Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 13, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at 2: borisjohnson says he's cautiously optimistic and that there's the rough shape of a deal on brexit. but he's faced backlash in yorkshire, where a heckler told him to get back to parliament. why are you not with them in parliament, sorting out the mess that you have created? would you mind? i am very happy to get back to parliament very soon. but what we want, ithink parliament very soon. but what we want, i think to see... why don't you sort it out, boris? the number of people killed as a result of domestic violence is at its highest level for five years. the vast majority were women. the family of 18—year—old owen carey call for a change in the law following his fatal allergic reaction to a burger at a byron restaurant.
2:01 pm
coming up on afternoon live, all the sport withjohn watson, women's golf and the first day of the solheim cup. yes, europe holed a one—point advantage after the opening foursomes, with the fourball is now under way. thank you very much. and darren has all the weather forecast for us this evening. it is looking a pretty picture. will it deliver? yes, it is lovely. lots of sunshine gci’oss yes, it is lovely. lots of sunshine across the uk today and tomorrow. you probably wouldn't want to change that, but in japan, you probably wouldn't want to change that, but injapan, they are trying to change the weather. more on the latest attempt later. thank you very much. also coming up... a bumpersummer up... a bumper summer for butterflies. a once—in—a—decade mass emergence of painted ladies saw nearly half a million recorded across the uk.
2:02 pm
hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. downing street has announced that borisjohnson will go to luxembourg on monday to hold talks with the president of the european commission. it's fuelled speculation of a renewed push by the government to try to secure a brexit deal. speaking in the last hour in rotherham the prime minister said that he was cautiously optimistic and that there was the rough shape of a deal to be done. during that speech mrjohnson was heckled by a man in the crowd who told him to "get back to parliament". here's what happened. i know the transformative potential of local, accountable leadership. someone with the power to sort out what matters most to local people... like ourmps, what matters most to local people... like our mps, boris. are you getting back to parliament? indeed. year? i am all in favour of our mps... why are you not with them in parliament, sorting out the mess that you
2:03 pm
created? do you mind? i am very happy to get back to parliament very soon, but what i think we want to see... why don't you sort it out, boris? why don't you sort it out, boris? why don't you sort it out, boris? why don't you sort it out? what we want to see in this region is towns and communities, able to represent that gentleman and sort out his needs. the prime minister speaking in rotherham. the house of commons speakerjohn bercow warned the prime minister not to ignore a new law designed to postpone brexit if a deal can't be reached. borisjohnson has said he'd rather be "dead in a ditch" than ask for a delay. jessica parker reports. in the mood to do a deal? thank you. a historic shop, coughing up thank you. a historic shop, coughing upfor thank you. a historic shop, coughing up for something... boris johnson is in yorkshire today, but will hotfoot it to luxembourg next week for brexit talks. haggling over how to keep the irish border open, amid reports that his democratic unionist
2:04 pm
allies are in the market to rub out objections to northern ireland alone abiding by some eu rules. apparently, nonsense. we would not vote for any arrangement which makes us different to the rest of the uk and as a result forms a border between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom. meanwhile, there is this man. order! he is loud, expressive... i couldn't give a flying flamingo what your view is! visibly divides opinion, and until the end of october, remains the highest authority in the house of commons. european union withdrawal... and an actor recently passed is designed to force the prime minister to force a delay to brexit. —— and actor recently passed. but boris johnson says he won't, and ministers have talked about testing the law to its limit. the speaker has fired his own warning shot, saying he is prepared to be creative in upholding the will of parliament. not obeying the law must surely be a
2:05 pm
nonstarter. period. john burke oh's making it clear that he will do what he can to stop any prospect of mps being sidelined. ——john being sidelined. —— john bercow. and being sidelined. ——john bercow. and the being sidelined. —— john bercow. and the speaker has form for defying convention and delivering some procedural surprises. so these latest comments suggest he will not be shy at doing so suggest he will not be shy at doing so again. the office of speaker has become irretrievably politicised, and radicalised. it would have been unthinkable ten or 15 years ago for the speaker of the house of commons to launch a personal attack on the prime minister like this. do you wa nt prime minister like this. do you want to come and meet helen? this is doncaster. the way through for boris johnson is farfrom clear. a crowd of o bsta cles johnson is farfrom clear. a crowd of obstacles await, whether it is getting a brexit deal with the eu or getting a brexit deal with the eu or getting his way in the house of commons. during his speech,
2:06 pm
the prime minister said there had been a good deal of progress in talks with brussels ahead of his meetings with senior officials on monday. i think people do deserve to know what is going on. we are working incredibly hard to get a deal. there is the rough shape of the deal to be done, and as some of you may have seen, i myself have been to talk to various of the eu leaders, particularly in germany, france and in ireland, where we have made a good deal of progress. i am seeing the president of the commission and the president of the commission and the chief negotiator, michelle barnier, on monday, and we will talk about the ideas we have been working on, and we will see where we get. i would say i am cautiously optimistic. is that a good enough characterisation? i am cautiously
2:07 pm
optimistic. mary regan is a political reporterfor rte, a news and current affairs outlet for irish and international news. shejoins me now from dublin. mary, thank you very much for joining us this afternoon. first of all, what is your understanding of the dup's position? because we are hearing some very contradictory things about their view of where these negotiations have reached. yes, we have been hearing from the dup this morning and what we have been hearing is, one thing to the london times newspaper and something else entirely publicly in what arlene foster has been saying. but i think despite all this ebb and flow of expectation around whether there might be some move towards a compromise this week, the irish government, for its part, is remaining remarkably cautious, and also remarkably consistent. leo varadkar has been saying this
2:08 pm
morning things that were in line with what he said to borisjohnson when he was with the prime minister on monday, and that is that the government here is not going to be willing to give up on the backstop for something that merely amounts to a promise for something that does not stand up to scrutiny as it were, and he says that what he sees coming from the british side now falls very short of meeting the irish government's objectives, and he says the gap is still very wide between the gap is still very wide between the eu and uk sides at this point. depending on who you listen to, all sorts of ideas are still being bandied around, such as a northern ireland only backstop that wouldn't apply to the rest of the uk. the idea of having this border down the irish sea. how much traction are any of those ideas really having? well, again, the irish government is absolutely consistent in its message. this whole idea of possibly
2:09 pm
having a northern only backstop when it comes to agriculture, for example, the taoiseach said this morning that what he has been hearing fall sort of meeting what the irish government's objectives are, and the taoiseach met boris johnson earlier this week. they had a private meeting and the taoiseach said today that he does trust him, he accepts the prime minister'sacting in good faith and that he does want some kind of deal, but he says the irish government here will fight to get a deal, but not at any cost. so what he's saying is that the irish government will not sign to something which essentially amounts to a leap of faith, and that the gap is still very wide between both sides. how confident is the irish government that the rest of its eu colleagues will stand by dublin till the very end? yes, it remains as confident now as i think it has been
2:10 pm
throughout this process. the eu's incoming commissionerfor trade, throughout this process. the eu's incoming commissioner for trade, the irish representative on the european commission, was in ireland, and he has been speaking just a short while ago. he has been pointing out that the eu's support for ireland on this remains a staunch as ever, and also, the irish government is pointing out that it the irish government is pointing out thatitis the irish government is pointing out that it is not doing any solo runs in terms of negotiations, which is why it doesn't want to engage in many respects with on—air negotiations, if you like, with the british government, because it is leading the negotiations to the eu, —— leaving the negotiations, and it is constantly pointed out that the eu negotiates as a whole, and there are no solo run negotiations on the pa rt are no solo run negotiations on the part of the irish government. how amenable with the irish government be to an extension if britain needed another one? well, phil hogan, the commission, speaking this morning,
2:11 pm
also pointed out that he believes the european commission would grant an extension and that the eu member states would be willing to grant an extension to britain if they wanted one. he said this in the context of their possibly being a general election there. his comments are quite interesting in that respect. he said there are pure pathways defining a sensible outcome to what he called an unfortunate situation, but he said if it was the case that there was to be an election in the uk in november, and he said, who knows what an incoming government might do, he even suggested that there might even be a second referendum. he said that if there was a request by the british government for an extension beyond october to 31st, then that would be listened to by the european side. mary, good to talk to you. thank you for giving us the perspective from dublin, mary regan from rte. so how is all of this going down in brussels, where the uk's brexit
2:12 pm
negotiator has been meeting his eu cou nterpa rts negotiator has been meeting his eu counterparts again? let's speak to our europe correspondent gavin lee. we hear that there is good progress from the prime minister here, that there is the rough shape of a deal. what is the view there are?m there is the rough shape of a deal. what is the view there are? it is interesting covering this day in, day out, for the last few years since 2016, since the brexit process began, and after the referendum, and listening to theresa may's words, when she said she was cautiously optimistic of a deal, the uk's chief negotiator at the time david davies said he was cautiously optimistic, and so was dominic raab. these characters are appearing like banuo's ghost now, and borisjohnson is also using the same view. he wa nts to is also using the same view. he wants to prevent what they call a no—deal brexit in less than seven weeks. i think from the side of the water, the way in which this is
2:13 pm
being seen, you have the momentum borisjohnson will come to luxembourg to speak tojunkojunko, president of the european commission. the spokesperson today said that this was a common accord meeting, both of them are agreeing to have it. junko junker was meeting, both of them are agreeing to have it. junkojunker was on his way to strasbourg next week, —— jean—claude junck, and he way to strasbourg next week, —— jean—claudejunck, and he was speaking with 150 mps at the european parliament focusing on brexit. they did not give any hint of what they might discuss, but the uk believes this is a breakthrough moment. i think it is farfrom uk believes this is a breakthrough moment. i think it is far from that. today, in this building behind me, the team from the uk, the envoy for borisjohnson, has the team from the uk, the envoy for boris johnson, has been the team from the uk, the envoy for borisjohnson, has been meeting with the eu side, having technical talks, not negotiations but the sense here from michel barnier, the chief negotiator, that there is nothing
2:14 pm
more of a vision from moving the border in northern ireland to customs checks elsewhere in business parks, but that is not something thatis parks, but that is not something that is solid or which will solve the long drama of the backstop. so for them, there is nothing at the moment. so they are still waiting. just to share with you if you have the lines coming out of the press conference the irish taoiseach leo varadkar is holding. he says that the irish government position has not changed, he is not aware of any change in the position by the dup, and that what has been proposed so far falls very far and that what has been proposed so farfalls very far short. and that what has been proposed so far falls very far short. given that the eu 27 say that they speak with one voice, how confident are you that what i have just shared with you will be shared with those who are doing the negotiations for brussels? ultimately, michel barnier speaks on behalf of the 28, meets with them, and their ambassadors, he gets his steer, and eu summits are important for that. we will have one
2:15 pm
inafew important for that. we will have one in a few weeks, coming up in october, and then we will get a sense from boris meeting all the 27 leaders for the first time. perhaps after the conservative party conference. no after the conservative party conference. no one after the conservative party conference. no one of the side of the water really believes at the diplomatic level there will be much further progress until after the conservative party conference and maybe that will the eu summit. listening to leo varadkar, i know from previous meetings when the leaders get together, it is off and he who is one of the most vocal, because he is worried about the impact economically, the most burnt, as they see it, from a no—deal brexit. so it depends on how far they go in these meetings, but it has been a cliche, hasn't it? they have been absolutely unified on this. they are really showing that you don't push them as individuals. they work as one, and they have been working very well for them through michel barnier. it was very heartfelt when you said that day in, day out, you have been covering this since 2016. we admire and are
2:16 pm
grateful for your staying power! thank you very much. every beat of the butterfly‘s wing, we have been there! gavin lee in brussels. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: in a trip to yorkshire, borisjohnson promises to devolve more power to the north, and confirms he'll meet with top eu officials next week as he tries to find a new brexit deal. the number of people killed by a partner or relative is at its highest level, for at least five years. most victims are women. a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to dairy was not made aware of the ingredients in his meal, by burger chain byron, an inquest has heard. and in sport, charley hull and as adah munoz give europe a one—point lead after this morning's foursomes on day one of the solheim cup. they leave the usa by 2.5 points to 1.5 at gleneagles. both australian openers depart on the fifth day of the ashes test at the fifth day of the ashes test at the oval. steve smith has begun to frustrating and once again.
2:17 pm
and alice tai continued her impressive performances at the world parrot championship. she set a new world record time in her heat in the 50 metre freestyle. she has already w011 50 metre freestyle. she has already won four gold medals so far. more on all of those stories that have passed. —— at half past. domestic violence deaths in the uk are at their highest level for five years. figures obtained by bbc news show there were 173 domestic killings across the uk last year, an increase of 32 on 2017. while both men and women are victims of violence in the home, the majority are female. several of the victims were stabbed, leading one criminologist to describe them as the "invisible victims of knife crime". the government says it's "fully committed" to tackling domestic violence, and ministers have promised legislation when parliament returns next month. tom symonds reports. rodrigo giraldo killed his wife, margory villegas, then put her body in the boot of this car before
2:18 pm
burying her in a shallow grave. officer: how long were you out looking for her? he lied to the police, claimed he tried to find her... for how long? two, three hours. ..and, as in so many domestic violence cases, what he did has shattered his family. there is the fact that we no longer have the greatest ally we've ever known, which is my mum, and really why i feel blessed to be here to be able to say these things because of her, her sacrifices, everything she ever did for us. you don't know when you can end up in a situation where you end up basically by yourself because you've lost your mum and your dad. we've obtained police figures showing killings involving domestic violence reached a five—year high in 2018. they're also contributing to the rise in knife crime. our analysis of the first 100 killings in the uk this year shows six women and one man were stabbed to death in domestic violence. the vast majority of
2:19 pm
victims are female. invisible in knife crime is the number of women who are killed by the use of a knife, in the kitchen or in the bedroom, and that is part of the issue about violence against women — it mostly remains invisible. what is happening? well, there is a big concern that measures introduced to protect women and men threatened by domestic abuse are not being used enough. this is clare wood. she was murdered in 2009. the killer, her boyfriend, had an appalling history of violence against women. clare's law, as it became known, allows anyone to request information about their partner's past, but it has still not been made an actual law. that was due to happen this year and then brexit chaos intervened. campaigners say it is vital. the public‘s knowledge and awareness of this scheme is quite low so the aim is to improve that, but really we need to see a bill which goes beyond the criminal justice system because only one
2:20 pm
in five victims will ever report to the police. there are so many more ways that we can intervene, from health, housing, right across the public sector, and that is what we need this bill to deliver. this week, borisjohnson tweeted his commitment to push ahead with the package of new measures. we're fully committed to tackling this horrific crime, he said. as the children of margory villegas know, it tears families apart. under the current system, not everyone in fleeing domestic abuse is guaranteed a safe home from their council. that's according to homeless charity crisis. maeve mcgoldrick is the head of policy and campaigns. shejoins me now. thank you very much for coming in. at what point in a relationship that is abusive is the victim most
2:21 pm
vulnerable? what we find is, whenever people are trying to separate from that relationship, and at the point they decide to try and leave the relationship, that they are at highest risk of homicide, and thatis are at highest risk of homicide, and that is really the point where we would be saying they need a safe and secure home to go to to help them escape from that partner in the first place. and how variable is the provision of that sort of safe haven across the uk? yeah, there is support for people in recent announcements to help victims of domestic abuse move into refuges, and this is a really welcome step forward. however, what we are calling for is to ensure that anyone who goes to their counsel with experience of domestic abuse is guaranteed the support from the council to move into a permanent home, and without that security, we know a lot of people don't leave the relationships. they either end up going back to the home they had before with the violent partner, or they don't live in the first place, because they are concerned equally about becoming homeless as a result.
2:22 pm
how has the provision of refuges, for example, change in the last few yea rs, for example, change in the last few years, because obviously, with austerity, councils have found it difficult to make ends meet and cover a ll difficult to make ends meet and cover all the services everybody wa nts ? cover all the services everybody wants? absolutely, and there have been several cuts to the volume of refuges available to people, so trying to find a place to move to and find immediate security has been really challenging for a lot of local authorities with the cuts. however, there have been new measures to increase the scope for refuges, which is really welcome, but that leaves people in limbo. sometimes they are stuck in refuges for a long time and can i get back into their own permanent accommodation and move on from the experience of domestic abuse. how much of a factor as domestic violence amongst people who are homeless? yes, we have seen, interestingly, a rise in people experiencing domestic abuse and homelessness in the way that your figures show today in the rise of
2:23 pm
domestic abuse overall. yesterday, official statistics showed 23,000 people went to the council with experience of homelessness who had also experienced domestic abuse, which is roughly around 60% of men who are homeless... sorry, of women who are homeless... sorry, of women who are homeless... sorry, of women who are homeless, have had experience of domestic abuse and about 16% of men. so 6096 of experience of domestic abuse and about 1696 of men. so 6096 of women and 16% of men? about 1696 of men. so 6096 of women and 1696 of men? yes, and only about 296 and 1696 of men? yes, and only about 2% of people are entitled to support from the council to find them permanent accommodation. that is really low. the government are saying they are committed to supporting victims of domestic abuse. how important is better, different, new legislation, the domestic abuse bill that is fit to become law? is it fit for purpose in your view? we were really welcome to see the prime minister announced it would come back in the queen speech. it would have been a huge concern if that was lost. so that is a huge
2:24 pm
step. but we are looking to amend that legislation when it comes back to parliament in coming months, to ensure there is a duty in there to provide people with housing support. otherwise, we just know they won't end up leaving the relationship, because they are concerned about ending up in the streets, where they are equally vulnerable. we fundamentally need a housing support offer in place for people to make that pathway away from a violent relationship, to seek refuge and to be able to move into permanent accommodation as quickly as possible. thank you for coming in, maeve. an inquest has ruled that a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to a burger had not been made aware of the ingredients in his meal. owen carey collapsed after eating at a branch of byron in south london, in 2017. his family has called for a change in the law to protect people with allergies. keith doyle reports. it was a meal to celebrate owen carey's 18th birthday. but the teenager died a short time after eating a chicken burger and suffering an allergic reaction in april, 2017. the inquest heard that despite telling staff he had
2:25 pm
allergies, he was not made aware that the chicken was marinated in buttermilk, something he was allergic to. the coroner said a lack of information on the menu, which did not mention the presence of buttermilk in the chicken, meant both owen and the staff were reassured by it. his family spoke outside the coroner's court and called for what they named as owen's law. owen was the shining light in ourfamily and his death should not have happened. we hope now that something good can come out of it and we are calling on the government to change the law on allergen labelling in restaurants. the restaurant chain said its procedures were industry standard for the time but accepted more can be done to protect people with serious food allergies. it is clear that the current rules and requirements are not enough. and the industry needs to do more, more to help support customers with allergies and more to raise awareness of the risk of allergies.
2:26 pm
the coroner concluded owen carey died from a serious anaphylactic reaction less than an hour after eating the meal, a meal he had been reassured would not trigger his allergies. time for a look at the weather. darren is here, but first, before we talk about the weather, for some reason, you want to talk about sport? yes, i love sport! you know that. do you like the olympics? yes! summer olympics, athletics and all that? you like to watch it? yes. i don't know what relevance this is to the picture behind you. that's a bit scary! well, next summer, the olympics take place in tokyo, and normally come in the summertime, temperatures are 35 degrees in tokyo, where the olympics take place, and the humidity is 80%, so it is really humid, and it is really, really hot. and they are
2:27 pm
worried about the experience spectators and people taking part in the games are going to have, so they are trying to change the weather. and this canon is the latest attempt to change the weather. so what they are doing is mixing air and ice and shooting it out of this canon, and they have got a load of spectators there to do this test that they did there to do this test that they did the other day. as you can see, they are having a lot of fun. it is snowing. it is not real snow, of course. . . snowing. it is not real snow, of course... it is like the artificial snow you get on a mountain, in a way. it is a bit like that, yeah. but remember, it is going to be 35 degrees. so, does it work? well, what do you think?! i kinda think the reason you're telling us is... they do all kinds crazy stuff. the temperature was 25.1 celsius when they started the test. the idea was to reduce the temperature and drop
2:28 pm
the humidity. the temperature at the end was 25.1 celsius! it didn't work, but by all accounts, it was a lot of fun. right. and that is part of it. so, back to the drawing board, then. they have other ideas, and one of them is an umbrella hat, which shields the sunlight and heat, and politically just which shields the sunlight and heat, and politicallyjust leaves which shields the sunlight and heat, and politically just leaves you which shields the sunlight and heat, and politicallyjust leaves you in the shade, but you have got to wear a stupid hat all the time. how does the person behind you see? you are not going to break records if you are running on a stupid hat, are you? that is also pole vaulting with a stupid umbrella hat. i think this is all a bit heath robinson. they have some crazy ideas, some of which work, though! may be that will work. i will try and get a picture of you. not a view! the person wearing it.|j don't mind. i am up for that. want to tell us about our weather? yes, well you would not want to change our weather at the moment, would you? it our weather at the moment, would you ? it is our weather at the moment, would you? it is a beautiful day, and the sun is out. look at that picture. a
2:29 pm
beautiful picture taken by sue in wakefield. beautiful blue skies, a bit of patchy, high cloud, and thin cloud as well. essentially, dry and sunny through the rest of the day. some cloud around near the south coast. still persisting towards the channel islands. we also have a speckling of showers in scotland, north and west of the country in particular. otherwise, dry. a bit breezy across northern scotland, but much stronger winds are to come. elsewhere, winds are lighter than they were yesterday, although temperatures were lower than they we re temperatures were lower than they were yesterday. a high of about 26 degrees. 22, there were 22 today, but scotland and ireland should feel quite pleasant. overnight, clear skies and light winds, you can see how the weather changes in scotland and northern ireland. it clouds over and northern ireland. it clouds over and milder here. elsewhere, in rural areas, temperatures lower than that, perhaps down to 2—3 in england and
2:30 pm
wales. here, we are dominated by this area of high pressure, bringing all the sunshine today and tomorrow. but we have a weather system a deep area of low pressure approaching northern parts of the uk, so we will see more cloud for northern ireland, but particularly into scotland, rain and drizzle over the hills, and the wettest weather is likely to be for the northern isles and in the highlands later in the day. elsewhere, probably dry, lots of sunshine for england in way also. rain like to here as well, and a bit warmer too. it will be a windy day in scotland, gales across the north, gusts of 60 mph for the far north, and with that area of low pressure to the north, it will take those 60 mph plus winds overnight into the northern isles and into sunday morning. at the same time, the weather front is moving southwards, bringing the rain. there may not be an awful lot of rain on sunday, but it looks cloudy for northern ireland, northern england and. perhaps southern scotland. northern areas cooler and fresher, if you
2:31 pm
showers, but this sunshine continues across southern england and wales, and it is likely to be warmer, 25—26 in london and the south—east. into early next week, some slight changes. the weather front is a band of cloud and not much rain. sinking towards the south, but the wind direction behind changes. high pressure to the west means a north—westerly breeze, so cooler, fresher air for early next week, but most fresher air for early next week, but m ost pla ces fresher air for early next week, but most places will be dry.
2:32 pm
this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson says he's cautiously optimistic and that there's the rough shape of a deal on brexit— but he's faced backlash in yorkshire where a heckler told him to get back to parliament. why are you not with them in parliament, sorting out the mess that you have created? would you mind? i am very happy to get back to parliament very soon. but what we want, i think to see... why don't you sort it out, boris? irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup— something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed as a result of domestic violence is at its highest level for five years — the vast majority were women. a teenager who died from an allergic reaction
2:33 pm
to dairy was not made aware of the ingredients in his meal, by burger chain byron, an inquest has heard. and coming up, a bumper summer for butterflies — the highest number of painted lady butterflies for a decade are seen across the uk. sport now on afternoon live withjohn. the latest from gleneagles, the solheim cup. good afternoon. europe leading on the opening day edging out the united states by a point after this moring's foursomes, two and half to one and half the lead. so agood start as europe look to wrestle the cup back from thje usa who've won the last two edictions. we're under way in this afternoon's fourballs. julie inkster the american captain, making the surpise move of splitting
2:34 pm
the korda sisters who combined so brialliantly this morning. they won the only match for the usa, in the foursomes, the altrernate shot format winning six and four. beating caroline massson and jodie ewart shadoff. charlie hull and azahara munoz anchoring home europe in the final match to give them the lead. can we get away without talking about the ashes? australia 83 for three, chasing emgland out for 294" traiolling 211. archer has both openers
2:35 pm
caught behind the wicket australia lost their opening pair cheaply, disappointment for david warner. actual striking just a few moments ago. the discussions will continue, how do you get steve smith out? he has been so impressive through the series and angle beloved to level up and avoid defeat at the oval. alice tai's impressive performances at the world para championships continue. she set a new world record time in her heats in the s8 50metre freestyle, she's won four gold medals at the games so far. sir dave brailsford, the head of cycling's team ineos, formerly team sky, has said this
2:36 pm
morning that he's recovering from prostate cancer. sir dave underwent surgery last month after the cancer was diagnosed in july. the 55 year—old oversaw team gb's domination of track cycling at the 2008 and 2012 olympics and has led a team that has produced seven tour de france winners in the last eight years. now he mayjust be a month into his old trafford career but harry maguire is manchester united captaincy material — according to his manager ole gunnar solksjaer. the england defender has been impressive so far following his summer move from leicester and solksjaer says he's already one of the leaders at the club. he is definitely a character and personality that can be captain of a big club, he is a leader in the dressing room, both by performances, presence and stature and behaviour. he isa
2:37 pm
presence and stature and behaviour. he is a character that you would say you would like to follow. some are technical leaders, some are leaders by voice and he has got the lot. that's all the sport for now. democrats hoping to become their party's presidential nominee have failed to land any major blows on the front—runner, joe biden, in a televised debate on abc news in houston. it was the third such event — but the first to feature all of the main contenders. laura trevelyan was watching the debate in chicago. good morning from houston and a fascinating evening wearjoe biden was in the centre of the stage flanked by his progressive rivals,
2:38 pm
elizabeth warren has been getting momentum and bernie sanders butjoe biden turned the table on his rivals and got them to defend their expansive and expensive programmes for government run health care. it was a classic performance, he started strong and rambled and came back strong but another fascinating thing was how the second tier of candidates tried to break out and julian castro who is from texas and was in the barack obama administration came under fire after months for trying to imply thatjoe biden was old and forgetful and could not remember details of his own health policy. i cut up with him this morning and asked was that really what he meant thatjoe biden as old and forgetful? what what people have said the ad glad i pointed out his plan would
2:39 pm
leave 10 million people uncovered and he denied people would have to buy into his plan, i was amazed he denied saying that two minutes after he had said it. that is why i pointed that out, that is a big difference because his plan would leave generally people uncovered in my approach would come on everybody. whether it is vice presidentjoe biden or somebody else have somebody says one thing and then two minutes later deny that they said it i am going to call them on that and that is what i did. another viral moment came from the former congressman from el paso which suffer the mass shooting earlier in the summer when hispanics dominantly targeted and work as a position on gun control which is far
2:40 pm
more radical than anyone in the democratic field, the position that they want to ban assault weapons but o'rourke what a mandatory buy—back of these weapons. republicans are saying this is democrats coming from their guns but o'rourke said public opinion is shifting and this is the policy that americans want. lam i am listening to everyone on this issue and most want to see those guns return, do not want to see them in our streets ought to be used against us so every pass that law it will be mandatory that you sell that weapon back to the united states government but a quick reminder, you do not need extra hunt for self defence, you only need it for use on a battlefield to kill people, that's what it is designed for and good at, it has no place in civilian life. i
2:41 pm
believe the majority of americans understand that whether not o'rourke becomes the nominee may having an influence on the democratic party are laying out that position on guns. a very interesting evening here in houston, joe biden still seems to be the frontrunner. interesting that all three front runners are over a 70s of the democratic party not yet experiencing a generational shift. at this stage in the campaign to thousand seven ba rack at this stage in the campaign to thousand seven barack obama was behind hillary clinton and look what happened there, he became the nominee. a way to go yet. a nursery worker convicted of sexually abusing young children in her care will be banned from entering devon and cornwall when she's released from prison. vanessa george, who's from plymouth, is expected to be released soon, after being jailed in 2009. the parole board says she no longer poses a ‘significant risk to the public‘.
2:42 pm
duncan kennedy reports. it was in 2009 that vanessa george was jailed for a minimum of seven years for sexually abusing children in plymouth. she had taken photographs on her phone of her abusing children in a nursery and swapped the images over the internet. two months ago, the parole board said she could now be released. but because of the reaction of victims‘ families and others to that, the head of the national probation service has now taken the highly unusual move of writing an open letter to the people of plymouth, in which she says, vanessa george will not be allowed to return to devon or cornwall. the parole board has imposed an unusually large exclusion zone but some have questioned how such a wide ban could be enforced. i really think that they have a job on their hands because these are the most comprehensive parole
2:43 pm
conditions i have ever seen. she is not able to come to devon and cornwall, she is not able to access any internet enabled devices, and, in the 21st century, that's really difficult. in custody, vanessa george admitted her crimes to police. i knew it was wrong when i was doing it. what was wrong about it? it was vile. but she has never given detectives the identities of all those she abused. it is one more reason why her imminent release is so controversial. duncan kennedy, bbc news. luke pollard is the labour mp for plymouth, sutton and devonport — hejoins me now. thank you forjoining us. what is your view of the conditions that have been attached to vanessa george's release? i didn't want to be the least but if she has to be a wa nt be the least but if she has to be a want the toughest and most comprehensive row conditions they can be and these look pretty tough,
2:44 pm
28 different conditions, many of the families that have potentially the children abused by her will welcome the fact that she will not be allowed into devon and cornwall, she will not be allowed to use any internet enabled devices and that means she will not be able to contact them on their children again. but it is the whole system as it seems for many families to be broken and that is why we need to look at not only making sure these conditions are strictly enforced against vanessa george but that we look at how someone who still refuses to name the babies and toddlers she abused can pass the levels for showing adequate remorse to be released early. she has been assessed as no longer posing a significant risk, the parole board not have taken that decision likely iam sure. not have taken that decision likely i am sure. this is why we need to look at the rules around the parole board and i have no doubt they were something following the instructions
2:45 pm
and guidelines they had but this is and guidelines they had but this is an unusual case, vanessa george is written's most prolific female sex offender. we do not have a huge numberandi offender. we do not have a huge numberand i want offender. we do not have a huge number and i want to make sure the rose and adequately drawn so that we can have proper levels of the most shown because normally in circumstances like this there would be an admission for the victims are on the ability to identify them. that has not been the case which means whether vanessa george as released early or not the family members of those young people still have a life sentence of not knowing whether it was their child that was abused by her and then had the images of that abuse shared on the internet. given that she cannot be fostered a vote that information, what more could have been done in terms of maybe geographical area to give families a greater reassurance? not a living on into devon and coral isa not a living on into devon and coral is a good start. i want to make sure that whatever she ends up and we do not know she will settle in the
2:46 pm
united kingdom, at the children in that are protected from harm is why these strict parole conditions need to be properly enforced. it is something i have taken up with the secretary of state forjustice to say is that adequate resources going into this to make sure that not only she never comes the devon and coral again, is never able to contact the children she abused but that children and other people and the locality she settled be protected as well.|j people and the locality she settled be protected as well. i hope the authorities will make sure this is properly resourced because we know there are problems with probation and parole in terms of funding but this can be someone we cannot let through the net, it has to be enforced to keep people safe. thank you. in a moment ben is going to bring us the latest business news.first a look at the headlines on afternoon live borisjohnson says he's cautiously optimistic and that there's the rough shape of a deal on brexit — as downing street
2:47 pm
confirms he'll meet with top eu officials next week. but irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short, and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup— something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed by a partner or relative is at its highest level, for at least five years. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. speedloan finance which trades as a&b pawnbrokers and herbert and brown has closed shops across the uk. but it's unclear exactly how many have shut. the national pawnbrokers association says it's concerned that customers can't get through to the company's helpline. it said it will do everything it can to ensure customers rights are protected. sainsbury‘s has become the latest supermarket to target packaging waste. it says it'll halve the amount of plastic used in its stores by 2025.
2:48 pm
the retailer warned that customers will have to change their behaviour to achieve the "bold ambition" — such as by buying milk in plastic pouches. it is also inviting the public and business partners to submit new ideas. ovo will become the uk's second largest energy supplier after it agreed to buy sse's retail business for £500m. ovo — which was created 10 years ago — is already the uk's largest independent energy supplier. with an extra 3.5 million customers from sse and 8,000 staff, it will be second only to british gas in terms of size. some real worries for customers of a&b pawnbrokers? yes, many are being left in the dark after branches were closed and calls una nswered.this is after a&b pawnbrokers (albemarle & bond) and herbert brown stores
2:49 pm
have closed their doors, and its website says "this store" has ceased trading.albemarle & bond was established in 18110 — so it's almost 180 years old. owner speedloan finance has yet to make it clear whether any of the 116 stores will remain open. the pawnbrokers' trade body hit out at the firm's unanswered helpline.the national pawnbrokers association said. "in particular we are most unhappy with the fact that customers cannot get through to the helpline. we have demanded that the management of the company resolve this as a matter of urgency.". and we're talking about people who are often in urgent need of money who are most likely to be affected? exactly. pawnbrokers allow customers to offer something valuable as security for a loan, or buy items such as so they lend money quickly, but usually at a worse rate
2:50 pm
as security for a loan, or buy items such as jewellery and antiques. so they lend money quickly, but usually at a worse rate than banks. for example — a customer "pledges" an item, such as a gold ring for a set period of time, usually six months.pawnbroker gives 50% to 60% of the item's value as a cash loan. customer pays 7% to 8% interest every month. an item can be redeemed during the loan period by paying back the original loan and any interest up to that point. if you fail to pay back the loan, the item gets sold to cover the cost. and what happens to those pawned items that people might be wanting to get back? the company said that any items pawned in a&b stores will be transferred to a central store, and can be redeemed or sold through this operation. (read on) through this operation. lots of attention this week on the office rental space firm wework — and more news from them today? yes, it wants to list its shares on the nasdaq and will curb the voting power of founder and ceo adam neumann —
2:51 pm
so question is — will this calm investors‘ nerves ahead of its stock market debut next week? vivienne nunisjoins us now from ny. why is this raising eyebrows on wall street? wework is a very interesting company. we had had huge figures about how much this company would be valued at, up to $60 billion and only adhering it will be as low as $15 billion although investors have had questions around the way the ceo has run this company. he has done really eccentric things, the want we. there have been changes announced today way hi voting stock woodworking, no longer have so much sway, has also said both family
2:52 pm
members and has been allowed to be on the board either. we know his wife plays a key role in the company so we wife plays a key role in the company so we will have to wait and see whether investors are assuaged by those changes they will be listing week on september 23. they came under quite a bit of pressure from one of the main investors this week. absolutely. softbank is its biggest investors, adding $10 billion in wework and it had told the company to mainly put this on hold. we were seeing those valuation figures drop. wework seem to be pushing ahead, listing on the nasdaq and the robe a lot of interest in what happens. thank you. vivian at ilana lively stock exchange
2:53 pm
will stop let‘s have a look at the market. the pound has strengthened which puts pressure on because it makes exports less competitive and means profits when they sell in dollars or euros are worthless in pounds. a bit of a flat day on the index of the shares in london. in just three weeks this summer, nearly half a million painted lady butterflies were recorded as part of an annual count. it‘s a ‘once in a decade‘ phenomenon and this year 30 times more painted ladies arrived in the uk compared to last year. the last big influx of the migratory butterfly happened in 2009. the count also revealed that several other common species have
2:54 pm
experienced a good summer, helped by the fine weather. dr dan hoarejoins us from butterfly conservation in dorset, who organises the big butterfly count. thank you forjoining us quite seems like you had a lot of volunteers this year. we had a record participation, absolutely fantastic to have so many people involved, over 100,000 accounts picking all our records. anecdotally i have noticed this in to be a lot more butterflies around this year. how dependent are you for accuracy on the number of people who take part in making sure you have got the numbers? the more people who take pa rt numbers? the more people who take part the better our data is. we want lots of people to take part in their gardens and local parks, wherever they take their dog for a walk right across the uk because is really
2:55 pm
interesting about these numbers is how a common species can have a very different year in scotland or the north of england as it does in the south of england. we saw that with a common species like small tortoiseshell this year which did much better in the north and wasn‘t seenin much better in the north and wasn‘t seen in nearly such numbers in the south. which of the species that did best across the board? painted lady came out way in front, more than 400,000 observations and that three—week recording period at the end ofjuly and start of august which is remarkable. that is a species that come see it every year in small numbers, and intercontinental migrants spreading across europe and reaching our shores and the summer. we get that every year but every decade or so, the master we had a really good year was 2009, every ten years we get this conditions combine to send them all away and we get a account like
2:56 pm
this year. other species bounced back from last year, peacock butterfly number two, small white, gatekeeper, all widespread species that might visit your garden or cn your part. it looks cyclical to some extent, how concerned should be about climate change and butterfly populations if we are seeing these big increases this year? butterflies are big increases this year? butterflies a re really big increases this year? butterflies are really temperature—sensitive and the perception as you get some sunshine and you get the butterflies but actually there‘s an interaction going on, the butterflies need warm weather to fly but also need breeding habitats and when you get large numbers of butterflies that is a result of good weather conditions for them to fly but also good breeding conditions to lay eggs for their caterpillars to survive and actually the single year snapshots are fantastic, they show the big ups and downs but what matters more and the long—term is the long—term data
2:57 pm
going back 40 years show the long—term trends for the species and that tends to smooth out the influence of the weather in any given year. what we are seeing is that climate, strong climate change and strong response to changing temperatures across species in the uk. thank you. thank you. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. lovely dry day, plenty sunshine, showers to come and decent temperatures for scotland and northern ireland, as well as yesterday and the south, slightly fresh but what of sunshine. clear skies meet will turn quite chilly except for northern ireland and
2:58 pm
scotla nd except for northern ireland and scotland workload increases, the breeze picks up, rain not far away bocelli for early chilly for anglers and wheels but sunshine to come tomorrow. more cloud for northern ireland and especially into scotland when we will see some rain in the north—west, further south and will be sunny and probably one of than today. the rain in the north accompanied by a gale in northern scotland, still windy on sunday in the northern isles but the rain will be across northern england and north wales and perhaps other scotland and northern ireland, patchy lecturing. cooler and fresher to the north, but to the south in the sunshine it should be even warmer on sunday.
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
this hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m martine croxall. today at 3: borisjohnson says he‘s cautiously optimistic and that there‘s the rough shape of a deal on brexit. but he‘s faced backlash in yorkshire, where a heckler told him to get back to parliament. why are you not with them in parliament, sorting out the mess that you have created? would you mind? i am very happy to get back to parliament very soon. but what we want, i think to see... why don‘t you sort it out, boris? irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup — something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed as a result of domestic violence is at its highest level for five years, the vast
3:01 pm
majority were women. a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to dairy was not made aware of the ingredients in his meal by burger chain byron, an inquest has heard. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport. and the latest from gleneagles? yes, where europe or the one point advantage at the opening foursomes at the solheim cup. thank you very much, and darren is good though it here with good news for the weekend? yes, sunshine today. how long will it last? all the details later, plus the latest attempt by the japanese to change our weather. don‘t go away. fun, but not effective. also coming up... a bumper summer for butterflies. a once—in—a—decade mass emergence of painted ladies saw nearly half a million recorded across the uk.
3:02 pm
hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m maxine croxall. downing street has announced that borisjohnson will go to luxembourg on monday to have a working lunch with the president of the european commission. it‘s fuelled speculation of a renewed push by the government to try to secure a brexit deal. park the pm‘s chief brexit negotiator has been in brussels today, where he has presented some ideas on how the solve the irish border problem. speaking this afternoon in rotherham, the prime minister said that he was cautiously optimistic and that there was the rough shape of a deal to be done. his irish counterpart leo varadkar, though, said he wasn‘t sure mrjohnson would be able to make the compromises necessary to get the deal through. he also played down reports that the dup had reportedly agreed to "shift its red lines" over the backstop. mr varadkar‘s comments weren‘t the only setback for the prime minister today. in rotherham, he was heckled by a man who told him to "get
3:03 pm
back to parliament‘. our political correspondent jessica parker has more. downing street has announced that borisjohnson will go to luxembourg during his speech, the prime minister said there had been a good deal of progress in talks with brussels ahead of his meetings with senior officials on monday. when it comes to getting an agreement with brussels, how does he fancy his chances? i will see where we get. i would say we are cautiously optimistic. is that a good enough characterisation of where we are? i am cautiously optimistic. meanwhile, there is this man. order. he is loud, expressive,...lj couldn't give a flying flamingo what your view is! visibly divides
3:04 pm
opinion... and until the end of october, remains the highest authority in the house of commons. and an axe recently passed is designed to potentially force the prime minister to force that would seek a delay to brexit. —— an act. ministers have talked about talking there testing the law to its limit. the speaker has fired his own warning shot, saying he is prepared to be creative in upholding the will of parliament. not obeying the law must surely be a nonstarter. period. john burke was making it clear he will do what he can to stop any prospect of mps being sidelined when parliament returns. the speaker has form for defying convention and delivering some procedural surprises. these latest comments suggest he won‘t be shy of doing so again. the office of
3:05 pm
speaker has become irretrievably politicised, and radicalised. it would be unthinkable 15 years ago for a speaker to launch a personal attack on the prime minister like this. this is doncaster... a way through for borisjohnson is farfrom a way through for borisjohnson is far from clear. a crowd of obstacles await, whether it is getting a brexit deal with the eu or getting his way in the house of commons. i‘m joined by our political correspondent helen catt in westminster. not the easiest of trips to yorkshire for the prime minister today? know, as you heard there, heckled during that speech about the prorogation of parliament. mps he had not sitting. you saw him being slightly heckled by people on his
3:06 pm
walkabout, but the prime minister said he was cautiously optimistic about being able to reach a deal with the eu. he reiterated his point that the uk will be leaving on october 31. he said that again, and we know he is off on monday to continue his efforts to try to reach some sort of deal. he will be meeting the president of the european union jean—claude juncker and his chief negotiator michel barnier. that will be the first time since he took office. sometimes, optimism expressed by downing street isn‘t always matched by that coming from brussels, as it? no, and we have heard different things coming from different sites for some time now. “— from different sites for some time now. —— from different sides. the sense of optimism is being downplayed. there is a sense we will get some sort of deal, but not expecting monday to be any massive breakthrough moment. it isjust another meeting in a series of ongoing face—to—face meetings to try to get all sides to inch toward some
3:07 pm
kind of deal or compromise. helen, thank you. our ireland correspondent emma vardy is in belfast. how clear is leo varadkar about the progress boris johnson how clear is leo varadkar about the progress borisjohnson is talking about? well, there is definitely a contrast between what the irish prime minister leo varadkar is saying and perhaps what boris johnson and his allies, the democratic unionist party, are saying. we heard today leo varadkar telling the irish broadcaster rte that he still feels the two sides are quitea that he still feels the two sides are quite a long way apart, and that he feels any ideas put forward so farfor he feels any ideas put forward so far for the he feels any ideas put forward so farfor the irish borderfrom the uk side do not go far enough to clinch a european deal with the support of the republic of ireland. a lot of speculation came overnight, because the front page of the times this morning suggested the dup was suddenly about to roll back on its red lines and accept something they had previously rejected, which was a solution for northern ireland which
3:08 pm
could have meant a border down the irish sea, but that suggestion was rubbished almost immediately by the dup leader arlene foster. they said that saw it was nonsense and their position has not changed. there were many reasons they were not able to sign up to the backstop, which was agreed in the theresa may, which could have meant special treatment for northern ireland, northern ireland having to abide by some single market rules while the rest of the uk did its own thing, but that was not enough to get the dup votes then and it still isn‘t now. so the dup isn‘t going to sign up to anything which it believes will cut itself off from the rest of its market in great britain. and it doesn‘t want any different treatment, which were the suggestions that were hastily downplayed by the dup overnight. so while there is some sign boris johnson as being more positive, the dup itself says the tone has changed from the republic of ireland and it is now more likely to find a deal, that isn‘t the same as getting one.
3:09 pm
and as i say, we have heard from leo varadkar that he and as i say, we have heard from leo va radkar that he believes and as i say, we have heard from leo varadkar that he believes the sides are still some way apart. this all comes down, as it has been agonised over months, to the irish border. how will you find some sort of arrangements which remove the needs from czechs going from northern ireland to the public of ireland and vice versa? that is where the sweet spot will lie if there is any last—minute deal. —— the republic of ireland. the positions from the two sides certainly look as if there will be some need for movement from the dup and the eu in terms of what they would be prepared to accept irish border proposals if we are to get this deal through. they might be positive like it‘s from boris johnson and the dup, but until you find a solution both sides can agree to, that is where it has to lie. thank you, emma vardy. our europe correspondent gavin lee is in brussels, where the prime minister‘schief brexit negotiator has been this morning. gavin, what new common ground is there that might suggest there could be a
3:10 pm
change in both sides‘ approaches next week? if there is something, and we don‘t know about it publicly from eu officials last night, we have to work in slight caps on your back to the future mode, because the way the eu works in this way, commenting on how the meetings are going with boris johnson commenting on how the meetings are going with borisjohnson and as envoy david frost who has come two days a week for talks, he usually updates, and in this case it was last night. as of last night, all of the talks so far from david frost. michel barnier said this: we have no reason to have any optimism at all. i cannot say objectively with the contact under way, that there could bea contact under way, that there could be a deal in mid—october, but at the moment, we have no reason to be optimistic. cautiously optimistic, borisjohnson said. we are getting
3:11 pm
on the nuances of language here. has something happened today? well, david frost is back in brussels. we left about an hour ago, the uk side said that he had some new proposals. but from the eu side, no sense that they got anything other than the same you heard last night, imaginative, creative, but no proposals which will solve the backstop issue. so i am led to believe one of two things. either these are words to the electorate, borisjohnson project these are words to the electorate, boris johnson project in these are words to the electorate, borisjohnson project in the impression that he is doing something, firing ahead, or, boris johnson has something to meet with him on monday before he meets with jean—claude juncker for the first time, the president of the european commission, the first time since he was the prime minister. he will meet him and the luxembourg pro minister in luxembourg for a working lunch. we are not sure where yet, but we will be informed of both sides how that went. thanks very much, gavin lee in brussels and emma vardy in belfast.
3:12 pm
and helen catt in london. police will take no further action will be taken against leave.eu, a brexit campaign founded by businessman arron banks during the referendum in 2016, over breaches of electoral law. after reviewing a file of evidence submitted to the crown prosecution service the metropolitan police said: "it is clear that whilst some technical breaches of electoral law "were committed by leave.eu, in respect of the spending return "submitted for their campaign, there is insufficient evidence "to justify any further criminal investigation." domestic violence deaths in the uk are at their highest level for five years. figures obtained by bbc news show there were 173 domestic killings across the uk last year an increase of 32 on 2017. while both men and women are victims of violence in the home, the majority are female. several of the victims were stabbed, leading one criminologist to describe them as the "invisible victims of knife crime". the government says it‘s "fully
3:13 pm
committed" to tackling domestic violenceand ministers have promised legislation when parliament returns next month. tom symonds reports. rodrigo giraldo killed his wife, margory villegas, then put her body in the boot of this car before burying her in a shallow grave. officer: how long were you out looking for her? he lied to the police, claimed he tried to find her... for how long? two, three hours. ..and, as in so many domestic violence cases, what he did has shattered his family. there is the fact that we no longer have the greatest ally we've ever known, which is my mum, and really why i feel blessed to be here to be able to say these things because of her, her sacrifices, everything she ever did for us. you don't know when you can end up in a situation where you end up basically by yourself because you've lost your mum and your dad. we‘ve obtained police figures showing killings involving domestic violence reached a five—year high in 2018.
3:14 pm
they‘re also contributing to the rise in knife crime. our analysis of the first 100 killings in the uk this year shows six women and one man were stabbed to death in domestic violence. the vast majority of victims are female. invisible in knife crime is the number of women who are killed by the use of a knife, in the kitchen or in the bedroom, and that is part of the issue about violence against women — it mostly remains invisible. what is happening? well, there is a big concern that measures introduced to protect women and men threatened by domestic abuse are not being used enough. this is clare wood. she was murdered in 2009. the killer, her boyfriend, had an appalling history of violence against women. clare‘s law, as it became known, allows anyone to request information about their partner‘s past, but it has still not been made an actual law.
3:15 pm
that was due to happen this year and then brexit chaos intervened. campaigners say it is vital. the public‘s knowledge and awareness of this scheme is quite low so the aim is to improve that, but really we need to see a bill which goes beyond the criminal justice system because only one in five victims will ever report to the police. there are so many more ways that we can intervene, from health, housing, right across the public sector, and that is what we need this bill to deliver. this week, borisjohnson tweeted his commitment to push ahead with the package of new measures. we‘re fully committed to tackling this horrific crime, he said. as the children of margory villegas know, it tears families apart. you‘re watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: borisjohnson says he‘s cautiously optimistic and that there‘s the rough shape of a deal on brexit, as downing street confirms he‘ll meet with top eu officials next week. but irish prime minister leo
3:16 pm
varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short, and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup, something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed by a partner or relative is at its highest level for at least five years. an inquest has ruled that a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to a burger had not been made aware of the ingredients in his meal. owen carey collapsed after eating at a branch of byron in south london in 2017. his family has called for a change in the law to protect people with allergies. keith doyle reports. it was a meal to celebrate owen carey‘s 18th birthday. but the teenager died a short time after eating a chicken burger and suffering an allergic reaction in april 2017. the inquest heard that despite telling staff he had allergies, he was not made aware that the chicken was
3:17 pm
marinated in buttermilk, something he was allergic to. the coroner said a lack of information on the menu, which did not mention the presence of buttermilk in the chicken, meant both owen and the staff were reassured by it. his family spoke outside the coroner‘s court and called for what they named as owen‘s law. owen was the shining light in ourfamily and his death should not have happened. we hope now that something good can come out of it and we are calling on the government to change the law on allergen labelling in restaurants. the restaurant chain said its procedures were industry standard for the time but accepted more can be done to protect people with serious food allergies. it is clear that the current rules and requirements are not enough. and the industry needs to do more, more to help support customers with allergies and more to raise awareness of the risk of allergies. the coroner concluded owen carey died from a serious anaphylactic
3:18 pm
reaction less than an hour after eating the meal, a meal he had been reassured would not trigger his allergies. the singer lily allen has told the bbc that her record company warner music failed to take action after hearing allegations of sexual assault against her. the 34—year—old alleges she was attacked by an industry executive who works with the label. a spokesman for the company said it took accusations of sexual misconduct extremely seriously. miquita oliver has the details. music: smile by lily allen. lily allen has been in the music business since she was a teenager. last year, she wrote for the first time about her alleged sexual assault by an unnamed record industry executive in 2016. she says that, since the release of her memoir, her label have not acted on her allegations. have you had any engagement
3:19 pm
from your record label since you wrote about the assault that happened to you in the book? yes, i went out for dinner with one of the label bosses and he said to me that he had no idea about this incident until he read about it in the book. did he say, "now that we know, boy, are we going to do "something about it"? no. a spokesperson for the company said, "these allegations from 2016 are appalling. we take accusations of sexual misconduct extremely seriously and investigate claims that are raised with us. we‘re very focused on enforcing our code of conduct and providing a safe and professional environment at all times." lily said she wanted to speak out about her alleged attack in order to protect other artists in the industry, but she only came forward last year. i buried it within myself. actually, that is not entirely true because the working relationship between myself and this person did eventually disintegrate and i grew to really, really dislike him as a person
3:20 pm
and as an idea. but not at that time. at that time, i was still weirdly protecting him within it, because it was, i don‘t know, ijust wasn‘t in a great place. lily is currently working on her album. it will be her last with warner. the bbc understands lily allen‘s alleged attacker continues to work with the label. and you can listen to that interview with lily allen in full on the next episode podcast on bbc sounds. a nursery worker convicted of sexually abusing young children in her care will be banned from entering devon and cornwall when she‘s released from prison. vanessa george, who‘s from plymouth, is expected to be released soon, after being jailed in 2009. the parole board says she no longer poses a ‘significant risk to the public‘. duncan kennedy reports.
3:21 pm
it was in 2009 that vanessa george was jailed for a minimum of seven years for sexually abusing children in plymouth. she had taken photographs on her phone of her abusing children in a nursery and swapped the images over the internet. two months ago, the parole board said she could now be released. but because of the reaction of victims‘ families and others to that, the head of the national probation service has now taken the highly unusual move of writing an open letter to the people of plymouth, in which she says, vanessa george will not be allowed to return to devon or cornwall. the parole board has imposed an unusually large exclusion zone which reflects the nature of her crimes and the number of her victims." but some have questioned how such a wide ban could be enforced. i really think that they have a job on their hands because these are the most comprehensive parole conditions i have ever seen. she is not able to come to devon and cornwall, she is not able to access any
3:22 pm
internet—enabled devices, and, in the 21st century, that‘s really difficult. in custody, vanessa george admitted her crimes to police. but she has never given detectives the identities of all those she abused. it is one more reason why her imminent release is so controversial. malaria is one of the world‘s most deadly diseases. according to the un, it kills a child every 30 seconds. 90% of cases are in sub—saharan africa, where for the first time, a mass vaccination programme is being piloted. kenya is the latest country to join the tests. 300,000 children there are to be immunised. our global health correspondent tulip mazumdar has been to the country‘s national vaccine depot in kitengela, just outside the capital nairobi.
3:23 pm
so, there are around 100,000 vials of malaria vaccine here in this cold room. most of it has already gone to communities in western kenya where this pilot is taking place. and this here is the vaccine. it has been 30 years in the making and it works by training the immune system to attack the malaria parasite which is spread by mosquito bites. the child needs four doses of this vaccine before they reach two years old. it‘s been found to prevent malaria cases in four out of ten children. it has also been found to cut the most severe malaria cases by a third. this could potentially be a game—changer in the global fight against one of the world‘s oldest and deadliest diseases. this vaccine will greatly reduce a child's risk of getting malaria, but not to zero, so other precautions are important. bed nets, of course, are crucial.
3:24 pm
but also, access, prompt access, to malaria treatment, if they do become sick, is also an important part of the package. the lorries are now being loaded up ready for their long journeys to kisumu, kakamega and mombasa. it is mainly routine vaccinations that are going into these areas, but there are also some last—minute malaria materials that will also be going to the pilot areas. now, clinical trials have already shown the malaria vaccine to be safe and effective. the task now is to find out how well they work in real—life settings within communities, many of them very remote, here in kenya. the manufacturer whirlpool has intensified efforts to contact people who have bought tumble dryers which might pose a fire risk. since a full recall was announced injuly, the firm has located more than 60,000 potentially faulty dryers, but hundreds of thousands remain in uk homes. simon gompertz reports.
3:25 pm
the tumble dryers have been blamed for a series of fires, including this at a block of flats in london. now, at whirlpool, near bristol, thousands of tumble dryers are coming off the production lines to replace the faulty ones. one every ten seconds. they are letting the cameras in for the first time to try to show how safety conscious they have become. under the recall, owners can get a replacement, a modification or refund. of 500,000 problem dryers to find, 65,000 have been located sincejuly. the people that you see working on this floor are working flat out to make sure we have availability of products and the people taking the calls are working saturdays to make it convenient for you and when the consumer calls us to know within seven days they will get the unit installed. the problem was that behind where the drum normally is, there was a risk that fluff could build up in such big clumps that, were that to fall on the heating element underneath,
3:26 pm
it might catch fire. the fix has been a much better seal to prevent fluff build—up and also a pin on the back of the drum, so that when it went round, it would stop the fluff accumulating in big clumps. but more than 1.5 million owners, like denise in kent, had already got theirs modified, so don‘t qualify for the terms of the recall. and hers has overheated since the repair. that makes me very angry, very angry. i had the modification done when it was suggested. that caused my problems. and now i am in a situation where i am left with a faulty machine while other people have been given their money back or a new one. it‘s just not fair. brands affected are hotpoint, indesit, creda, swan and proline. there is growing pressure on whirlpool to do more. we need much greater progress. we need all of these unsafe tumble dryers out of our homes where they pose a fire risk today. we also need greater assurances
3:27 pm
that the modifications that whirlpool have undertaken are actually making those machines safer. dryers have become a big source of anxiety. denise will not leave the house while hers is running. time for a look at the weather. here‘s darren. what have you brought with you, and keep it clean. this is a snow cannon. why, it is the middle of summer? on a good day, windy day, it can fire stow from 15 metres. they have been testing it on a group of spectators, trying to change the weather just a group of spectators, trying to change the weatherjust in time for the tokyo olympic games next summer, because they are worried about heat and humidity, of course. so they are trained to use a snow cannon to bring down the temperature and humidity and make it more co mforta ble humidity and make it more comfortable for spectators, who are having a jolly old time. how hot and humid does it get in tokyo? 35 degrees are typical in the summer in
3:28 pm
tokyo, and a humidity of 80%, so very uncomfortable. they are trying to drop the temperature, and at the start of the experiment, the temperature was 25.1 celsius. now, if the temperature at the end of the experiment had dropped to 25.0 celsius, it might have been a success. but? but, it didn't. it was 25.1 celsius at the end of the experiment. so it failed. so they have to think about it all over again. they are looking at different alternatives, and they are particularly worried about the marathon, because of people running and all that heat for 26 miles. marathon, because of people running and all that heat for 26 mileslj have and all that heat for 26 miles.” have a question. they knew it would be this out when they decided to give the games to tokyo. it's like football all over again! it is. so they have got special road surfaces that don‘t absorb the heat, they are also going to start the marathon runners off earlier. in the middle of the night or something?
3:29 pm
and they are allowing the trees to grow to provide a bit more shelter. and remember this wacky idea of umbrella hats? yes. i promised you an umbrella hat, and in the name of science... have you found one?! and using all the bbc‘s resources... i like it! i bring you an umbrella hat. i love it. this one doesn‘t work. it doesn‘t even keep the rain. no, it is not wide enough, is it? probably not, but it is waterproof either! these umbrella hats are also quite dangerous. there are a number of pointy ends there. you are not selling it! somebody else tried to, and they failed. but of course, this snow cannon, we should not forget about the snow cannon. if that works, if they can provide more snow. . . works, if they can provide more snow... but it didn't work! perhaps over a large area, we didn‘t know i don‘t need this, but something like this! in the middle of summer? in the middle of summer. heat
3:30 pm
exhaustion, yeah. ithink the middle of summer. heat exhaustion, yeah. i think they have got a lot more thinking to do in the time they have available. he looks good, though, doesn‘t he? time they have available. he looks good, though, doesn't he? you have not really helped. i never really do. can you help us with the weather forecast for this country?” do. can you help us with the weather forecast for this country? i will try. another lovely weather watcher picture for you here, this one in west sussex. earlier today, we had cloud through the south coast, sitting across more southern areas to the channel islands. there is also a few show is creeping in across northern and western parts of scotland, but away from here, dry with lots of sunshine. the wind is lighter than yesterday, and it feels very pleasant out there. temperature is as yesterday, where we had 26 is the top temperature. 22 around the london area, a pleasant numberfor scotla nd london area, a pleasant numberfor scotland and northern ireland. through this evening and overnight, as the sky is clear and winds are light, it will get colder under clear skies. the scotland and northern ireland, we will have a lot
3:31 pm
more cloud coming in, the breeze freshening up, so it will be milder here, but temperatures in england and wales could be lower in rural areas, 2—3 perhaps. the pressure keeps it dry at the moment around the country, but at the moment, at the country, but at the moment, at the top we have this deep area of low pressure, which will bring wet and windy weather, and the brain that affect northern and western parts of scotland. there will be more cloud for northern ireland, and today, probably dry until the evening. plenty of sunshine for england and wales, and temperature is probably higher than today, perhaps 23 or so. it is worth focusing on the strength of the wind across scotland, because it will be across scotland, because it will be a windy day, strong winds, and gales across northern parts of scotland, gusts of 60 miles an hour or more, and those will transfer up towards the northern isles during tomorrow evening and tomorrow night, perhaps into sunday morning. that deep low pushes away. it also drags down that weather front there, which pushes away. it also drags down that weatherfront there, which is producing the brain. there won‘t be much rain on sunday, but it could be a cloudy and damp sort of day.
3:32 pm
northern england and north wales, perhaps the far south of scotland, raining, but to the north of that, cooler, fresher air. four southern parts of england and wales, dry with more sunshine. probably warmer as well, 25—26. that is probably the peak of the heat. the weather front move southwards, and there will be much rain on it at all. a band of cloud with a bit of drizzle clears away early next week, and the wind direction changes, drawing down to the west. that will drop temperatures, bringing cooler and fresher air, but with high—pressure close by, next week still looks dry for that most of the country.
3:33 pm
this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson says he‘s cautiously optimistic and that there‘s the rough shape of a deal on brexit— but he‘s faced backlash in yorkshire where a heckler told him to get back to parliament. why are you not with them in parliament, sorting out the mess that you have created? would you mind? i am very happy to get back to parliament very soon. but what we want, i think to see... why don‘t you sort it out, boris? irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short and that he was not aware of any
3:34 pm
change in position by the dup— something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed as a result of domestic violence is at its highest level for five years — the vast majority were women. a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to dairy was not made aware of the ingredients in his meal, by burger chain byron, an inquest has heard. sport now on afternoon live withjohn. solheim cup — the latest from gleneagles. europe leading on the opening day edging out the united states by a point after this moring‘s foursomes, 2 and half lead and have an advantage in this afternoon‘s fourball matches as they look to wrestle the cup back from the americans who‘ve won
3:35 pm
the last two editions. let‘s bring you the latest, this is the afternoon‘s fourballs.europe are up in three. julie inkster the american captain, making the surpise move of splitting the korda sisters who combined so brialliantly this morning. they won the only match for the usa, in the foursomes, the alternate shot format winning 6 and 4. beating caroline massson and jodie ewart shadoff. charlie hull and azahara munoz anchoring home europe in the final match to give them the lead. and the ashes. yes england have been making inroads into australia‘s batting on day two but the man who‘s been a constant thorn in their side
3:36 pm
all summer — steve smith — is still there. here‘s the latest scorecard england were bowled out for 294 intheirfirst innings with jos buttler finally dismissed for 70. jofra archer quickly dismissed both openers, marnus labushagne and smith added 69 before labushagne fell — also to archer. sam curran got matthew wade but smith grinds relentlessly on alice tai‘s impressive performances at the world para championships continue. she set a new world record time in her heats in the s8 50metre freestyle, she‘s won four gold medals at the games so far. chelsea manager frank lampard believes there have been more than four refereeing mistakes through the use of var in the premier league this season.
3:37 pm
managing director of the professional game match officials limited mike riley said yesterday that four decisions should have been changed by var but weren‘t. lampard disagrees.. maybe we should have expected and in between momentary were coming to terms. from howi between momentary were coming to terms. from how i have seen var watch behind—the—scenes trying to get everything right and i would appreciate it has the minority of things that have not been quite right. there‘s been racing success for frankie dettori today — as he eased to victory in the doncaster cup. dettori rode the 9—1 on favourite stradivarius to victory — finishing ahead of cleonte and max dynamite. the win means stradivarious has now completed the stayers triple crown, with this success adding to the wins he had in the ascot gold cup and the goodwood cup. that‘s all the sport for now.
3:38 pm
i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. more now that an inquest has ruled that a teenager — who died from an allergic reaction to a burger — had not been made aware of the ingredients in his meal. owen carey collapsed after eating at a branch of byron in south london, in 2017. his family has called for a change in the law to protect people with allergies. in the last hour, the family of owen carey have given this statement. the menu misled owen. she had reassurance that the menu being described as ducik and contains nothing other than chicken. yes it was marinated in buttermilk and owen didn‘t know that and maybe the waiter did not know that and for that reason he was said something
3:39 pm
that reason he was said something that contained an hour and we need to know that the restaurant industry asa to know that the restaurant industry as a whole will adopt what will become owens law that they will voluntarily take action. mr rowson of bilin has the power to instructor staff today, to make them more clear in what the news contain and to have that dialogue and a much more open manner. and make sure no one else suffers the fate that owen suffered. what do you want specifically the law to say? we want owen's law to require the restaurant industry to make the ingredients in their meals more explicit on the face of the menu so that at the point of ordering the dialogue that they say ta kes pla ce ordering the dialogue that they say takes place does take place. we want them also to make sure the training of the staff is far more thorough.
3:40 pm
it is clear to us that perhaps byron‘s training was not as good as it should have been and the nature of the stuff they have an turnover they have clearly means they run a risk of staff not really being properly trained. we cannot say exactly what happened but it is clear that better training and quality of menus, a font people can see that that is clearly visible on the face of the menu than on the reverse in the bottom left—hand corner, a black font and print on blue background, nobody reads that. that‘s what the law we hope will see changed. impossible to calculate your loss but what do you hope his legacy might be? more and more people know are having allergies,
3:41 pm
hundreds of thousands of people and i hope that improving the safety of people when they eat out at restaurants who have allergies wrote basically mean that his legacy will move forward and save lives. democrats hoping to become their party‘s presidential nominee have failed to land any major blows on the front—runner, joe biden, in a televised debate on abc news in houston. it was the third such event — but the first to feature all of the main contenders. our correspondent, laura trevelyan gave us this update from houston. a fascinating evening wearjoe biden was in the centre of the stage
3:42 pm
flanked by his progressive rivals, elizabeth warren has been getting momentum and bernie sanders butjoe biden turned the table on his rivals and got them to defend their expansive and expensive programmes for government run health care. it was a classic performance, he started strong and rambled and came back strong but another fascinating thing was how the second tier of candidates tried to break out and julian castro who is from texas and was in the barack obama administration came under fire after for trying to imply thatjoe biden was old and forgetful and could not remember details of his own health policy. i caghut up with him this morning and asked was that really what he meant thatjoe biden as old and forgetful? what what people have said they are glad i pointed out his plan would leave 10 million people uncovered and he denied people would have to buy into his plan, i was amazed he denied
3:43 pm
saying that two minutes after he had said it. that is why i pointed that out, that is a big difference because his plan would leave ten million people uncovered my approach would come on everybody. whether it is vice presidentjoe biden or somebody else have somebody says one thing and then two minutes later deny that they said it i am going to call them on that and that is what i did. another viral moment came from the former congressman beto o‘rourke from el paso which suffer the mass shooting earlier in the summer when hispanics dominantly targeted and he has a position on gun control which is far more radical than anyone in the
3:44 pm
democratic field, the position that they want to ban assault weapons but o‘rourke wants a mandatory buy—back of these weapons. republicans are saying this is democrats coming from their guns but o‘rourke said public opinion is shifting and this is the policy that americans want. i am listening to everyone on this issue and most want to see those guns return, do not want to see them in our streets ought to be used against us so if we pass that law it will be mandatory that you sell that weapon back to the united states government but a quick reminder, you do not need it to hunt for self defence, you only need it for use on a battlefield to kill people, that's what it is designed for and good at, it has no place in civilian life. i believe the majority of americans
3:45 pm
whether not o‘rourke becomes the nominee may having an influence on the democratic party are laying out that position on guns. a very interesting evening here in houston, joe biden still seems to be the frontrunner. interesting that all three front runners are over a 70s of the democratic party not yet experiencing a generational shift. at this stage in the campaign to thousand seven barack obama was behind hillary clinton and look what happened there, he became the nominee. a way to go yet. in a moment the latest business news.first a look at the headlines on afternoon live borisjohnson says he‘s cautiously optimistic and that there‘s the rough shape of a deal on brexit — as downing street confirms he‘ll meet with top eu officials next week.
3:46 pm
but irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short, and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup— something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed by a partner or relative is at its highest level, for at least five years. the number of people killed by a partner or relative is at its highest level, for at least five years. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live speedloan finance which trades as a&b pawnbrokers and herbert and brown has closed shops across the uk. but it‘s unclear exactly how many have shut. the national pawnbrokers association says it‘s concerned that customers can‘t get through to the company‘s helpline. it said it will do everything it can to ensure customers rights are protected. sainsbury‘s has become the latest supermarket to target packaging waste. it says it‘ll halve the amount of plastic used in its stores by 2025. the retailer warned that customers will have to change their behaviour to achieve the "bold ambition" — such as by buying milk in plastic pouches. it is also inviting the public
3:47 pm
and business partners to submit new ideas. ovo will become the uk‘s second largest energy supplier after it agreed to buy sse‘s retail business for £500m.0vo — which was created 10 years ago — is already the uk‘s largest independent energy supplier. with an extra 3.5 million customers from sse and 8,000 staff, it will be second only to british gas in terms of size. there‘s a big push to get people on to smart meters — but many of them may not be so smart afer all! yes, it seems nearly a third of all energy companies fitting smart meters are still installing old technology. government guidance says that since the middle of march 2019 customers should only have been given second generation smart meters. however, eight companies still installing first generation smart meters say
3:48 pm
the network is not reliable enough to switch customers on to. they say this is particularly a problem in northern england and scotland. what‘s the difference between the first and second generation smart meters? the second generation of meters is supposed to be able to connect remotely to a national network, which should make switching supplier possible, for the first time for many customers. when contacted by the bbc, the companies emphasised that the issues were industry—wide problems. two different contracts were given out by the government to install those networks. the southern communications network is being run on pre—existing mobile technology, while the northern communications network is being run via specialist radio signal. so is that why there‘s a geographical difference? well a number of the companies claim that problems with the signal in that northern communications network mean that they cannot reliably connect
3:49 pm
customers to it. therefore customers living in the south of england and wales are much more likely to receive a second generation meter, than those living in the north of england and scotland.the company responsible for the operation of the data networks across the uk, smart dcc, said thousands of second generation meters were being installed in the north every day. let‘s stay with energy matters — because that ovo deal you mentioned in the headlines... that‘s a big move isn‘t it? yes — ovo will become the uk‘s second largest energy supplier after it agreed to buy sse‘s retail business for £500m.the deal is expected to be completed in late 2019 or early 2020. sse — one of the big six energy suppliers — said there would be no immediate impact on customers after completion — and addedit will "do all it can to ensure a smooth transition for customers and employees".
3:50 pm
rik smith, energy expert, uswitch.com. is this good news or not for customers?*what about the smart meters story — what do you make of that?> everyone should be reassured primarily because ovo are the best of the big six. in terms of customer service this is a fantastic move but thatis service this is a fantastic move but that is going to be difficulty in integrating these businesses. it is u nfortu nately a integrating these businesses. it is unfortunately a matter and it is quite possible that may be some wrinkles for those customers but nonetheless at any point they are not reassured by the service they are getting they can always switch supplier to somebody they prefer in terms of price of customer service. normally when we hear about mergers the theory as that if you have fewer
3:51 pm
biggerfirms there is the theory as that if you have fewer bigger firms there is less of a need for them to compete to win custom over. that is a valid observation but we have over 60 energy suppliers competing in the market. there will still be the other five of the big six vying for business has no was on the other small suppliers. when it comes to the small suppliers, the well backed suppliers offer that the best customer service and price product and often those are the green so that is still remains a welcome choice out there for anyone looking for that better deal.” welcome choice out there for anyone looking for that better deal. i am keen to get your thoughts on the smart metre study, what do you make of it, the fact that customers seem to be getting the first generation and not second generation does? when we did a survey last month of over 2000 households we found that still 20% of them rubbing off on these first—generation metres since march this year. march 2019 is a relevant
3:52 pm
date because after that point effectively the older generation we just cannot be counted towards an energy supplier‘s obligations to install smart metres by 2020. it really does come down to the fact that the roll—out has been somewhat bungled and it is this north—south divide with the north very much running behind schedule and making it very difficult for suppliers to get second—generation metres installed. thank you. they keep saying to me to get a smart metre installed but i stilljust fill in the card and said to them. i then send it and online. that is very analog of you, i am surprised. in just three weeks this summer, nearly half a million painted lady butterflies were recorded as part of an annual count.it‘s a ‘once in a decade‘ phenomenon and this year 30 times more painted ladies arrived
3:53 pm
in the uk compared to last year. the last big influx of the migratory butterfly happened in 2009. the count also revealed that several other common species have experienced a good summer, helped by the fine weather. a little earlier i spoke to dr dan hoare, from butterfly conservation in dorset, who help to organise the big butterfly count... we had a record participation, absolutely fantastic to have so many people involved, over 100,000 accounts picking all over 100,000 counts breaking all our records. anecdotally i have noticed this in to be a lot more butterflies around this year. how dependent are you for accuracy on the number of people who take part in making got the right numbers? the more people who take part the better our data is. we want lots of people to take part in their gardens and local parks, wherever they take their dog for a walk right across the uk because is really
3:54 pm
interesting about these numbers is how a common species can have a very different year in scotland or the north of england as it does in the south of england. we saw that with a common species like small tortoiseshell this year which did much better in the north and wasn‘t seen in nearly such numbers in the south. which of the species did best across the board? painted lady came out way in front, more than 400,000 observations in that three—week recording period at the end ofjuly and start of august which is remarkable. that is a species that come see it every year in small numbers, and intercontinental migrants spreading across europe and reaching our shores and the summer. we get that every year but every decade or so, the master we had a really good year
3:55 pm
was 2009, every ten years we get this conditions combine to send them all away and we get a account like this year. other species bounced back from last year, peacock butterfly number two, small white, gatekeeper, all widespread species that might visit your garden or see in your park. it looks cyclical to some extent, how concerned should be about climate change and butterfly populations if we are seeing these big increases this year? butterflies are really temperature—sensitive and the perception is you get some sunshine and you get the butterflies but actually there‘s an interaction going on, the butterflies need warm weather to fly but also need breeding habitats and when you get large numbers of butterflies that is a result of good weather conditions for them to fly but also good breeding conditions to lay eggs for their caterpillars to survive and actually the single year snapshots are fantastic, they show the big ups and downs but what matters more and the long—term is the long—term data
3:56 pm
going back 40 years show the long—term trends for the species and that tends to smooth out the influence of the weather in any given year. what we are seeing is that climate, strong climate change and strong response to changing temperatures across species in the uk. thank you. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. hello there it‘s been a lovely day across most parts of the country so far and this more warm sunshine to come through the rest hello there it‘s been a lovely day across most parts of the country so far and this more warm sunshine to come through the rest of this afternoon. hey we‘ve got the blue skies here in a linkage there. there‘s still some cloud affecting the english channel through to the channel islands and we‘ve still got the cloud bringing a few showers into the north and west of scotland a chance of one or two for northern ireland.
3:57 pm
for northern areas the winds could be a little bit blustery across northern scotland but elsewhere the winds much lighter than they were yesterday. and temperatures will be lower than yesterday but still very pleasant 17 or 18 degrees scotland and northern ireland a high of 22 in southern parts of england. it‘ll turn chilly though overnight with the clear skies and light winds. but you can see how cloud increases across northern ireland and particularly scotland so right not far away from the northwest and particularly scotland so rain not far away from the northwest by the end of the night. so much milder here than it will be for england and wales where in some rural areas we could find temperatures down to two or three degrees. we‘ve got that clearer sky underneath this area of high pressure that‘s giving us the sunshine today and will again tomorrow. we‘ve got those weather systems approaching the far north of the uk. so not only have we got cloud for scotland in northern ireland we‘re also going to find some rain particularly up towards the northern isles into the highlands it will turn much wetter during the afternoon. for england and wales it‘s likely to be dry and again there‘ll be lots of sunshine probably temperatures a little bit higher than today 23 even 24 degrees
3:58 pm
as well as turning wet it‘s turning windy across scotland in particular strong winds gales in the north. gusts of 60 miles an hour and those gale force winds likely to continue to affect the northern isles overnight into sunday morning. at the same time we‘ve got the weather front bringing the rain slipping it‘s way further south it‘s a bit weaker by this stage but get stuck really across northern ireland northern england, north wales perhaps the far south of scotland so these areas seeing some cloud and a bit of rain and drizzle for much of scotland. further north it will be brighter with some sunshine and one or two showers further south across southern parts of england and wales we‘re enjoying the sunshine and the warmth with temperatures peaking at 25 or even 26 degrees. that weather front is very weak, it will bring a little bit of drizzle southwards as we head into early next week. it‘s more a band of cloud on the whole it‘s running into that area of high pressure but it won‘t be as warm we‘ll find cooler fresher air pushing down onto north westerly winds but still generally dry.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m martine croxall. today at 4: borisjohnson says he‘s cautiously optimistic and that there‘s the rough shape of a deal on brexit. but he‘s faced backlash in yorkshire, where a heckler told him to "get back to parliament". why are you not with them in parliament, sorting out the mess that you have created? would you mind? i am very happy to get back to parliament very soon. but what we want, i think to see... why don‘t you sort it out, boris? irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup, something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed as a result of domestic violence is at its highest level for five years. the vast majority were women.
4:01 pm
a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to dairy was not made aware of the ingredients in his meal, by burger chain byron, an inquest has heard. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. including some golf at gleneagles? yes, europe leading by a point on day one of the solheim cup. the latest on this afternoon‘s football matches also. thanks very much. and we will get all the weather updates from darren. hello, martin. good afternoon. lots of sunshine here today, and for many parts of the country, it will last through the weekend, butjoy me later for through the weekend, butjoy me laterfor all through the weekend, butjoy me later for all the details. —— join me. also coming up — we‘ll be finding out how stripes and speed, could help footballers, just like in the animal kingdom. that‘s in news nationwide just after 4:30.
4:02 pm
hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m maxine croxall. downing street has announced that borisjohnson will go to luxembourg on monday to have a working lunch with the president of the european commission with borisjohnson has saying he "won‘t be deterred by anybody" from leaving the eu on 31st october. speaking this afternoon in rotherham the prime minister said that he was "cautiously optimistic" and that there was the rough shape of a deal to be done. the pm‘s chief brexit negotiator has been in brussels today, where he has presented some ideas on how to solve the irish border problem. however, after reports that the dup had reportedly agreed to "shift its red lines" over the backstop, the irish president leo varadkar said he wasn‘t sure mrjohnson would be able to make the compromises necessary to get the deal through and that what has been proposed so far "falls very far short."
4:03 pm
mr varadkar‘s comments weren‘t the only setback for the prime minister today. whilst in rotherham, he was heckled by a man who told him to "get back to parliament". our political correspondent jessica parker reports. in the mood to do a deal? a historic shop... no messing about! borisjohnson is a historic shop... no messing about! boris johnson is in a historic shop... no messing about! borisjohnson is in yorkshire today, but will hotfoot it to luxembourg next week for brexit talks. and not eve ryo ne next week for brexit talks. and not everyone is after a selfie. during a speech, the prime minister was heckled over what he suspended parliament. are you going back to parliament? indeed. yeah? yeah. i am all in favour of our indeed. yeah? yeah. i am all in favourof ourmps... indeed. yeah? yeah. i am all in favour of our mps. .. why are you not with them in parliament sorting out the mess that you have created? but when it comes to getting an agreement with brussels, how does he fa ncy agreement with brussels, how does he fancy his chances? we will see where we get. i would say i am cautiously
4:04 pm
optimistic. is that a good enough characterisation? i am cautiously optimistic. meanwhile, there is this man. order! he is allowed... expressive...” couldn't give a flying flamingo what your view is! , visibly divides opinion, and until the end of october, remains the highest authority in the house of commons. european union withdrawal... and an actor recently passed is designed to force the prime minister to forced a delay to brexit, but borisjohnson has said he won‘t, and ministers have talked about testing the law to its limits. the speaker has now fired his own warning shot, saying he is prepared to be creative in upholding the will of parliament. not obeying the law must surely be a nonstarter. period. john bercow is making it clear he
4:05 pm
will do whatever he can dropping any prospect of empties being sidelined when parliament returns, and this speaker has form for defying convention and delivering procedural surprises. so these latest comments suggest he will not be shy of doing so again. the office of speaker has become irretrievably politicised, and radicalised. it would have been unthinkable ten or 15 years ago for the speaker of the house of commons to launch a personal attack on the prime minister like this. do you want to come round and meet helen? find a deal here. this is doncaster. the way through for borisjohnson is farfrom the way through for borisjohnson is far from clear. a crowd of obstacles await, whether it is getting a brexit deal with the eu or getting his way in the house of commons. our political correspondent helen catt sent us this from westminster. you heard there, borisjohnson was
4:06 pm
heckled during that speech about the prorogation of parliament. obviously, mps here not sitting. you also saw him being slightly heckled by people on his walkabout. but the prime minister said he was cautiously optimistic about being able to reach a deal with the eu. he reiterated his point that the uk will be leaving on the 31st of october. he said that again, and we know that he is off on monday to continue his efforts to reach some sort of deal. he will meet jean—claude juncker, president of the european commission, and his chief negotiator michel barnier. that will be the first time he has met them since taking office. sometimes optimism expressed by downing street isn‘t always matched by that coming from brussels, is it? know, and we have heard different things from different sides for some time now. actually, the sense of optimism is being slightly downplayed. there is optimism he will get some sort of deal, but we do not expect monday to be any sort
4:07 pm
of massive breakthrough moment, and it is just another meeting in a series of ongoing face—to—face meetings to sort of try to get all sides to inch towards some sort of deal, some sort of compromise. our ireland correspondent emma vardy is in belfast. well, there is definitely a contrast between what the irish pro minister leo varadkar are saying and perhaps what boris johnson and leo varadkar are saying and perhaps what borisjohnson and his allies the democratic unionist party are saying, because we had today leo varadkar telling the saying, because we had today leo va radkar telling the irish broadcaster rte that he still feels the two sides are quite a long way apartand any the two sides are quite a long way apart and any ideas put forward so farfor apart and any ideas put forward so far for the apart and any ideas put forward so farfor the irish borderfrom the uk side do not go far enough to clinch a european deal with the support of the republic of ireland. a lot of speculation came overnight because the front page of the time this morning suggested the dup was suddenly about to row back on its red lines and accept something they had previously rejected, a solution for northern ireland, which could have meant a border down the irish
4:08 pm
sea. that suggestion was rubbished almost immediately by the dup leader arlene foster, and they said that story was nonsense in their position has not changed. there were many reasons they were not able to sign up reasons they were not able to sign up to the backstop, which was agreed under theresa may and could have meant some special treatment for northern ireland, northern ireland having to abide by some single market rules while the rest of the uk did its own thing. that wasn‘t enough to get the dup votes then, and it still isn‘t now. so the dup is not going to sign up to anything which it believes will cut itself off from the rest of its market in great britain, and it doesn‘t want any different treatment, which was the suggestion that was hastily downplayed by the dup overnight. so whilst there is still some sign that borisjohnson is whilst there is still some sign that boris johnson is being whilst there is still some sign that borisjohnson is being more positive, the dup itself saying the tone has changed from the republic of ireland then it is now more likely to get a deal, that is not
4:09 pm
the same as getting one. we heard from leo varadkar he believes the sides are still some way apart. this all comes down, of course, as it has been agonised overfor all comes down, of course, as it has been agonised over for once, all comes down, of course, as it has been agonised overfor once, the irish border. how are you going to find some kind of arrangement which removes the need for czechs going from the republic of ireland to northern ireland, or vice versa? that is where the sweet spot will lie if they will be any last—minute deal. the positions from the two sides at the moment certainly seem as if they will be movement from the dup, movement from the eu in terms of what they would be willing to accept in terms of the irish border proposals if we are going to get this deal through. there may be positive language from boris johnson in the dup, but until you find it a solution which both sides can agree to, that‘s where it has to lie. and our europe corresponent gavin lee gave us this update from brussels. if there is something that we don‘t know about from eu officials, since
4:10 pm
last night, we have to do work in slight back to the future mode, because the way the eu works in this way, comments from michel barnier on how the meetings are going with borisjohnson how the meetings are going with boris johnson and as how the meetings are going with borisjohnson and as eu envoy david frost, who has come from the past two days a week for talks, and he updates... usually, well, it was last night. so all the talk so far from david frost, michel barnier said this... there is no reason to have any optimism at all. i cannot say objectively with the context under way that there could be a deal between now and mid—october, but until now, we have no reason to be optimistic. cautiously optimistic, borisjohnson, we are getting into nuances of language here. has something happened today? well, david frost was back in brussels. he left about an hour ago, and david frost was back in brussels. he leftaboutan hourago, and i david frost was back in brussels. he left about an hour ago, and i was told by the uk side he had some new proposals, but from the eu side, no sense they got anything other than what you heard last night, which was
4:11 pm
imaginative, creative, but no proposals which will solve the backstop issues. so i am led to believe one of two things. either these are words to the electorate, which borisjohnson these are words to the electorate, which boris johnson is these are words to the electorate, which borisjohnson is putting forwards to suggest there is some kind of sense of him doing what he can, firing ahead, or borisjohnson has something to take with him on monday when he meets with jean—claude juncker for the first time, the president of the european commission, first time since he was prime minister. in luxembourg, he will meet him and the prime minister of luxembourg for a working lunch. we are not sure where yet, but we are being told by both sides how that went. gavin lee and brussels. —— in brussels. police will take no further action against leave.eu, a brexit campaign founded by businessman arron banks during the referendum in 2016, over breaches of electoral law. after reviewing a file of evidence submitted to the crown prosecution service, the metropolitan police said: "it is clear that whilst some
4:12 pm
technical breaches of electoral law "were committed by leave.eu in respect of the spending return "submitted for their campaign, there is insufficient evidence "to justify any further criminal investigation." domestic violence deaths in the uk are at their highest level for five years. figures obtained by bbc news show there were 173 domestic killings across the uk last year, an increase of 32 on 2017. while both men and women are victims of violence in the home, the majority are female. several of the victims were stabbed, leading one criminologist to describe them as the "invisible victims of knife crime". the government says it‘s "fully committed" to tackling domestic violence, and ministers have promised legislation when parliament returns next month. tom symonds reports. rodrigo giraldo killed his wife, margory villegas, then put her body in the boot of this car before burying her in a shallow grave. officer: how long were you out looking for her?
4:13 pm
he lied to the police, claimed he tried to find her... for how long? two, three hours. ..and, as in so many domestic violence cases, what he did has shattered his family. there is the fact that we no longer have the greatest ally we've ever known, which is my mum, and really why i feel blessed to be here to be able to say these things because of her, her sacrifices, everything she ever did for us. you don't know when you can end up in a situation where you end up basically by yourself because you've lost your mum and your dad. we‘ve obtained police figures showing killings involving domestic violence reached a five—year high in 2018. they‘re also contributing to the rise in knife crime. our analysis of the first 100 killings in the uk this year shows six women and one man were stabbed to death in domestic violence. the vast majority of victims are female. invisible in knife crime is the number of women who are killed by the use
4:14 pm
of a knife, in the kitchen or in the bedroom, and that is part of the issue about violence against women — it mostly remains invisible. what is happening? well, there is a big concern that measures introduced to protect women and men threatened by domestic abuse are not being used enough. this is clare wood. she was murdered in 2009. the killer, her boyfriend, had an appalling history of violence against women. clare‘s law, as it became known, allows anyone to request information about their partner‘s past, but it has still not been made an actual law. that was due to happen this year and then brexit chaos intervened. campaigners say it is vital. the public‘s knowledge and awareness of this scheme is quite low so the aim is to improve that, but really we need to see a bill which goes beyond the criminal justice system because only one in five victims will ever report to the police. there are so many more ways that we can intervene, from health, housing,
4:15 pm
right across the public sector, and that is what we need this bill to deliver. this week, borisjohnson tweeted his commitment to push ahead with the package of new measures. we‘re fully committed to tackling this horrific crime, he said. as the children of margory villegas know, it tears families apart. you‘re watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: borisjohnson says he‘s cautiously optimistic and that there‘s the rough shape of a deal on brexit — as downing street confirms he‘ll meet with top eu officials next week. but irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short, and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup, something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed by a partner or relative is at its highest level, for at least five years.
4:16 pm
and in sport, or charley hull and her partner give europe a one—point lead after the foursomes this morning. europe are leading in two have this afternoon‘s fourball matches. after being bowled out, england have taken four after being bowled out, england have ta ken four australian wickets after being bowled out, england have taken four australian wickets on day two of the fifth and final ashes test. their nemesis steve smith is still there, having reached yet another half—century. and alice tai continued her impressive performances at the world parrot championship, setting a new championship record time in her heat in the 50 metre freestyle. she has already won four gold so far. —— world para championship. more to come later. an inquest has ruled that a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to a burger had not been made aware of the ingredients in his meal. owen carey collapsed after eating at a branch of byron
4:17 pm
in south london, in 2017. his family has called for a change in the law to protect people with allergies. keith doyle reports. it was a meal to celebrate owen carey‘s 18th birthday. but the teenager died a short time after eating a chicken burger and suffering an allergic reaction in april 2017. the inquest heard that despite telling staff he had allergies, he was not made aware that the chicken was marinated in buttermilk, something he was allergic to. the coroner said a lack of information on the menu, which did not mention the presence of buttermilk in the chicken, meant both owen and the staff were reassured by it. his family spoke outside the coroner‘s court and called for what they named as owen‘s law. owen was the shining light in ourfamily and his death should not have happened. we hope now that something good can come out of it and we are calling on the government to change the law on allergen labelling in restaurants. the restaurant chain said its procedures were industry standard for the time but accepted more can be done to protect people
4:18 pm
with serious food allergies. it is clear that the current rules and requirements are not enough. and the industry needs to do more, more to help support customers with allergies and more to raise awareness of the risk of allergies. the coroner concluded owen carey died from a serious anaphylactic reaction less than an hour after eating the meal, a meal he had been reassured would not trigger his allergies. stephen yaxley—lennon — known as tommy robinson — has been released from prison two months into his sentence. the english defence league founder had beenjailed for nine months for contempt of court after live—streaming on facebook a trial, putting the trial at risk of collapse which could have seen the defendants not convicted. he has denied being attacked in prison, and claimed he was kept in solitary confinement. a nursery worker convicted
4:19 pm
of sexually abusing young children in her care will be banned from entering devon and cornwall when she‘s released from prison. vanessa george, who‘s from plymouth, is expected to be released soon, after being jailed in 2009. the parole board says she no longer poses a "significant risk to the public". duncan kennedy reports. it was in 2009 that vanessa george was jailed for a minimum of seven years for sexually abusing children in plymouth. she had taken photographs on her phone of her abusing children in a nursery and swapped the images over the internet. two months ago, the parole board said she could now be released. but because of the reaction of victims‘ families and others to that, the head of the national probation service has now taken the highly unusual move of writing an open letter to the people of plymouth, in which she says vanessa george will not be allowed to return to devon or cornwall.
4:20 pm
but some have questioned how such a wide ban could be enforced. i really think that they have a job on their hands because these are the most comprehensive parole conditions i have ever seen. she is not able to come to devon and cornwall, she is not able to access any internet—enabled devices, and, in the 21st century, that‘s really difficult. in custody, vanessa george admitted her crimes to police. i knew it was wrong when i was doing it. but she has never given detectives the identities of all those she abused. it is one more reason why her imminent release is so controversial.
4:21 pm
let‘s return now to news that domestic violence deaths in the uk are at their highest level for five years. figures obtained by bbc news show there were 173 domestic killings across the uk last year — an increase of 32 on 2017. to discuss this, suzanne jacob is here from safelives, a uk—wide charity dedicated to ending domestic abuse. she joins me now from the from rachel williams‘ survivor conference in newport. suzanne, welcome, and thanks for joining us this afternoon. what are the powers that exist now before we see this domestic abuse bill brought before parliament that could be used more effectively? well, there are a really wide range of powers held by statutory agencies, which might be the police or probation services, or in some cases, children‘s social care. actually, those different agencies have a lot of power at their disposal at the moment, so we warmly welcome the prime minister‘sconfirmation that the domestic abuse bill will be brought forward , domestic abuse bill will be brought
4:22 pm
forward, but we also want to see really creative, robust use of those existing powers, which sit among all those different agencies, to constrain somebody‘s behaviour so they can‘t be in a position to think that they can take somebody else‘s life away from them. why are those powers not being used to best effect? well as you said, i'm here at rachel williams‘ conference here today, the first of its kind in wales. hundreds and hundreds of domestic abuse survivors have travelled from across the uk to be here today, and what they are saying consistently is that the problems are with lack of belief, so they are not being believed when they take that incredibly brave step to say, this is happening to me. they are not having their disclosure is acted on, and certainly not in a way that is robust and using the powers i mentioned available to people. and there are gaps between the different systems, the different agency systems, the different agency systems, so you are falling through the gap as a survivor and a victim, and that is putting you at risk,
4:23 pm
because we are not taking that really coordinated approach to wrap around the person causing harm and make it very clear to that individual through the use of those powers that we will tolerate domestic abuse. you will not get away with perpetrating this kind of behaviour. so until we change all of those things right from the belief in the survivor and the victim who is right at the centre of this, to making sure that the perpetrator is the person who is held to account by all of those different agencies, working really, really effectively together, then we are not going to get that horrible, huge number down. and while we‘re talking about it today being particularly high, actually, we know that that probably masks an even higher number, because as sylvia welby, the academic, looked into a number of years ago, there are probably a high number of people taking their own lives as a result of the abuse they have suffered because they cannot see any other way out, and so actually, this figure, the number of women in
4:24 pm
particular we are losing to domestic abuse is much higher than the figures we have heard today. how important is it for the forthcoming domestic abuse bill to have as part of ita domestic abuse bill to have as part of it a statutory duty that safe accommodation will be found if a domestic violence victim has to leave their own home? well, what we wa nt leave their own home? well, what we want at safelives is for people to stop asking, why doesn‘t she just leave, and for people to start asking, why doesn‘t he just stopped? so it is important that a whole range of services are available to victims and survivors of domestic abuse, both in their own home and in their own community, and in some cases in secure accommodation. but actually, why should anybody who is living with domestic abuse have to leave their own home? what we really should be doing is making sure that the perpetrator is held to account and made to change their behaviour, because then, the victim or survivor
4:25 pm
can stay with their children in their own home, safe with their own children, connected to their friends and family, to their gp, to the school, to their life, to their workplace. why should they have to disrupt their life in that way? so those statutory obligations to provide a range of services for victims, survivors and children, are really important, but that has got to go alongside making sure that we turn this whole conversation over, bring men into the conversation. so, the act martin sheen has been here at the conference this morning talking really eloquently and passionately about how men have got to be part of this conversation, own the fact that this is predominantly perpetrated by men, and that there isa perpetrated by men, and that there is a need for men to join the conversation work out how we are going to stop this from happening in first place. no one should have to leave their own home in the middle of the night with a bean bag under one arm and their kids under the other. that is not a 21st—century
4:26 pm
solution to this problem. suzanne jacob, chief executive of safelives, thank you very much. thank you. torrential rain has caused severed flood across spain‘s eastern coast with valencia and alicante badly affected. at least three people were killed after some areas saw their heaviest rainfall on record. the bad weather has caused chaos on the roads and badly disrupted public transport. several rivers have burst their banks. some schools have been shut and the authorities have reported power outages. malaria is one of the world‘s most deadly diseases. according to the un, it kills a child every 30 seconds. 90% of cases are in sub—saharan africa, where for the first time a mass vaccination programme is being piloted. 300,000 children there are to be immunised. our global health correspondent, tulip mazumdar has been to the country‘s national vaccine depot, just outside the capital, nairobi. so, there are around 100,000 vials of malaria vaccine here in this cold room.
4:27 pm
most of it has already gone to communities in western kenya where this pilot is taking place. and this here is the vaccine. it has been 30 years in the making and it works by training the immune system to attack the malaria parasite which is spread by mosquito bites. a child needs four doses of this vaccine before they reach two years old. it‘s been found to prevent malaria cases in four out of ten children. it has also been found to cut the most severe malaria cases by a third. this could potentially be a game—changer in the global fight against one of the world‘s oldest and deadliest diseases. this vaccine will greatly reduce a child's risk of getting malaria, but not to zero, so other precautions are important. bed nets, of course, are crucial. but also, access, prompt access,
4:28 pm
to malaria treatment, if they do become sick, is also an important part of the package. the lorries are now being loaded up ready for their long journeys to kisumu, kakamega and mombasa. it is mainly routine vaccinations that are going into these areas, but there are also some last—minute malaria materials that will also be going to the pilot areas. now, clinical trials have already shown the malaria vaccine to be safe and effective. the task now is to find out how well they work in real—life settings within communities, many of them very remote, here in kenya. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. most areas will continue dry and sunny through the rest of the day. still some cloud through the english channel and channel islands, and a few scattered showers for northern and perhaps western scotland. sunny skies, temperatures 17 and the central
4:29 pm
belt, 22 in southern england. wind is lighter than yesterday, and with light winds and clear skies, it gets cold very quickly, apart from scotla nd cold very quickly, apart from scotland and northern ireland, where cloud increases later in the breeze picks up again. in rural parts of england and wales, temperatures lower than that, maybe 2—3. plenty of sunshine for england and wales on saturday. stronger winds developing further north into northern ireland and particularly scotland, where there is rain for northern and western areas through the day. gail is on the far north of the country, and further south, light winds mean temperatures are probably higher than today. the reigning northern area slips down and get stuck across northern england, wales and northern ireland stop north of that, fresher airand afew ireland stop north of that, fresher air and a few showers. not as windy on sunday, and to the south, it will be warmer in the sunshine.
4:30 pm
borisjohnson says he‘s cautiously optimistic and that there‘s the rough shape of a deal on brexit— but he‘s faced backlash in yorkshire where a heckler told him to get back to parliament. why are you not with them in parliament, sorting out the mess that you have created? would you mind? i am very happy to get back to parliament very soon. but what we want, i think to see... why don‘t you sort it out, boris? irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup— something reported in the papers today.
4:31 pm
the number of people killed as a result of domestic violence is at its highest level for five years — the vast majority were women. a teenager who died from an allergic reaction to dairy was not made aware of the ingredients in his meal, by burger chain byron, an inquest has heard. also coming up — we‘ll be finding out how stripes and speed, could help footballers — just like in the animal kingdom. that‘s in news nationwide, in the next few minutes. sport now on afternoon live withjohn. solheim cup — the latest from gleneagles2. europe lead on the opening day of golf‘s solheim cup against teh united states,
4:32 pm
they took a one point lead into this afternoon‘s fourball matches as they look to wrestle the cup back from the americans who‘ve won the last two editions. europe were up in three.. julie inkster the american captain splitting the korda sisters who combined so brialliantly this morning. winning the only match for the usa, in the foursomes, the altrernate shot format winning six and four. beat caroline massson and jodie ewart shadoff. charlie hull and azahara munoz anchoring home europe in the final match to give them the lead. and the ashes?
4:33 pm
yes england have been making inroads into australia‘s batting on day two but the man who‘s been a constant thorn in their side all summer — steve smith — is still there having made his tenth consecutive 50 against england. here‘s the latest scorecard. england were bowled out for 294 intheirfirst innings withjos buttler dismissed for 70. jofra archer quickly dismissed both openers, marnus labushagne and smith added 69 before labushagne fell — also to archer. sam curran got matthew wade but smith grinds relentlessly on.
4:34 pm
england did have a ten show catch with smith on 66, joe root putting it down. alice tai‘s impressive performances at the world para championships continue. she set a new world record time in her heats in the s8 50metre freestyle, she‘s won four gold medals at the games so far. chelsea manager frank lampard believes there have been more than four refereeing mistakes through the use of var in the premier league this season. managing director of the professional game match officials limited mike riley said yesterday that four decisions should have been changed by var but weren‘t. lampard disagrees..
4:35 pm
maybe we should have expected and in between moment where we are coming to terms. from how i have seen var watch behind—the—scenes trying to get everything right and i would appreciate it has the minority of things that have not been quite right. there‘s been racing success for frankie dettori today — as he eased to victory in the doncaster cup. dettori rode the 9—1 on favourite stradivarius to victory — finishing ahead of cleonte and max dynamite. the win is a 10th successive victory for stradivarious — an unbeaten run which stretches back nearly two years. that‘s all the sport for now. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk.
4:36 pm
let‘s go to newcastle where look north‘s dawn thewlis is talking about an unusual piece of research. and north west tonight‘s rogerjohnson is in salford talking about a remarkable story that has emerged about australia‘s batsman steve smith. so first dawn, what is this research about? we learn all sorts of things from the animal kingdom and researchers at newcastle university have in studying a predator who think that football teams who wear stripes could have an advantage over those that were more solid colours. according to the scientists teams like newcastle united and sunderland have more of a chance of confusing the opposition if they can move fast enough. the team have been using playing mantis in their study and a reporter went along to have a look at the such. a praying mantis is being tested to see if it can spot
4:37 pm
this stripey image move and when it speeds up the insect struggles to spot it. the deceptions trying to see if there is a pattern that helps animals hide whilst they are moving and what we have found as certain patterns when these high contrast stripes, if an animal moves fast enough it can be quite effective at hiding the play from a predator. this got staff at newcastle university thinking other benefits to stripes on the football pitch. university thinking other benefits to stripes on the football pitchm depends a fast run but also the width of the strikes and how far you are away. it might depend on the lighting in your environment, this effect is stronger when the lights are not as bright. depends on the situation but i think we are talking a little bit faster than newcastle are running great snow. 12 mantis are running great snow. 12 mantis are taking part, all female and the fear is they had male ones they
4:38 pm
would get eaten by the females. sometimes during the research they fell asleep. mantis are not normally associated with football. they will be terrible footballers, they would only be interested in eating the ball. can the magpies learn from the mantis? newcastle play liverpool tomorrow and i have to say winning an already cut doesn‘t seem to have done at liverpool anyone because they are the reigning european champions. whereas it is 50 years since newcastle last won a major trophy in 1969, the european intercity cup. unless newcastle can suddenly start running faster than the speed of light i do not think winning stripes will help them very much. they might be the exception that proves the rule. and roger,
4:39 pm
tell us more about this story with batsman steve smith? steve smith came to england in 2007 to play as a 17—year—old and actually ended up playing in the kent but has first stop when he flew over without any of his family was to play as the overseas player in cheshire. he arrived and grappenhall and was taken out with his team—mates to a pub in the village where everyone had one too many to drink, steve smith then get out of his room for two days, didn‘t set foot on the cricket pitch might alone play a game and he went back home so his first introduction to english cricket was not a happy one. it was disappointing because has mother is english so he also has a
4:40 pm
british passport, so you could therefore argue he might have been eligible to play for england and not australia and therefore all the torment me never have happened. was it the fault of grappenhall because he had to much to drink? probably not but he came to kent later that summerand not but he came to kent later that summer and played a bit down there. what have people in grappenhall said? they are disappointed obviously that steve smith was the one who got away. it wasn‘t a batsmen at that time, he was a leg—spinner and a lower order batsmen when he came over at 17. he has got unorthodox style and eve ryo ne has got unorthodox style and everyone said he looks unconventional when he is batting but as the england bowlers have found out it is impossible to get him out. grappenhall are disappointed that he never played for them. it is a remarkable study by 20 came over he was a promising
4:41 pm
player but he was a leg—spinner, not really a batsmen, probably lower order so to end up being a non—bowling top order batsmen and possibly the best batsmen in the world right now, ian not sure anyone could have foreseen that. it isa anyone could have foreseen that. it is a great disappointment and we will never know but that is one of those things. grappenhall sate was not an initiation, just a few drinks but obviously rather put steve smith. when he came back later that summer his habit it is 18th birthday don‘t in kent and the chairman of the club down there said he wasn‘t a good average australian overseas player, not 18 points and a curry enemy, it was a couple of points and an early night ready for the cricket. that has determined instead and perhaps grappenhall just cricket. that has determined instead and perhaps grappenhalljust was not for him. a man of many surprises. thank you. more on those studies on
4:42 pm
the respective programmes this evening at 630. thank you. us democrats hoping to become their party‘s presidential nominee have failed to land any major blows on the front—runner, joe biden, in a televised debate on abc news in houston. it was the third such event — but the first to feature all of the main contenders. sophie long reports from houston a single debate, in a single night... the democratic party‘s top ten presidential candidates meeting on the same stage for the first time.
4:43 pm
a different lineup but a familiar dynamic. former vice—presidentjoe biden fighting to preserve his front—runner status, as those trailing behind vied for attention. the first fireworks came on the key issue of healthcare. for a socialist, you‘ve got a lot more confidence in corporate america than i do. you have got defend the fact that 500,000 americans are going bankrupt. gun crime is traditionally a toxic issue in us politics, but in a state where there have been two mass shootings in less than two months, this is what got the biggest cheer. hell, yes, we‘re going to take your ar—15, your ak—47, we‘re not going to allow it to be used against our fellow americans any more. cheering. perhaps the mostjarring exchange of the night was delivered by first—time candidate julian castro, and the topic was beside the point. are you forgetting what you said two minutes ago? automatically... are you forgetting already what you said just two minutes ago? he aggressively questioned the 76—year—old‘s memory. it was the youngest candidate on a stage with an age gap spanning four decades that played peacemaker. this reminds everybody
4:44 pm
of what they cannot stand about washington, scoring points against each other, poking at each other. as front—runner, joe biden was always going to have a target on his back, and his challengers came here with plenty of ammunition. but some candidates tried to emphasise areas of agreement and kept their greatest criticism for the man they all desperately want to beat, president donald trump. sophie long, bbc news, houston. laurie laird is an american politics commentator and economistjournalist, shejoins me now... tell us how useful these debates are. we have got so used to them, i suppose we expect them to take place. i don't know how much the influence voters, i think they were not as if they did not take place but i do not know how much voters make up their minds based on these debates, particularly when there are some many of them. we are still a
4:45 pm
year away, a year and a bit away from the selections we will see a lot more spanning before the election date comes along. americans pay attention to these debates but it is not entirely clear how much the influence voting patterns. what you have seen so far, who amongst the democratic contenders is really best equipped to tackle donald trump? i thinkjoe biden was the winner last night although that was a low bar, he is so very prone to m ista kes a low bar, he is so very prone to mistakes at times and he dropped out of the 1988 race because he was found to plagiarise new cannot. the fa ct found to plagiarise new cannot. the fact he did not make any mistakes kicking out the winner of this debate. could any of these candidates beat donald trump? i do not believe that we can yet, i think the three frontrunners, joe biden, i was with one and very old and particle terms. one is 70, joe biden
4:46 pm
and sanders are 77 and 78 and none of these candidates strike me as a candidate who will get people off their sofas and into the ballot box. this election, america 2019 is so very polarised, nominal chains and minds of what the election in november of 2020 will come down to is who gets out and votes and i cannot believe any of these three democratic frontrunners are inspiring enough to get people to vote. when you look at their policies when you think the democrats find themselves these days on the political spectrum ? democrats find themselves these days on the political spectrum? that is a good question because the party is being pulled further to the left of where most americans sit. most americans are now saying they would like to see some sort of health care reform. warren and sanders are pushing what they are calling medical aid for all which would look
4:47 pm
quite like the uk, a single peer system which would eliminate private insurance altogether. joe biden prefers some cater private initiative and health care. most americans are not that far along the left, the do not want to see a single payer system. equally with gun control and plays very well with democratic activists but most americans were not want to see and outright ban on guns so the party is being pulled very much to the left and that is despite the fact that the leading democrat on capitol hill nancy pelosi the speaker of the house realises this and has tried to keep them in the centre but the party is moving to her left. we see this and primaries, activists must active and busy part is pulled to the edge and have to try and tap back to the centre come election time. whether the democrats can do that once they pick a candidate is
4:48 pm
an open question. still a while left, we will not talk again for thank you. in a moment ben bland is going to bring us the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live borisjohnson says he‘s cautiously optimistic and that there‘s the rough shape of a deal on brexit — as downing street confirms he‘ll meet with top eu officials next week. but irish prime minister leo varadkar said that what had been proposed so far falls very far short, and that he was not aware of any change in position by the dup— something reported in the papers today. the number of people killed by a partner or relative is at its highest level, for at least five years. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. speedloan finance which trades
4:49 pm
as a&b pawnbrokers and herbert and brown has closed shops across the uk. but it‘s unclear exactly how many have shut. the national pawnbrokers association says it‘s concerned that customers can‘t get through to the company‘s helpline. it said it will do everything it can to ensure customers rights are protected. sainsbury‘s has become the latest supermarket to target packaging waste. it says it‘ll halve the amount of plastic used in its stores by 2025. the retailer warned that customers will have to change their behaviour to achieve the "bold ambition" — such as by buying milk in plastic pouches. it is also inviting the public and business partners to submit new ideas. ovo will become the uk‘s second largest energy supplier after it agreed to buy sse‘s retail business for £500m.0vo — which was created 10 years ago — is already the uk‘s largest independent energy supplier. with an extra 3.5 million customers from sse and 8,000 staff, it will be second only to british gas in terms of size.
4:50 pm
a big date in the fashion industry calendar today — london fashion week opening? yes, although the start of this year‘s london fashion week has been hit by protests. climate activists targetted the opening to highlight the impact the fashion industry has on the environment.protesters from the extinction rebellion group glued themselves to a door and poured a "bleeding" red carpet at the event. the protesters arrived before the first show and were gone a few hours later. fashion editors, buyers and bloggers entered the building through another main door nearby.the activists though have vowed to disrupt the annual fashion showcase, where luxury brands such as burberry, victoria beckham and erdem are presenting their spring
4:51 pm
2020 womenswear collections. the protesters were even calling for the event to be cancelled? they were putting pressure on the british fashion council to call the whole thing off. it‘s a point i raised with caroline rush — the chief executive — when we spoke earlier. and i asked her if the industry was paying enough attention to demands from customers for more ethical, environmentally conscious fashion. particularly at the designer end of the market, the business is showcasing during london fashion week, they are looking at sustainability, focusing on reducing the impact on the planet. we have many young designer business as part of london fashion week that put sustainability at their core and as a platform globally to talk about sustainability is that we have focused the exhibition part of london fashion week and a positive
4:52 pm
fashion which tells the story of how businesses are addressing sustainability and making sure they are fit for the future. the way that consumers address it is that and look at their consumption will have to change for the future but as industry we have to take responsibility in terms of how we are addressing our impact and understanding that impact on the planet. also collectively coming together to look at innovation and the ways we can perhaps use the materials that are already available before they go into landfill to repurposed them and be part of an industry that has less impact on the planet and on the natural resources. what is happening on the markets? the pound has hit its highest level against the dollar since july amid hopes a no—deal brexit can be avoided.
4:53 pm
sterling jumped more than 1% on friday to over $1.24 against the dollar, its highest level in seven weeks. from the energy sector — we‘ve had news that ovo will become the uk‘s second largest energy supplier after it agreed to buy sse‘s retail business for £500m. and the london stock exchange has formally rejected a takeover bid from the hong kong exchanges and clearing — a rivalfirm that runs the stock market in hong kong. richard hunter, head of markets, interactive investor. let‘s start with sterling, strengthening and that is not good news for all firms. no, we have seen particularly over the last three yea rs particularly over the last three years just how opposite correlating the direction of sterling as to the direction of the ftse100. many of the ftse100 companies are overseen, overseas and when the alnwick mix
4:54 pm
overseas and when the alnwick mix overseas earnings more valuable. it does no go lock and step necessarily, the ftse100 is still had a fairly good week pattern because of the merger and acquisition activity you just mentioned but in terms of stirling itself the move from low couple of weeks ago of $1 20 to 124 is a significant move and currency markets which is the biggest in the world and very much reflects the fa ct world and very much reflects the fact that i know deal could be avoided even f that means brief extension despite the protestations of the prime minister. the most prominent merger and acquisition that people have been focusing on from the energy sector and ovo buying up the sse retail business which would create another titan of energy. it is interesting to see how
4:55 pm
the sector is consolidating. this particular part of the sse business is something the market has been suggesting for a long time that this is being sold off, a previous attempt failed. equally interestingly what it leaves sse with as a business that is renewable and we are seeing the current extraordinary focus on renewable energy means that sse can give its full focus to that part of the business. let's pick some other letters out of the alphabet soup, the london stock exchange rejecting the london stock exchange rejecting the orderfor its hong kong rival and they didn‘t seem to welcome this proposal of a merger. the cat set amongst the pigeons earlier in the week, the london stock exchange
4:56 pm
initiallyjumped week, the london stock exchange initially jumped around 15% week, the london stock exchange initiallyjumped around 15% although the settled litter in the day to being around 5% higher which give you a clue that already a couple of stumbling blocks had been announced. formerly the stock exchange has come out and said these are the stumbling blocks, prices and high enough, we wa nt to blocks, prices and high enough, we want to continue with our $27 billion acquisition, that was a quite obvious stumbling block earlier and all things considered even before we get into any political considerations, the stock exchange, the london stock exchange is saying that basically it is undervaluing the company and in any event over the avast decade or so the under stock exchange has been on the under stock exchange has been on the acquisition front rather than the acquisition front rather than the receiving end. thank you.
4:57 pm
britain‘s main index edged higher, led by financial stocks. but losses in stocks of global companies due to a rise in the pound it quick look at how the us markets are trading. can we go to the second page? no. yes. you only have to ask. it takes time for them to travel across the atlantic. the tech heavy nasdaq not quite doing as well. the pound strengthening against the dollar, a level not seen since mid—july. that‘s all the business news. use tommy gesticulating, i was wondering what was coming next. ben brown is here shortly
4:58 pm
with the news at five — but first it‘s time for a look at the weather with darren bett most areas continuing dry and sunny through the day, still some cloud through the day, still some cloud through the day, still some cloud through the channel islands and a few scattered showers for northern and western scotland but sunny skies, temperatures 17 in the central belt, 22 in southern england, winds lighter than yesterday and with the light winds and clear skies it is going to get cold very quickly except for scotla nd cold very quickly except for scotland and northern ireland as a cloud increases, the breeze picks up button rural parts of england and wales temperatures lower than that, maybe two or three. plenty of sunshine for anger than wales on saturday, stronger winds further north into northern ireland and scotla nd north into northern ireland and scotland were rained for northern and western areas through the day. gales the far north of the country, for the south with light when steps is properly higher today. the rain and northern areas of substance to northern england and north wales and south of scotland and northern ireland, not of that sunshine and showers, not as when the on sunday and to the south warmer in the
4:59 pm
sunshine.
5:00 pm
today at 5: the prime minister says he‘s cautiously optimistic of getting a brexit deal. but he‘s faced backlash in yorkshire, where a heckler told him to get back to parliament. why are you not with them in parliament, sorting out the mess that you have created? would you mind? i'm very happy to get back to parliament very soon. but what we want, i think to see... why don‘t you sort it out, boris? the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, says the government‘s proposals so far fall short, and he‘s not aware of any change in the dup‘s position — something reported earlier today. we‘ll have the latest on the brexit talks. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: a teenager who died from an allergic reaction at burger chain byron

49 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on