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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  September 17, 2019 9:00pm-10:00pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the main exit polls from israel's election are in. israel's prime minister benjamin neta nyahu has failed to secure a majority. but whether he'll be forced from office still isn't clear. benny gantz fromt the blue and white appears to have won a similar number benny gantz from the blue and white appears to have won a similar number of seats to benjamin netanyahu. that means days of negotiations overform a governing coalition will begin. and this man, avigdor liberman, could be crucial in deciding who takes power. also on outside source — a historic court case in the british supreme court — that could determine what happens next over brexit
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the supreme court is going to decide whether borisjohnson‘s suspension of parliament was lawful or not. we'll bring you up to date. it's11pm in israel — polls closed one hour ago and they're showing deadlock between the two main parties. these two men benjamin netanyahu — the current prime minister, leader of the right—wing likud party — and the former military chief benny gantz who leads the centrist blue and white party — are vying to become prime minister. barbara plett usher, monitoring the polls, showing
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inconclusive results in israel's parliamentary election. expert analysis, but barbara joins us expert analysis, but barbara joins us along with the guest in jerusalem, barbara what do you think of the numbers we are seeing? but is just go through that year, the exit polls, three have been released channel 11, the public broadcaster has neta nyahu and channel 11, the public broadcaster has netanyahu and the lithe public broadcaster has benjamin netanyahu's likud and benny gantz‘s blue and white tied on 32 seats each with avidor liebermans‘ israel our home party on 10 seats the second exit poll from channel 12 has benjamin netanyahu behind, with his likud party on 22 seats, blue and white one ahead on 3a seats and isreal our home on 8 seats. and channel 13's poll projects likud further behind with 31 seats,
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benny gantz‘ party ahead on 33 seats and avidor lieberman on 8. very interesting, it looks like mr netanyahu very interesting, it looks like mr neta nyahu is taking very interesting, it looks like mr netanyahu is taking a bit of a hit in the selection and to someone who has been watching this very closely, what is your take away on this. there is no clear victory, this is not a new dawn for israel right now, this is not a new dawn for others. it isa this is not a new dawn for others. it is a negative momentum against netanyahu, it is a negative momentum against neta nyahu, who it is a negative momentum against netanyahu, who had 35 seats and then he added the four of the party which should be close to 39 seats and he is not, he is very much behind at 31 and 32 and he may have slipped one oi’ and 32 and he may have slipped one or two seats from the last election book, but as long as he has one or two more than netanyahu, it means the more israelis look at benny as
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the more israelis look at benny as the new prime minister of israel than neta nyahu, so the new prime minister of israel than netanyahu, so it is really his government to lose. and it in addition to that comment seems to be almost equal in the linchpin of the person who can throw either way is lieberman's party. he is already set from the beginning that he does not wa nt to from the beginning that he does not want to go left or right, he wants a national unity government, which just happens to be what most israelis want. they want their leaders to put aside the differences and create a national unity government and if he is going to force that, he will have a very big say. these are preliminary projections, but you been doing the polls, except the main reason why national unity government pitched that benny has been giving that in lieberman, and do think there is a slide and netanyahu's support. he
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has run a campaign on divisiveness and hating the other person and insulting people, where is benny has been very diplomatic in saying that i want to create a very wide unity government that is for secular unity government that is for secular unity government that is for secular unity government that will keep up the religious parties. so he has been campaigning ona religious parties. so he has been campaigning on a let's get together and work together, where netanyahu is talking about benny being the greatest threat. a lot of israelis did not buy that and looks like we are at some kind of deadlock, once during that deadlock, there will be two key players, lieberman hooking contributed their way to the left or right, but looks like he's going to tip it for national unity and the other one is the president who gets to decide who is most likely to form the next government of israel after he consults all the political
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parties. elusive a little bit of the layout of what is going to happen next. israel's president reuven rivlin tweeting that's a joking reference to the fact this is the second general election of the year. in fact it's the first time in israel's history that two elections have happened so close together. back in april, there was a tie between the parties of benjamin netanyahu and benny gantz. they both won 35 seats, and both declared victory. but it was mr netanyahu who appeared to be able to secure a majority government with the support of right—wing and religious parties. but he couldn't. there are 120 seats in the israeli parliament, the knesset.
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he fell short of the magic number of 61 seats — a majority. instead of giving benny gantz the opportunity to try and form a government, mr netanyahu decided instead to call another election. we're finding out if that move has paid off for him. often people who won the election but this is one where no 11. we cannot say who was victorious, but it is always the case that the election is the starting point to find out who can build wood coalition and only when the coalition and only when the coalition has been built, that is when we know who was victorious. where some way away from it now, i am with some guests to help make
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sense of this, we also have a former member and i want to talk about the corruption charges that netanyahu is been very motivated largely because he is facing possible corruption charges and he would like to be the head of the government when that comes up. head of the government when that comes up. how do you think this is going to play in the coalition talks? the reasons why we had these elections is because netanyahu wants to use being prime minister in order to use being prime minister in order to make sure that he does not face any legal proceedings and basically and that purpose, assuming the polls are correct, he has been defeated resoundingly. they are not that conclusive? he cannot form the government that he wanted, which is a government that will grant him immunity from legal proceedings as long as he is in power. he might yet be in government, but not the
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government for which she went to these elections. he did not go to these elections. he did not go to these elections. he did not go to these electionsjust to be prime minister, or debit specific policy, he did this in order to prevent legal proceedings moving against him and in that sense, he lost that kind of government. i do think you be more difficult for them to form a unity government? it looks like you'll very difficult for the right block to form a party or the left block to form a party or the left block to form a party or the left block to form a government, and he was going for all or nothing, meaning he could have formed a government or could have come closer with lieberman, which he could still do now but lieberman a second beginning that he is aiming to its national unity, so he will have a very difficult time doing this, especially since he does not have a clear majority and does not look like, even if he squeaks by to 61 to
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62, that is not enough to govern, because barely what he had the last time is in a worse position than what he was and he is somewhat worn out this point. the other issue a secular versus religious. they took this as a wedge issue in saying that it wanted secular government and he got his constituency for that. i did expect that the play out in coalition talks? that is going to be a major determinant, it had an appeal to a larger israel voters, this is why lieberman did well. and the thing is with the parties is that when they are in government under netanyahu, they tend to overreach, ask for more budget, more benefits and at one point, israel substantial secular population said that they're going to fight back and
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that they're going to fight back and that enough was enough, enough of the overreach on budget, enough without taking your share and serving in the military and this is what we have seen here and this is also what will make a difference on how the coalition is built. is this really about a question ofjewish citizens asking what sort ofjewish country are we? i do not think, most of the people who supported the law that was passed about a year ago which defined israel as a jewish state, there is some issue of that but i think that the religious have been part of the government, the orthodox parts and why they were not able to form the government was because lieberman basically said that it because lieberman basically said thatitis because lieberman basically said that it is enough of the draft, meaning everyone should serve in the army, they should all serve some national service because that is
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fair, everyone should be treated equally and serve equally. let me ask you about the arabs, they have played an important part in this election. the palestinian citizens, how are they playing into the coalition? it is probably one of the only place in the middle east where they can vote in a real democracy, let's get onto politics, showing. we pulled them and what was most fascinating was 50 or 60% would come out to vote but was fastening was a 50% voted them going into the government direct the joining the government. it is significant, is about 20 to 30% more than we had pulled previously two years ago and that may be part of the nation state law when the israeli said that this is more of a jewish state in the state for everyone even though it is
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democratic, they may be pushing back and sang, maybe now is our time to come out and vote and be a part of a government and really showed that no one is going to give us any rights of we do not take them. get out and vote. did he say that he would not invite arab groups and was coalition? for a tactic, it was not a wise thing to say for any party. how can the arab parties influence how the government is formed? they have recommended who they want to be prime minister, it will be very significant if they say they want benny, even if they have no intention ofjoining the government. that may mean that he has more seats and more people recommending him for the government and that can be significant, but they could also have support from the outside say now is a new chance to set a new agenda for israel and there could be agenda for israel and there could be a new government with benny as the head and we want to be part, maybe you are not ready for that, maybe on
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the outside, let's talk about things that we want for our community and let's see how we can move from there stoplights so another factor to watch in terms of how this is going to come together. may be addressing his supporters and his parties hq and what he wants and the other parties to offer his seat as part of the coalition government. whatever the outcome of the election, benjamin netanyahu has already passed a milestone. injuly, he became israel's longest—serving prime minister overtaking this man, david ben gurion — who was one of israel's founding fathers and its first prime minister. like nearly all israelis, mr netanyahu's served in the military. he was captain of an elite commando unit — here he is in 1976. in the 1980s, he was israel's ambassador to the united nations. and he's been involved israeli politics ever since.
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story here's the journalist noga tarnopolsky. here's the journalist noga tarnopolsky. she's written about benjamin neta nyahu for years, and is covering this election for the los angeles times. his role as been dominant, it is ha rd to his role as been dominant, it is hard to compare them to any other leader because he has been prime minister for so leader because he has been prime ministerfor so long that leader because he has been prime minister for so long that there is an entire generation that only know him as prime minister and his influence is huge. remember venture netanyahu influence is huge. remember venture neta nyahu is influence is huge. remember venture netanyahu is not just influence is huge. remember venture netanyahu is notjust involved in the political fight but the political fight to, the the political fight but the politicalfight to, the results the political fight but the political fight to, the results of the election and his legal fete are intertwined and that is because he is planned to be indicted on fraud, bribery in breach of trust charges pending a hearing which is expected soon. if he is able to form a government, he could potentially obtain immunity and even pass a law preventing the high court ofjustice
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from removing that immunity. the story that haaretz article links to is titled "1,000, 2,000, 4000: can netanyahu escape the corruption cases against him" those numbers refer to the names of the three cases against him in case 1000, he's accused of taking gifts from this man hollywood mogul arnon milchan, in exchange for political favours. in the other cases, he's accused of seeking positive coverage from media organisations — again, in return forfavours. whether or not he's charged, whether israelis believe he has a case to answer depends on who they support. here's noga tarnopolsky again. these supporters think that it is pa rt these supporters think that it is part of the deep state conspiracy against him, hand—in—hand with the media and his opponents think he is facing corruption charges and that it isa
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facing corruption charges and that it is a serious matter. benjamin netanyahu's been prime minister since 2009, and throughout, one of the biggest issues has been palestinian statehood, and the issue ofjewish settlements in the palestinian territories. back in 2009, he expressed conditional acceptance of a palestinian state alongside israel. he's toughened his stance since then. before the election in 2015, he argued that ceding land to the palestinians would risk leaving israel open to attack. he said "whoever ignores that is burying his head in the sand". when he was asked if that meant a palestinian state would not be established if he was elected he said "indeed". last week, he said this. in recent months, i've made a diplomatic effort in this direction and in recent days, the conditions for this have ripened. today, i am announcing intentions to upload the formation of the next government,
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israeli sovereignty with the northern dead sea. that was effectively a promise to annex 30% of the occupied west bank — some of which you can see here. that's territory palestinians want to be part of any future palestinian state. mr netanyahu also said he would annex all israeli settlements in the west bank, but that it would need to wait until the publication of president trump's peace plan. israeli settlements in the west bank are seen as illegal under international law, althugh israel disputes this. let's hearfrom noga again on if netanyahu would follow through on that promise. netanyahu made a statement that he has made in every election campaign ican has made in every election campaign i can remember saying that he will make policy moves towards annexing parts of the west bank. i think if he can, he will try but in all honesty if he is reelected tonight, if we have clear results, his number one priority will be to try and
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secure his own legal future and get some retroactive immunity and i assume they'll be all consuming. this remains a huge incident on the international stage, other political issues on top of this? they were not an issue in the campaign other than the annexation which is directed at parts of his constituency, the jewish settlers in the right wing nationalists for whom this is very important and perhaps may have had some impact there, but more broadly did not really play into the campaign issues. but his statement in itself through upside down the foundation of the peace process for the terms of them which is the negotiation settlement for two states and brought a lot of alarm from the international community as she said, but here there's a lot of
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skepticism that he would actually carry it out that it was a campaign promise that his neck promises and not follow through on them. we have to see but one thing that is interesting is that he linked it to mr trump's peace plan and said that this would be a historic opportunity to extend jewish sovereignty know whether or not that is the case, he's using the plan as a means for doing that representing it as such and so does raise questions as to what exactly the trump administration is in plan for how the conflict shall be resolved. complicated at times, but they're also very important both for the future of israel but also for the middle east more generally.
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stay with us on outside source — still to come. the office rental firm wework has delayed its listing on the stock market. we'll find out why investors are getting cold feet. jo swinson has closed her first conference as the liberal democrats' leader, by pledging to stop brexit. she said if the party wins the general electon with a majority, article 50 will be revoked without any further public vote. we must stop brexit. applause and we are crystal clear, a liberal democrat majority government will revoke article 50 on day one. applause
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because there is no brexit that will be good for a country. europe makes our united kingdom stronger. the exit polls benjamin netanyahu and benny gantz, right now it is far too early to see who will form the next government.
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vivian is with us in new york, hi, what is going on. there was a lot of hype around it, some huge evaluations like $60 billion down to $50 billion over the past few weeks, the company has been releasing a little bit of the financial workings of the company you would say that they're fairly unimpressive what they saw and they have been burning through cash, think they lost $1.6 billion last year nuzzling slightly below the amount of revenue it was bringing in. basically, it is been expanding and taking on new leases open to turn a profit by renting out that space with the rental prices and making a profit but it has not been bringing in enough money and that is why investors lost their nerve. apple and the irish government
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were in court today, over tax. however, unlike other big tech firms and governments —— they are on the same side. both are trying to overturn a european commission ruling, that ordered the tech giant to pay the irish government more than 1a billion dollars, in back taxes. nicholas hirst is a senior correspondent on eu competition at mlex in brussels and explained earlier how this all started. relates to a tax deal that apple struck with ireland back in 1991. investigators looked into the deal and cannot find any rhyme or reason and cannot find any rhyme or reason and they ordered the irish to tear it up and apple to reimburse the hefty sum of its for the past ten yea rs hefty sum of its for the past ten years and it was really wildly unpopular with the pass government and apple two and it was also a terrible picture with a reputation in europe and really to the corporate brand. focusing on two stories on today's outside source, the general election, the poles have
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been closer 90 minutes most of the exit polls throughout and they all vary, but they all largely tell the same story which is that it is too close to call, some give benny gantz, who was challenging benjamin netanyahu. some give the blue—and—white alliance a slight advantage, and the third biggest party and how he plays, who gives a support you may affect who becomes the next israeli prime minister. that is one story we are focused on in this the second because today, the uk supreme court considers two appeal, one from england and one from scotland, both focused on the co re from scotland, both focused on the core issue, did borisjohnson the prime minister behave unlawfully when he suspended parliament, paroled parliament for five weeks, purgation of parliament, proceedings began today and will bring you right up began today and will bring you right up to date, there is there are plenty of things and will explain
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how those fit into the brakes astray, plenty to get to the next half hour. hello there. we will give you a quick update on hurricane humberto, it is picking up strength with an eye clearly visible in the centre of the hurricane in this continuing to pick up from the east coast of the united states, there is no major concerns here but that is working in a northeasterly direction while continuing to pick up strength and will probably pass to the north of bermuda but still close enough to bring winds with torrential rain and large in battering waves to the coastline is all, subtle deviation in the track of that to bring them into the bermuda area. across the united states, sunshine across many areas of temperatures above normal for this time of year and thunderstorms moving into the gulf of mexico with an area of low
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pressure responsible to bring in some heavy downpours, slow—moving downpours as well as the east texas and louisiana with the risk of some flooding issues here. when placing by worried about is nepal over the next couple of days, some extreme rainfall here and other rainfall potential is the jet stream which is got a little dip in it and areas of accelerating winds that will encourage the air to rise and it is working over the monsoon, whenever you get the monsoon interacting with the jet stream, that is never a you get the monsoon interacting with thejet stream, that is never a good combination and could lead to some extreme falls of rain for central nepal between tonight and wednesday, perhaps up to 400 and places in the rain will come down very heavily in a short space of time and landslides of possible that is not the only place 0c heavy rain, there's plenty of rain around in the monsoon is being beefed up by an area of low pressure so again, we could see some flooding issues building in an you
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can see a line up thundershowers across thailand into cambodia, southern parts of vietnam in the philippines. those monsoon downpours will continue to bring heavy rain into the philippines and particularly the island will see some flooding and we could see a profession to depression form. and we have strong winds continuing through parts of the baltic, north coast of the area with lists and that cool blustery air will continue to work its way into belarus and ukraine, and plenty of showers around, particularly temperatures rise significantly as we head into this weekend, meanwhile for us, weather—wise, more sunshine coming up weather—wise, more sunshine coming up tomorrow but scotland having a
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cloudier day and maybe if a few mist patches.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the main exit polls from israel's election are in and the result is too close to call. israel's prime minister benjamin neta nyahu has failed to secure a majority. but whether he'll be forced from office still isn't clear. benny gantz from the blue and white alliance appears to have won a similar number of seats to benjamin netanyahu. that means days of negotiations overforming a governing coalition will begin. and this man, avigdor lieberman, could be crucial in deciding who takes power. also on outside source, a historic court case in the british supreme court that could determine what happens next over brexit. the supreme court is going to decide whether borisjohnson's suspension
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of parliament was lawful or not. here's the case against him. no prime minister has abused his powers in the manner which we allege in at least the last 50 years. the judges will consider thousands of pages of evidence — the government's lawyers say the suspension is just politics. the uk's supreme court has begun hearing considering the legality of boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament. it's a ruling that may have consequences for the brexit process, but also for the definition of the relationship between parliament and prime minister. 11 judges will consider this.
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outside the court, police held back protesters for and against brexit. inside the court, the president of the supreme court, lady hale, emphasised that the issue was not about brexit, but whether the suspension of parliament was legal. it is important to emphasise that we are not concerned with the wider political issues which form the context for this legal issue. as will be apparent when we hear the legal arguments, the determination of this legal issue will not determine when and how the united kingdom leaves the european union. today, the supreme court heard appeals from two cases, one from the high court in england — it has already ruled that borisjohnson acted lawfully but the decision is being appealed. the other comes from the court of session in scotland, which ruled he had acted illegally — that ruling is also being appealed. first up was the english
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case, brought by the campaigner gina miller. here's part of the appeal from her barrister lord pannick. it is, we say, a remarkable feature of these proceedings that the prime minister has not made a witness statement. for the executive to use a prerogative power to seek to evade control by parliament stands the basic principles of constitutional law on their head. the entire legal battle is playing out against the fact that the uk is due to leave the eu without a deal at the end of octrober and there is currently no deal between the uk and the eu on how that will work.
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that is of no consequence to those 11 judges on the supreme court. there's plenty of pressure and passion, as you can see from the the reception that gina miller received when she left court today. booing. we want brexit now! brexit now! the supreme court also considered from the scottish case, which was brought by a number of people, including the scottish national party mpjoanna cherry. the scottish court found borisjohnson had acted unlawfully in suspending parliament. the counterargument is being made by the advocate general for scotland, who's arguing that courts should not be interfering in political matters. the court is not equipped to decide what is a legitimate political consideration and what it was an illegitimate political consideration. it is because the courts are not
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to cross the boundaries and intrude upon the proceedings of parliament. they may make the declarator, and i want to take up a point mentioned towards the end of the submission by my learned friend lord pannick, if this court finds that the advice of the prime minister was unlawful, the prime minister will take all necessary steps to comply with any declaration made by the court. these are inevitably complicated legal arguments, so this is useful — it's a summary of the day from the institute for government. what stood out today is the sort of idea of competing ideas of parliamentary sovereignty that we see on the one side from the challengers and on the other from the government. the government is saying in this case what parliamentary sovereignty means is that parliament can enact
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any law that it likes and nobody can set aside any law that parliament enacts. and the government says, "well, the prime minister exercised his prerogative power to advise the queen here and he didn't violate any statute set out by parliament by doing that. what lord pannick qc, the representative for gina miller, one of the challengers, was setting out this morning was a much broader, richer view of what parliamentary sovereignty actually means in the uk constitution. the idea that for parliament to be sovereign is notjust simply that parliament can make any law, it means parliament must have the opportunity to make laws and also means parliament scrutinising the government through questions, motions, debates and so on. so, in a sense, what the court is being asked to rule on this week is really the core of the uk constitution, that sort of first rule, this idea of parliamentary sovereignty. nick eardley is in westminster.
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do we have any comment on the legality of what is playing out because we will wait for the supreme court took a position? but in political terms, how did you judge day one for the prime minister?” think borisjohnson's day one for the prime minister?” think boris johnson's argument day one for the prime minister?” think borisjohnson's argument is pretty clear. this is a political decision. not a job of the courts to get involved in why we have sent parliament home for a few weeks and to decide whether or not we told the truth and we said it was all about the queen's speech. what was really interesting though is the politicians we have been speaking today from the uk governments i have not repeated with their lawyer said in court. so the lawyer said in court that the government would take all necessary steps to make sure that whatever the supreme court decided was acted on. government ministers have been a lot more relu cta nt ministers have been a lot more reluctant to say what that means. borisjohnson himself reluctant to say what that means. boris johnson himself refusing reluctant to say what that means. borisjohnson himself refusing to say exactly what he would do if he
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loses the case for the justice minister here, robert buckland, also refusing to say if parliament would be called if the government would try to maybe prorogue parliament again later in october. something that has been suggested behind the scenes in the last couple of weeks. the part of the reason for that is simply the government wants to see exactly what the supreme court comes up exactly what the supreme court comes up with was of it desperately hopes that its argument prevails, that the supreme court decides there is no place to decide whether the government kissing parliament home or not. the simple reason is if parliament is recalled if mps are back here or maybe the week after before the 4th of october, he will make borisjohnson's before the 4th of october, he will make boris johnson's brexit before the 4th of october, he will make borisjohnson's brexit task harder. —— 14th of october. we have seen harder. —— 14th of october. we have seen mps are prepared to do whatever it takes apartment to try and block his brexit plan a potentially leaving without a deal. so he wants to keep parliament shopped until the 14th of october. thank you very
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much. lots of dates keep in mind with breaks at the moment with the two i mentioned in the will be on of its 31st of october and that's when its 31st of october and that's when it is due to happen unless that date is extended. and for it to be extended cam of the uk has to request a and that you have to agree. neither of those two things have happened. also bear in mind october the 19th of that it's the date by which the uk and that you have to have a deal or that law which nick was talking about will kick in and will demand the prime minister that he requested an extension which he says he will not do. and he is playing a scar is very close to his chest as to what he may do if he reaches october the 19th and there is no deal in place. we shall see. lots of twists and turns to come. more political drama in israel. these are coming in now on the exit polls. the exit polls have been released, and it's too close to call. the polls close for an hour and a half. they all say at best it netanyahu half. they all say at best it neta nyahu and half. they all say at best it netanyahu and his party is even
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stevens with the blue and white coalition but some put mr netanyahu down. us foreign policy expert saying this... i wonder if tom bateman agrees with that. he is in tel aviv at the headquarters of mr netanyahu's tel aviv at the headquarters of mr neta nyahu's party. tel aviv at the headquarters of mr netanyahu's party. not doubting this analysis but i have heard people write neta nyahu off analysis but i have heard people write netanyahu off before. these are exit polls. we know from the past that in israel the exit polls can get things wrong and particularly last time, they underrepresented the votes for likud and also the religious parties he relies on for a coalition government. so there may be changes changes can make a big difference but even given that, there's a long way to go for mr netanyahu if these exit polls are to be in any way
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believed for him to get past that magic number of 61 seats in the is really parliament to be able to form a coalition government, a majority government. now he has not shown up yet but they have started showing the party political videos in the last 20 minutes or so so a sign he may try and come and tell us a bit more but one bit of information we have had in the last hour or so is a statement from the office of the president of israel who now takes on a crucial role because he gets to pick which party leader ultimately gives the first chance to try and form a coalition. he has said he wa nts to form a coalition. he has said he wants to move all of that when the result becomes clear. it may be tomorrow or even the next day or whenever a clear picture about what the parties stand at the start of the parties stand at the start of the coalition negotiation begins. sometimes with american politics we hear people say what is the route to the white house, meaning which states as a candidate need to get the magic number to take the presidency? what is benjamin
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netanyahu's presidency? what is benjamin neta nyahu's route to presidency? what is benjamin netanyahu's route to the prime minister should be these exit polls are correct? there is really only two realistic scenarios. the first is that he can simply form a coalition with his own likud party and other parties of the right wing and other parties of the right wing and the religious parties. but he is never near that if the exit polls are to be believed. that leaves a second which is he needs the seats of the party of avigdor lieberman a formerfriend of the party of avigdor lieberman a former friend turned rival and former friend turned rival and former defence minister. he walked out of government before it began after the election in april and he objected to what he sees it as a dominance of the religious parties over the neta nyahu dominance of the religious parties over the netanyahu coalition. so avigdor lieberman would have to come back quite a long way on what he was saying before. he has suggested he simply would not sit with mr netanyahu simply would not sit with mr neta nyahu with those simply would not sit with mr netanyahu with those parties
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government so it is hard to see that that could happen. but of course this is is really politics anything is possible. the allure of power both for neta nyahu is possible. the allure of power both for netanyahu and avigdor lieberman may be such that they could come to some accommodation. tom, thank you. if he is to prove amber moraga continue as prime minister, he have to gain a lot of ground or avigdor lieberman will have to give a lot of ground. they are both known as men who very much stick to what they think. they do not budge too much for coming under pressure from rivals but something is got to give as i was explaining if this extraordinary political career abridgment that yahoo is not to come to an end. we shall see how it shakes down. let's hope to hear from the major players and politics as we go into the evening here at bbc world news and bbc news channel. stay with us on outside source. still to come: we will look at the prism of security and policies towards
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palestine, two issues that played it well throughout the italy campaign. we have to look about what motivated people to support the different parties. a woman who survived cancer has become the first person to swim across the english channel four times in a row. 37—year—old sarah thomas from colorado completed the challenge this morning after more than 54 hours in the water. robert hall reports. exhausted but triumphant, as the first rays of the sun lit the shoreline ahead, sarah thomas reached out towards the end of herjourney. here she comes. the friends who had willed her to succeed during moments when her spirits ebbed were there on the pebbles to greet her. well done, sarah! i was throwing up, i was sick. she said you got this. my husband said, "keep going."
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this story of determination and stamina began in the early hours of sunday morning. sarah thomas said she used swimming to cope with her cancer treatment. she dedicated this challenge to those who have survived the disease. 54 hours and ten minutes crossing the world of‘s busiest shipping lanes. the four legs of the journey should have totalled 84 miles, but the channel currents forced sarah to swim in a series of loops so the actual distance was closer to 130 miles. kevin murphy, a cross—channel swimmer himself, was one of the official observers aboard the sarah's support boat. he says this new record is an extraordinary achievement. you can train as much as you like, but if you haven't got the power to withstand the demons, the demons in your head which say you can't do this, if you can't fight those, you never will do it. sarah thomas has been known to sleep for 24 hours after her swims.
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the physical and mental effects of this one will determine whether she can set her sights even higher. robert hall, bbc news, at sandgate in kent. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is: the israeli general election, the exit polls are out. benjamin netanyahu and benny gantz are neck and neck. right now, it's too close to call. but it looks difficult for benjamin netanyahu but it looks difficult for benjamin neta nyahu to form but it looks difficult for benjamin netanyahu to form a new government coalition. it's found that an average of 74 men, women and children were killed every day in afghanistan throughout the month of august. both the taliban and afghan government have questioned the validity of the casualty figures identified by the bbc. most people killed were combatants, including more taliban
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fighters than expected, but a fifth were civilians. lyse doucet has this report from herat. not a day without violence. . not a day without loss. one month in afghanistan. the darkest day of all. a wedding hall, 92 dead, a suicide bomber of islamic state, the worst attack of august, the deadliest this year. it was meant to be the best night of
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this man's lie. 20 minutes after the bridegroom danced with joy, this man's lie. 20 minutes after the bridegroom danced withjoy, life changed forever. the days of summer in august saw on average 74 deaths a day. even the islamic festival was shattered by violence. we went to visit one family violence. we went to visit one fa m ily left violence. we went to visit one family left devastated. two daughters out shopping. two children left behind at home.
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a tele— band truck bomb killed them and 12 others. —— taliban. one month in decades of war. even 870 70—year—old grandmother has a gun. three of this woman's sons and grandsons were shot dead right in front of her house by islamic state fighters. 40 grandchildren now under her care.
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another son died in war decades ago. may five entered in battle. across afghanistan, month after month, life goes on here, even as more lives are taken, more families shattered. for many afghans, this now feels like a forever war. even of this past month of violence has been far more talk of peace, afghans wonder and worry whether the months to come will be the same. fighting intensifies and so, to come of the pain and what is now the world's deadliest conflict.
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much more from her and our collea g u es much more from her and our colleagues in afghanistan as a look at one month in that country. let's go back to the israeli election. he laments all the time. the exit polls are out and suggest that it is neck and neck between the blue and white alliance of benny gantz and the vitamin that yahoo party. a big player here is avigdor lieberman. he lead a party that could get 8—10 seats which means they could be a big part of who gets to go into coalition. this wire report here. benjamin netanyahu benjamin neta nyahu has benjamin netanyahu has previously refuted the idea of going into a national unity government. so either
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mr avigdor lieberman will shift in this position from the last few minutes which seems unlikely or benjamin netanyahu will have to shift from his position he has repeatedly said during the campaign was he does not make a habit of going back on things but perhaps he would do in order to stay in power. we will see. and barry mind these two men have fallen out over whether ultra—orthodox dues should be able to opt out of the military draft. avigdor lieberman says no and vitamin neta nyahu says avigdor lieberman says no and vitamin netanyahu says he has. these two men are a ways apart for the fa ct two men are a ways apart for the fact they have been allies in the past. but without those 8—10 seats that avigdor lieberman looks like he will pick up in the parliament, it looks hard to see a route for benjamin netanyahu to continue as prime minister. that said, he has been on the back of a politically plenty of times over the years and he often comes out on top. let's see how this shakes down. let's look at the issues that have been driving this campaign. security is a key issue for many israelis. tensions have recently increased along the border with lebanon. these pictures are from
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earlier this month. they show smoke rising after israel exchanged fire with hezbollah militants. and hezbollah has a close relationship with israel's foe iran. the relationship between those two is documented and they loathe each other. mr netanyahu says his leadership will keep israelis safe. but benny gantz is a former high—ranking general who is hawkish on security issues, and so both men occupy similar ground on this issue. just last week, benjamin netanyahu declared that he would "apply israeli sovereignty" in this area the jordan valley. it was effectively a promise to annex 30% of the occupied west bank. that's territory palestinians want to be part of a future palestinian state. but mr netanyahu has been pursuing policies that make a two—state solution more unlikely.
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blue and white's benny gantz has been more coy. that was a policy introduced at the last minute and the last week of the campaigns and some saw as a ploy to pick up voters. there are major? about whether ms. burnett yet who will ever be in a position to carry out that policy. bear in mind for all the campaign promises a parties make, they inevitably have to form coalitions and so they inevitably have to compromise on their policies. benny gantz is more coy. he's declined to say whether he would accept a sovereign palestinian state, but he has rejected withdrawing from all of the occupied west bank. to find out if there is much difference between the two lead candidates in the minds of palestinians, barbara has been speaking to palestinian academic yara hawari.
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there is not a huge amount of difference between the two political parties when it comes to the palestinians. we saw that demonstrated aptly when benjamin that yahoo made his annexation plan. there was actually a scramble to say who's when it was first. the blue—and—white party said that netanyahu blue—and—white party said that neta nyahu has stolen blue—and—white party said that netanyahu has stolen the plan from gantz. the jordan netanyahu has stolen the plan from gantz. thejordan valley is an area of 50,000 palestinians. they are not discussed at all. netanyahu said he had no intention of annexing palestinians himself. it begs the question what happens in the palestinians also they have been absent from the discourse of the entire election process which is not surprising at all. bear in mind benjamin netanyahu surprising at all. bear in mind benjamin neta nyahu has surprising at all. bear in mind benjamin netanyahu has been prime minister of israel longer than any other prime minister of the country and some say these exit polls marked the beginning of the end for him.
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people have written them all before and we shall see how it shakes down in the coming days. talk to you tomorrow. hello there. if you like your weather story dry and settled, so far so good this week. it's been quite quiet. this was from a weather watcher picture scene from lincolnshire on tuesday afternoon, but i could have picked numerous locations. itjust illustrates what a beautiful september day many of us had on tuesday and there is more to come actually for the rest of the week. dry by day but with the nights growing longer, that means cooler overnight with potential for some mist and fog to form. but the high pressure is really the driving force behind the story this week. with a weak weather front toppling across that high, it will bring patchy rain and a bit more cloud for scotland and northern ireland, but elsewhere it looks likely to be another promising day. with lighter winds, temperatures fairly uniform to what we have had so far this week,
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10—20 the overall high. as we move out of wednesday into thursday, that frontal system moves its way into the north sea. as high pressure establishes itself a little further and again things will stay quiet. we could see some early morning mist and fog clear, but it will do so and then again another promising day. largely dry, light winds around and some sunshine coming through with highs warmer in scotland of 19 degrees and 22 possible in the south—east corner. now a repeat performance almost on friday with a good deal of dry weather and the forecast and the winds changing direction slowly, and if anything they can make it a little warmer still. so as we move out of friday into the weekend, we will need to keep a close eye on this with a front pushing in from the atlantic, with high pressure way further south and south and east, and that means that winds will come more from a southerly direction and will drive more heat across the uk and more humidity, which could be an important factor. so a great start to the weekend
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again and lots of sunshine and some decent warmth out there quite widely across the country. but we just need to look at what's happening out to the west. a few sharp thundery downpours could trigger off later in the day. ahead of it, though, 25 or 26 degrees is not out of the question. so that means that through saturday night into sunday morning, we could see the potential for some sharp boundary downpours to drive their way in from the west. great news for gardeners and growers, we are desperate in some areas for some rain now, but it is not great news if you have outdoor plans. keep abreast of the forecast for the details, and hopefully behind it, something a little brighter but not quite as warm. as we move out of sunday, that bad showery rain moves away only to be replaced potentially by another spell of windy weather pushing in from the west. so we are starting to see a change, as you can see quite clearly. let's just recap — into the weekend, we have got that southerly flow that drags in more heat, but more moisture and more humidity
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from the near continent. that is going to spark off some thundery downpours. the high—pressure we have seen all courtesy of this week undulating jet will drift away and as for the jet stream, it is then set to strengthen. strong westerly right across the uk and it's a jet stream that drives in the areas of low pressure from the atlantic so into next week, going to turn more unsettled. the detail is little difficult to pinpoint at the moment, but low pressure looks likely to dominate, especially up into the north and the west where we see the rain and the strongest of the wind. next week, it will stay mild. turning increasingly wet and windy. my advice is to keep abreast of the forecast for all the latest details. take care.
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tonight at 10: in a landmark case at the uk supreme court, judges consider whether borisjohnson acted unlawfully in suspending parliament for five weeks. one of the main issues being tackled today was whether this was a purely political question and not a matter for the court. the court is not equipped to decide what is a legitimate political consideration and what is an illegitimate political consideration. no prime minister has abused his powers, in the manner in which we allege, in at least the last 50 years. cheers and boos. feelings were running high on both sides, as some of those

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