Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 2, 2019 11:30pm-12:00am BST

11:30 pm
will arrive next frontal system will arrive through the middle part of the weekend. saturday at this stage is not looking too bad. should be a dry start, winds coming up from the south or south—east. we should see variable cloud, sunny spells, but the first signs of that rain and wind will arrive across northern ireland and western scotland by the end of the day. quite a mild day, temperatures generally the mid to high teens celsius. through saturday night that frontal system very slowly works its way eastwards. it will tend to grind to a halt, we think, so it could be by the end of saturday night or sunday morning there could be quite a bit of rain across parts of scotland, england and wales. some of them will be quite heavy. they will tend to ease down through the day, leave a legacy of cloud, one or two showers but also some sunny spells developing. those temperatures again around the seasonal those temperatures again around the seasonal average, so those temperatures again around the seasonal average, so that is 15— i7 celsius. on into next week, then, it looks like it stays unsettled stop low pressure being driven by a fairly strong jet across the north
11:31 pm
atla ntic fairly strong jet across the north atlantic will keep things wet and windy. particularly across the north and west of the country, we are looking at high—pressure potentially building in from the south—west towards the mid to latter part of the week. but with low pressure nearby and winds coming in at the atlantic, i think temperatures will remain around the seasonal average. there will be quite a bit of wind and rain, most of it in the north and rain, most of it in the north and west, with parts of the south and west, with parts of the south and south—west perhaps turning a little bit drier towards the latter pa rt little bit drier towards the latter part of the week as high—pressure wa nts to part of the week as high—pressure wants to build them. i think the general theme is for the outlook to remain rather unsettled.
11:32 pm
hello. this is bbc news with ben brown. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first the headlines: the government publishes its final brexit plan — the prime minister calls it a ‘fair and reasonable compromise‘ for both the uk and the eu. yes, this is a compromise by the uk and i hope very much that our friends understand that and compromise in their turn.
11:33 pm
the replacement for the controversial backstop will see northern ireland remain in the eu single market for goods and leaving the customs unions — an idea the dup can accept. this is a serious and sensible way forward to have engagement with the european union in a way that allows us all in the uk to leave. in other news, donald trump launches a scathing attack at the whistleblower behind the impeachment inquiry into the president dealings with ukraine, accusing them of being a spy. and, the duke and duchess of sussex have finished their tour of southern africa, as the couple sues a sunday newspaper for publishing a private letter. commentator: it's dina asher-smith, she is the champion! and at the world athletics championships, dina asher—smith becomes the first british female to win a global sprint title.
11:34 pm
hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are chief leader writer for the observer, sonia sodha, and sebastian payne, whitehall correspondent for the financial times. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. most of them leading with the new brexit proposals. the metro goes with the prime minister's letter to eu commission president jean claude—juncker, outlining his conditions for a brexit deal. the daily telegraph says borisjohnson has put pressure on ireland to accept his brexit proposals after hardline brexiteers, and some labour rebels, say they'd back his deal, which could give the prime minister a commons majority for his agreement. the financial times says mrjohnson has managed to unite the brexiteers in his party with his plan
11:35 pm
but that his deal has received a frosty reception in brussels. the guardian agrees — the paper says the prime minister is fighting a losing battle after the eu's chief brexit negotiator gave a scathing private assesment of mrjohnson‘s brexit proposal. the i say the eu is poised to reject the prime minister's plans. but the daily express strikes a more optimistic note — the paper thinks a deal might be close, asking — is this the beginning of the end? is this the beginning of the end? big question. i do not think so. i think whatever happens in the next few weeks, we are going to be talking about brexit for the next five to ten years and if this country. the question of the express is is this deal going to wash with
11:36 pm
both the eu and mps in parliament. it is important to keep both sides of that equation in mind because a deal is not going to get through if mps in parliament do not back it but neither will get through unless the eu agrees. what borisjohnson has set out is what he thinks is a compromise... the metro calling it a dearjean letter. which is quite clever. quite a complicated solution. the idea is that northern ireland would leave the customs union... would be in a customs union with the uk but it would be part of the single market essentially, as you would have regulatory alignment. common standards and regulations and what that means is you would need to
11:37 pm
sets of checks — customs checks between northern ireland and the republic of ireland and regulatory checks between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. a big thing that has emerged tonight is the dup. borisjohnson has has emerged tonight is the dup. boris johnson has managed has emerged tonight is the dup. borisjohnson has managed to get the dup behind it and borisjohnson has managed to get the dup behind itand i borisjohnson has managed to get the dup behind it and i think there is a chance that with the dup swinging behind it, that will bring some hardline brexiteers with them. i think a big question is will the eu accept it and one thing that is very clear is that this arrangement would still involve customs checks on island which the eu have said is a redline because of the good friday agreement and if you do not have customs check that as a compromise for the single market. how do you think this differs from theresa may's deal which was rejected three
11:38 pm
times by the house of commons? what she was putting forward was to try to keep the uk closely aligned with trade relations with the eu even though we were leaving and the backstop to stop a hard border was keeping the uk in the orbit of the block after we left according to brexiteers. but borisjohnson says the whole of the uk including northern ireland has to leave the customs union because they want to be able to strike free trade deals with america, canada, australia, you name it. even though this actual proposal is complicated, it signals a very different kind of brexit because it went borisjohnson became prime minister, there was a total clear out from the cabinet and a total change to the strategy. up until then, the people driving this
11:39 pm
probably trying to protect the trading relations and keeping them as they are to the greatest possible degree. borisjohnson as they are to the greatest possible degree. boris johnson and as they are to the greatest possible degree. borisjohnson and his team once a looser relationship with the eu but the loser you make it, the more problem you face with ireland. i think this proposal is serious. a lot of people criticise boris johnson's government for its rhetoric and not doing serious legal details. this is serious legal details. this is serious legal details. the problem is it potentially reaches one of the key redlines which is no new customs check on the island of ireland and mrjohnson is basically saying, if you want to do a deal, you need to blow that redline and whether they do not... the express, we mentioned that, they are also saying barnstorming speech at the tory
11:40 pm
conference. after that the premise reveals his final master plan so not much secret about the express see this. you have been at the tory conference. let's talk about his speech today. i was watching it on tv because i had come back to london today. a sensible idea. you only get today. a sensible idea. you only get to see the snatches... you can watch it all on the bbc news. that is how i watched it. it borisjohnson‘s own terms, the speech was a success because it went down well in the whole, conservative activists clearly like to. he has had a fairly good week at his conservative conference... he is the darling of the tory party conference. but voters are incredibly different and
11:41 pm
in terms of a peach to voters, there was a lot of rhetoric. it was clearly a general election peach. he wa nted clearly a general election peach. he wanted to talk about domestic issues and there were not any brand—new domestic announcements anyway and a lot of them have actually fallen apart so this pledge that the government is going to find iii new hospitals actually pretty quickly disintegrated and it turned out to bea disintegrated and it turned out to be a maximum of six... they say seed money for the others. it sounds like a euphemism. i thought it was a pretty, watching it as an outsider, it felt like a pretty empty speech with lots of fairly mediocre tracks and not a lot of policy. it was borisjohnson saying, even after the last week, i will bring the country together but if you look at some of the rhetoric he has been using,
11:42 pm
surrender act, the way he approached the debate in parliament last wednesday, enormous cabinet sources briefing to the papers there will be writing and lynching... but... iam sorry, that is not a government that wa nts to sorry, that is not a government that wants to bring the country together it is in credibly polarising. john mcdonald talks about lynching ministers as well. that was back in 2014. i would condemn that sort of language whatever it is but the last couple of weeks that has been coming out of the government, not labour. let's steer us of back to brexit with these new proposals. the guardian have got that the eu reaction and they are quite downbeat about it. they say there is a dismay in brussels and they are saying the eu thinks it is a trap and they are saying they will not be intensive talks on these proposals, these
11:43 pm
so—called panel talks where they go into a darkened room and did not brief the media until they have some sort of deal. this reflects the fact that these proposals are more about domestic audience. the drg and dup are crucial partners and he got them on board. that is a big thing, the dup because they have always said no checks. this deal does not do that. it is adding more checks across the irish sea but, going back to the brussels point of view, it is the crucial redline of no new customs checks on island. the backstop is not going. —— island of ireland. there is still a big gap and if there is going to be a deal, britain is going to have to move again,
11:44 pm
potentially further towards the eu position but from downing street's point of view, they want to get this thing out there and they want to at least have more talks about it. we're not into the tunnel, when you doa we're not into the tunnel, when you do a deal in brussels, lock yourself away, taking a mug of coffee and stay that to get this thing done. whether we get to the tunnel we will find out next week. because they will have to have the two legal text, agreed to the new deal and taking it to the 27 member states. for taking it to the 27 member states. foer taking it to the 27 member states. for mr johnson, taking it to the 27 member states. for mrjohnson, he could be pleased they did not say no... they were not likely to just a note straightaway. i think we have to be cautious about reading too much in the fact that the eu saying there is something to discuss although there are problems. this exchange between the uk and eu is not just about the
11:45 pm
this exchange between the uk and eu is notjust about the realities of the dog but also about perceptions and both sides, neither side, wants to be blamed for a no—deal outcomes are both sides are at least trying to make it look like they are doing as much as possible to get a deal so as much as possible to get a deal so a lot of hearts would have sunk anything you when they saw these proposals because the reason they have these red line on customs check is because of the good friday agreement and a lot of experts think it would not be respectful of the good friday agreement and the situation which is quite a fragile equilibrium... there will be checks but not necessarily on the border but not necessarily on the border but we're not sure where they would be. any checks well, by definition involved some border infrastructure so involved some border infrastructure soi involved some border infrastructure so i think the eu will look at that and see that is very problematic from the perspective of the good friday agreement. there is also quite a bit of uncertainty in these
11:46 pm
proposals. borisjohnson said both sides need to commit to never implementing customs check on the irish border ever but at the same time, there is a storm and lock, or assembly, which the assembly is not sitting —— stormant in which norman ireland stays allied with the rest of the eu so that means that every four years we would be returning to this debate and it is going to be up for grabs. it is difficult to see how the eu can sign up to know customs check forever. no customs check forever stop if northern ireland that sue diverged in a significant way from the eu regulations and is not allowed to impose any customs check that compromises the integrity of the single market. the independent have borisjohnson‘s
11:47 pm
solution to the border — two orders. ireland joined the uk and the european communities at the same time, and eu membership has done a lot to solve the issues as part of the peace process —— two borders. the fact you have the same tariff regimes, vat, every single thing. you don't need a border. exactly, brexit caused a problem with this because part of the reason for leaving the eu is to do things differently and have extra changes there. so the first possible border would be between the republic of ireland in northern ireland, but nobody wants that border, and it would become a hotspot for potential violence and for paramilitary activity. so what mrjohnson is proposing is instead of having one harder border there softer borders, so harder border there softer borders, so there would be a border going
11:48 pm
between northern ireland and the republic of ireland for tariffs, for customs and goods, so if you are selling boxes or manufactured goods 01’ selling boxes or manufactured goods or something it would have to have a lot of electronic advanced paperwork donein lot of electronic advanced paperwork done in advance before it goes there. the second border is down the irish sea, which is that when things go between great britain and northern ireland there would be extra checks there. two ordinary people day—to—day it might not look that different, to businesses it is hugely complicated. a lot of extra paperwork to do, but the fact is this is the kind of thing you are going to do if you want the kind of brexit mrjohnson wants, given the unique circumstances of the province. let's go to the telegraph, which mrjohnson writes for, occasionally, and it supports him, and its angle is that the pressure now is on dublin to back this deal. some labour mps suggesting they will help it get through the commons, but it would still need the seal of
11:49 pm
approvalfrom the it would still need the seal of approval from the irish it would still need the seal of approvalfrom the irish prime minister, leo varadkar. the irish reaction like the eu reaction has been a little bit frosty. the irish reaction has been more frosty than the eu as a whole, it is fair to say. if you look at other parties in northern ireland like sinn fein, the northern ireland like sinn fein, the northern irish business community as well, they have all been incredibly negative about it. i think it is right to say that, if ireland isn't happy, the chances are, actually, this deal won't be agreed. and i think one thing that the eu has done quite successfully as part of this process is to act as a block, so they haven't been many people peeling away and disagreeing with the main eu line. after all, britain is negotiating with the eu, not with 27 individual member states at the moment, although that could change once we leave. we heard from katya
11:50 pm
adler earlier in the programme the eu is staying firm and saying there needs to be unanimity around this, soi needs to be unanimity around this, so i think ireland will be very significant. there is other news, one of the story we are going to touch on, which is the statement from the duke and duchess of sussex, what the times call the duke of sussex's inflammatory attack on the tabloid press. and really there angle is that senior royal aids warned the prince about this attack, and they have been rather disappointed that he has been so strong in his language —— aides. in his denunciation of the tabloid press. this goes back to a story in the times on sunday —— mail on sunday newspaper, and there has been huge amount of coverage, because for papers, any story about the royals cells papers, and harry and meghan
11:51 pm
has been heaven for papers. and the african tour has been very successful. they have just got fed up successful. they have just got fed up with the intrusion and what you see in the times as the royal establishment speaking back to them, saying look, you shouldn't have done this now, it will become another big story, and it has now become another story, and it has now become another story about the royal establishment, which generally tries to avoid fights, it doesn't get into these kinds of rows, and harry and meghan who take a very different approach to this. but the fact they are suing the mail on sunday, they are going to fight that rigorously. and of course, you can't forget this does bring back memories of harry and his mother, diana, a lot of people drawing the link between how his mother was treated by the tabloid press in the 19905 and how his wife i5 press in the 19905 and how his wife is being treated now. the very 5trong. he talks about a ruthless campaign against his wife, and the pre55 vilifying her almost daily for the last nine months. i mean, i've
11:52 pm
got a lot of sympathy with him saying that, actually, because i think meghan markle has been treated abominably by parts of the british press in the last year or so, since theirwedding. press in the last year or so, since their wedding. you press in the last year or so, since theirwedding. you can press in the last year or so, since their wedding. you can see where he is coming from, and for me it is not a massive surprise, actually, that the royal establishment, unnamed royal sources, are saying we are shocked by this and it is not the way we do things. of course it is not the way they do things. one thing i would say about prince harry and prince william is they have a more authentic voice, i think. he wrote it himself, apparently, and didn't tell anyone. you can completely understand his anger. this is a man who when he was a young boy saw his mother's vilification by the tabloid press, and now he is seeing another woman he loves going through the same thing. sol he loves going through the same thing. so i can really see where he is coming from. i think this sort of longer term question about this, i don't think there is any question
11:53 pm
that the private letter between meghan markle and her father that was published by the mail on sunday, i don't think they should have published that. i think it was a private letter, i think there were concerns about privacy, i don't think it was in the public interest. private intere5t —— —— what public intere5t private intere5t —— —— what public interest is there in knowing about her communications with her father? the challenge mounted i5 her communications with her father? the challenge mounted is a very meaty one, and it is based on the premise of copyright. doesn'tjust ratchet up the tension? may be, but i think this is a fight he wants to have, good on him. is edified he can win? perhaps, -- is it a fight he can win? perhaps. i think copyright is an interesting thing.|j can win? perhaps. i think copyright is an interesting thing. ijust can win? perhaps. i think copyright is an interesting thing. i just want to say very quickly, there are freedom of the press i55ues to say very quickly, there are freedom of the press issues here and the ability to report on these things. we published leaked
11:54 pm
government documents and leaked private letters all the time. it is all about the public interest defence on this, and that is what is going to get tested. we could talk about this all night, but we can't. that's it for the papers tonight. hello. dina asher—smith is the world 200 metres champion, the first female british sprinter to claim an individual global gold and only the seventh woman to claim a world title for britain. let's relive the near—22 5econd5 that changed her life in doha. dina asher—smith back side of the blocks, already leaves brian a metre behind. she has run a brilliant
11:55 pm
race, dina asher—smith, 5he behind. she has run a brilliant race, dina asher—smith, she has to control into the home straight. it i5 dina asher—smith, with brown trying to chase, and brown is getting closer, but dina asher—smith i5 getting closer, but dina asher—smith is away and she is going to take the gold medal. it's dina asher—smith, 5he gold medal. it's dina asher—smith, she is the champion. world champion. dina ‘5 done it. she is the champion. world champion. dina 's done it. i amjust, like, lost for words. because it is a different thing everyone being like, oh, you are the favourite, but you still have to go and do it. you are only the favourite if you perform how you are expected to. so i was really focused on putting on a good race. i dreamt of this, but it is real now. meanwhile, there could be another british golden girl by this time tomorrow, and katarina johnson—thompson recorded two personal be5t5 to lead the heptathlon after day one. she was in second place going into the fourth and final event of the day, the 200 metres. but her time ofjust over 23 seconds gave her a 96—point lead over defending champion nafi thiam.
11:56 pm
it is really important to end the day on top. obviously there is two events tomorrow i have to negotiate, but to end the day on top after not the best 200, my 200 hasn't been great this year, so that's definitely something to work on for next year, i'm happy that i'm on top after that. in the women's shot put, britain's sophie mckinna threw a lifetime best of more than 18.5 metres to automatically qualify for the final. a5a as a thrower, you generally know when you let go if it is going to be a good throw. i let go of it and i turned around to my coach and i was 5hocked. training's been going really well, but to go 61, i didn't expect that. to go into a final and perform to the best of my ability at a world championship in october, it means the world. to qualify for the olympics, or 50% there, with the trials next year, that's all i've ever wanted. laura muir came through her heat in the 1,500 metres
11:57 pm
without any problems. the european champion has been trying to recover from a calf injury in time for doha, and claimed it was 100% before herfirst of a possible three races. she came third in her heat. sarah mcdonald is also through to the semi—finals tomorrow. britain will have two women in the final of the 5,000 metres after both eilish mccolgan and laura weightman qualified from their heat5. that final is on saturday night. liverpool have got their champions league campaign back on track with a thrilling win over salzburg at anfield. jurgen klopp's side were 3—0 up after just 35 minutes, after goals from sadio mane, andy robertson and mo salah. but salzburg battled back and scored three goals of their own, with teenager erling braut haaland clinching the equaliser, only for liverpool to deliver the killer blow, salah getting his second of the game and his team's winner. meanwhile, chelsea also got theirfirst win of the champions league campaign, thanks to goals from tammy abraham and willian.
11:58 pm
the result gives frank lampard his first win in european football a5 a manager. that's all the sport for now. hello there. we really have seen some contrasting weather conditions acro55 some contrasting weather conditions across the country, haven't we, this week. wednesday was a beautiful day. lot5 week. wednesday was a beautiful day. lots of blue sky and sunshine, but a bit of a chill in the air. in those clear skies by daily to clear skies overnight, and at this time of year that means that the temperatures are falling away. so thursday will be another chilly start with some pockets of frost and mi5t another chilly start with some pockets of frost and mist and fog around. it is all change yet again. a5 storm lorenzo, this deep area of low pressure continue5 a5 storm lorenzo, this deep area of low pressure continues to track in from the atlantic. now, the heaviest of the rain and the damaging gu5t5 of the rain and the damaging gu5t5 of wind5 of the rain and the damaging gu5t5 of winds will be through ireland, but for northern ireland, england and wales into the south—west, we will see gu5t5 of wind, 50—60 mph, and a spell of will see gusts of wind, 50—60 mph, and a spell of wet weather. clouding over as we come further inland but dominantly dry. highs of11—
11:59 pm
over as we come further inland but dominantly dry. highs of 11— 16 degrees. we will see a spell of wet and windy weather sweeping its way south and east during friday. that clears away to a relatively dry start for the weekend, but more rain to come. take care.
12:00 am
welcome to newsday on the bbc. i'm rico hizon, in singapore. the headlines: donald trump hits out at the democrats leading the impeachment inquiry, and has angry words for reporters at the white house. it isa it is a whole hoax and to know who is playing at tuitt, people like you and the fake news media we have in this country and i say in many cases the corrupt media. the british government publishes its new brexit plan. despite a cautious response from the eu, borisjohnson says a deal could be done in days. i'm lewis vaughanjones, in london. also in the programme: vigils in hong kong, amid mounting violence. protestors pay tribute to those injured in clashes with police.

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on