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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 26, 2019 10:40pm-11:01pm BST

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“a r ‘ait as well as last night because of not as well as last night. nothing will ever top that my life time comes that was a special moment for me. what was everyone saying to you at school this morning? people i've known for five plus years community fa ns known for five plus years community fans and non—united fans everyone was just buzzing for me. fans and non—united fans everyone wasjust buzzing for me. just 16 talking to our colleagues from bbc northwest tonight. that's all from sportsday. coming up nexzt on bbc news, the papers. goodnight. hello and welcome to our look ahead
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to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are anna mikhailova — the deputy political editor of thetelegraph and the director of the cross—party think—tank demos, polly mackenzie. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. boris johnson‘s most senior brexit adviser dominic cummings is pictured on the front of the telegraph. the paper reports he says politicians who refuse to respect the result of the eu referendum, should not complain about rancour in the house of commons. the independent has a scoop about an oil company which is run by a major tory donor who met with borisjohnson, has had a £1.6 billion deal underwri by th british taxpayer, despite it being investigated by the seriour fraud office. (the financial times reports on accusations of a cover—up facing the white house, over a call between donald trump and the ukranian president.
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a story we have been covering earlier this evening. don't be a bully boris! reads the headling across the metro. the prime minister's sister rachel accuses of him of being ‘tasteless and reprehensible' and using the house of commons as a ‘bully pulpit‘. on the daily mail — bank scammers steal £1million a day — as the paper reports britain's fraud epidemic is growing at an alarming pace, despite repeated promises by banks to act. a warning on the times to deliver brexit or face riots! senior allies to the prime minister warn of civil unrest on the scale of the gilets jaunes protests in france or the riots in los angeles if brexit is frustrated. and a defiant borisjohnson pictured on the front of the daily express. borisjohnson tells mps to control their tempers but insists he will not surrender to no deal threat.
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so let's talk to them now. should we start with the metro? don't be such a bully. a sister weighed then. you first. on a day when boris is already being attacked pretty much by, you know, each party in the commons, by the public, after he has lost a huge supreme court case that all of his plans for the un and the week have been thrown completely, you know, out of whack. suddenly his sister, racheljohnson who is very outspoken herself, has come on the radio and really said you should not have been so aggressive with your language. you can be a bully, you are completely different in the comments compared to how i know you. it's quite... it's interesting you say she's outspoken because i'm not conscious of her being so outspoken and criticism of her brother. since he has become prime minister. first
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of all you know, she's a writer, she's very much got a name in her own right. she's on the other side of the brexit to pay completely and has always said that thejohnson family doa has always said that thejohnson family do a sort of come at each other, they're always debating and there's a lot of competition from there's a lot of competition from the university days until now and the university days until now and the debate over brexit. but you are right. she, joe, stanley, they were all at his side when he was elected oi’ all at his side when he was elected or chosen prime minister by the conservative membership, so it is a big deal in the way thatjoejohnson quitting his government was a big deal. in the language is quite strong. tasteless, a bully pulpit. is there a gender element that has caused her to wait in, do we think here? possibly, because there was a gender element happening in the house of commons. it was women mostly talking about not feeling safe and boris johnson mostly talking about not feeling
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safe and borisjohnson dismissing those concerns as humbug. you know, i think he is right that there's beena i think he is right that there's been a lot of very aggressive and difficult language on all sides of the brexit debate but that does not make it ok for you to do it too. he's the only one who is the prime minister. it's interesting to see the family which was, as anna says, so the family which was, as anna says, so united on that moment when he became prime minister. his brother resigned, was quite critical of the position on brexit but did then go out of his way to the following day say how much he supported the rest of boris's domestic agenda and rachel has taken a different approach. she has said this is not the guy i know, and it is interesting. if you the can of boris johnson is a likeable chap on the zip wire with the flags making jokes, he's not that guy since he has been the prime minister. in the more time goes on the more we are seeing a bully, a narcissist, full of vindictive language and obviously
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it seems that that is a strategic choice, because they think that plays well for them and setting up this people versus parliament election that they are hoping for. i wonder if that is the case. there is something likeable about boris johnson, but we have not seen it since he stepped across into number ten. and i wonder if during a general election this irritable, vindictive, nasty man can actually win the votes he thinks he can. let's turn to the telegraph in your byline is on the story and you have a picture of another band was accused by some, or credited by some depending of what their position is, with driving a lot of the agenda and the tone of the current boris johnson regime or government. dominic cummings, who is one of the two chiefs of staff a lot of people credits as being one of the most powerful people in government shaping the policy and direction and strategy, he very rarely makes
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public appearances and yet tonight he was at an event for stuart wheeler's book launch in the older vote leave gang back together and he said some things that, you know, or in the context of today a very interesting because we had a day where even boris johnson interesting because we had a day where even borisjohnson has come on tv and said you know, of course i don't ever condone any attacks on mps that we should try to lower the temperature he said to have our collea g u es temperature he said to have our colleagues in the bbc. in his right—hand is saying well, what are the mps expect? if they've been campaigning for second referendum in failing to sort breaks ed's people will be angry with them which is a really incendiary thing to say on a dealer today. in what context did he say this? was just an off—the—cuff remark? he was interviewing stuart for the book launch and my colleague was there. there were not considered
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remarks and not overheard at the bar oi’ remarks and not overheard at the bar or anything. there were very public. and he was asked what you think of this? basically in the context of today in the commons and debates on mps using language that is abusive. we've had people likejess phillips, and caroline standing up and saying i'm receiving death threats. but people coming up and defending boris johnson and saying look, this is also being politicized and at the end of the day your main criticism is that he's calling this a surrender act and that's definitely politics and is it really horrendously abusive language? no. it's not abusive language. i guess the concern is that it's the language of war. in a sense of this negotiation that we are having with the european union is a military style encounter. do you agree with
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anna in terms of the tone that dominic cummings is taking which she was suggesting there's a difference in the kind of tone that the prime minister is taking along with his adviser today? do you see that gap between them? there's a slight difference here. this picture that the editor chose shows the disdain and contempt that he has. not obviously for the 17.4 million people that voted to leave but the everybody else in the country. what's clear is that he doesn't people might say that's reading it toa people might say that's reading it to a picture. we have bad days or less good side of our faith. the language exudes contempt for people. the picture editor chose the picture that might communicate that. he might've smiled during this intervention. talking about language we can't leave the front page of the telegraph without mentioning this and tell us what he is saying here.
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to mps in central lobby has a square box and says they have not improved with the toxic mood here but we have paid off the national debt. always worth stopping for. this is quite a fun picture on the front page of the economist. it's well, you recognise the characters of course. donald trump and boris johnson. the characters of course. donald trump and borisjohnson. and her majesty in the background none to pleased. so it was really interesting, it was on tuesday when the supreme court ruling came, i was in new york with the prime minister during his trip and that was meant to bea during his trip and that was meant to be a huge day because he had his bilateral with donald trump and in the morning obviously we had the news that borisjohnson had been set back. everyone did. the time difference helps, but then they had
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their meeting and donald trump spent their meeting and donald trump spent the meeting in a slightly patronizing way saying yes, you're going to get through it and you are so going to get through it and you are so great and you can get that supreme court giving him all kinds of device to make advice weighing in and then of course a few hours later the new strop that donald trump's impending impeachment proceedings. they both had a terrible day in a way that's the point. they are similar in theirsort way that's the point. they are similar in their sort of childish bullying tactics, but did seem to be really, really working for both of them that they had a teflon ability to survive accusations of being misogynists and womanize rs to survive accusations of being misogynists and womanizers and accusations of being corrupt. accusations of being incompetent and this week suggests that they are penetrable, something that might happen to them. we don't know. let's ta ke happen to them. we don't know. let's take it out of the bubble. it looks terrible if you're watching parliament live a lot of people were last night a lot of people don't
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though. sometimes people switch on the lot of mps shouting at each other you just get annoyed with them. borisjohnson other you just get annoyed with them. boris johnson is other you just get annoyed with them. borisjohnson is quite cleverly, i think it may turn out to framing an election along the lines of me versus parliament, parliament versus the people and actually it could work. it's also true that his personal ratings, there was a part of today, do seem to have nosedived quite significantly and on the donald trump side support for impeachment has gone up and it's now equal those who do and don't support it. let's go to the financial times. that's their chief story. this is quite a tough piece suggesting he goes through the cover—up line that nancy pelosi, chief democrat in the houseis nancy pelosi, chief democrat in the house is pushing now on the back of the whistle—blower letter that we saw today and probably you start there. this letter has been released, which suggests that the transcript of the phone call which
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happened in july was transcript of the phone call which happened injuly was put into a different and extra secure electronic storage system and not circulated to the usual channels. because officials must have understood exactly what it suggested or applied. that trump was in this not—so—subtle way basically trying to strong—arm the ukrainian leader into investigating joe biden. an interesting thing, i don't know how much you read into this line later on in the paragraphs down, and said not for the first time did this happen over the thing that she is describing. maybe he does this a lot? quite possibly. in terms of how things are stored it's hard without being a security expert in the us to know what that actually means and i think we've got to be careful reading into various storage patterns to the fact that they have not released a full transcript and released a shell the fact that there we re released a shell the fact that there were people on the call who obviously did not raise alarm does
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raise concerns. and just before we go for this hour let's just spend a moment thinking about jacques, go for this hour let's just spend a moment thinking aboutjacques, the financial times calling him the bulldozer. isn't it wonderful? the great picture of him almost making cigarettes look cool, and i don't know where that's been accused of her pictures of him on social media today. and i don't think there's ever beena today. and i don't think there's ever been a more french person. i don't know... even to call? i think, he was president from 1995 to 2007. i don't know, i was 14 or something when he was first president so the first time i started to be aware of french politics at all and so for me it's really the end of an era. isn't
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it's really the end of an era. isn't it nice to take a moment in the matters of brexit for someone who is an undoubted statesman across the pond and the other one. but the kind of thoughts to remember him with and we have to leave it both. see you backin we have to leave it both. see you back in an hour's time. that's it for the papers this hour. anna and polly will be back at half past eleven for another look at the papers, and don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — 7 days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers — and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you anna mikhailova and polly mackenzie. goodbye. good evening everybody. in a week it has been so far. real contrast to last week and it's all been about low pressure, started up with lots of heavy rain, didn't we? but a low pressure, started up with lots of heavy rain, didn't we? buta part of heavy rain, didn't we? buta part of the week and then turn more showering. some of their showers
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really been quite heavy and it will continue as well. as we go into tomorrow. we start off with low pressure in the driving seat and is another area of low pressure, this here which will bring extremely wet and windy weather is moving to the weekend. for the here and now low— pressure weekend. for the here and now low—pressure and clouds are circulating around that low continues to bring some showers. some of them quite sharp and it will continue through friday morning. sta rt continue through friday morning. start up with some of the showers merging togetherfor start up with some of the showers merging together for longer spells of rain and driving in bite gusty winds and 45 mph as well. skelton on the lead to much to the best of the dryer whether just a few of the lead to much to the best of the dryer whetherjust a few of us that it showers here. top temperatures of 12 to 18 degrees. as you move out of friday the area of low pressure will drift off into the near continent and clear skies and eastern scotland will allow those temperatures to fall away. on saturday morning the
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shower restart using and those that hopefully few and far between into the afternoon and until that next low— pressure the afternoon and until that next low—pressure starts to move in. the timings of this low certainly subject to change. the rest of the forecast for the weekend and potentially going to bring so wet and windy weather. circulating around that low, some gusty winds with 55 mph. is a start to pull away to the north sea 60 miles an hour for time across eastern england. sunday will start off pretty miserable, great wet and windy. the rain eases the way into the afternoon and potential for seeing some sunshine, but the now swing around to the more there northerly feel and generally particularly across the far north of scotland with temperatures perhaps 11 to 13 degrees highest values of 17 or 18 into the far south. certainly looks as though they're going continue
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next week and just to summarise for you the weekend at the moment, saturday looks largely fine with just a few showers but as we are going to the early hours of sunday heavy rain, strong gales slowly starting to ease away as sunday progresses. that's it for me, whatever you are doing, have a great night. take care.
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this is bbc news, i'm carrie gracie. the headlines at 11:00: the prime minister has defended his language as dozens of mps demand an apology from him after furious exchanges in the commons. i totally deplore any threats to anybody, particularly female mps. the's language is encouraging people to behave in and is —— disgraceful and abusive way towards public figures i have witnessed myself on the streets. the row comes as a man is arrested for allegedly verbally abusing staff and smacking the doors and windows at mpjess phillips' constituency office. a whistleblower accuses donald trump and the white house

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