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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 2, 2019 10:40pm-11:01pm BST

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line, with a of the habitat the line, with a great deal of hopefully not having tempted fate, thank you very much indeed. after two defeats in their opening game of the champions league. liverpool and chelsea have their first wins of the competition. but, neither had the smoothest ride. adam wild has been watching the games tonight, and is at the touch—screen. adam, we had nine goals in one match involving a premier league team last night. they nearly matched it at anfield this evening. liverpool fans have been treated to some extraordinary games at anfield of late, this, just another one. they were very keen to get the defence of their european title up and running after defeat in the opening game of the competition to napoli. they have done that, it finished 4—3 in group e on another raucous and very very exciting european night at anfield. some really special goals as well to keep
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that crowd entertained. the first for liverpool coming from sadio mane, a really excellent solo effort from him. cutting inside, a neat one—two and perfectly finished. they doubled the lead midway through the first half, another brilliantly worked goal, andy robertson the left back starting and finishing the move. mo salah added a third and at that point liverpool were cruising. but back came the austrian side with some very good goals of their own hwang hee—chan pulling one back before the break. that's before the japanese playertakumi minamino with a brilliant finish. and then — erling braut haland, he'd only been on the pitch a few moments, you might have seen us bigging him up on sportsday at 630 tonight, well we did with good reason. on as a sub and scoring the equaliser. 3—3 at that point but liverpool weren't quite finished. mo salah with the winner. 4—3 the final score and that anfield getting another treat with a really enthralling match, chelsea also had just show some character this evening to get their winning ways back.
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indeed, frank lampert‘s side, lost their opening game of the seasons competition. they were in france to take on lille. and this is how it finished in group h. 2—1 the final score. but chelsea were really made to work for this one. they took the lead midway through the first half, tammy abraham with a good take and slotting the ball in. lille though, were level before the break as you can see there. and it took frank lampards side until the last quarter of an hour to find the winner. a terrific volley from william so 2—1 it finished there. chelsea now third in that group just another result to tell you about, at the noucamp where barcelona came from behind to beat inter milan 2—1. inter had taken the lead in just the second minute of the match
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but two second half goals from luis suarez. both excellent goals. some really terrific goals across europe tonight. so 2—1 it finished in the big game in group f. that's four points barca have from their first two games in that group. thank you adam, let's have a quick look at some of days other sports news. the fa have charged bernardo silva with misconduct after the manchester city player posted a picture of team mate benjamin mendy, likening him to the face on a spanish sweet brand. new zealand have recorded the biggest win yet at the rugby world cup, hammering canada 63 nil in oita. the all blacks continue their run of never losing a world cup group game. all three barrett brothers scored in the game... jordie getting the second of the eventual nine tries the second of nine eventual tries. elsewhere — france needed three late tries to survive a scare
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and see off the united states for their second win. the victory moves france up to second in pool c, one point behind england. andy murray is through to the quater finals of the china open after beating fellow briton cameron norrie over three sets. after two tight sets both of which were taken on tie breaks, murray raced through the decider 6—1. it's the first time he's won two straight atp tour singles matches since hip resurfacing surgery injanuary, and in his first quarter final since. he'll play top seed dominic thiem. we'll finish by returning to our top story tonight. dina asher smith has become a magnificent seventh female world athletics champion for great britain. and just after making history while on her way to complete her post—race media commitment. she got a call from somebody in the crowd... and after turning around... she realised it was her mum.
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so itjust goes to show... behind every golden girl... is another... just as important magnifixcent mum... that's all from sportsday. coming up next on bbc news, the papers. goodnight. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are chief leader writer for the observer sonia sodha and whitehall correspondent, for the financial times, sebastian payne.
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many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. most of them leading with the new brexit proposals. the metro goes with the prime minister's letter to eu commission president jean claude—juncker, outlining his conditions for a brexit deal. the daily telegraph says borisjohnson has put pressure on ireland to accept his brexit proposals after hardline brexiteers, and some labour rebels, say they'd back his deal — which could give the prime minister a commons majority for his agreement. the financial times says mr johnson has managed to unite the brexiteers in his party with his plan — but that his deal has received a frosty reception in brussels. the guardian agrees — the paper says the prime minister is fighting a losing battle after the eu's chief brexit negotiator gave a scathing private assesment of mr. johnson's brexit proposal. the i say the eu is poised to reject
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the prime minister's plans, but the daily express strikes a more optimistic note — the paper thinks a deal might be close, asking — is this the beginning of the end? sebastian is this the beginning of the end? sebastian is this the beginning of the end 7 let's sebastian is this the beginning of the end? let's start with the metro. they do it as a sort of dearjohn letter to me here is how i leave the eu. well, it's a clever front page. eu. well, it's a cleverfront page. it sort of symbolises that this is a big moment in bragg z. we have a had a lot of these so far, but this is boris johnson's a lot of these so far, but this is borisjohnson‘s final a lot of these so far, but this is boris johnson's final gambit to get a brexit deal so we could leave as he wants to at the end of october. he gave this very tub thumping speech, sonya and i were both there at the tory conference, with the mood was very much pro boris johnson, they love him there, and the speech he gave today spoke to that. as soon as the speech was done, and all the activists have left manchester, he dropped this new brexit proposal, which went to brussels in a letter, it's a very completed, so we will try to get quick —— get through quickly as possible. does my quarters, instead
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of having a border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland from of course, the republic of ireland is still in the eu, northern ireland is still in the eu, northern ireland is still part of the uk. there would be a sort of softer border between the northern ireland and republic of ireland border, but also the softer border across the irish sea. between customs, will be britain and northern and command for goods and regulations to make would be between the republic of ireland and northern ireland. so essentially it's quite collocated. and this is his last gambit to gambit to try to say, look, let's get a guy get rid of the backstop, go for my does my partner solution, and we will find out the next ten days of this will fly. what do you think was mike i don't think it will fly, actually. i think if you look at the detail of what's being proposed, and it's enough to give everyone a headache, really. it is incredibly completed. and if you look at the way, the reaction in northern ireland this afternoon, you have got several opposition parties coming up against us. opposition parties coming up against us. you've got the northern irish
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business community coming against it, and in some ways, who could be surprised. instead of one border and one set of regulations and checks, there will be a —— they will actually be dealing with two. it can be terrible for them. is boris johnson care about the? he just wa nts johnson care about the? he just wants the do you pee on board. that's true, so given that he's got the dup on board, and he's done that by essentially giving them a veto on the arrangements with the republic of ireland, because the storment assembly will get to sort of vote on this every four years. given that he's got them now on board, i think the feeling is in westminster that lots of the erg, so the hard—line brexit fraction of the tory party will fall in behind the dup, and if you sort of count in a very small numberof labour you sort of count in a very small number of labour and peace as well, that might be enough to get the deal across the table. but that is the westminster angle. there is also a question of will that you sign up to this? exactly. and while it's true to say that i think the eu is likely
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to say that i think the eu is likely to look more favourably on any proposals that are more likely to get through parliament, when you look at the detail of this deal, it is still absolutely upfront about the need for some customs checks will stop —— in ireland. custom check somewhere. and that really has beena check somewhere. and that really has been a redline for the eu. check somewhere. and that really has been a redline forthe eu. so check somewhere. and that really has been a redline for the eu. sol think there is still too much distance between where the uk is, and what it suffering, and the eu to get over it. let's talk about the reaction, your paper, the ft, they havejohnson reaction, your paper, the ft, they have johnson plan unites reaction, your paper, the ft, they havejohnson plan unites brexiters, but faces a frosty reception in brussels, and that does seem to be the mood music coming out of brussels. indeed, i'm a little more optimistic about this than sonia, because from my perspective, this was all about domestic politics at home. because the eu has been negotiating with mrjohnson, because he's never got any coalition together in parliament to pass a new brexit deal. we know the dup, who supported the government, they voted
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against every single brexit deal, and within the erg, that's the big group of your sceptic tories, also not supporting a deal. so by getting this proposal and keeping both of those sites on board, plus we have also heard from a number of labour mps tonight, that said they would also back a deal on these terms, what mrjohnson is saying to the eu in part is, look, if you work with me on this, i can get this through. but as you were just saying, when you look at the reaction from the eu side of this, it is frosty. you know, that's how we've kind of described it. other papers have scalded hanging by a thread, because the fact is, sonia is right, there isa gap the fact is, sonia is right, there is a gap between where the eu's red lines are on custom checks, and not having any extra border infrastructure, and what mrjohnson is proposing. in dublin's reaction has been pretty lukewarm as well, and that's kind of key, is to? yes, it's very much key in terms of what the eu have said all along. is that ireland has to be happy with us. we are acting as a block, if we are going to accept the agreement. or to strike a deal. sol going to accept the agreement. or to strike a deal. so i think that is,
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that that is a bad sign for boris johnson's chances of getting this through. i think there were a couple of problems with this though. the first is that if you have these very light touch customs checks, that borisjohnson is light touch customs checks, that boris johnson is essentially suggesting in this paper that he's put to the european union. that really does open the door to smuggling. and people getting around the rules, because there aren't comprehensive checks. and if you are the eu, you are going to be looking at that and really being worried about the integrity of the single market. and the second issue with it is to keep the dup happy, there is this sort of democratic lock on the agreement. so every four years, there must be some kind of vote, whether it's a storment assembly, which isn't actually sitting at the moment, or some sort of democratic referendum, but you know, northern ireland must agree to this regulatory alignment with the eu. and i think, again, you know, boris johnson has said as part of this
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agreement he wants both sides to sign up to never having customs checks at the border in ireland, but actually, if you sort of, if you are pulling this up for debate every four years or so, you could get to a situation, where ireland —— northern ireland isn't going to be in a regulatory fashion with the republic of ireland and the eu any more. and you know, not to have custom checks in that situation would be very different. it compromises the integrity of the single market. sebastian, the guardian have a couple of interesting takes also quite pessimistic about brussels angle saying there is dismay in brussels. it also saying they feel it isa brussels. it also saying they feel it is a trap. and they also ruling out the idea of intensive talks, so called tunnel talks, where you go in like a tunnel, and there is no kind of briefing of the media. you just get on and negotiate for hours and hours on and on till you come up with a solution, that's kind of been
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rolled out according to the guardian. for now, and i think the thing we should remember about this, this only came out today, and obviously, time is ticking, there is not that much time left, but before the 31st of october, and even less time before the final eu count. everybody is aware that if there is going to be a new deal, people are going to be a new deal, people are going to be a new deal, people are going to have to move very quickly, andl going to have to move very quickly, and i think what number ten was looking for tonight was to get this thing received, and not dismissed out of hand. so although all the mood music is the guardian painting it is quite negative, the fact that they are saying, look, we can talk about this command if you look to whatjean—claude about this command if you look to what jean—claude said in about this command if you look to whatjean—claude said in response to that letter, he was saying there we re that letter, he was saying there were positive elements to it, but it was still too far away. the question i'iow was still too far away. the question now is this is an opening bid. this is not the final offer, as some people have suggested. because i think the uk is going to move more of this. it's going to move more towards the eu position. the government has had its the final offer, haven't they? know, there has beena offer, haven't they? know, there has been a lot of confusion on this. some people have said that, but if you have the per minister this morning, if you saw him, he did not say this is the final offer. i think it's very key to realise there are
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ten days where this thing could move. and i do think we will see some movement if the government moves a bit more, we will go, and then you've got a chance... all right, let's go to the telegraph's front page, sonia, because they are a bit more optimistic, as you might expect as a johnson supporting paper. saying there is pressure on dublin to back the deal, pointing at the dup agreed to the brexit plan, and labourmp the dup agreed to the brexit plan, and labour mp suggesting they would help get it through the commons. sure, but it does all come down to the eu, and what the eu says. and i think, you know, one thing we need to be aware of and interpreting the mood music that's coming out of the eu is they were never going to say no, i heard know today. they were a lwa ys no, i heard know today. they were always going to leave talks open for discussion. and i actually think i'm you know, the so—called tunnel phase, i think it's very weird isn't it? lingo, people going into intensive talks come as you put it so intensive talks come as you put it so well, but i think we will reach that as well. there is also an issue
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of perceptions here, and neither side wants to be seen as the side thatis side wants to be seen as the side that is responsible for taking us towards a no—deal brexit. so there was no way that the eu going to extend words indicating that it's prepared to talk on the basis of what boris johnson prepared to talk on the basis of what borisjohnson put out today. so i think we should be worry about leaving too much to that. what do you think they really want to deal? or with a quite like to see it go into another extension at the end of the month? i think they would like a deal. i think they would like, to be honest, brexit has gone on for three yea rs honest, brexit has gone on for three years since 2016. it's dominated a huge amount of your‘s time. i think there are definitely member states who want the uk to leave as soon as possible in an orderly fashion. they also want to protect the integrity of the single market, and what boris johnson has put forward today certainly doesn't do that. and it's ha rd to certainly doesn't do that. and it's hard to see them compromising towards that. i think they already see what they put forward in terms of the backstop. the last question, sebastian, if it comes to boris johnson, you know, saying he, when
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it comes to october the 31st, he is going to defy, or not break the law, but we are going to leave. what are your predictions about how he's going to do that? because -- does downing street have a secret cunning plan? idoubt downing street have a secret cunning plan? i doubt they would be able to tell me or sonya or anyone else. some people think they don't have a plan at all, they're just making out as if they have won. yes, my best guess would be the fact is that if this goes nowhere, and there is no new dealfrom this goes nowhere, and there is no new deal from that you counsel on the 19th of october, then that is the 19th of october, then that is the day then that the legislation kicks in, and mrjohnson is forced to write a letter to look back later. he will do some kind of bravado show, maybe it'sjust later. he will do some kind of bravado show, maybe it's just my glitters, maybe he was against it to try to get around it. but then at that point, it ends up back in the court. and if they force mrjohnson to extend, and we have an election, he has got the perfect narrative, andi he has got the perfect narrative, and i think if you look at the slogan of this year's conference, get brexit done, that is his election slogan. i will get it done if you give me the majority. 0k,
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election slogan. i will get it done if you give me the majority. ok, i promise at 11:30pm we will talk about other things other than brexit. but for the moment, sebastian and dina sonia, we will be back at half past 11 for another look at the papers. hello there. wednesday's sunshine was a welcome relief for many, to all the rain which we've had for the past couple of weeks, particularly across england and wales. it's all down to this area of high pressure, which will continue to hold on tonight and into the first part of tomorrow as well. it means the winds will gradually ease down across the north east of scotland, eastern parts of england. most will see clear skies, with that cool air mass, it's going to be another cold night, particularly across the northern half of the country. less cold across the southwest. that's because winds will be picking up across the west with this, the arrival of ex—hurricane lorenzo, which will push in across ireland, to bring some huge waves here, gale force winds, outbreaks of rain. it starts fine across much of the country, but gradually,
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the cloud and the wind will be picking up across the west. gales developing across some irish sea coasts. temperatures creeping up across the southwest, but still another chilly day to come across the north and the east. storm lorenzo moves through and decays quite quickly on friday, so we will see some milder conditions with some sunshine by the end the day.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 11:00: borisjohnson delivers his final brexit proposals to the eu, calling on both sides to change their positions. yes, this is a compromise by the uk andi yes, this is a compromise by the uk and i hope very much ourfriends understand that and compromise in their turn. the replacement for the controversial backstop will see northern ireland remain in the eu single market for goods, and leaving the customs unions — an idea the dup can accept. this is a serious and sensible way forward to have engagement with the european union in a way that allows us european union in a way that allows us all in the uk to leave. the duke and duchess of sussex end their tour of southern africa,

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