that ambition. the ambitions for cancer survival are also great. we wa nt for cancer survival are also great. we want to see 55,000 extra people surviving their cancers for five yea rs or surviving their cancers for five years or more in that ten year period. and everything is set up to be able to do that. we have the innovations, we have the fantastic staff, we just don't have enough of them, which is why cancer research uk has been calling on government to invest in a fully funded costed plan for the long—term for staff in the nhs. sara hiom, thank you very much your time this morning. sara hiom from cancer research uk. the department of health says cancer survival rates, as you just heard, are ata survival rates, as you just heard, are at a record high but they want to go further and save even more lives. matt taylor is in little venice in london for us this morning.
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we sent you there because we are hoping it might be a nice weekend. good morning. good morning. nota bad good morning. not a bad weekend in store for quite a few but it's been a week where we've seen tropical activity come our way. good morning from little venice. a stone throwaway from paddington station, a beautiful oasis of calm here. a bit of dispute over where the name came from, little venice. lord byron was credited with it but robert browning, the famous poet, claims to give the area its name. either way it isa give the area its name. either way it is a beautiful start with those quys it is a beautiful start with those guys overhead. for some it will stay roughly like that through the day but a day of contrast —— blue skies. ex—tropical activity coming our way, this time in the form of tropical storm gabrielle. what's happening with the ex—tropical storm coming our way? bringing humid and warm air, not a chilly start but wet conditions in
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parts of scotland and northern ireland in particular. if we see the big picture across the uk at the moment because the pressure chart you can see that in scotla nd pressure chart you can see that in scotland and northern ireland, that is what is producing the rain. the further south and east you are away from that, you have to sunshine. so, this rain at times across scotland and western ireland, they will come and western ireland, they will come and go really through this morning. easing off a little bit and brightening up, but it doesn't mean parts of northern england, northern west well will turn increasingly damp throughout the day, a bit easy, but nothing desperately strong as far as winds are concerned —— a bit breezy. to the east you will see spells lifting temperatures to about 2a- 25 spells lifting temperatures to about 2a— 25 degrees, and to scotland and northern ireland, a more pleasant entered the day with temperatures in the mid—teens as very best —— and to the mid—teens as very best —— and to the day. a fairly damp night, all of
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that confined to southernmost counties tomorrow morning, clear skies developing elsewhere. a few mist and fog patches are possible into friday's rush—hour and it will be equal start. cooler than this morning, temperatures down into single figures. a mild and muggy start for southern counties of england tomorrow morning but here there will be some overcast skies and some light rain and drizzle around, that were mostly clear and we will have a dry day. so good, long sunny spells as well and even if it isn't as humid as today, it will feel strong in that september sunshine. levels at what they should be for this time of the year, 16— 21 celsius. and that continues into the weekend, northern england, southern wales enjoys the best weather, there isa wales enjoys the best weather, there is a chance of some rain in the forecast, particularly for scotland, but overall it is a weekend to get out and about. why not enjoy places
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where you are much like this? back to charlie and louise. lovely day, thank you matt. ben said there was a lovely little tea shop around there? there is a little tea shop in a boat, it is moored, it is really lovely. and you are going to take us to the high street? yes, very different. we've talked about this a lot, but just what is the best way to revive our high streets? this is a report from the centre for cities with nationwide, and its findings are quite different to what's been suggested before. theirfindings are quite their findings are quite different. rather than blaming the usual culprits, the internet and business taxes, it says the answer is creating more jobs in all sorts
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of different industries in town centres to boost the number of local shoppers. this is what they told us. the decline of high street is usually blamed on online retail or on the tax system. but what our evidence is showing in its report is actually there is a more fundamental reason and that is this lack of spending power. the reason we know that is because when we look at different high street is up and down the country, some are actually doing quite well at the country, so to go to cambridge city centre or brighton city centre, only 7% of the high street is empty, and places like newport and wales, a quarter of the high street is empty. and the fact that some places are doing well means despite online shopping and you can buy anything online and the business rate system, the high street can survive. that tells us there is something going on as well. obviously online shopping is still changing the high street and is making it adapt, but if you have a
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knife spending power and footfall in those places, you can withstand those changes. it is a really common sense approach. if you put people into a place, they have two buy things. —— they have to. that's quite different to what the government's already trying. it's created a £1 billion fund to regenerate 100 town centres. other plans suggest opening more offices, doctors surgeries, libraries and other community facilities on high streets, rather thanjust relying on retail and shops, but what about the firms that are already there? this firm isjust this firm is just saying this firm isjust saying get people there, and if they are there, they will probably pick something up on the way home from work. so many retailers are pulling back from the high street. mike ashley, the controversial boss of sports direct and house of fraser has been snapping up firms, last month he bought jack wills for £13 million. and says he thinks there's a strong future for the high street if it adapts to changing habits. here's been speaking to our retail
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correspondent emma simpson about what happens next. i like to think things like jack wills are going to be mega, that is what i like to think. buying all these distressed assets when other retailers are retreating, you are piling in while others are piling out. i don't think you see next piling out. i don't think you see primark piling out. i don't think you see tk maxx piling out. i think you will see it's a lot, lot smaller pool, a lot smaller pond but the fish are going to be enormous and i want to be one of those enormous fish. i believe in bricks, i'm not a clicks man, i was not born in the clicks man, i was not born in the clicks area, i believe in bricks.
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please go to leicester, elevation and delivering the right thing for the brand could do it. a rare interview with the head of sports iraq. —— direct. i think with more and more retailers pushing on towards online, he is still very confident about the state of the high street. thanks for your perspective. it 6:51am. -- it is. being in a loving relationship is something that enriches many people's lives. for those with learning disabilities, finding that special someone can be challenging. earlier this year, care providers were given guidance on how to best support them to find love. this programme has heard calls for this to become mandatory and workers should be properly trained to support people in their search for a meaningful relationship, as brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. he was joanne's first love. this is
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lou. he's handsome. they ran 10k is together, but being together was never easy as lee stayed in a supported living care home with rules and a curfew. if i went around the house and visit, i wasn't allowed to stay. this photo was taken at a family wedding, the first and only night they spent together. this was taken two days later, the last ten kilometres they ran together, the next day, please rang joanne to say her fiance had died suddenly in his sleep. he passed away. but as his fiancee, you were never allowed to stay with him. no. that must break your heart looking back at the time you missed. that must break your heart looking back at the time you missedlj that must break your heart looking back at the time you missed. i know. so? it's wrong. you're entitled to a relationship. but there are so many barriers to relationships for people
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with learning disabilities. this date night is all about trying to smash through them. is my towbar. —— he is. i shouldn't have said that, but he's the best boyfriend i got in the world. and you and eileen have found what everyone here wants, love stopped joe is still looking. how is it going? amazing. butjoe's search is more difficult now that his support hours have been cut. you use to get 2a, but now only seven. support hours have been cut. you use to get 24, but now only seven. only seven hours a week? my goodness. that is a big job. i did miss my friends. because you can't see them? that is right. emma says she would love to find her prince, but she has been heard before. some people are... it is difficult to find someone you can are... it is difficult to find
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someone you can trust. many are risk averse because the risks can be great. it is a tricky situation, yeah. you've had training as denmark yeah! the last speaks volumes. really good training does exist in lancashire. you feel sad and frightened with your partner, do you think that is good or bad? this summer, the cqc released guidance for staff, but training isn't mandatory. a £1 million boost to social care was recently announced but council say it isn't enough. social care was recently announced but council say it isn't enoughlj couldn't live without him. and in the past i am told, is the opposite of what andrew and eileen have, baron lives lived without love and without hope. —— baron. baron lives lived without love and without hope. -- baron. they aren't lonely anymore and that's what bills people, being lonely —— kills people. so having a good relationship is important. it's everything. a's everything, yeah.
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very moving —— it's everything. very moving -- it's everything. it's so very moving -- it's everything. it's so important and we know from solid research loneliness kills. it has the same health impact as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. we also know from solid research, people with learning disabilities died 20 years earlier than the general population. the cqc is taking this increasingly seriously so that is why they have issued this new guidance. but i spoke to a group called supported loving and they said they wanted to go much further. listen to this — they told me a support worker has to have training, as do, in things like picking up a heavy box, in things like data protection, but something as important as helping somebody to
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understand what a relationship is, what a good relationship looks like. and to facilitate it, is simply left to chance. cqc gave me a statement saying supporting people to have a life, not just a saying supporting people to have a life, notjust a service, requires providers to consider all aspects of a person's needs including sexuality, relationships and sex. that is why we issue the guidance. they tell me that later this year they are going to publish a significant report into this subject, so watch this space. we don't know what's going to happen next. thank you, jane. it is a sensitive issue for everybody involved, so please get in touch if you like. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm sonja jessup. police say they'll call in extra officers to prevent any disruption caused by protestors who plan to fly drones near heathrow airport tomorrow. the climate change activist group
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heathrow pause want to use the devices within the no—fly zone as part of a campaign to halt the airport's planned expansion. police say they're confident that passengers will not be affected. a charity in hammersmith that works with young people at risk of going to prison says it's helping turn around their lives by working with horses. keyalife uses equine therapy to support vulnerable young people. they also try to help them find a job, work experience or further training. doing that because, what really stood out for me was being aware of how you're feeling, you know? and not acting off emotion, you know? which i've grown up doing, and it's gotten me into a lot of trouble. a relatively new london dialect is becoming increasingly popular with londoners under 25, that's acccording to an expert in dialects from the british library. it's been named multicultural london english, or mle, and can be heard all around the capital,
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but it's mostly heard in inner london. if you went back 30, a0 years ago, you might have been able to tell whether a speaker was a british asian speaker, a british caribbean speaker or a traditional london cockney speaker, if you like. nowadays, those kind of three types of speaker are speaking a relatively similar type of language, in some parts of london, young speakers. let's take a look at the travel situation now. it looks like the tube is running well so far, no reported problems this morning on any of those lines. on the roads, it's mostly works to tell you about, really. this is the piccadilly underpass which is closed westbound, knightsbridge is down to one lane westbound near wilton place. the north circular is getting busy. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning, it's quite an interesting day of weather today across the capital, it's going to be rather blustery
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there'll always be plenty of cloud but some bright and sunny spells throughout the day as well. it will feel rather humid, some very warm air around at the moment, in fact it's a very mild start of the morning. there will be some early—morning brightness around, some spells of sunshine, but the cloud is never too far away today, perhaps a few spots of drizzle and thickness at times but mostly a dry day. as we head to the afternoon, top temperatures of 23 or 2a celsius in the best of any sunshine but all the while we have a brisk westerly wind blowing. through this evening the cloud will thicken and then we will start to see the spots of rainjust push down on the weather front from the north—west, that is a cold front and will clear its way south—east eastwards into tomorrow morning. tonight was a temperature still 12—13 degrees towards northern home counties otherwise a very mild night to come, we'll see lots of sunshine develop tomorrow. but a fresher feel to things, more sunshine and warming up over the weekend. that's it for now. there's more from me in around half—an—hour. tthere's plenty more news,
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travel and weather on our website at the usual address. (tx sting) good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. our headlines today: riots, shortages of medicine and rising food prices — the government publishes its worst—case scenario for a no—deal brexit. cancer survival rates in the uk are improving, but they still lag behind other rich countries. saving the high street — another new report suggests radical changes to the way our town and city centres are run. i'll look at whether it really
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can make a difference. england drop batsman jason roy for the final ashes test, which starts this morning. after failing to regain the urn, they say they're already planning for the future. finding love isn't easy, but if you have a learning difficulty, it can be almost impossible. campaigners are calling for more support to give everyone the chance of building a loving relationship. that's what kills people, it's being lonely. so having a good relationship, it's important. i've found a little oasis of calm in central london. little venice in central london. humid today and rain in scotland and northern ireland, but the further south and used you are, it's going to be dry and warm. i'll have your full forecast on breakfast. good morning. it's thursday the 12th of september. our top story:
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less fresh food, an increase in prices and the chance of riots — examples of the kind of disruption the uk could face in the event of a no—deal brexit. the government has given into pressure from mps and published details of operation yellowhammer. the papers set out contingency plans for what the government calls a reasonable worse—case scenario, based on the assumptions of theresa may's administration. chris mason reports. parliament forced the government to publish this document which, until now, was categorised as "official, sensitive". ministers insist it's not a prediction but what they call a reasonable worst—case scenario, a deliberately stretching context to ensure that we are prepared, and they insist we are now vastly better prepared. but make no mistake, this is stark stuff. certain types of fresh food supply will decrease, it says, which will cut choice and put up prices. it also suggests there could be riots. protests a nd cou nter— protests will take place across the uk, it says.
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lorries could have to wait more than two days to cross the channel. passengers could be delayed on the eurostar at st pancras in london. some businesses will go bust. there'll be a growth in the black—market. some providers of adult social care could fail because it says the sector is already fragile and there could be an increase in staff and supply costs. it is extraordinary that these are consequences that could flow from the government's own policy. normally when you're protecting against something like this, it's natural disaster, the action of others you don't control. it is government policy if no agreement is reached with the eu to inflict a no—deal brexit, and this is what the government says could happen. the document does, though, say demand for energy will be met, and there'll be no disruption to electricity or gas supplies. the key thing now is the extent
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to which this shapes or changes public attitudes to the prospect of a no—deal brexit. chris mason, bbc news. let's get more on this now with our political correspondent jessica parker, who is in westminster this morning. jasika, so, we are all trying to absorb some of the details of yellowhammer and the implications of that. meanwhile, of course, trying to deal with the implications of the ruling in the scottish court over the suspension of parliament. there's an awful lot going on. it's important to point out with the yellowhammer documents, what's in them was more or less leaked to the sunday times last month but there's more to them now when they are on the government website. the government has blocked the release of something else requested, communications between downing street aides around the reasons for
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the prorogation of parliament and cabinet minister michael gove said that was inappropriate and disproportionate. what's been published with the yellowhammer documents, it will be an for those in westminster arguing against no deal and those arguing as well that parliament should be recalled. of course that's relevant, isn't it, after the court of session ‘s in scotla nd after the court of session ‘s in scotland yesterday ruled the prorogation of parliament was unlawful. the government will suggest these documents aren't up to date, mitigations have been put in place and updated plans will be available soon. but this puts more pleasure matt prodger en boris johnson and makes his do or die pledge harder to deliver —— puts more pressure on borisjohnson and makes his do or die pledge harder to deliver. new figures show cancer survival rates in the uk are improving but still remain below
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those of other wealthy countries. a study in lancet oncology found rates were worse than australia, canada, denmark, ireland, new zealand and norway. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. for some years now, the uk has lagged behind other developed countries when it comes to treating cancer. the gap is closing, with definite signs of improvement. but the latest research shows there is no room for complacency. we don't have enough radiologists, endoscopist and pathologists that read the test, so we have somewhat ofa read the test, so we have somewhat of a bottleneck in the nhs to get people through the system and this can make ourgps people through the system and this can make our gps somewhat more relu cta nt to can make our gps somewhat more reluctant to refer at the earliest possible opportunity when there is this bottleneck in the system. the latest data looks and survival rapes for seven of the most common cancers in seven high—income countries with similar healthcare systems. the uk was at the foot of the league in five of the seven cancers, including pancreatic cancer, with less than 8% survived five—year,s after diagnosis. in australia, the five—year, survival rape was close to 15%.
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the government points to significant increases in survival rates over the past 20 years. faster diagnosis and swifter treatment are the key to better results. cancer charities say to achieve that, more staff specialising in cancer care are needed right across the nhs. dominic hughes, bbc news. police are continuing to question a 22—year—old man following the death of baby boy who was pulled out of a river in greater manchester yesterday. the boy, believed to be almost 12 months old, was recovered from the water by firefighters who attended the scene but died later in hospital. our reporter, yunus mulla, has this report. flowers have been left here and candles have been lit after what officers describe as an incredibly tragic incident in which an innocent baby boy has died. officers were called here along with emergency services
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after reports of a child was in the water. that baby boy, said to be around 12 months old, was taken to hospital in a critical condition but later died in hospital. now, we don't know for sure how that baby ended up in the water. detectives say they've launched a murder investigation. they are supporting the baby boy's family at this unimaginably difficult time. a 22—year—old man was arrested at the scene. he remains in police custody for questioning on suspicion of murder. the police say they are keen to hear from anyone who might have that vital piece of information that could help them with their investigation. the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes could be stabilising, or even falling, according to a new study. the research, lead by the baker heart and diabetes institute in melbourne, is based on data from a7 countries dating back to the mid 1960s. but diabetes uk said there are still challenges with obesity and unhealthy lifestyles which are both linked to the condition.
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let's talk about something we haven't mentioned yet. despite an increase in allegations of rape, the number of people prosecuted and convicted in england and wales is on the decline. women's justice groups say crown prosecution service lawyers have altered their approach to rape, from building cases to screening them out if they believe a jury won't convict. the cps denies this. let's talk about this in more detail with rebecca hall, a volunteer with the support organisation trafford rape crisis. good morning and thank you so much for joining good morning and thank you so much forjoining us. the figures are really stark, 1.5% of rapes reported to police in england and wales led to police in england and wales led toa to police in england and wales led to a charge or summons. that's home office data. what do you see? those figures aren't surprising, that's a trend we've seen over the last 12—18 months, these numbers are at a record low since records began. the cps is failing to deliverjustice
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for victims. shocking. to put that into context encase people get confused by statistics, the 1.5% of rapes reported to police leading to a charge compares with the previous figure of 1a%, which was just three yea rs figure of 1a%, which was just three years ago. something dramatic is changing. yeah, absolutely. what we wa nt to changing. yeah, absolutely. what we want to know is exactly what. there's a review in progress at the moment and we need to find out exactly why the cps is failing to ta ke exactly why the cps is failing to take these cases forward, why the police are failing to put charges forward to the cps. these victims need justice that's not being delivered to them. in the work you do, are you seeing the same number of women coming forward in the first instance, possibly when you first see them? we see women at all stages of the coping or aftermath of the trauma. it can be years afterwards. actually the majority of women who come forward to us choose not to
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report and by the government's own admission only 20% actually report. despite the increase, which we do welcome, it isn't a true representation of what's happening. there must be so many reasons but what are some of the main reasons for women not reporting? there are an abundance really. it's a very complex crime. these women undergo obviously a significant trauma but then being asked to relive that trauma when they report, to convince a police officer firstly. trauma when they report, to convince a police officerfirstly. they trauma when they report, to convince a police officer firstly. they are being asked to hand over their phones to acquire digital evidence. that can be really stressful for someone. that can be really stressful for someone. it is another privacy violation for them. then they have to ta ke violation for them. then they have to take that case to court and many fear they won't be believed, they don't want to relive the trauma. just a very traumatic experience. lots of people looking from the outside might think because of different cases with the police and the cps, there's more sensitivity around issues. it could be to do
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with child sex offences, for example, but also you might think by now around rape. overall there might have been a more sensitive approach which might have had an impact stop we are not seeing that, to be honest with you. these crimes are highly complex and every person dealing with them need special training. first—line officers who are dealing with these reports don't have the right experience to process these claims and lots of women aren't getting the support they need through the process. you are hearing nightmare stories of that first encounter when you try to get help? yeah, absolutely. i've actually spoken to someone on the helpline who tried to take their case forward to the police and found the process to the police and found the process to traumatic. she withdrew her claim —— too traumatic to. it wasn't continued as a result. —— two to ——
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too traumatic. people might say when you hear those stark figures, why report it? but it's important, isn't it? we welcome the police putting their trust in the police in the light of things like the #metoo movement, but these figures will deter women from coming forward. it will take us back to a really stark place where people are too afraid to own what's happened to them. the home office has responded saying they are extremely concerned by the figures, victims of rape need better and work needs to be done across the system and they have said the government has increased funding by £85 million over the next two years for the cps. they will look at more action needed after a review of the system. is there any optimism for you that that might make a difference? it seems a little too little -- difference? it seems a little too little —— a little too —— to little, too late. it is shocking. we need an
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in—depth review of whether trial by jury in—depth review of whether trial by jury is appropriate for this kind of complex crime, we need more training for frontline and first support officers and support for the victims at every stage of the process. rebecca hall from the trafford rape crisis, thank you. now we are going outside to the rather beautiful surroundings of little venice in london. the canal network there. some might not be familiar with it but it is beautiful, isn't it? it is hard to believe we are just two miles away from piccadilly circus and just walk up the regent's canal, that is where you got london zoo, two miles away, and then towards camden lite. good morning. it isa towards camden lite. good morning. it is a beautiful site this morning. here is where two canals meet. it is looked after the canals and river
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trust, if you want to escape the hustle and bustle, where better to head off to? and there are many sites like this up and down the country to be enjoyed this morning. you will be enjoying it in the sunshine, some of you in the rain, but it shouldn't be too bad at all, should it? let's take a look at the forecast. just about wherever you are, afairly forecast. just about wherever you are, a fairly humid start to thursday morning, but while we've got some dry and sunny shower south and east, there will be some outbreaks of rain. you can see on the weather chart, just pushing down because parts of northern scotland and northern ireland, these are re m na nts of and northern ireland, these are remnants of tropical storm barry gabriel, it has dragged up some tropical storm area, and you can see the odd heavier burst, although most of it light and patchy will push its way to northern wales in the
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afternoon. we continue with some sunny spells towards the south and east of england but overall cloudy overall compared this morning. the wind strength not as strong as yesterday and a contrast in temperatures. it could reach 2a — 25 degrees in the south—east corner, 13-1a in degrees in the south—east corner, 13—1a in the north—west of scotland. that pressure moves south—west words. —— westwards. with clear skies developing further north, lighter winds, as you can see, the temperatures will be on the chilly side. we could be talking about two or three degrees in some rural areas to start friday morning. and a bit overcast a cross to start friday morning. and a bit overcast across southern counties of england and the channel islands, but you will bejoining england and the channel islands, but you will be joining the rest of the country with those good, sunny spells later in the day. for most it would be a fine friday, lots of sunshine. not as humid as today, but
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it will feel pleasant in the sunshine nonetheless. temperatures ending this week, claiming, plenty of sunshine for england and wales, especially on saturday. a bit more on saturday with some outbreaks in the north, that will add southwards into sunday. not a huge amount of rain around, if you do have any outdoor plans, you are going to be able to make the most of them. back to you. sounds lovely, thank you very much. hello, ben. i've done my usual thing of condensing ao very much. hello, ben. i've done my usual thing of condensing 40 pages of that into a post—it note. we've got the waitress supermarket bit and the high street department stores bed. and a sort of familiar tail —— bit, the high street bit is widening
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its losses to £35 million. that's because of all these familiar beings, the high street is really struggling, more people shopping online and in john struggling, more people shopping online and injohn lewis' case, it's when people make touch, feel, try, look at all of this stuff and then go and buy it somewhere else and they're really contending with that when they are paying the overheads for these big stores. but the supermarket side is doing pretty well, profits rising 6.8% coming in at £100 million. so a real divide opening up because it seems we are still prepared to go in and buy food, and in some cases a bit more expensive, people are prepared to fork out for that. so clothing, homewares, electronics, all that stuff, sails down nearly by 2%. the
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boss blaming that tough outlook, seeing conditions remain difficult on the high street. and we will talk bit more about this in the next half— hour, looking at the bit more about this in the next half—hour, looking at the impact on retailers. there is one impact on breathing new life into the high streets, what can be done and the likes ofjohn lewis are likely to play an important role in that given their role in big town centres. and operation yellowhammer, the brexit scenario possibilities, those are focused on fresh food prices, it is a political issue right now, a very real issue. and also one of those things were all told during the campaign that there will be no shortage of anything. but the reality is this is where the current point comes in, it isn't about retailers, they say they will provide what they can. perishable item cues can only stay in the port
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so item cues can only stay in the port so long. we're so to open borders and that is how all of the supermarkets are set up, i visited a number of firms who said they could put their audience by two or 3pm one day and arrives 8am next morning. so inevitably, whatever your politics, if there is a delay at the border, that means that might take longer to come in. ben, thank you very much. we will talk a little bit more about yellowhammer now. this is all about the implications of what if we were ina no the implications of what if we were in a no deal the documents were published overnight. let's speak to andy mcdonald. the government same time and time again this morning, the government should always pay for a worst—case scenario. michael gove says this is neither an impact assessment or a prediction of what would be to happen. would you like them to be planning for it, though? we have to
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know what it truly is because we we re know what it truly is because we were told in august it was a baseline assessment. we are now told this is a reasonable worst—case. i hate to think what a worst case would look like. this is going to be devastating. if those trucks are trapped for 2.5 days, addison's and perishable goods and goods for our manufacturing base will be absolutely disrupted —— medicines. this is a catastrophic failure of our economy if this comes to fruition. and for borisjohnson to try and keep this information from us try and keep this information from us in the first instance, but to deliberately crush the ships on the rock —— this ship on the rocks is absolutely beyond imagination. he wa nts to absolutely beyond imagination. he wants to discount this, say it isn't releva nt, wants to discount this, say it isn't relevant, it came from the government. we take this enormously seriously and you can't keep discounting these messages, you can't keep denigrating and denouncing judges and the rule of law. this is serious stuff, and in a
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really difficult situation as a country at the moment. you said yourself if, yourself if, and if, isn't it, the prime minister keeps saying over and over again he is trying to get a deal? but he is doing absolutely nothing to get a deal. and we do know that this is the consequence of no deal. and all the consequence of no deal. and all the effort, amber rudd tells us all the effort, amber rudd tells us all the energy is going into no—deal brexit and, nothing is going towards planning for a deal that would obviate these risks. so this is recklessness in the extreme and we have to recall parliament to examine these documents that we —— they wa nted these documents that we —— they wanted to hide from us and reconvene the parliament on the basis that the prorogation was illegal. that will go to the supreme court. tell us a little bit, if you could about what labour's position is. we might have
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to make this personal because it seems confused. tom watson asking for a referendum before an election, where do you stand on that? well, thatis where do you stand on that? well, that is tom's personal view. that is not the view of the labour party. we have said we wanted to stop no deal in the first instance, secure that extension as we described, if we get toa extension as we described, if we get to a general election, then we can make that offer of a referendum after a general election. so i'm afraid that is our position and not as described by tom. if they were to bea as described by tom. if they were to be a referendum, he is asking for the labour party to have remain, that should be policy, what is your view? my view, i voted to remain. i think remain as the better option. but the reality is there was a vote to leave and we can't simply dismiss that. so it is eminently sensible if
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the people are going to decide the outcome, that we negotiate a credible deal that would protect some of ourjobs, protect our economy and the remain option is the alternative. my personal preference would be to remain because i don't think we can improve upon that. but if the british people decide they still want to leave, they should do it in still want to leave, they should do itina still want to leave, they should do it in a way that mitigates the damage that would be caused. and that's in the interest of the uk and of the european union. so it is eminently sensible that we try to thrash that out to protect our economy. let me talk about how this plays in your constituency, they voted to leave, didn't they? aren't they frustrated? clearly, people did vote to leave in that proportion in my constituency, but here on teesside, we are heavily dependent on the chemicals processing industry and we know that if we crush out without a deal, that puts that industry in jeopardy and we would probably lose in the order of 50,000 jobs, talking about damage to the
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pharmaceutical industry and to automotive is. so my responsibility is to speak up for the economic interests of my constituents —— of motives. and pointing out the dangers of a no—deal brexit and it seems to me that the mood is changing, people are aware of these dangers and the really so these secret documents or documents that have been try to be kept secret, away from public eyes really reinforce the point that the dangers are immense. this is more like emergency planning for war or a natural disaster, and we're doing this voluntarily and boris johnson is crossing the ship against the rocks. boris johnson is crossing the ship against the rocks. borisjohnson will have a lifeboat, but the working people will not. i can see you are having some issues withjob will not. i can see you are having some issues with job earpiece. will not. i can see you are having some issues withjob earpiece. a yougov poll last week said 13% for the conservatives and i can see you know the poll, 23% to labour, it isn't moving in your direction. well, i think once we get to that
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general election and we set the brexit conundrum in the context of the wider malaise which has been caused by the tory government, inflicting austerity on communities like mine, if we set out and get the opportunity as we will, because we will have equal coverage, we will be able to get that message across and we will have the response to the crisis in our public services and the lack of investment in our industries and that imbalance in our economy. we will lay that out and i'm extremely confident that we will secure a majority when that general election comes. of course, i'm reminding you that it's three weeks to go before the last general election, we were 2a points behind in the polls and we brother to neck and neck. just briefly. the work we have been doing will resonate when the election comes. with many members of your party, when are you going to vote for a general election because you've already voted to
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refuse one place? when we got this no deal is you nailed and we get to sing with us and we got that timetable set up —— get that nailed — and we have that timetable set up, we expect the prime minister to abide by the law and we don't trust him an inch and we have to make sure when we get to the european council that he is negotiating that extension as he is mandated to do. at that time we will move onto coal a general election. thank you for your time on breakfast this morning. speaking to ben wallace, he sits on boris johnson's cabinet, we speaking to ben wallace, he sits on borisjohnson's cabinet, we will be finding out some of his thoughts in about an hour's time. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm sonja jessup. police say they'll call in extra
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officers to prevent any disruption caused by protestors who plan to fly drones near heathrow airport tomorrow. the climate change activist group heathrow pause want to use the devices within the no—fly zone as part of a campaign to halt the airport's planned expansion. police say they're confident that passengers will not be affected. a charity in hammersmith that works with young people at risk of going to prison says it's helping turn around their lives by working with horses. keyalife uses equine therapy to support vulnerable young people. they also try to help them find a job, work experience or further training. doing that course, what really stood out for me was being aware of how you're feeling, you know? and not acting off emotion, you know? which i've grown up, you know, doing, and it's gotten me, you know, into a lot of trouble.
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a relatively new london dialect is becoming increasingly popular with londoners under 25. that's acccording to an expert in dialects from the british library. it's been named multicultural london english, or mle, and can be heard mostly in inner london if you went back 30, a0 years ago, you might have been able to tell whether a speaker was a british asian speaker, a british caribbean speaker or a traditional london cockney speaker, if you like. nowadays, those kind of three types of speaker are speaking a relatively similar type of language, in some parts of london, young speakers. let's take a look at the travel situation now. we have minor delays eastbound on the central line. that on the central line. is due to a signal failure. now we've got some long queues on the ma. there's been an accident and the motorway‘s partly blocked westbound just before junction 6 for slough. it's slow back to the m25. and some roadworks to be aware of. this is the piccadilly underpass, which is closed westbound. knightsbridge is down to one lane westbound near wilton place. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini.
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hello, good morning, it's quite an interesting day of weather today across the capital, it's going to be rather blustery, there'll always be plenty of cloud but some bright and sunny spells throughout the day as well. and it will feel rather humid, some very warm air around at the moment. in fact, it's a very mild start of the morning. there will be some early—morning brightness around, some spells of sunshine, but the cloud is never too far away today, perhaps a few spots of drizzle and thickness at times but otherwise a dry day. as we head to the afternoon, top temperatures of 23 or 2a celsius in the best of any sunshine but all the while we have a brisk westerly wind blowing. through this evening the cloud will thicken and then we will start to see the spots of rain just push down on the weather front from the north—west, that is a cold front and it will clear its way south—east, eastwards into tomorrow morning. tonight was a temperature still 12—13 degrees towards northern home counties otherwise
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a very mild night to come, we'll see lots of sunshine develop tomorrow. but a fresher feel to things, more sunshine and warming up over the weekend. that's it for now. there's more from me in around half—an—hour. now, it's back to charlie and lousie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: less fresh food, an increase in prices and the chance of riots — examples of the kind of disruption the uk could face in the event of a no—deal brexit. the government has given into pressure from mps and published details of operation yellowhammer. the papers set out contingency plans for what the government calls a reasonable worse—case scenario. shadow brexit secretary kier starmer is calling on parliament to be immediately recalled so that mps can scrutinise the documents and block no—deal. let's discuss this in more detail with our brussels reporter, adam fleming. the eu commission's michel barnier is briefing officials later. what can we expect?
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hi, charlie. where at the european parliament in brussels and michel barnier, the eu chief negotiator, is spending a couple of days speaking to senior members of the european parliament and he will speak to the conference of residents today, the leaders of the big little groups of the political parties in europe and today they will discuss the fact meps have come up with a new motion, resolution on their latest thinking on the brexit process, which they will debate and vote on when they go to strasbourg for their official sitting next week. today's meeting is to give the go—ahead to that. michel barnier will be updating meps on where he thinks the talks have got to. those talks happening between the uk goes the 80s and the eu but not today. the british negotiator, a chap called david frost, was here today ——
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negotiations. with been given a clue about what he's discussing. stuff on the backup plan to the irish backstop. yesterday they were talking about streamlining customs and how could you handle that situation for goods where there's different rules in northern ireland and ireland. but it all seems quite general and the eu is still waiting for detailed, specific written proposals. new figures show cancer survival rates in the uk are improving but still remain below those of other wealthy countries. a study in lancet oncology found rates were worse than australia, canada, denmark, ireland, new zealand and norway, which have similar healthcare systems. the government says cancer survival rates are at a record high. a man's been arrested on suspicion of murder after a baby boy died hours after being pulled from a river in greater manchester. the boy, thought to be almost a year old, was recovered from the water by firefighters in radcliffe. officers said it was not clear how the boy came to be in the water. there are calls for video game
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companies to protect young people from becoming addicted to their products. mps are recommending that a gaming feature known as loot boxes, where players pay cash for the chance of winning virtual goods, should not be sold to children. the industry's uk trade body said it would review these recommendations with utmost seriousness. those are the main stories. the weather is coming up in a little while. holly is here to tell us about the sport. the fifth and final ashes testis sport. the fifth and final ashes test is here, hard to believe. a bit ofan test is here, hard to believe. a bit of an anti—climax, we know england can't win the ashes after losing the fourth test at old trafford last week but they can still level the series and the captain, joe root, behind you, is quite optimistic. they did win the world cup earlier this year so it's been a good summer
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all round. the fifth and final ashes test gets underway in a few hours' time, at 11am, with a new—look england side hoping for the win that would level the series. sam curran and chris woakes come into the team for the match at the oval, with jason roy and craig overton dropped. and whatever the result, captainjoe root insists that after winning the world cup, this should be seen as a successful summer for england. to win the first 50—over world cup is a huge achievement for english cricket. absolutely should be seen as a successful year. but we've got a chance to level the series and make it a slightly better than it looks right now. so that's the full focus of the group. we've just got to make sure that we win this game. maisie summers—newton thanked her family for their support, after winning herfirst world pa ra—swimming title. she smashed her own world record to take gold in the 200m individual medley at the championships in london, adding to the two european titles she won last year. that was one of three golds for britain on the third day
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of competition, including a first title for louise fiddes in the 100m breaststroke. she set a new championship record. and alice tai took her third gold of the meet in the 100m butterfly, just holding off the 13—time paralympic champion jessica long. tai is set to compete in eight events this week. rory mcilroy has been named the golfer of the year by the american pga tour, beating world number one brooks koepka to the award. it's the third time that mcilroy has the taken the honour. this season, he won the players championship, the canadian open and the tour championship. women's super league champions arsenal are back in champions league action tonight for the first time in five years. they're the only english side to win the competition, and they travel to italy to face fiorentina in the first leg of their knockout tie.
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manchester city take on swiss side lugano later, but last night, hibernian were comfortably beaten by slavia prague in the first leg. hibs had actually gone ahead early on, but they eventually lost a—1. glasgow city beat chertanovo 1—0. following football can be a frustrating affair, and fans of fort william fc have endured the worst of times. but after 29 months without a win in the highland league, they beat clachnacuddin 1—0 last night. you can imagine the roar that greeted jack brown's goal. last month, they actually won a cup game after an agonising wait of 8a0 days just after a bbc scotland documentary aired about what was billed as britain's worst football tea m. so since that has gone to air, they have won a cup game and now their
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first—ever league game. huge result. the only way is up! that's the way to look at it, things are getting better all the time. definitely on the up, go on the fort! loot boxes, which allow gamers to buy mystery virtual items such as skins and weapons using real money, are the latest controversy to hit the video game industry. there are concerns that they encourage gambling. now mps want to ban children from buying them. in a moment, we'll speak to a gaming journalist along with a father and son affected by gambling. but first, here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. three quarters of 5 to 15—year—olds play online games, and mps say the companies behind them depend profits for their profits on keeping those players glued to their screens. they're calling on firms to protect players from the harm caused by excessive time and money spent on games. for video games in particular, there's been a big switch so that a lot of games people play
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are free to play but then you are encouraged to purchase things as you play the games. a particular concern is loot boxes, where players spend real money on virtual goods, such as packs of star footballers in fifa. one player told the committee they spent up to £1,000 a year on the game. the mps want loot boxes regulated under the gambling act, and say they shouldn't be sold to children where there's an element of chance involved. the mps say the companies behind games like fifa and fortnite hadn't even done any research into the potential harm they might cause. they said it was unacceptable that companies with millions of users, many of them children, should be so ill—equipped to discuss the impact of their products. but the games industry insists it hives responsibly. —— behaves. we want players to play safely, we want them to play in a balanced way. we provide technical settings, technical measures.
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we provide education, robust age ratings and guidance and information sources. the mps say e—sports, where games players compete in professional competitions, is a fast—growing business in the uk, but they call for the same duty of care to protect players as applies in other sports. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. adam and david bradford and bianca wrightjoin us now. particular interest for you because of the addiction to gambling and the concerns about the pathways in to that. let's speak to bianca right. good morning. good morning. give us a sense of the main concern, because some of this will be new, the notion of the principles of buying things with real money in a virtual world. explain it a bit for us. it's part ofa explain it a bit for us. it's part of a larger problem in terms of micro— transactions. when i was growing up, i boughta game, i paid
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my money and i the game and i was able to play it all. now you buy a game and there's transactions built into the game, or you get one for free within app purchases that require you to spend real money to progress in the game or get aesthetic elements like skins and so on. that means you are in entering a model where it is paid to win. the person with the credit card can buy the advantage and therefore do better in the game. it takes something away from the skill of the game but also it is easy for those micro— transactions to add up very quickly. the thing here the committee of mps are talking about is children should be banned from buying loot boxes. why do you think it's an issue? children aren't a lwa ys it's an issue? children aren't always aware of the value for money and they're always aware of the value for money and they‘ re not always aware of the value for money and they're not aware of the fact these transactions add up over time. a loot box or any micro— transaction can cost anything from 99p to £99
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and if you're buying those over and over again... certainly and if you're buying those over and overagain... certainly the and if you're buying those over and over again... certainly the way game mechanics work, people are encouraged to keep buying them to get what they want. if you have a loot box, for example, and you don't know what you're going to get, there's an element of surprise involved. you have odds of getting it but you don't know those odds. you will keep spending until you get what you want essentially. david, give us a sense, what you want essentially. david, give us a sense, you what you want essentially. david, give us a sense, you set up an organisation, safer online gambling group what's the connection between the gaming world and what people think of as more conventional gambling, which led to lots of financial problems for you ? absolutely. i suppose the experience of my problems overlays itself with taking a vision of what's happening now in the gaming industry, which is getting closer and closer to a gambling mindset. we recognised that
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there were parallels with my life and where gaming's going. it would end up in the same place. it's now a proving ground at the moment for would—be proving ground at the moment for would— be gamblers that proving ground at the moment for would—be gamblers that could get very much into the addictive cycle. to give people an impression, there was a point where you had £500,000 of gambling losses and you got in an enormous amount of trouble in relation to that, didn't you? yeah, and it's that kind of experience that i can look back from this position of relative calmness now and see where that's headed for young people. young people are less equipped to make the right decisions about financial and risk, which i called but others call chance. adam, talked briefly, you've talked on breakfast before about how it's had a massive impact on the whole of
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yourfamily, had a massive impact on the whole of your family, especially about these loot boxes. can it have a subtle influence or maybe a big influence on children particularly? a massive influence. in the last month we did some research on this as a group and we found children are becoming quite devastated when they don't get what they want out of these games because they want out of these games because the mechanics are very bright, very fast, very impulsive, and there's lots of pop—ups in the game. it's a very dangerous place for young people, and we call it a gateway to gambling. that's exactly what mps have called it this morning. there's umpteen opportunities for you to lose money on these games without knowing the chances of getting a better player or a better football team ora better player or a better football team or a better weapon. it's quite dangerous. those who play it regularly, you say lose money but they say spend money, it's part of they say spend money, it's part of the game. that's how it's set up.“ it was transparent, but i think what we've got here is a problem where if
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it's a gambling product, its regulated. you know it's a game of chance and that's available for people over 18 who have the financial literacy and a greater awareness of the world to know how to use that. but because we call this fun and a game, the videogame industry don't want to call it the thing. doctor bianco, over time, authorities have been wary of getting involved in the past? definitely. and we've seen game developers and publishers starting to regulate themselves. for example, the big players like console manufacturers, sony and microsoft, et cetera, have been looking at ensuring publishers indicate drop rates, so the chances of getting those big prizes. there's been pushback from users. games like star wa rs pushback from users. games like star wars battlefront, for example, there was a lot of user responses to that which then resulted during the testing phases in changing the gameplay. thank you very much. for those that don't know, skins
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are... ? very briefly? aesthetic elements that allow you to customise your character. ok, thank you very much indeed. we've got the industry uk trade body, interactive entertainment, said ina body, interactive entertainment, said in a statement that it puts the welfare of players first and vows to review the committee recommendations with the utmost serious. thank you. fresh air is always available and we can offer you a beautiful example of that this morning. look how lovely that this morning. look how lovely that is! good morning, yes, louise. we all need a bit of a calm starts of the morning, sometimes. certainly not this one here in little venice in central london, a beautiful scene behind me. this is where regent canal and behind me. this is where regent canaland grand behind me. this is where regent canal and grand union canal meat just to the north—west of the city centre. in fact, just two miles that way we have london zoo, a little
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gentle walk. and the island behind me is cold browning island. —— called. here claims to have penned the name little venice to which the area is now known. lots of sunshine this morning. cloud is now starting to increase but there is a lot more cloud elsewhere across the country today. you may have to wait a little bit longer before you see blue skies overhead for some of you, but let's ta ke overhead for some of you, but let's take a look at the forecast because we've got an ex— tropical store with us, it's not as scary as it sounds. we will have some windy conditions across the country but not as busy as we saw yesterday —— tropical storm. so it should be a warm and fairly humid day. you can see on the chart a cold front is pushing across northern ireland and northern scotland, and the west of england, too. it will continue to edge into england, north and west wales
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eventually. the further south and east you are you should stay dry. the sun is out, because it is ex— tropical weather with us, temperatures will peak at around 25, mid— 70s in fahrenheit. lightly fresh air in scotland, temperatures in the mid teens at best. a windy day, but nothing untoward. winds hitting around a0—50 miles an hour and gusts hitting northern parts later. we still do have lots of cloud around to begin with, rain and drizzle heads southwards across england and wales but then skies clearing for all. without happening we will see temperatures hold up in a fairly we will see temperatures hold up in afairly humid we will see temperatures hold up in a fairly humid 15— 16 degrees for some southern counties, whereas for all further north, dropping into single figures, a press start to your —— fresh start for your morning journey to work. the big exception
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will be the southernmost counties of england, and channel islands, they will start drizzly, drying up later. it will feel very pleasant, 16—21 on friday and that sets out nicely for the start of the weekend. plenty of sunshine on saturday, plenty of sunshine on saturday, plenty of sunshine two. we will see my cloud pushing across the northern half of the uk on sunday and then in the night, a bit on the cool side, but i reckon these days you really want to get out and enjoy them. thank you very much indeed, thank you. get out and enjoy them. thank you very much indeed, thank youm get out and enjoy them. thank you very much indeed, thank you. it is stunning down there, just beautiful. ben is looking atjohn lewis, figures out this morning and waitrose, those figures also out. it's interesting, up at lewis, but
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down at waitrose. yes, both of them down at waitrose. yes, both of them do make up the john lewis partnership but they acted like almost two different businesses. —— act. a loss of £35 million for the department store, but a profit of £100 million for the supermarket. retail expert kate hardcastle is here. good morning. hello. are willing to go in and buy food, but maybe not clothing and other stuff? there is so clothing and other stuff? there is so much going on. retail is certainly not for the fainthearted right now. consumers want more and you are making less money and they are expecting retail theatre on the floors, they want the stores to be exciting and innovative and we know john lewis tends to be a bit more of a vanilla, safe offer. they want products moving all the time, first things to look at and also we are buying less stuff. less material things. and other things you are talking about there is money, overheads just to have the stores open, on big expensive high streets.
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they are paying those costs before they have even sold anything. they are paying those costs before they have even sold anythingm their huge general stores as well, but we have been looking at fashion as well, looking in a lot of own brand, i would say that is a category a mistake. people have so much choice, so much competition, do they want a lot of brands they don't know much about or do they want to be wearing the latest, the best, when it comes to their fashion choices? what does it tell us about our shopping habits, we are still willing to pay a premium for food because waitrose is by no means the cheapest food retailer out there, but not willing to fork out for clothing and electronics and those sort of things? we are very changeable out shoppers —— as shoppers and you can't say that demographics apply unanimously. some people might treat themselves, some people might treat themselves, some people might treat themselves, some people might be saving. waitrose have been having a big push because
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they know marks & spencer going to push into the field. and there is a statement from charlie mayfield, chairman of the john lewis partnership, he says should the uk leave the year without a deal, we expect these effect to be significant —— the effect to be significant. that is quite remarkable, from the boss of one of our biggest retailers. it does highlight the supply chain issue. and at a time when they need to be delivering for customers. this is a big challenge for most businesses out there, they need to know how they can move faster not lower, and what they are looking at is a situation that will create delays. they can order stuff one day and haveit they can order stuff one day and have it the day after, and it is worth mentioning morrison, they are a supermarket, they are talking about improving relations with amazon, so having an online presence, but they really do sell themselves as a first retailer. what are they going to do? fresh is so
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important to morrison's. it's all about the pickups from the bakery and the need to make sure they're moving faster. the amazon partnerships arejust moving faster. the amazon partnerships are just that. they are ona partnerships are just that. they are on a fix and rebuild strategy at the moment, they are starting to get some traction, but the brexit process could cause more delays and make them less of an opportunity within the competition. it is interesting. just looking at the figures, sales bowling but pretty significantly —— following, perhaps a turnaround ? significantly —— following, perhaps a turnaround? customer choice is huge and they're using those choices wisely. eight, as always, thank you for talking us through that. kate ha rd castle for talking us through that. kate hardcastle talking us through that. we will talk more aboutjohn lewis after 8am, the two parts and that gap widening. that's all from you, and cue. —— all from me, thank you. being in a loving relationship is something that enriches many people's lives, for those with learning disabilities, finding that special
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someone can be challenging. earlier this year, care providers were given guidance on how to best support them to find love. this programme has heard calls for this to become mandatory, as brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. he was joanne's first love. this is lee. he's handsome. yeah. he loves running. they ran 10k is together, but being together was never easy as lee stayed in a supported living care home with rules and a curfew. if i went around the house and visit, i wasn't allowed to stay. you were never allowed to stay overnight? no. this photo was taken at a family wedding, the first and only night they spent together. this was taken two days later, the last ten kilometres they ran together. the next day, please rang joanne to say her fiance had died suddenly in his sleep. so the police needed to tell you he passed away. he passed away.
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but as his fiancee, you were never allowed to stay with him. no. that must break your heart looking back at the time you missed. i know. so? it's wrong. because you're entitled to a relationship. but there are so many barriers to relationships for people with learning disabilities. this date night is all about trying to smash through them. he's my towbar. i shouldn't have said that, but he's the best boyfriend i got in the world. andrew and eileen have found what everyone here wants, love. joe is still looking. how is it going? amazing. i'm loving it. butjoe's search is more difficult now that his support hours have been cut. you use to get 2a, but now only seven. only seven hours a week? oh, my goodness. that is a big drop. i do miss all my friends. because you can't see them?
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that is right. emma says she would love to find her prince, but she has been heard before. some people are... it's difficult to find someone to trust. yeah. many are risk averse because the risks can be great. it is a tricky situation, yeah. you've had training? yeah! the laugh speaks volumes. really good training does exist in lancashire. you feel sad and frightened with your partner, do you think that is good or bad? this summer, the cqc issued the first—ever guidance for staff, but training isn't mandatory. a £1 million boost to social care was recently welcomed but councils say it isn't enough. i couldn't live without him. and the past cost i am told, is the opposite of what andrew and eileen have, barren lives lived without love and without hope.
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to have a relationship, you aren't lonely anymore, and that's what kills people. being lonely. so having a good relationship is important. it's everything. it's everything, yeah! you can see those people working in the field have to balance the safety issues of, you know, actually, how do you make sure people are safe at the same time as giving them the freedom to have those relationships. jayne will bejoining freedom to have those relationships. jayne will be joining us freedom to have those relationships. jayne will bejoining us into freedom to have those relationships. jayne will be joining us into talk about those issues. —— is soon to talk. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm sonja jessup. police say they'll call in extra officers to prevent any disruption caused by protestors who plan to fly drones near heathrow airport tomorrow.
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the climate change activist group heathrow pause want to use the devices within the no—fly zone as part of a campaign to halt the airport's planned expansion. police say they're confident that passengers will not be affected. a charity in hammersmith that works with young people at risk of going to prison says it's helping turn around their lives by working with horses. keyalife uses equine therapy to support vulnerable young people. they also try to help them find a job, work experience or further training. going through the course, i think what really stood out for me was like, you know, being aware of how you're feeling, you know? and not acting off emotion, you know? which i've grown up, you know, doing, and it's gotten me into, you know, into a lot of trouble. a relatively new london dialect is becoming increasingly popular with londoners under 25, that's acccording to an expert in dialects from the british library. it's been named multi—cultural london english, or mle, and is mostly spoken by multi—lingual and multi—ethnic young people in inner london.
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if you went back 30, a0 years ago, you might have been able to tell whether a speaker was a british asian speaker, a british caribbean speaker or a traditional london cockney speaker, if you like. nowadays, those kind of three types of speaker are speaking a relatively similar type of language, in some parts of london, young speakers. let's take a look at the travel situation now. so minor delays eastbound on the central line. major problems on the ma. it's closed westbound atjunction 5 for langley after an accident. traffic's being diverted via the aa and a355, and those tailbacks are right back through the m25 interchange. and some roadworks to be aware of, the piccadilly underpass is closed westbound. knightsbridge is down to one lane westbound near wilton place. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning, it's quite an interesting day of weather today across the capital,
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it's going to be rather blustery, there'll always be plenty of cloud although some bright and sunny spells throughout the day as well. and it will feel rather humid, some very warm air around at the moment. in fact, it's a very mild start of the morning. there will be some early—morning brightness around, some spells of sunshine, but the cloud is never too far away today, perhaps a few spots of drizzle from the thickness of that at times but otherwise a dry day. as we head through the afternoon, top temperatures of 23 or 2a celsius in the best of any sunshine but all the while we have a brisk westerly wind blowing. through this evening the cloud will thicken and then we will start to see the spots of rain just push down on the weather front from the north—west, that is a cold front and it will clear its way south—eastwards into tomorrow morning. tonight's temperatures still 12—13 degrees towards northern home counties, otherwise a very mild night to come, we'll see lots of sunshine develop tomorrow. but a fresher feel to things,
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more sunshine and warming up over the weekend. that's it for now there's more from me in around half—an—hour. good morning, and welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. our headlines today: riots, shortages of medicine and rising food prices — the government publishes its ‘worst—case' scenario for a no—deal brexit. cancer survival rates in the uk are improving — but they still lag behind other rich countries. a tale of two firms. john lewis reports a loss, but its supermarket business waitrose bounces back. its boss warns of a significant impact of a no—deal brexit. england drop batsman jason roy for the final ashes test which starts this morning. after failing to regain the urn, they say they're already planning for the future. finding love isn't easy, but if you have a learning difficulty, it can be almost impossible. campaigners are calling for more
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support to give everyone the chance of building a loving relationship. that's what kills people, it's being lonely. so having a good relationship, it's important. i have found an oasis of calm in little venice in central london. it will be a breezy and humid day for many, but while some see rain, some will start with the sunshine and there is more to come tomorrow. good morning, it's thursday the 12th of september. our top story. less fresh food, an increase in prices and the chance of riots, examples of the kind of disruption the uk could face in the event of a no—deal brexit. the government has given into pressure from mps and published details of operation yellowhammer. the papers set out contingency plans for what the government calls "a reasonable worse—case scenario", based on the assumptions of theresa may's administration. chris mason reports. parliament forced the government
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to publish this document which, until now, was categorised as "official, sensitive". ministers insist it's not a prediction but what they call a reasonable worst—case scenario, a deliberately stretching context to ensure that we are prepared, and they insist we are now vastly better prepared. but make no mistake, this is stark stuff. certain types of fresh food supply will decrease, it says, which will cut choice and put up prices. it also suggests there could be riots. protests a nd cou nter— protests will take place across the uk, it says. lorries could have to wait more than two days to cross the channel. passengers could be delayed on the eurostar at st pancras in london. some businesses will go bust. there'll be a growth in the black market. some providers of adult social care could fail because it says the sector is already fragile
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and there could be an increase in staff and supply costs. it is extraordinary that these are consequences that could flow from the government's own policy. normally when you're protecting against something like this, it's natural disaster, the action of others you don't control. it is government policy if no agreement is reached with the eu to inflict a no—deal brexit, and this is what the government says could happen. the document does, though, say demand for energy will be met, and there'll be no disruption to electricity or gas supplies. the key thing now is the extent to which this shapes or changes public attitudes to the prospect of a no—deal brexit. chris mason, bbc news. let's get more on this now with our political correspondent, jessica parker who is in westminster this morning. so many of the details we will be looking out through the morning, and also the government has other issues
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as well and they are looking at whether this prorogation was legal or not. yes, an awful lot going on, and it's important to point out with the yellowhammer documents, what we've seen published overnight is more or less what was leaked to the sunday times last month. however, there is a difference between documents being leaked to a national newspaper and actually being published on a government website for everybody to go and see. interestingly, ministers have rejected another request to see communications between senior downing street aides around the reason for prorogation. michael gove has said that request was inappropriate and disproportionate. i think what has been published will be ammunition for those who are arguing againstan be ammunition for those who are arguing against an od or brexit and arguing against an od or brexit and arguing for parliament to be recalled and it all comes after the highest civil court in scotland, the court of session, ruled yesterday that the prorogation of parliament had been unlawful. the government will say that they are not quite
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up—to—date and mitigating strategies have been put in place and they will update everybody shortly on those but be under no illusion, this is added pressure on borisjohnson and it could make his pledge to deliver brexit do or die by the 31st of october a little bit harder. we will get more on the point of view from the government from the secretary of state for defence who will talk to us state for defence who will talk to us at around 830. new figures show cancer survival rates in the uk are improving but still remain below those of other wealthy countries. a study in lancet oncology found rates were worse than australia, canada, denmark, ireland, new zealand and norway. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes for some years now, the uk has lagged behind other developed countries when it comes to treating cancer. the gap is closing, with definite signs of improvement. but the latest research shows there is no room for complacency.
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we don't have enough radiologists, endoscopist and pathologists that read the test, so we have somewhat of a bottleneck in the nhs to get people through the system and this can make our gps somewhat more reluctant to refer at the earliest possible opportunity when there is this bottleneck in the system. the latest data looks at survival rates for seven of the most common cancers in seven high—income countries with similar healthcare systems. the uk was at the foot of the league in five of the seven cancers, including pancreatic cancer, where less than 8% survived five years after diagnosis. in australia, the five—year survival rate was close to 15%. the government points to significant increases in survival rates over the past 20 years. faster diagnosis and swifter treatment are the key to better results. cancer charities say to achieve that, more staff specialising in cancer care are needed right across the nhs.
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dominic hughes, bbc news. the number of people investigated for rape who were later convicted has fallen to its lowest level since records began more than a decade ago. figures seen by bbc news show there were fewer than 2,000 convictions across england and wales in the 12 months to the end of march — down by more than a quarter on the previous year. police are continuing to question a 22—year—old man following the death of baby boy who was pulled out of a river in greater manchester yesterday. the boy, believed to be almost 12 months old, was recovered from the water by firefighters who attended the scene but died later in hospital. our reporter, yunus mulla has this report. flowers have been left here and candles have been lit after what officers describe as an incredibly tragic incident in which an innocent baby boy has died. officers were called here along with emergency services after reports that
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a child was in the water. that baby boy, said to be around 12 months old, was taken to hospital in a critical condition but later died in hospital. now, we don't know for sure how that baby ended up in the water. detectives say they've launched a murder investigation. they are supporting the baby boy's family at this unimaginably difficult time. a 22—year—old man was arrested at the scene. he remains in police custody for questioning on suspicion of murder. the police say they are keen to hear from anyone who might have that vital piece of information that could help them with their investigation. let's get the latest figures from the high street. the latest from john lewis and waitrose. it's a partnership that involves the two, so partnership that involves the two, so the department store and supermarket and it is a tale of two firms. the supermarket business doing very well, falling slightly
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but profits up nearly 7%, coming in at £100 million, so far, so good and it suggests we are still going out and buying food. at the other side, the department store, sales down pretty sharply by 1.8% and that has meant that their profits fell overall and actually they made a bigger loss than they did in the year before, so a loss of nearly £35 million. it's a familiar thing, the high street really struggling, we are playing lots of rent, rates, overheads and filling the stores with stuff and not necessarily getting the shoppers through the door to buy it. in the case ofjohn lewis, they often suffer what is known in the industry as show rooming and they put amazing stuff out for us to touch and feel and decide if we want to buy it and then maybe we go home and buy it online instead and that's a real problem for them. they have been trying to get around that. for all retailers, we are looking at the preparations they are making for brexit and they are keeping a close eye on their supply chains because we know so
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much of what we buy in the country is imported. less significant are the big white goods, whether that's computers or washing machines or fridges, much more concerning if it is fresh and perishable goods and in the case of waitrose they rely on a short turnaround, a small supply chain and they are worried about things being stuck at the port. so charlie mayfield this morning said that should the uk leave the uk without a deal, it will be significant and we will not be able to mitigate the impact, so clearly retailers try to work out what is happening with things being stuck at ports. we will speak to more that later. so far this year, more than a 1,200 migrants have risked their lives crossing the channel in small boats. 86 made the journey just on tuesday — a record number. with camps in france under the threat of closure there are concerns more people will attempt the crossing. in a moment, we'll speak to an afghan woman who made the trip at the age of 12,
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but first, colin campbell has this report from calais. midnight in calais. under the cover of darkness, migrates chase a lorry trying to head to the port. they are trying to head to the port. they are trying to head to the port. they are trying to get from france to the uk. our thermal imaging camera reveals that kelly is alive with migrant activity, trying to stow away on uk destined lorries, the targeting of trucks is relentless. where are you from? but for those with money there isa from? but for those with money there is a quicker way of getting to britain. it is dangerous and expensive. last month, 336 migrants crossed the english channel in small boats. the largest number ever recorded. operating inside the migrant camps, the smugglers charge between 3000 and £5,000 per person. ina growing between 3000 and £5,000 per person. in a growing migrant camp near dunkirk i found migrants, many with children, waiting for people smugglers to get them to the uk. the
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small boat crossings are dependent on calm seas and gentle winds that blow towards the uk. spotting their departures from the calais coastline in the early hours of the morning is like looking for a needle in a haystack, but when the sea conditions are not right, there is no letup stop at great risk, migrants are trying all forms of transport to reach britain. that is some of what is going on at the moment. we're joined now by gulwali passarlay who came to the uk from afghanistan 12 years ago. we have spoken to you here before on brea kfast. we have spoken to you here before on breakfast. let's talk about your journey because you were very young when you set out. let's talk about the reasons why you wanted to come here. i left home when i was 12 in 2006 mainly due to the conflict and war that was happening in afghanistan and like many other afg ha ns i afghanistan and like many other afghans i was forced to flee and my family sent me to europe for my safety a nd family sent me to europe for my safety and it took me about a year or so safety and it took me about a year or so before i got to the uk. i was
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in the hands of smugglers and traffickers and it was a hellish journey. this journey, most recently we have seen journey. this journey, most recently we have seen many journey. this journey, most recently we have seen many of these people trying to come across the channel in small inflatable boats and you ended up small inflatable boats and you ended up coming on a truck, refrigerated lorry to get to the uk, climbing on board that. but when you are trying to get from greece to turkey you we re to get from greece to turkey you were on board one of the little inflata bles. were on board one of the little inflatables. no, from turkey to greece. sorry, of course, turkey to greece. sorry, of course, turkey to greece. you are on a small inflatable. i was in a boat for 20 or 30 people and there were hundred and 20 in it and we were in the mediterranean for almost 50 hours andi mediterranean for almost 50 hours and i saw death with my own eyes. i was very and i saw death with my own eyes. i was very lucky to survive as the boat was about to be capsized and we would have drowned. i could have been one of the 15,000 people who lost their lives in the last five yea rs or lost their lives in the last five years or so, even more since lost their lives in the last five years or so, even more since i lost their lives in the last five years or so, even more since i made the journey so i was lucky i survived thanks to the greece
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coastguard who rescued us. within minutes the boat would have capsized because the bread was broken down. —— boat was broken down. it brings back bad memories when i think about it now and whenever i see news people drowning and dying, it breaks my heart. talk to us about what is going on at the moment because we seem going on at the moment because we seem to see more people trying to get to the uk in boats. why do you think there is this change. when i arrived in calais it was such a miserable place, it was unimaginable. it was cold, humiliating, we were harassed daily by the french police and i was running after the trucks and lorries andi running after the trucks and lorries and i was so close yet so far. one of the reasons i was coming to the uk was because my brother was here andi uk was because my brother was here and i was almost unwelcome in every other country in europe, except italy. so the people now are making the journeys are so desperate and they are the lucky ones who have money to pay smugglers but they are putting themselves at great danger. it is sad to see and i think the
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british government needs to do more to provide legal and safer routes. they should not be a need for smugglers and traffickers to put people in dangerous situations, but sickly at the english crossing, because it's one of the busiest in the world —— particularly at the english crossing. this was not happening in my time. people would ta ke happening in my time. people would take the trucks and lorries and trains but not actually be able to get boats and come across like this. whenever i see the sea and the boats, it troubles me greatly and i think we need to be more compassionate and show solidarity with those people. when people are making what must be a very difficult decision to get on board one of those inflatables for what is a very, very dangerous journey across the channel, that process, they are literally thinking that the risk is worth it because there is no other way. i think it's difficult to say. it's a life—and—death situation for them. staying in calais is dehumanising situation and with the whole brexit debate, smugglers have
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been praying on their vulnerability and people have been saying if brexit happens you cannot get to the uk, so people are willing to pay a lot of money to risk their lives and go into small dinghies and boats. it is unacceptable. what makes me even more upset is when the uk government or the prime minister says we need to send them back and uses degrading language and calls them illegals or a bunch of immigrants, but they are people who have seen enough violence and we should be showing kindness to them. we do not know their situation. you will be aware of the argument that they have got to europe, when they first get to europe, when they first get to europe they should stay in the country that they first arriving. rather than making the extra hazardous journey to the uk. but i was not welcome in those countries, that was my personal experience. why should we expect italy and greece and france to take the burden. why
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can't we take ourfair share of responsibility and people are coming here for all sorts of reasons. family, cultural, historical reason and they see britain as a place of fairness and justice and equality but the international law does not say you should stay in the first safe country. claiming asylum is a human rightand safe country. claiming asylum is a human right and you have to remember that. we are part of the human convention on refugees and the law is that you cannot claim asylum u nless is that you cannot claim asylum unless you are on the soil and i think britain should have a better system where people can claim asylum in france or britain and they could come here safely and legally through a civilised route rather than risking their lives. thank you for your point of view and that's good to speak to you. you've been here how long? almost 12 years. thank you. we are enjoying the scenes we are seeing in london and we are in little venice, canalside and it's looking rather lovely. tell us about the weather.
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yes, something very calming about being near water. we are in little venice, two and a half miles away from piccadilly circus, a little oasis of calm but it is getting busier with the morning commute. the bridge behind me was built in 1810 and it's where the regent's canal and it's where the regent's canal and the grand union canal meet, and and the grand union canal meet, and a couple of miles up the road you can walk to london zoo. a pleasant start this morning, still a bit of sunshine peeking through here and there and for the rest of us if you ta ke there and for the rest of us if you take a look at the forecast, a lot of cloud today, quite humid because we have the ex tropical storm gabrielle coming in across the mid—atlantic gabrielle coming in across the mid—atla ntic but it gabrielle coming in across the mid—atlantic but it shouldn't cause too many issues. it's also bringing rainfor too many issues. it's also bringing rain for some this morning. a damp start in parts of scotland and northern ireland and those weather fronts are edging their way south and there is a chance of rain developing across parts of north—west england and wales and already some drizzle here and there and that will continue to edge southwards, but it does mean if you are in scotland or northern ireland, gradually turning drier and
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brighter, greyerfor gradually turning drier and brighter, greyer for northern england and also parts of wales and made it a south—west later on. towards east anglia and the south—east, sunny spells and while the wind is picking up, touching a0 or 50 the wind is picking up, touching a0 or50 mph the wind is picking up, touching a0 or 50 mph across the north of england, nothing too strong and still bringing warm air. 25 celsius is the possible high across south—east england this afternoon. generally around the mid teens as we look at scotland and northern ireland. the fresh air in the north will head south through the night and it does mean for a time there will be cloud across england and wales, patchy rain or drizzle and by the end of the night into tomorrow morning will be across southernmost counties of england and the channel islands. but temperatures will not drop much tonight, 15 or 16 degrees into the start of the morning but elsewhere a fresh start to friday with temperatures in single figures away from the towns and city centres but lots of sunshine around to begin with, a lovely starting friday for most and any mist and fog will clear, patchy rain and drizzle,
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cloudy conditions in the southern counties and the channel islands will be gone and it's going to feel very pleasant. light winds, sunshine overhead and temperatures where they should be between 16 and 21 degrees. that takes us neatly into the weekend and it looks like a good weekend and it looks like a good weekend to get outdoors. lots of sun drying on saturday and more cloud across the north of scotland and the cloud will spread south on sunday and the knights will be cool, but all in all it will be a weekend where dry weather dominates and once the sun is out it is still strong september sunshine, so that is something to look forward to. that is how it is looking. we will bring you a extraordinary story now and it's about friendship that has been taken to a whole other level. how far would you go to help a friend in need? would you give them money, or a place to live? one woman has been given the gift of life, thanks to her best friend who donated her kidney. since she was a little
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girl, helen ashley lived with kidney failure and needed a life—saving transplant. step forward, her best friend lauren. they join us now. welcome to you both. good morning. just explain, you had a long—term condition and you two works together and this is where the friendship began. yes, i was poorly from the age of six and i had my first transplant at aged 11 through a deceased donor, but they don't last forever so roll on 18 years and u nfortu nately forever so roll on 18 years and unfortunately it came to the end of its life but i was lucky to get that long out of it, to be honest and we started to look for living donors. you are in the office, sitting next to each other, and then what? just explain. my mum looked at giving me her kidney but they have to do lots of tests and it didn't work out, so lauren kind of stepped forward. i think it was actually at your
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wedding that you first started talking about it. oh, my goodness. i suppose i knew a lot about the process and what her mum had gone through and when helen rang me and said my mum cannot go through with it any more, i went home and had a chat with my husband and said i wanted to say to her that i would be tested and just check. which is an incredibly generous, brave thing to do. did you know quite a lot about the process is to go through? yes, and a lot of that was from helen and what her mum had started going through. i did quite a bit of research and made my mind up before i even spoke to helen rather than making a promise that i could go back on. do you remember the conversation when lauren first said categorically, i want to do this for you? do you remember that? categorically, i want to do this for you? do you rememberthat7m categorically, i want to do this for you? do you remember that? it was a bit of a blur, really. laurent had started mentioning it but i did not really wa nt started mentioning it but i did not really want to get my hopes up and i
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did not want to put pressure on her. soi did not want to put pressure on her. so i sort of let her go ahead and do the research, ring up the living donor team and left her to it, really, to begin with but, yes, you just can't really put into words how it makes you feel. that somebody would do that for you, particularly a friend. it is absolutely staggering. tell us a bit about it. you investigated, they did lots of tests a nd you investigated, they did lots of tests and it was found that you could be a donor and you've made up your mind previously so that, had you? yes, i think it was probably about six months of tests to check we we re about six months of tests to check we were compatible as a match, a full check of my health and my kidney function before they would say they were happy for us to go ahead. and the operation was how long ago? nine weeks today. do a little health check. how are you feeling? you first. how are you,
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post giving up that kidney? immediately after the surgery i felt fine. as the weeks have gone on, i do feel tired but really well in my cell. is that to be expected? it takes time for the body to readjust and get used to working with one kidney. and how does it feel to have her kidney? well, a little bit strange. a bit odd to think i have my friend's kidney inside me but, yes, just amazing, and before i was on dialysis which meant i was hooked up on dialysis which meant i was hooked up to on dialysis which meant i was hooked uptoa on dialysis which meant i was hooked up to a machine every night and i could do that at home which was a benefit but it was restrictive and i was on a really restrictive diet as well and i obviously did not feel that great and the best way i can describe it is probably like a hangover feeling every morning describe it is probably like a hangoverfeeling every morning but without the alcohol. so now i feel so without the alcohol. so now i feel so much better and i've not had to
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have my dialysis for the last nine weeks since having the kidney, so it is amazing. are you two still working together? we will be when we go back. i'm just working together? we will be when we go back. i'mjust trying working together? we will be when we go back. i'm just trying to think of the scenario when you come to the office every day and you say how are you? she can't say she's tired when we get on in the morning. lauren will save me —— kill me if i'm saying i'm tired after she has gone through all of this. and you are making the tea forever. work have oxley helps you with it. work have been so good. to have them let us be off at the same time, so supportive —— work have obviously helped you with it. i think there is a bit of shock at first with my family. they we re shock at first with my family. they were obviously worried about me, my health but they've all been so supportive. what would you say to anyone because people will think about it, and they will be thinking maybe i can do it, what would you
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say? do your research, speak to people and at the manchester royal infirmary where we had the operation they had dedicated living donor nurses. give them a ring, they will send you loads of information and there's loads of support groups out there, speaking to people who have been through it and who have done it ten years ago even. an amazing young lady, as are you, helen and thank you both. good luck with the rest of your recovery. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, making an appearance on our shores today, ex tropical storm gabrielle, it is in ex tropical storm, just the remnants of the system, bringing rain across northern ireland and into scotland, but also, this warm tropical air,
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really quite humid today for england and wales. that ran from northern ireland and scotland gradually moves further south, pushing into northern england, perhaps a bit of rain for north wales as well. sunny skies developing behind that. fairly gusty winds today, not quite as windy as yesterday, certainly much warmer than yesterday for england and wales, temperatures, 21, 24, 25 celsius, quite humid as well. behind the rain, across scotland and northern ireland, not as warm. through tonight, the remnants of the syste m m ove through tonight, the remnants of the system move further south, clear skies, and could turn a bit chilly across scotland, northern ireland, temperatures down in single figures, further south, still holding onto the warm and humid air. that will replace, as the cold front moves south, a fresher feel on friday, high—pressure developing, weak weather system across the west of
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scotland, a few showers throughout the day on friday, for most of us, it is going to be a dry day, lots of sunshine and light wind throughout the day. temperatures will be down bya the day. temperatures will be down by a few degrees. a little bit fresher. losing humidity. temperature 16 to 21 celsius. into the weekend, high—pressure is there or thereabouts across southern areas, weak weather system moving into northern parts, bring us some cloud and outbreaks of cloud, breezy conditions across the north of scotland, for most of us, it will be dry with lots of sunshine over the weekend, feeling warmer, temperatures into the mid 205 in the south—east.
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hello, this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and tadhg enright. tamping down trade war tensions, trump delays proposed tariffs on chinese goods ahead of talks on a possible deal. live from london, that's our top story on thursday the 12th of september. financial markets are cheering the news to a further delay to tariffs on key goods ahead of

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