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tv   Brexitcast  BBC News  October 3, 2019 9:30pm-10:01pm BST

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we still have not got any raspberries here but... you have a banana. adam and brussels. 0k, it has been another big week. really, i feel cross side, actually. my binder is got increasingly thicker. and are we poised to get a new brexit deal? brussels asked concrete proposals. operational and whether the prime minister come up with? new protocols
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with ireland and northern ireland and a legal text then no one is actually seeing the full version of so actually seeing the full version of so broadly speaking, is everybody ready? broadly speaking, the solution to replace the backstop, which was the thing in the last thing that fell into the comments to go against the border coming back was northern ireland, for agriculture, things and stuff that's made and northern ireland, stays in the single market following the eu rules, but northern ireland gets a vote on that every four years and it kinda gives people a veto. they get a veto even before it comes in. six months before. it will be due to start of this ever happened at the end of the transition period which is the start of 2021, so it is not immediate if this was the fly, it would not have to have been at the start. the second bit of it which is much more troubling in terms of the
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politics of it all is of the whole uk leaves the customs union and that means that it would have to be some form of customs checks on the island of ireland and an increase of checks between great britain and northern ireland going that way, but not the other way and that is where it all gets very weird. if two countries are not in a customs union with one another, then you have to have custom checks and conventions is that as a border in the whole thing about the backstop for the replacement of the backstop is trying to find a solution to that. customs is always been a conundrum. in this new protocol, basically near teddy make nearly all they can be done through technology and things that are physically can happen in a factory and at some point on the supply chain rather than actually being ata supply chain rather than actually being at a border and there is a commitment to say they would never have checks on the border, but my goodness, you and brussels have been
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hearing how that is gone down. goodness, you and brussels have been hearing how that is gone downfi went to see her, the european parliament brexit coordinator and leslie they've come back from the shed. where did she have to say? he is quite excitable —— he. angela merkel has been quite quiet about this, and manual macron has been quiet about this, and the deputy prime minister of ireland has been more vocal as you would expect but we will go into what the reservations are in the eu side and why they're not shouting it on the rooftops. and remind us how he matters in the whole process. the european parliament matters because like our parliament it is a veto of the brexit deal. the european parliament has to be on board because they can say no if they
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aren't it will not matter if the negotiators say yes stop the parliament has to be happy as well and a very key figure when it comes to brexit and ask him question after question and at the end of it, he just wanted me out of his office. i said one more thing then. let's have a listen. i promise. you are no worse than a politician stubjoe i am learning from the best. you can literally kick me out of this do you think borisjohnson literally kick me out of this do you think boris johnson is literally kick me out of this do you think borisjohnson is not serious making a deal? i think that is a good question because we have serious doubts about the seriousness of this proposal because today, a memo was leaked sent by downing street to tory mps that said is such
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a document has been sent to the tory mps that you can opt out of the seriousness of the proposals. but do you think he meant, can ijust ask, you think he meant, can ijust ask, you may not know, the politicians, what sometimes happens is they could bea what sometimes happens is they could be a bit stretchy with the time? is theiraid for be a bit stretchy with the time? is their aid for someone that stands in your eye like that, like why not, did he have anyone with him when trying to? he tried to walk me out, i tried to sit down for the interview and it was a planned interview. i was, interview and it was a planned interview. iwas, i interview and it was a planned interview. i was, i asked interview and it was a planned interview. iwas, iasked him, and hejust, he interview. iwas, iasked him, and he just, he was like just one last question. i promise. he is an ultra,
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isn't he? even appeared at the lib dems conference c has been trained as stop this happening from a political point of view but a high representative, do you think someone like that really is of the eu overall? it has to pass apartment like any deal. the interesting thing about the brexit steering group, not battle star galactica. shame. they are made up of some very strange people, the mep that will come out and talk about the government quite often, but in official terms the react, they've been on top of the citizens' rights, they pushed that but when it comes to the overall shape of the deal in the eu previously, they been quite supportive and not that troublesome
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ina supportive and not that troublesome in a political sense, which is why think it is important that the statement they put out, the actual written statement was really, really grim for the written statement was really, really grim forthe uk written statement was really, really grim for the uk because normally they try to be helpful and also they do liaise with michel barnier‘s team comes the statement cannot of come out with the knowledge of the other bits of the eu machine. out with the knowledge of the other bits of the eu machinelj out with the knowledge of the other bits of the eu machine. i think we are ina bits of the eu machine. i think we are in a very big political dance on both sides and it is not always elegant and i feel that both sides have their good cops in their bad cops. for example, boris johnson actually made a very good impression in the eu with his covering letter that came with the proposals. in the eu with his covering letter that came with the proposalsm in the eu with his covering letter that came with the proposals. it was a bit of progress. it was received very well and there are elements in his proposals that have also been praised by eu leaders and there's plenty that they don't like that which we will get into but more than one of the diplomats i spoke to said steve barkley, that is the member wa nt to steve barkley, that is the member want to hear from steve barkley, that is the member want to hearfrom him, because he is
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known as the tough guy. the brexit secretary. so it is almost as if borisjohnson secretary. so it is almost as if boris johnson charms leaders secretary. so it is almost as if borisjohnson charms leaders in berlin and at the g7 and with his letters a nd berlin and at the g7 and with his letters and then starts threatening countries like spain. give us a deal. steve barclay and let's all remember, steve barclay was man enough to do a really hard quiz, so again. he could be less flattering, this is a number ten move, david frost was the eu negotiator on behalf of boris johnson and steve barclay as part of the team but this isa numberten barclay as part of the team but this is a number ten cabinet office, a push from them. the big picture, it which you hear is the said things about the rules, the idea of northern ireland staying in the single market and accepting eu rules, they see that it is a big concession here and the other thing thatis concession here and the other thing that is fascinating and they know
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that is fascinating and they know that customs is the trickier bit but there is a very well—placed people. very strong signals from eu capital, including dublin and contemplating these kinds of proposals. some you simon, the minister and saying today that if this is the final proposal, there will be no deal. very tough talk, but this may be the basis of something. whether or not it can be donein something. whether or not it can be done in ten days seems really stretchy. when they said take it or leave it and it turned out to not be that at all of this deal, monday to send the regulations front. one important thing, the eu does feel that the prime minister has very much come towards their concerns but it comes to regulations but the fact that they will have a vote on those,
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that they will have a vote on those, that there will be a time limit on it and maybe not start at all as adam is pointing out is that there are many in the eu that feel giving with one hand and taking away from the other and that is why there were questions about when the prime minister says this is our big compromise and what are you going to give me, there are many that say thatis give me, there are many that say that is not really a compromise if, there's so many caveats in there that it may not actually happen. and so what you may have in this political dance is that both sides wanting a deal that the eu does believe the prime minister wants one but will it make the other compromise is necessary if leading up compromise is necessary if leading up to compromise is necessary if leading uptoa compromise is necessary if leading up to a general election will he feel that he can lose votes with the beemer compromises exposing the single market with the customs here, and seeming to abandon member states, so that is why it is sold the exit here. adam, before you move
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on to tory concerts, we are doing a new playlist on bbc sounds. sounds so unique and get these. we do not do the singing, we just introduce the songs. our brexit cast, give us good suggestions. so if you do, e—mail brexitcast. .2. national poetry day. congratulations. ifeel a haiku coming on. stay tuned for that and we do the poetry as well. you saw the reception. and three,
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this is people have stopped me in the street of this, why are you wearing headphones? please explain. it is so you can hear us and we can hear you, but most people are asking that question, they are getting at is that there are things more discreet than these damn things and we are talking about, rather. they double his earmuffs as well. is the best we could afford. because we are at our core, subtle. we have matching subtle microphones and headgear. did you see my segway there? the house of commons. boris johnson had to go talk about his new plan for mp5 johnson had to go talk about his new plan formps and johnson had to go talk about his new plan for mp5 and this time next week we spent a lot of time talking about how frustrated and angry and upset
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and how traumatised the house of commons felt. today, it was much more conciliatory is trying to play nice and take concerns seriously, the tone is really different. really starting to try and show the serious proposals, sceptical, never cynical, always sceptical. but shifted it was blue well, they need votes and it is some cabinet ministers have had a word on his level of thinking might not want to go quite as hard core the art rhetoric issue did it even his conference speech later on, we will go into that. less of the very anti—parliament, there is no week is going to move back from his broad argument i am going to end the horror show and everyone is trying to put on this terrible agony which he campaigned for, but never mind
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about that but i think now there's something on the table to talk about, we are into a different phase. and if last week was the sort of screaming wall of noise, this week but the speech in manchester in the performance today felt warm all or at least a willingness to listen. he still can forgive a popjumper co. the speaker of, because he is their favourite person of all and he has almost lost his voice does have a listen to what he had to say.|j has almost lost his voice does have a listen to what he had to say. i am very faithful to him a great the amount of people coming to the chair and the humanity and much appreciated, i want to take the opportunity to announce to the house but this is only temporary, it is not down to the consumption of a kangaroo's testicle. it would probably be poison. we set the prime
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minister was probably be poison. we set the prime ministerwas in probably be poison. we set the prime minister was in the heart of parliament. that was one bit that wasn't necessarily... he was cracking jokes, about parliament being trapped like celebrities i am a jungle. he was poking fun at parliament rather than. making a political point but was in the midst of the resolve last week one thing that's really important to say. of the resolve last week one thing that's really important to saym we can never get the deal, but it's clear to me that there is much better chance of there being a majority for this deal and parliament than it was for the previous ones. this is still a bumpy period and as a tapestry in the
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conference, we had a chat with boris johnson and they ask they given everything that is happened breaking the law, getting people either party and this is what he said. in the past few weeks of lost major votes, taking mps out of your party and the highest court is found you broke the law gave the wrong advice to the queen, how do you think this is going? i think this is going as well as it could be, if not better. because this is always going to be a very difficult time. glimmers of the soul, must really quite something in the discussion going on, and they know that westminster types of the danger in days like this talking about numbers and wrapping presents before even by the presence because obviously the conversation matters, but my favourite quote from the european research paper asked what he made of the plan. tolerable, he
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says. mr bakergiven he made of the plan. tolerable, he says. mr baker given his opposition to theresa may's deals and how he sees himself as the guardian of what he sees as brexit, tolerable is pretty much an endorsement. him doing the conga line, and all of them may be morris dancing,. how solid is this new majority? because of this is a starting point towards a potential deal, surely all of these people doing the conga today might bea these people doing the conga today might be a bit disappointed. we have to go might be a bit disappointed. we have togoa might be a bit disappointed. we have to go a long way from tolerable to being intolerable. to might be labour mps the maid voted for it if they think it is going to win, if they think it is going to win, if they think it is i have no idea what the date is, the
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beginning of october, it might be that there is a deal that tentatively is likely to get to parliament but cannot get agreed with the eu whereas previously there was a deal those agreed by the eu and we could not agree with it. to the noises that we are hearing from the noises that we are hearing from the commons helped shape the reactions, given before that brussels might be up for one last run, but only if it could clear the commons? is on the big questions, david frost, the prime minister is in brussels tonight and tomorrow to a nswer in brussels tonight and tomorrow to answer the massive list of questions of the european commission but all of the european commission but all of that aside, the suggestion that there may be a majority apartment for borisjohnson's there may be a majority apartment for boris johnson's deal there may be a majority apartment for borisjohnson's deal in the current proposals are not acceptable to the eu. let's be honest about it. the chances of getting a deal now
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between that and the european union is zero. the only possibility would be if he turned around and said you know that northern irish backstop, i will take it. that can be done but we are done dancing around in circles. there's a chance that it is possible and get your diaries out, there's a skeleton of a timetable we re there's a skeleton of a timetable were recreated down where the meaningful photos penciled in according to some people for saturday for the 19th of october, so get your weekend planned, yet, if. and numberten, that is of get your weekend planned, yet, if. and number ten, that is of the think the eu will say with the eu might say is thank you very much for this, but they would not agree to that. as things stand, they were not agree to that comes later taken by the
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details of what they put forward absolutely but on the two big principles are customs and consent, as faras principles are customs and consent, as far as they are concerned, they have gone quite far in the eu rules but for northern ireland, they will not move on the other two and if the eu does, then there is no deal and they're willing to do that whether there is no deal by hook or by crook, or it is no deal. let's talk about the best negative video over la st about the best negative video over last week where if you have seen it before, you'll love to see it again. it is about the commodores in manchester, because there is the prime minister walking down the corridor to the next. i know this is. a look like he was in need of refreshment.
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there was no, disposable, cops. the, i would not miss. you'll make it was whisked, whisk. it suggests that he was afraid of michael gove because he was the one who banned everything. you dictated that a cabinet they all had to go through with their disposable cups. no disposable cups. if he had written that out for a bit of script, you thought that was a bit too sort of cliche for that. to remember what date is today. thursday. is national poetry day, so we did a pond earlier on to come up with some brexit poetry. some people got the scrolls
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out people sat in meadows, people looked into the distance and they thought, we recruited a poet. john is here! by hello, hello. so, john webb has brexitcast come up with?m light of poems, —— a lot of poems, first one is you and the second one is brandon, and then the third one. is the first one. it goes like this.
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there was very good, i like that one. this is from jake. ilike, i i like, i like. we like the core of the party that would understand that. another terrific castor for us.
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that was classy, impressive. she was there sitting a few days back. here it goes. thank you. we have to ask you. what is your prediction? no idea. shalli go on? thank you very much. a poetry slam, likea go on? thank you very much. a poetry slam, like a poetry slam. no, i think that is a terrible idea. so
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next week, goodbye. hello there. we've had a couple days of drier, colder weather, and then storm lorenzo came on the scene. this of course was a hurricane. it's not had a great deal of impact and it's weakening through friday, but really the outlook stays very unsettled — more atlantic bands of cloud and rain coming in. now this area of low pressure is lorenzo — it slowed down as it approached the uk, and it'sjust drifting down across northern ireland, england, and whales, but weakening all the while. so winds for many are becoming lighter on friday. the strongest of the winds, gusting over 60 mph in the far southwest of england and wales. but the rain we are seeing
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is easing its way south, as most places become dry in the afternoon with a little bit of sunshine coming through. those temperatures probably a bit higher than we saw on thursday — 14—17 celsius across southern parts of england and wales. any remaining rain clears into the near continent, winds easing down through the evening across the southwest of england and wales. we will find it turning a little chilly across the northeast of scotland, closer to the area of high pressure. but more weather systems will be pushing in through the atlantic this weekend. whilst for many places, especially across eastern areas of the uk will be dry, there may not be an awful lot of sunshine. out west, the cloud thickens with a few spots of rain coming in under the main rain band, which is arriving in northern ireland with the winds picking up a bit as well. ahead of that, temperatures between 14—16 celsius. during the second half of the weekend, that weather continues to ease its way eastwards across the uk. but then it stops and the main weight of rain gets drawn down towards the near continent. and by sunday morning, it may be dry with sunshine in northern ireland, wales, and the southwest. the cloud and rain elsewhere tends
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to ease off in northern areas, but continues quite wet towards the southeast of england. these are the sorts of temperatures we are looking at, no great shakes as a whole. but where you get the sunshine out to the best, particularly west and the southwest of england, i7 celsius should feel quite pleasant. that weather system slides away into continental europe, but there is another area of low pressure with the winds picking up and driving in the next weather system, as well. eastern areas probably starting off dry, we have the rain band pushing its way from west to east, coupled with some strong winds with the gales quite possible towards the northwest of the uk, closer to that area of low pressure. and those temperatures around 14—15 celsius or so. near normal for this time of year. the area of low pressure will stick around for a while, with those weather fronts pushing through. but we will have a wraparound of cloud and better weather coming back in the northern ireland,
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back into scotland, particularly in the northwest of scotland. so wet and windy weather here on tuesday. the rain band clears away for the southeast of england, there will be a few showers around, particularly the northern parts of england and wales. but towards the south and southeast, it may well be dry. those temperatures not really changing a great deal, we are still in the same sort of hermas. further ahead, this of the jet stream — still have a strong jet stream across the uk. eventually it buckles out in the atlantic, and that may develop an area of high pressure here later on. but we are still stuck on the wrong side of the jet stream with low pressure still dominating our weather. and that low pressure centre will be across more northern parts of the uk. so this is where we are likely to see the wettest and windiest of the weather, still very mixed. we may find that high—pressure coming in next weekend, more of a northerly wind, and that may cool things offjust a little bit. goodbye.
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tonight at ten — borisjohnson's new brexit plans get a very lukewarm response from dublin and from brussels. the prime minister told mps he'd made a genuine attempt to find common ground to get a new brexit deal. we've made a genuine attempt to bridge the chasm, to reconcile the apparently irreconcilable, and to go the extra mile, as time runs short. what we have before us is a rehashed version of previously rejected proposals that put the good friday agreement at risk, that would trigger a race to the bottom on rights and protections for workers, consumers and our precious environment.

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