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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 18, 2019 1:30pm-2:00pm BST

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overdose of they had taken the overdose of medicine. —— the 18th of february. the family members also told the jury the family members also told the jury that they had heard both their pa rents jury that they had heard both their parents discussing taking their own lives. now, the family have been in court during this three week trial. there were gasps from the public gallery and we are expecting the family and mrs ecclestone to come out and speak to us shortly outside the court with a family statement. thank you. time for a look at the weather. thank you. a quiet few days and plenty of sunshine as well. that is certainly the picture at the moment. to the south of the uk, almost faultless blue skies but there are exceptions to the rule, and as we cast our eye further north, scotland, more cloud around with quite persistent drizzling rain for some of us as well. that is the biggest talking point for today. high pressure is centred across the
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uk, keeping things pretty quiet. light winds and dry weather. but this warm front dipping into scotla nd this warm front dipping into scotland is the cause of the thick cloud and the outbreaks of rain. through the afternoon, the rain pulls away from mainland scotland, drifting towards the northern isles. more cloud for northern ireland, northern england, perhaps, and parts of east anglia. in the south, up to i9 of east anglia. in the south, up to 19 or 20 with the sunshine. just 11 oi’ 19 or 20 with the sunshine. just 11 or 12 for aberdeen. through the evening and overnight, the rain moves away from scotland but the cloud lingers on. patches of mist and fog possible across southern scotla nd and fog possible across southern scotland and northern england. quite chilly with loads of three or four in rural spots. but a lot of sunshine first thing here. the mist and fog will burn back through the morning with a drier day to come for scotland. sunny spells developing as well with a lot of fine weather across the uk generally tomorrow. temperatures ranging from the high teens across northern scotland, so a
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much warmer day, for example, for aberdeen. in the low 20s for the south. the centre of the high still close by but it is heading off towards the continent. we live to the western edge of it and that moves us the western edge of it and that moves us into the more direct south easterly airflow, bringing warmer airfrom the easterly airflow, bringing warmer air from the continent. so a lot of sunshine on friday, and we lose the cloud from scotland, and some spots in scotland could even get up to 24. certainly a warm feel across the uk to bring the week to a close at this point in september. but if anything, warmer still on saturday, as we really ta p warmer still on saturday, as we really tap into a plume of air coming up from northern spain and across france, sweeping all the way across france, sweeping all the way across the uk. saturday brings the promise of plenty of sunshine and temperatures quite widely in the low 20s, possibly up to 26 in the south—east. but keep your eye out there towards the west as for a clue of what is waiting in the wings. a big change for the second half at the weekend. becoming more unsettled with the chance of some heavy, possibly thundery rain, and feeling
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cooler as well. but for now, a bit ofa cooler as well. but for now, a bit of a renaissance of summer. a reminder of our top story. the supreme court is told that borisjohnson‘s suspension of parliament is not a matter for its judges to rule on. the court is considering whether the prime minister acted legally when he suspended parliament. that's all from the bbc news at one, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. good afternoon, i'm gavin ramjaun, and this is latest sports news. some sad news and the former rangers player fernando ricksen has died at the age of 43. the dutchman had been suffering from motor neurone disease. he was capped 12 times by his country and won the domestic treble during a six—year spell with rangers.
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the captain of the side looks across. in 2013, fernando ricksen revealed he was terminally ill. from then until now, he battled bravely, raising money for charity as he did so. raising money for charity as he did so. but today, rangers announced his passing. their managing director stuart robinson said everyone connected with rangers will be distressed by fernando's passing. arising from the netherlands in our ago, fellow dutchman and rangers
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team—mate reacted to the news. ago, fellow dutchman and rangers team—mate reacted to the newsm ago, fellow dutchman and rangers team-mate reacted to the news. it is really a shock. but we knew it was coming and hopefully, he finds some peace 110w. because coming and hopefully, he finds some peace now. because it was a hard struggle. you was fighting every day. 0nly struggle. you was fighting every day. only this time, he lost the battle. a battle that touched the hearts of many. after a disappointing start to the english sides' champions league campaigns last night, manchester city and tottenham will look to get off the mark later. city are taking on shakhtar donetsk in ukraine. and the premier league champions are in the middle of a defensive crisis. john stones has been ruled out for up to five weeks with a muscle injury, leaving them with just one fit recognised centre back. football is not how you handle the good situations but how you handle the bad ones and this team did it in the past. when we won the last two seasons seven titles,
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nobody gave us anything, we won for ourselves and we are going to do it again so that is what it is. wales boss warren gatland says he is shocked that backs coach rob howley has been sent home from the world cup for an alleged betting breach. howley flew home from japan yesterday. the former scrum—half was due to leave his role after the tournament, but his planned successor stephen jones has flown out to join the team early, as they prepare to take on georgia in their tournament opener. we were shocked, but i think the union are dealing with this, and my focus now has to be on the next five days in terms of preparing the squad. you have to deal with adversity at times, you lose key players, and this has happened, and i must say that the players in the last 24 hours have really stepped up and been incredibly responsible and resilient, and sometimes that brings teams closer together, and we have to draw a line in the sand under this.
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you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. the bbc briefing is a new in—depth downloadable guide on the big topics in the news, and the first edition released today is about energy. the idea is to lay out the context and the facts about how we produce, use and pay for it while having to meet our climate goals. 0ur energy and environment analyst roger harrabin is here to tell us more about the document. it's a big compendium on facts. some straightforward, others may prove contentious. covers transport, housing, electricity, politics and costs. what are the main findings of the briefing? the briefing starts with the new reality that energy
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policy in the uk is based on the need to get greenhouse gases down to zero by 2050. you can see back in 1990 the uk was emitting nearly 700 million tonnes of c02. by 2017 there was a 40% cut. by 2030 another big reduction is needed. and by 2050 a reduction of 89% or more is needed to meet the climate act. and we'll need to find ways to remove the rest. anything unexpected in the briefing? i think the energy consumption graph will surprise many people. with the number of gadgets we have, you might expect energy use to be going up. but this chart shows the opposite. energy use was tracking the growth of the economy. then after the year 2000, it started to be forced down by thinks like the eu's energy
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saving rules on appliances. that's even though the economy has continued to grow. here's another perhaps surprising chart. it's often said that the uk has high energy prices. but this one shows that when it comes to electricity prices for households, the uk is more or less in the middle of the league table for rich nations. with germany, the most expensive and canada the cheapest. transport will be crucial if these targets are going to be met so what about electric cars? yes, the former pm, mrs may, said the uk would lead the world by phasing out petrol—only cars by 2040. looking at this chart, that's clearly not the case. the uk's 2040 target is in line with canada and sri lanka. but it's a decade less ambitious that some others including israel and slovenia.
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and way behind the real leader norway. and a reminder that you can download the document by going to the bbc news website bbc.co.uk/energy. it was meant to be a turning point for afghanistan, the taliban and the us in peace talks discussing how to withdraw foreign troops and bring a ceasefire to a nation shattered by war. but now, with talks halted by president trump after a wave of attacks, the country is facing a renewed crisis. 0ur correspondent auliya atrafi has gone deep into taliban territory to speak to civilians most at risk.
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0verwhelmed with grief, in what is left of her home, she prays for her grandchildren. 0h, left of her home, she prays for her grandchildren. oh, my children, she cries. i wish it could have been me. trapped in a no man's land between the taliban and the government, her village was hit by an afghan forces air strike village was hit by an afghan forces airstrike in the village was hit by an afghan forces air strike in the middle of the night. in that moment, she lost six members of her family. night. in that moment, she lost six members of herfamily. two night. in that moment, she lost six members of her family. two sons, night. in that moment, she lost six members of herfamily. two sons, a daughter—in—law and three grandchildren. the youngest just daughter—in—law and three grandchildren. the youngestjust a year old. as she takes me into her home, she tells me this is all she has left in
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her life now. a few dusty possessions, some plates, and a supply of grain to last the winter. civilian casualties have risen almost every year since the beginning of the war between the us and the taliban and now, with the colla pse and the taliban and now, with the collapse of the peace talks, life is even more uncertain for those living in the margins. in total, 12 people we re in the margins. in total, 12 people were killed in the air strike. most of the village has already fled the violence. for those that have chosen to stay, scenes like these have become routine. the government said they were targeting taliban militants firing from the village. but many year say they want justice for those who have been lost.
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without the support of her sons, she 110w without the support of her sons, she now worries about her future. in revolt areas like these, many people's only hope is to survive through the coming winter. —— remote. the world health 0rganization has it called crisis", estimating that a person dies from a snakebite every 5 minutes, in the first of our special reports our global health correspondent tulip mazumdar has travelled to kenya to meet a new team of scientists tackling these ancient killers. a pilot scheme is under way here, testing out new snakebite ambulances that can get into difficult to access that can get into difficult to a ccess areas that can get into difficult to access areas quickly. the biggest problem that leads to these loss of lives is because of the distance and
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the duration taken from when the patient was bitten to when they go to hospital, so what you are trying to hospital, so what you are trying to do with the ambulance is reduce the time taken. the race is on to get to a teenage boy bitten by a snake as he tended to his livestock. cecilia and her sna kebite snake as he tended to his livestock. cecilia and her snakebite research tea m cecilia and her snakebite research team reach the remote village within an hour. they clean the wound. he is ina an hour. they clean the wound. he is in a state of shock. but the team carefully lift hi m onto in a state of shock. but the team carefully lift him onto the ambulance. and head to hospital. a couple of days later, cecilia visits the teenager. doctors here have seen more than 40 snakebite so far this year, around half of the victims we re year, around half of the victims were children. still requires another dose of antivenom. unlike
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most hospitals in kenya, this one does have a decent supply of antivenom but there is a global shortage of these drugs that can cost hundreds of dollars. the family don't know how they will pay. there isa don't know how they will pay. there is a long recovery ahead but medics have managed to save this patient‘s leg handy is expected to to school. this community is very used to living alongside snakes. how many have been bitten by a snake before? but today is a first for them, they are learning snakebite first aid. this is such a crucial work, showing the community themselves what to do in the minutes after someone has been bitten by a snake to give them the best chance of a good outcome before help arrives. communities
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like this when lucky. they now have a dedicated team ready and waiting to help them. if this pilot scheme isa to help them. if this pilot scheme is a success here, these snakebite squads could be heading to other parts of kenya very soon. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: the supreme court continues to consider whether the prime minister acted illegally when he suspended parliament. his lawyers say it is not for the courts to decide. relatives of those killed on bloody sunday 47 years ago arrive in court for the prosecution of a former soldier charged with murder and attempted murder. no clear winner emerges from israel's election, leaving a question mark over who will be prime minister. i'm ben bland. here's the business news.
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average prices for goods and services rose more slowly in august than injuly. inflation came in at 1.7% in august compared with 2.1% the previous month. a drop in the price of computer games brought down the average. clothing prices were also slow to recover from the summer sales. uk house prices rose at a slower rate in the year tojuly than at any time since september 2012. they went up, on average, by 0.7%, according to the latest figures. the office for national statistics said there had been general slowdown in uk property price growth in the last three years. this was driven by a slowing market in london and south—eastern england. but the latest figures show the biggest drop in prices in the last year was in the north east of england. the government will intervene in a us private equity firm's takeover of cobham, a uk defence and aerospace firm, because of national security concerns. advent international made a £4bn offer to buy cobham injuly and shareholders approved the deal last month. the dorset—based firm employs 10,000 people. it makes technology that allows planes to re—fuel mid—air and other military electronic
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and communication systems. let's return now to that top story. there's been a surprise drop in inflation, thanks to a fall in computer game prices. the consumer prices index measure of inflation fell below 2.1% injuly, according to the office for national statistics. it is the lowest rate since late 2016. the biggest drop in cpi inflation came from the "recreation and culture" sector, where prices fell by 5% in august, in particular in computer games and download.
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joining us now is kallum pickering, senior economist at berenberg bank. people's wages are now going up at a higher pace than average prices, so presumably that makes us all feel better off? the big story of the last ten years, that has been one of very wea k last ten years, that has been one of very weak wage growth. we were hit in britain because of the weaker sterling in britain. but now finally, wages are growing at around 4x, finally, wages are growing at around 4%, inflation, the latest, 1.7, for the average worker real wages have increased more than 2% on a yearly basis in the month to august and this is a positive development. this can continue with the uk avoids the accident of a hard brexit. one of the things we have been told about the things we have been told about the effect the uncertainty has caused the pound to be weak, but if
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it costs motorbike in goods and materials from abroad, those increased costs will be passed onto customers and we would expect inflation be higher? the pound falling after the eu referendum, that had a one—off effect on the inflation rate in 2017 and 2018. that has now faded. prices from abroad are now fairly stable. what matters for the outlook for foreign prices is where sterling heads from here. if the uk adds up with an orderly brexit, sterling will probably appreciate and get stronger versus other currencies and prices of foreign goods will go down. and on “— of foreign goods will go down. and on —— that on its own would be a big benefit over the medium—term. in a ha rd benefit over the medium—term. in a hard brexit, sterling would fall and that would repeat the situation that we had in 2016. that would be bad for real incomes. we know that the bank of england target rate for
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inflation is 2%. the bank is meeting this weekend. we will get their latest decision on interest rates tomorrow. given inflation has seen this surprise drop, do you think we can expect the bank of england to cut interest rates or not? probably not. the bank of england is forward—looking when it thinks about inflation. it considers the outlook not what has happened in the past. the data today tells us what happened in the past and the bank of england will look at waitrose, which is close to 4%, it will look at inflation expectations, which are rising above 3% and conclude that inflation will probably drift above the medium—term. the message tomorrow will be, we are not hiking interest rates yet but if we get an orderly brexit, we will have to hike interest rates gradually over the medium—term, probably. interest rates gradually over the medium-term, probably. the other point with this average measure of prices is it is interesting how much a difference a drop in the price of
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computer games can affect the overall figure. yes, you have each of these categories, food, video games, the price of clothing and shops, hotels, each accounting for a small proportion of the basket of goods that we consume but if you get a very big change, a big surprising change, that can have a big one—off effect. inflation is very volatile, we should focus on the underlying trends. the underlying trend is actually that inflation is roughly at the 2% target but with it —— wages rising, over time, at the 2% target but with it —— wages rising, overtime, it at the 2% target but with it —— wages rising, over time, it will gradually drift above that rate. thank you very much. let's have a look at how the markets are doing. we mentioned the bank of england and it is the central bank decisions that are occupying the minds of investors on the stock markets. we have the latest decision from the us federal reserve later today, it is widely expected to cut interest rates to try and tackle the global slowdown. markets tend to benefit
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from that, it creates an incentive to invest in stocks and shares. the bank of england decision is due tomorrow. investors taking a bit of a wait—and—see approach. 0il tomorrow. investors taking a bit of a wait—and—see approach. oil prices have retreated, extending the previous day's decline. and in currencies, the pound fell after that inflation slowdown. that's all the business news. us secretary of state, mike pompeo, is expected to arrive in saudi arabia later to discuss possible retaliation after an attack on the country's largest oil facility. us officials say they've identified that the drones and missiles used in the strike on saturday came from southern iran, but tehran denies any involvement. the bbc‘s security correspondent, frank gardener, has been getting reaction to the attack from saudi arabia's new ambassador to london.
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this is a blow for the world and the world economy, not just this is a blow for the world and the world economy, notjust saudi arabia. this attack would not have happened if there wasn't a war in yemen. saudi arabia went in with air strikes from march 2015. does saudi arabia now read —— regret getting involved in that war because let's be blunt, you have not dislodged the huthis, the majority of civilians killed because of the saudi led air strikes. this was surely a catastrophic mistake? anyone who says they don't regret conflict or war is lying to you or a madman. we felt we had to get involved because it was in the greater interests of yemen, saudi arabia and the region. you think it is bestjust to leave?
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of course not. we cannot leave yemen on its own. we work closely with them throughout the last 100 years. but what has the bombing achieved? principally it has achieved sending a message to iran that this is not somewhere they can control and take over and apply their malicious intent on. i want to return to the murder ofjamal intent on. i want to return to the murder of jamal khashoggi, in istanbul nearly a year ago by saudi agents. why haven't we been told what is going on with the trial? let me be clear, what happened in istanbul was a year ago, it was a stain on saudi arabia, our culture, oui’ stain on saudi arabia, our culture, our people, a government. i wish it did not happen. if saudi arabia was serious about getting to the bottom of this, why is the man named by the
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cia has being incidental in the murder at large? i know cia has being incidental in the murderat large? i knowa cia has being incidental in the murder at large? i know a friend of the crown prince but he seems to be above the law. no one is above the law. he was removed from his position. he is being investigated. we have not finished the investigation. if he had a role, he will go to jail, it is as simple as that. that was the saudi arabia ambassador to london. let's return to the supreme court. my colleague
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ben brown has been following events in the supreme court and we can ci’oss in the supreme court and we can cross live to him now. thank you, those proceedings will continue at two o'clock. let's just reflect on what has been said today. sirjames eadie making the case that when borisjohnson advised the queen to prorogue or suspend parliament for five weeks, it may have been controversial but he was saying as the government's lawyer that this was not unlawful, this is not a matter for the courts, this was a matter for the courts, this was a matter of pure politics. let's try and pick through the legal arguments with two professors of law from cambridge university. that argument that this is really nothing to do with the courts, the
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courts cannot rule on what mr johnson did, do you buy that?” think i do. it was persuasive in the court in england and this morning sirjames eadie was very persuasive, i thought, in pointing out once the courts get into the business of seeing how long a prorogation could be, there is no guidance. how can you say five weeks is too much but four is too little? it essentially is not a judge —— job forjudges, they need to be clear and defined standards. one of the judges did intervene and say what if parliament we re intervene and say what if parliament were prorogue for a year? surely that would be too long?” were prorogue for a year? surely that would be too long? i think everybody would agree it would be too long but that does not necessarily follow that there wouldn't be other remedies. for example the government would run out of money if it did not call parliament back. and there would be
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all sorts of difficulties with the armed forces. and so forth, if parliament was not called back. anotherjudge also raised the point that if the courts don't police this, then the queen gets sucked into this as the monarch, isn't that afair point? into this as the monarch, isn't that a fair point? that is a fair point but i think everyone here if they had been at all —wise will tread carefully around the cleese and avoid drawing her into controversy. and surely that is what would be expected. i think you take a slightly different view? yes, picking up on some of the questions that came from the supreme court justices, they were basically saying, we understand that things like why you might prorogue or how long are political but nevertheless, there are still potential constitutional limits, so you had interruption suggesting, what about the sovereignty of parliament, what a prorogation was used in a way that would stop parliament from sitting,
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from taking important decisions at a crucial time? there is very little time to actually take those decisions will there was a discussion as to whether that would limit parliament. that is an important thing and it is the job of the court to defend parliamentary sovereignty, to defend these principles. i think there is a space for us to think carefully about whether the provocation does undermine fundamental principles of out undermine fundamental principles of our constitution. —— prorogation. professor chris forsyth, is all of this because we don't have a written constitution and in a way we are stress testing the constitution we have between the government, the parliament and the courts? we are certainly stress testing the parliament and the constitution that we do have, and it's really been broken to destruction, i think, in some ways. it remains to be seen how things work out, but the fixed—term parliaments act is causing huge

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