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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 13, 2019 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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that's coming up after the headlines at 11:30. now it's time for the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello there, the weather has been pretty dry, particularly in the south over the past few weeks, and there is more dry weather for much of the week ahead. high—pressure often in charge, it will feel quite warm by day, particularly later in the week, we will see some chilly nights to come, and a bit of rain in the forecast especially over the next couple of days in the north. that is down to this area of low pressure during saturday, it moves into the north of scotland but it will bring windy conditions across scotla nd will bring windy conditions across scotland with some fairly heavy rainfall to come as well. the rainfall to come as well. the rainfall totals mounting up across highland scotland, the wind is picking up through the day as well. meanwhile a breeze —— a breezy picture for northern ireland, but the rest sees blue skies and
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sunshine, a fine day across must of the account today, temperature is up to about 21—23 widely across england and wales, northern ireland 19, scotla nd and wales, northern ireland 19, scotland 15—17. also strong gusty winds, these other wind gust on saturday afternoon, we could see 40-60 saturday afternoon, we could see 40—60 mile—per—hour gust of wind, particularly across the northern isles, that is where we see the strongest of those wind gusts. heading into saturday evening and overnight the winston to ease as this frontal system moves south, it will weaken a bit, patchy rain early sunday for northern ireland, part of northern england as well, and it is still reasonably mild as well with temperatures for most of us holding into double figures. through the day on sunday we have this weather front, it is putting south, just some patchy rain for northern ireland, northern england and perhaps north wales as well. either side of that some dry weather with some sunshine but a real contrast in temperatures, just 14 celsius in edinburgh but down in london, 25 degrees which will feel pretty warm through the day on sunday. heading into the new working week, at
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frontal system eases away towards the south and east, so most of us looking drier, higher pressure moving in from the atlantic, we have the tail end of that front bringing a bit of cloud across england and south wales early on monday, a few spots of light rain, but is that clear the way there will be more sunshine developing, a few showers in the north—west, but it is a little cooler about for 10—21 on monday. that's slightly cooling trend continues through into tuesday as well, high—pressure is going to sit out towards the west of the uk with the winds rotating around that, that means we have a northerly or north—westerly flow of air heading into tuesday. what some dry weather again with some sunshine, it will feel cool where you expect that northerly wind through northern and eastern scotland, down the east coast of england too, so temperature is about 13—14, the warmest of the weather will be across wales in the south—west of england where we will see highs of about 20 degrees or so. then heading into wednesday, no
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great change, similar to tuesday, most great change, similar to tuesday, m ost pla ces great change, similar to tuesday, most places dry again, some clad with the odd showers are scotland and down the east coast of england where it will feel cooler, where you are exposed to that breeze. ii degrees in aberdeen, the warmest weather will be towards the south—west with temperatures in cardiff up to about 18 celsius. and then a change later next week as high—pressure moves more widely across the uk, so a shift in wind direction for tuesday into wednesday, we have a cold northerly winds, but in the blue colours, that hold northerly pushed away towards the east later next week and we will see this much milder air moving from the west or the south—west. here is the west or the south—west. here is the outlook for the capital cities, towards the end of next week into next weekend, temperatures will be on the rise, be prepared for the mist and fog and some chilly nights through the middle part of the week.
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hello. this is bbc news ben brown. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first, the headlines. david cameron breaks his silence on brexit. in an interview with the times the former prime minister says a second referendum cannot be ruled out.
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meanwhile, boris johnson says he is cautiously optimistic about getting a deal on brexit, but a heckler in yorkshire tells him to get back to parliament. the family of a teenager who died from an allergic reaction after eating out want the law changed to improve food labelling in restaurants. after eating out want the law changed to improve food labelling in restaurants. the number of people killed as a result of domestic violence is at its highest level for five years. the vast majority were women. desperate housewives star felicity huffman is sentenced to 1a days in prison for her involvement in a college admissions scandal. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the guardian's dawn foster and broadcasterjohn sta pleton. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in, with david cameron breaking his
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silence ahead of a long—awaited memoir leading most of the papers. the times has the exclusive interview with the former prime minister who insits he was right to hold the referendum, but says he's sorry for the division and uncertainty it's caused. the daily mail calls it "cameron's revenge," as the former prime minister accuses boris johnson and michael gove of acting "appallingly" during the campaign. and the fallout from the interview leads tomorrow's daily telegraph, too, as david cameron says a second referendum should not be ruled out. while the daily express leads with the news that the former pm was shocked so many people voted to leave the eu. the mirror reports that david cameron admits in his book to smoking cannabis with his wife. while the ft weekend leads on the news that the prime minister, borisjohnson, plans to try
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and force a new brexit deal through parliament in 10 days. in the sun, the woman who geoffret boycott was convicted of beating up breaks her silence on the news this week that the retired cricketer is to be nominated for a knighthood, saying it's "disgusting." that we are. we will talk about pretty much all of those. dawn, let's kick off with the times newspaper. they have got extracts from the book and the big interview with david cameron. we have been waiting a long time to hear from him. easier to say mea culpa from the former prime minister?m him. easier to say mea culpa from the former prime minister? it is, with a lot of caveats. he says he regrets the way it went but he doesn't regret calling the referendum. lots of people said he calls the referendum for
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politicking, but lots of the conservative party were leaning towards defecting to ukip, and the referendum was called to placate them. he says that was not the case. he had plenty referendum from 2013. so it is not really a mea culpa. he says he regrets some of the fallout but doesn't regret calling the election. he does put a lot of the blame on boris johnson election. he does put a lot of the blame on borisjohnson and michael gove. he calls michael gove mendacious and so is boris didn't really have a strong feeling for either camp, and jumped into the campaign he thought would help brand boris more than anything else. —— says boris didn't. the headline, it isa says boris didn't. the headline, it is a very disconsolate figure of david cameron looking down, saying i'm sorry i failed, but actually, in terms of the decision to have the referendum, hejustifies terms of the decision to have the referendum, he justifies that. terms of the decision to have the referendum, hejustifies that. he says it was overdue. it was necessary. and he believes it was ultimately inevitable. and it was in
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the party manifesto. he said all along he was going to do it. yes, i hear what you are saying about his denials about it being to stave off the threat from brexit, but not many people are going to swallow that one, i think. people are going to swallow that one, ithink. what people are going to swallow that one, i think. what is interesting is the impact now. he is asked when he can sleep at night and he says he is really troubled by this. he has what he describes as robust conversations with people in the street about it. he does seem to be genuinely worried about what he has actually inflicted upon britain by doing this. because, you know, he recognises we are now a divided nation, and it is hard to see, it is hard for many people to see, it is hard for many people to see how those divisions will be held, especially in the short term. having said that, those people who voted leave, 17.4 million, are presumably delighted he took the decision to have the referendum and it was not in their view a mistake at all. i think there is the fact that he was not on their side. he can't win either way, can he? this wasn't the result he wanted. the people who voted leave thought he
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should have been with them all along. like a lot of politicians he will be remembered not for what he did but for what turned out to be, from his point of view, a wrong decision. yeah, absolutely. david cameron will be remembered for brexit in the same way that gordon brown is for gold, tony blair is for iraqis, and anthony eden was for servers. completely defined by it. —— suez. servers. completely defined by it. -- suez. the fact that he lashed out against michael gove and boris johnson, telegraph have that in a bit more detail, don't they? 0n the leaders, they behaved appallingly. 0n the prime minister, he has used sharp practices, but is bringing it up sharp practices, but is bringing it up to date, calling —— referring to the proroguement of parliament and sticking out of the 21 rebel tories. and that alone, he is not ruling out the second referendum ? and that alone, he is not ruling out the second referendum? absolutely. going with the headline but he wants
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a second referendum, that is misleading. he is not keen on it, he is not pushing for it. but he wouldn't rule it out. in his view there might be no other option. exactly. what is crucial is that he has repeatedly asked whether or not he trusts borisjohnson, and he will not answer. he lashes out heavily at michael gove. he says that boris johnson didn't really care very much about leave remain, and didn't really think too deeply about it. the fact he doesn't trust the current prime minister, i think, is key. and it is interesting what he reveals about his personal relationship with michael gove. he says michael gove behaved appallingly, and so too did boris johnson and so too did priti patel and so did did penny mordaunt. he was referring about contacts not just to the £350 million on the side of the bus, which he says was obviously a case of them leaving the truth at home, his words, not mine. but there are references to turkey joining the eu, and the threat of
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immigration, mass immigration coming to this country. which, as we all know, was not a viable option at that time and probably still isn't. 0ne that time and probably still isn't. one interesting little detail about their relationship, david cameron and michael gove, apparently when he asked him to take anotherjob in cabinet at michael gove refused, david cameron texted him and said "you are either a team player or 3-h" "you are either a team player or a..." nasty word. "you are either a team player or a. nasty word. i was waiting for that one. i have thoughts on that, but we will leave it there. yes, the viewers can pick that up in the telegraph if they want to. does it make it kind of salivating reading? would you be tempted to read the book, having looked at these extracts ? book, having looked at these extracts? i can't see this being a bestseller. i think tony blair's book had more detail on people were very interested to hear about the background to the iraq war. but
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cameron's book, you know, he was mostly defined by brexit. even though the second beanpole out, he left. so you are a lot more interested in what happened after the referendum and during the referendum and because he was not pa rt referendum and because he was not part of any big campaign, all the juicy bits are on the front pages, you know what you need to know. i can't see this being a bestseller, everybody picking it up and reading it. save yourself 25 quid, or whatever. it is a shame, because in fairness to david cameron, i think he said he was donating the profits to charity. so if people do not buy it, charities might get dosh they want. he did get an 800 grand advance. yes, true. did he keep it? i don't know. he wrote in £125,000 shed. right. in a similar vein, the daily mail, cameron's revenge. is it revenge? 0r daily mail, cameron's revenge. is it revenge? or is itjust him speaking his mind? i think that is an unusual word to place on what i have read so far, anyway. revenge ?
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word to place on what i have read so far, anyway. revenge? there has been a lot of animosity between cameron and johnson, ever since their university days. so maybe there is a bit of revenge. the interesting question is, ifjohnson had supported leave and michael gove had supported leave and michael gove had supported leave, how much difference would it have made? would remain have one? it was very close. it could have been the case. if leave didn't have the backing of some big cabinet ministers, they may have, you know, it may have swung the boat towards remain. it may well be that godinjohnson were the people who swung it. —— gove and. what is interesting in the daily mail is this phrase cameron uses about gove and johnson in the campaign, saying they left the truth at home, that priti patel and michael gove and borisjohnson were very happy to put com plete borisjohnson were very happy to put complete untruth on the side of buses. trashing the government. yeah. especially about turkey. and picking up the point i made earlier, he was clearly good buddies with gove before and he said he regarded him asa
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gove before and he said he regarded him as a compassionate conservative and he was distressed when he went banging on about turkey. erroneously, interviewer david cameron. it is quite clear from what he has said here in this interview with the times, repeated by the mail and others, but that relationship is nothing like as strong as it was. yeah, and his regret also is the campaign and the fact that they could not get across the positive case for the eu, and they felt that the leave sides... well, they argued they had a good technical case, a good political case. and johnson and gove had a highly emotional case with regards to immigration, is what he is implying. and that was the case but won. that's to brexit now, three years on, where are we now, who knows where we are. the financial times think they have got an idea of where we are, they thinkjohnson might be getting a deal together. this is really fascinating because up until 110w really fascinating because up until now it seems as if borisjohnson was
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very happy to plough on towards ideal, they did not appear to be any strategy except for crashing out on halloween. now apparentlyjohnson has a ten day process, so he thinks he can thrash out a deal with the eu in ten days in october. after this summit on october 17 and go through parliament. answer me this question, if we have not thrashed out a deal in three years, how are we going to thrash out a deal and get it through parliament in ten days? boris johnson thinks he is magic, he thinks, i think it is one of those things where if you open a bottle, someone comes up and says, come on, it is easy, and they can't do it either. could some of the people who voted against theresa may's deal before, with a bit of tweaking, might vote for a just because it is borisjohnson might vote for a just because it is boris johnson rather than might vote for a just because it is borisjohnson rather than theresa may? he has made everyone so angry
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with him. everyone here on the radio and television so there has been no breakthrough, no new put forward, that applies to the irish, senior members of the eu, maybe it is something like the deal that we never saw, the fourth version of theresa may's deal, which some mps like stephen kinnock and caroline flint were advocating, a middle way that mayjust flint were advocating, a middle way that may just unite flint were advocating, a middle way that mayjust unite the house. there was an interesting quote the other day that was in the sun i think that he was saying he fears it spares from the spartans, in other words the hard brexiteer ‘s, because he is going to compromise. but who knows. speaking of the sun, let's go to their story. that is away from brexit, it is all about suggest boycott, hero of theresa may, the master of the forward defensive, —— sir geoff boycott. the knighthood he had been given by theresa may is very controversial for highly controversial. i have to say i was astonished when i heard that news, i
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must be very careful about what i say, sir geoffrey boycott has always made —— has denied the charges against him, though he was found guilty by a court in france. though he has always denied it. i was astonished, what did theresa may think was going to happen by doing this? did she think everyone would think it was a good idea, for a woman prime minister to put this forward as well, former prime minister to put this forward, i find breathtaking. what about you? exactly the same, i felt angry, i felt disgusted, and his big herself says that it is disgusting. i think that again, you have a female prime minister who is confidently stressing the fact that she has a feminist, and obviously, the first thing you think of anything of geoffrey boycott is the fact that he was found guilty for battering his partner. what did you think was going to happen? it looks bad for the tories as well because they have borrowed parliament and one of the bill that has been thrown out
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because they ran out of time is about domestic violence. —— suspended parliament. you have boris johnson who had the police called to his flat, you had theresa may giving geoffrey boycott and honour, any other domestic violence bill thrown out. it looks terrible for the tories. as you say, what did theresa may think were going to happen?m there not a committee, advisers who go through all this and flying things up and raise alarm bells? several people, if you believe what you read, several people in the past have had suggestions for certain honours, and the committee of advisers has said no, don't do it, because of a committee committee, or whatever. i think it is extraordinary and it won't go away. asa extraordinary and it won't go away. as a geoffrey boycott could not clear less, he used those words on the today programme. he said he couldn't give a toss. he won't give a toss, but this story won't give away and it will roll on and on. it is unnecessary. in a way, you may
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wonderfrom his point of is unnecessary. in a way, you may wonder from his point of view, whether it is all worth having all these headlines... for a knighthood. all right, let's end up with jane austen. dawn, you studied, you completed two degrees ending with literature, so you can talk to us about jane austen. i did two degrees in english language and then i failed to —— literature and failed to read a single jane austen novel. all of us are focused on brexit but this is an interesting story about a group of women who every now and then, to get away from theirjobs, dress up as jane austen characters, they have balls with champagne and they have balls with champagne and they drink and may so when they pretend they are in a jane austen novel. it is this beautiful escapism, and... a bit naughty about some of the jane austen carrick is. —— characters. some of the jane austen carrick is. -- characters. they make a huge amount of friends, they go away for the weekend and pretend they are in these books, it is so wonderful to
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read. i was fascinated to read that the baker street regulars, an organisation of sherlock holmes enthusiast, founded in 1934, they have an annual conference, charles dickens fans get together to celebrate both the author and "a christmas carol". there is a difference between celebrating your hearing novels and dressing up as the characters? it is a lot of effort involved. talk about how much sewing they do and they pay so much attention to it. it is really fascinating the level of detail they go into. it is escapism but it is far more than just having a glass of wine when you get home. there is nothing wrong with a bit of escapism in these days of political uncertainty. you are a man city supporter, what could be more escapist than that? reality will set in... dawn, you are a liverpoolfan at you, great. newcastle tomorrow.
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that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thanks again to john and —— don and john, would buy from us. good evening, here's your latest sports news. europe have a slender lead over the united states at the solheim cup. they'll take a 4.5—3.5 lead into the second day at gleneagles as sarah mulkerrins reports. europe have never one a solheim cup
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when they have lost the morning session on the opening day, so it was so session on the opening day, so it was so important for katrina matthew and her european team to get off to and her european team to get off to a good start, and they certainly did. after the morning foursomes they led by 2.5 points to 1.5, three of the english players in particular pulling off good performances, brandy law and a half point commit major champion george holt scored, as did the experience charlie whole. that is four times she has now played in the solheim cup despite being just 23. looking into the afternoon you are wondering where the challenge from the americans may come, and it came early on from a record equalling when in the match, angel yin and ali mcdonald —— annie mcdonald doing everything they could to secure a 7—5 went to them, shortly after europe got point on the board. then it all came down to the board. then it all came down to the drama with the final two
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matches. spare a thought for brandy law and carlotta zagan do, they did everything to battle back, coming down the 18th they had to —— carlota ciganda. the real department for europe and the real good .14 usa was the final match, usa were four up with six to play, however they ended up with six to play, however they ended up halving that on the 18th. so it isa1—point up halving that on the 18th. so it is a 1—point lead for europe into saturday. jofra archer was the star of the show as england took charge of the fifth and final ashes test on day 2. the home side made 294, before archer took 6/62 as australia were bowled out for 225. sam curran ripped through the middle order as steve smith stood firm making 80. 0ur sports correspondentjoe wilson was watching at the oval. the day began here with the end of
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england was my questionings and ended with the start of their second innings. in between we saw ten australian wicket all, six of them to jofra archer who australian wicket all, six of them tojofra archer who was certainly at his best here today, bowling with pace, accuracy and stamina. his duel with minors labuschagne in the afternoon was a particular highlight, eventually falling lbw 48. -- highlight, eventually falling lbw 48. —— marnus labuschagne. david warner fell to five in the context of his series, not a bad score. in the context of steven smith's series, england getting him out the 80, seemed like a real victory. that wicket was taken by chris woakes, with smith making a rare mistake. the ball hitting him on his pads. wa the kind of dismissal england had hoped to take against smith so many times so much earlier in the series. we also have the impact of sam curran who plays his county cricket here for surrey, making his ashes debut, his left arm swinging, cummins had an impression, maybe
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smith thought at one stage he would run out of partners. england was making openers survived a tricky spell, they will be back on saturday morning, and england will hope to end their long summer on ashes high, evenif end their long summer on ashes high, even if we know the owners going down under. —— the urn. london broncos have been relegated from rugby league's super league. before tonight's matches they were one of four sides that were threatened with going down. broncos lost 19—10 at wakefield trinity, who were one of the other sides in danger of the drop. hull kingston rovers also lost, but they survive by virtue of a superior points difference. the other team in danger, huddersfield giants, beat catalans dragons. that's all the sport for now. the kind of weather you should expect this weekend depends very much upon where you are going to be spending it. the further south you are, you can expect a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine and it will turn warmer as the weekend
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wears on. further north the greater the chance of seeing some cloud, abrasive rain at times, it will actually turn cooler through the weekend as it will be very windy across the far north as well. because of this area of low pressure muscling its way in, you can see a lot of white lines, a lot of isobars on the chart, it will be windy, these frontal systems will bring outbreaks of rain, but further south high pressure in charge and underneath that area of high pressure with light winds and clear skies, actually started saturday morning, two or three degrees in some spots in the countryside in england and wales. after that chilly start in england and wales is where we will see the best of the sunshine, any early mist clearing quickly. but a different story for northern ireland and scotland, more cloud, mulberries, infact northern ireland and scotland, more cloud, mulberries, in fact very windy in the far north of scotland where they will also be some outbreaks of heavy and persistent temperature wise on saturday, 23 or 24 across the south—east of england. as we go through saturday night, the wind is cause one or two problems across the north of scotland, particularly for shetland where
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there are likely to be gusts of 60-70 mph, there are likely to be gusts of 60—70 mph, maybe a little stronger than that in places. 0utbreaks 60—70 mph, maybe a little stronger than that in places. outbreaks of rain pushing southward across scotla nd rain pushing southward across scotland and northern ireland in northern england, the rain tending to fizzle all the while to the south of that, light winds and clear skies, but generally not quite such a chilly start on sunday morning. sunday's weather will be dominated by this frontal system, this front will be wriggling around across the central swathes of the british isles, a bit of uncertainty about exactly where those wrinkles will ta ke exactly where those wrinkles will take the weather front and whether rain will be, but it looks like we will see some splashes of rain at times for northern ireland, into southern part of scotland, northern england, down into the north midlands and north wales. it is the south of that weather front sunday which will be warm, the warmest day of the weekend, 25—26, to the north of the weekend, 25—26, to the north of the weekend, 25—26, to the north of the weather front, things will be very cool and fresh, 14—15 degrees. as we go into the start of next week that frontal system will slide southwards, and all of us will get into some cool air, they could be
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the odd shower at times, particularly in the north and east but some dry weather and sunshine as well.
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this is bbc news. i'm nuala mcgovern. our top stories: borisjohnson says he's cautiously optimistic a brexit deal can be struck as he prepares for talks with the european commission president. but the eu and ireland say they've still not seen enough detail. we are in contact with the british government and also the european commission to explore ideas around start, but i have to say, what has been put forward so far falls very far short of what we would need. american actress felicity huffman is sentenced to 14 days in prison for her role in a university admissions scandal. it's one of the world's most powerful greenhouse gases — but chances are, you've never heard of it. we look at the dangers of sf6. thousands of people turn out to pay their respects

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