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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 14, 2019 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm samantha simmonds. the headlines at 8pm. the queen sets out the government's legislative agenda in a speech and ceremony stooped in centuries of tradition, yet at the heart of it — brexit. my my government's priority has always been to secure the united kingdom's departure from the european union on 31 october. while the labour leader is dismissive, the prime minister says he aims to create a new age of opportunity for the country. at the heart of this speech is an ambitious programme to unite our country with energy, optimism, but also with the basic common sense of one nation conservatism. the prime minister promised that this queen's
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speech would dazzle us! on closer inspection, mr speaker, it is nothing more than fool's gold. our other headlines at 8pm today... a plea from the parents of 19—year—old harry dunn, killed in a crash involving a us citizen on a trip to america they say she must return to the uk and face justice. she killed our son, she didn't need to kill him, she didn't need to have the accident. you cannot walk away from that and just leave, and expect nothing to happen. in syria, government forces are on the move to the border with turkey, raising grave fears of a dangerous new confrontation. and i'm rebecca jones at london's historic guildhall, where later this evening we will be revealing who has one the booker prize award for fiction, awarded to the best novel of the year.
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good evening. the queen has set out the government's future policies on issues such as crime, health and the environment, and of course , brexit. but given that the prime minister has no majority in parliament, many of the bills may not become law. mps are debating the speech now and will do so for the coming days. if they reject it, there are likely to be renewed calls for a general election. and hanging over it all, the brexit negotiations which are continuing in brussels. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports on today's events at westminster. plenty of pomp... ..but very bizarre circumstances. the band playing for the monarch‘s arrival, the queen and the crown here to announce the government's plans.
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but they are a wish list at the very best. going through the traditional motions... ..for a programme that might never happen. black rod! if this first promise is not kept. my government's priority has always been to secure the united kingdom's departure from the european union on 31 october. that is a huge if, and the doubts over brexit walked the government's other ambitions. new laws will be taken forward to help implement the national health service's long term plan in england. whether that is more funding for the help service, a points system for immigration, or longer criminal sentences. my government is committed to addressing violent crime and to strengthening public confidence in the criminal justice system. new sentencing laws will see that the most serious offenders spend longer in custody,
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to reflect better at the severity of their crimes. this unlikely pair aren't inclined to agree on any of that. whatever small talk boris johnson was trying and failing to make. jeremy corbyn‘s and so was unlikely to be, "sure, no problem." this government has no majority and the prime minister wants a better outcome than his predecessor but, just like theresa may, borisjohnson once an early election. the legislative programme, mr speaker, is a propaganda exercise that the government cannot disguise. this government has failed on brexit for over three years. they are barely beginning to undo the damage of a decade of cuts to our public services. the prime minister promised that this queen's speech would dazzle us. on closer inspection, mr speaker, it is nothing more than fool's gold. prime minister!
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as we prepare to get brexit done by 31 october, we are setting out now our vision of an open, global, free trading united kingdom, a high wage, low tax economy. the best place to invest, the best place to start a business, the best place to start a family and send your kids to school and without being chauvinistic or disrespectful to anywhere else in the world, in important respects, this country is the greatest place to live and to be. cheered at the end by his own side, this prime minister's fate right rest elsewhere — in the hands of diplomats and his own negotiators in brussels. waiting, waiting, and waiting. after the eu said no, no, and no again to the prime minister's proposals, there is now an irish maybe to a deal.
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a deal is possible and it is possible this month, it may even be possible this week, but we are not there yet. whether or not there is a deal matters more than anything said in parliament today. it is just about possible to see how it could happen this week but there is a lot of secrecy about exactly how. one cabinet minister said we are still in the middle of the forest. and even if there is an agreement, it would still have to get through the commons. there is no form of brexit that will be good for our country. and the liberal democrats will continue to fight to stop brexit. deal or no deal, the prime minister is driving scotland and at the uk into economic catastrophe — risking jobs, livelihoods and delivering a race to the bottom on fundamental rights. i do think that the sooner that we are able to implement the result of that referendum, the better. but a wish or sooner rather than later just doesn't mean much yet.
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in modern political life, even traditions take on a different style. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. well our europe editor katya adler sent us this assessment of brussels' likely reaction to today's queen's speech. well the eu is very much hoping for a deal, but the question is absolutely went from germany and france, all the other member states wa nt france, all the other member states want a new brexit deal that they can live with. they worry that something donejust to get live with. they worry that something done just to get it done last minute could have long—term problems for their single market and for the northern ireland peace process. so negotiations have continued today, and the stumbling block remains how to replace the backstop for the irish border, particularly when it comes to customs. can all that really be solved in three days' time when eu leaders to send on brussels for their summit when eu leaders to send on brussels fortheirsummit to? when eu leaders to send on brussels for their summit to? the political will is there on the eu side in dublin, which is such a crucial player here, in big powers germany
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and france. but actually, their eyes are on london and on the mounting pressure on boris johnson. are on london and on the mounting pressure on borisjohnson. he promised a brexit deal by this week, and he promised he wouldn't be asking for another brexit extension. so the eu hope that underneath all this pressure, he may feel forced to give it to the preprepared and preferred eu option of essentially keeping northern ireland in the eu's customs union after brexit. now if he doesn't, not all is lost for those who want a deal for the eu, because their legal deadline runs out at the end of this month, not this week. and of course if there is a request for another extension, that brexit deadline moves forward once again. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:a0pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. our guestsjoining me tonight are lucy fisher, defence correspondent at the time, and polly mackenzie, the chief executive of the cross—party think tank demos. the parents of harry dunn — the teenager killed in northamptonshire while riding his motorbike — say they will meet
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the us woman allegedly involved only if she promises to return to britain. anne sacoolas left the uk under diplomatic immunity, while police were investigating. she has offered to meet mr dunn's parents, who have travelled to the us. duncan kennedy reports. good morning to you and welcome to cbs this morning. seeking justice, only on cbs this morning, the parents of the 19—year—old british motorcyclist who was killed... from northamptonshire to network news, the extraordinaryjourney of harry dunn's parents. we watched as tim and charlotte told their tragic story to america. and in their measured dignity, they later told me they won't give up. i think everyone can see it's just not — she's not done the right thing, and she needs to do the right thing. she should have just stayed. it shouldn't have come to this. it's ludicrous. it should be very simple, in other words?
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we should be celebrating harry now, not coming to new york, trying to push this forward and get justice for him. yeah. anne sacoolas, the american said to have been driving the car that collided with harry, has now apologised. but harry's parents say they didn't come all the way to new york to receive a written apology. they say they want much more. drained by an alien world of media interviews, tim and charlotte said today they now want any meeting with anne sacoolas to take place in the uk, where they live — and where harry died. duncan kennedy, bbc news, new york. almost a week into turkey's military offensive against the kurds in syria — and a defiant message from president erdogan today. he's insisted, he will not back down, until victory has been achieved — no matter what anyone says. on the ground, fighting has intensified, and allegiances have changed.
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syrian troops have now gathered in the north of the country, when kurdish forces turned to them for help after being abandoned by the united states. the deal was brokered by russia. the kurds hope president assad's army will deploy along the entire length of the turkish border. turkey has already made gains, in two key border towns — ras al—ain and tell aby—ad, seen here in the middle of the map. dozens of civilians and fighters have been killed on both sides. rebel forces retain a hold over other areas, such as idlib — shown here in pink — as well as in the south of syria. meanwhile, the islamic state group still have a presence in areas in the east — shown on the map in green — showing how complex the situation is, with many moving parts. orla guerin reports from the border zone. rolling in to a hero's welcome.
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troops of the assad regime. they have been handed a victory without firing a shot. arriving today in the town of ain issa. look who's back. the kurds had to invite the regime in after washington left them alone to face a turkish invasion. and the town of tal tamer now in asad's hands. his supporters resurfacing. "i have kept this picture hidden for years," he says, "waiting for this day." but not everyone is celebrating. we met abu and his family on the turkish side of the border. he was planning to go home once kurdish militia were gone. not now. translation: i was shocked when they told me that the regime is now in control. we were happy when the turkish army went in.
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we were hoping to go back and live happily in our village. no one can go back with the regime there. his young relative mohammed wants to study medicine in the uk. he can't see a future in his homeland. i think this idea is impossible because i think the syrian war is endless. does that make you feel sad? i am feeling sad for my country, for my people, what can i do for them? this is the latest phase in the endless war. turkey continuing to pound northern syria. here, a drone strike. allegedly targeting a kurdish ammunition supply. "we work with the precision
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a jeweller," erdogan claimed today, but the civilian death toll is growing. and what of islamic state prisoners being held by the kurds? well, turkey claims they were long gone when it entered this prison in the town of tal abyad. ankara blames the kurds for freeing them but turkey has opened the door to a dangerous escalation here, and there are fears that it could move rapidly out of control. orna guerrin, bbc news. a british man jailed for multiple sex crimes against malaysian children, including a baby, has been found stabbed to death in prison near york. richard huckle was given 22 life sentences in 2016 after admitting emma glaze be sent us this update site below richard haeckel was stabbed to death here yesterday afternoon. it is understood he was found in his cell after being attacked with a makeshift knife here attacked with a makeshift knife here at full sutton prison. he was 33 yea rs at full sutton prison. he was 33 years old, and he had beenjailed
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for abusing as many as 200 malaysian children stop huckle had gone to malaysia as a teenager on a gap year and he went on to groom children while he was doing voluntary work. in 2016, he was given 22 life sentences for sexually abusing children between the ages of six months and 12 years old stop now when he was arrested in 2014 at gatwick airport, police found more than 20,000 indecent pictures and videos of the abuse on his computer. huckle had been writing a manual at the time of his arrest, telling paedophiles how to abuse children and avoid detection. now there has been a short statement from the prison service today, saying that full sutton prisoner richard huckle died on 13 october, and it would be inappropriate to comment further while the police investigation is ongoing. police have said that
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officers were called shortly after 12:30pm yesterday afternoon, reporting that a man had died at the prison. they say the police are investigating with the prison service, and the death is being treated as suspicious. a man who drove into cyclists and police officers outside westminster — has been jailed for life. salih khater ploughed into pedestrians and riders in parliament square last year on 14 august, before crashing in to security barriers. the old bailey heard that mr khater wanted to cause maximum carnage and it was "miraculous" that no—one was killed. a jury found him guilty of attempted murder injuly and the judge said he had a terrorist motive. promises on crime, the government, and above all brexit. the parents of 19—year—old harry dunn who was
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killed in a car crash with a us citizen. they demand she returned to the uk and faces justice. syrian forcesjoin kurdish the uk and faces justice. syrian forces join kurdish soldiers at the border of turkey, raising fears of a new confrontation with the russian and turkish army. let's cross over the bbc sport centre with sarah for all the support. let's start with england, because they can qualify for 2020 this year, taking on bulgaria and sophia right now there. three goals up, marcus rashford with an early powerful strike and ross barkley has added two more early on there. if england win and montenegro don't lose tonight, then they will secure their place in the finals. but as you can see, kosovo are their place in the finals. but as you can see, kosovo are 1—0 up. in the last couple minutes, play was stopped and the england skipper harry kane was spoken to by the referee. this was over alleged
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racial abuse in the stadium. there was then a message from the stadium announcer, and he has said that the game would be suspended again or abandoned if certain crowd chants continued. so we will keep you up—to—date with that, you can follow it on the bbc sport website. some more news coming from sophia, a british man has died following an incident there, the foreign office continuing they are supporting his family. the fa say they will comment —— waitfor family. the fa say they will comment —— wait for comment until the full circumstances are clarified. let's move on, because michael o'neill has secured his first friendly away win as the northern ireland manager after a hard —fought as the northern ireland manager after a hard—fought 3— to win over the czech republic. it has taken in 13 games, and despite a brilliant play, johnny evans put them 3—0 up. a hard —fought encounter play, johnny evans put them 3—0 up. a hard—fought encounter in prague. czechoslovakia made ten changes, but two goals in as many minutes into
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the second half left, northern ireland were left hanging on for the win. the brain charity has criticised ryan giggs and daniel james. giggs said thatjames was being streetwise when he claimed to being streetwise when he claimed to be knocked out during their match against croatia last night. he was involved in a collision in the first 15 minutes and appeared to be briefly unconscious, but he played on after treatment. giggs said he passed a concussion test at half—time. peter mccabe says his actions sets a dangerous example to the millions watching at home. ireland will miss the rest of their... afterfailing to have its red cardigan samoa overturned. he contested the red card after disciplinary hearing today, and... but a three week band has ruled him
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out for the rest of the tournament, evenif out for the rest of the tournament, even if they got to the final, he has 48 hours to appeal the decision. scotla nd has 48 hours to appeal the decision. scotland was my early exit from the world cup has put gregor temps and's future into the spotlight. he still has two years to go on his contract. southern failed to qualify for next week's quarterfinals. southern failed to qualify for next week's quarterfinalslj southern failed to qualify for next week's quarterfinals. i know he's trying to play this really fast, 100 mph game, the fastest game in the world. unfortunately, japan play that game far more effectively and accurately than us. but i think he's going to look at that. but i do believe he's the right guy to check the micro take us forward. we have to give them a chance, i think he has a great rugby brain and he has some great young players who are just wanting the chance to perform ona just wanting the chance to perform on a more regular basis. men and women will compete against each other for women will compete against each otherfor a women will compete against each other for a new trophy at an event to be held by swedish golf next
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year. the scandinavian mix will take place at stockholm nextjune. it is co—sanctioned by both the men's and lady's tournaments, and will feature 78 men and women in its field. the total prize fund will count towards world rankings. one more story for you before we go down, evans has won his first match as british number one. remember you can stay up to date on the england qualifier against bulgaria, they still lead 3-0, that against bulgaria, they still lead 3—0, that is on the bbc website. we will see you back at 10:30pm. thank you. there have been protests in barcelona after the supreme court in madrid gave nine catalan separatists long jail terms for theirfailed bid for independence from spain in 2017. scuffles broke out with police at barcelona airport and there were a number of arrests. thousands of people marched through the streets, blocked highways and halted traffic. the demonstrations also spread
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to other towns, including girona. the leaders of the independence group, including the territory's former vice—president, were sentenced to up to 13 years each — in a move condemned by the president of the catalan parliament as an "attack on democracy". meanwhile, a new arrest warrant for the former catalan president puigdemont has been issued. he has sought exile in belgium, from where he gave a statement on today's events. the supreme court's ruling against the members of the government, the parliament, and the most important social institutions in catalonia confirms the strategy of repression and revenge against all the cattle citizens who sewed it demographic ways to make it possible —— cattle land. by convicting them, they convict more than 2 million people who took part in the referendum held
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on one october, 2017. we said in the parliament of catalonia, and we say it again here today even louder — it is not a crime, no to citizens that they freely decide their own future. deeming dramatic us sent this from barcelona. the severity of the senses has sent shock across catalonia. they are not the 25 year sentences for rebellion that prosecutors had asked for, but still, 13 years is the harshest sentence for the crime of sedition. that has caused quite a lot of anger and calls for people to gather and go to the airport in barcelona to block operations there. we are also hearing of some demonstrations happening in other towns around catalonia, as well, train tracks
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being blocked. spain's prime minister, pedro sanchez, has been on television addressing the nation, and he says that people here were not being tried for their ideas, but rather for their criminal actions. he said it was time to turn the page and call for dialogue in catalonia. but others here have come out to the street saying they did not support the independence, but the failed unilateral occlusion of independence two years ago. but they are outraged by the jail terms handed down. and the harshest, 13 years, was given to the harshest, 13 years, was given to the former vice president of catalonia. he has released a message to his supporters in which he said, "nothing ends today. we will come back even stronger." hundreds of colleagues, family and friends have attended the funeral of pc andrew harper in oxford today. the 28—year old officer — who'd been married forjust four weeks — was killed while responding to a reported burglary in august.
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three teenagers have been charged with murder. jon kay reports. just weeks after his wedding day, the funeral of pc andrew harper. hundreds of his colleagues lined the route. a city silent. to remember a 28—year—old officer killed in the line of duty. inside oxford was at christchurch cathedral, his widow led the tributes. they met at school and married at just led the tributes. they met at school and married atjust 28 days before he was killed. he told the congregation, . ..
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she placed his ceremonial police hat upon his coffin. pc harper was killed while responding to reports ofa killed while responding to reports of a burglary in august. she said... your smile was infectious. your humour, relentless. even in the darkest of times, you made me laugh. your personality shone through in everything you did, and i'm so very, very proud of you. in the pouring rain, officers from around the country joined members of rain, officers from around the countryjoined members of the public. he was so young and he had just gotten married. you know, he had his life in front of him. and yeah, it's terrible. and how important is it for you to stand here and share your respects? very important. we be without the police?
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jon kay, bbc news, oxford. the number of people killed by typhoon hagibis injapan has risen to 56. the typhoon has brought record downpours with some areas seeing four months of rain into days. tens of thousands of troops have been drafted in to reach stranded residents. it is the worst storm to hit the country in decades. police say there have been more than 1300 arrests in connection with the ongoing extinction rebellion protests across london. hundreds of activists occupied their crossroads outside the bank of england this morning, targeting financial firms they say profit from climate change. the protests in the capital started last monday. the duke and duchess of cambridge have arrived in islamabad for a royal visit to pakistan. security is tight for their first official visit to the country. kensington palace say it is also their most complex tour due to
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political tensions and security concerns in the region. william and kate will visit organisations, working with young people in climate change. time for a look at the weather, here's darren. once again we've seen it rain developing across many parts of the uk today, and here in wiltshire, river levels certainly have been rising from the earlier spells of heavy rain. our attention has been focusing towards east anglia and the southeast, where we've seen some very wet weather and some thunderstorms pushing in from the near continent. so there is this amber thunderstorm warning from the met office for the evening, expiring before midnight as those storms run their way northwards and out to the north sea. but some very wet weather for a while, and there's more rain to push its way in towards the borders to. further west, the rain we are seeing earlier on, that will tend to peter off in general as we head towards the end of the night. it will turn dryer and a bit mixed year, temperatures in scotland where
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we saw the driest weather, 6—7dc. more of that drier weather along more widely tomorrow, many places dried with some much—needed dry weather. some early rain to clear overnight across north east england across the borders, and we could pick up1—2 across the borders, and we could pick up 1—2 showers in northern ireland, wales and the south of england. misty starts, brightening up england. misty starts, brightening up with some sunshine coming through. temperatures not bad, 16 celsius. that will be anchored by that low pressure which will certainly come into play later on in the week. overnight tuesday night, a speu the week. overnight tuesday night, a spell of wet and blustery weather sweeping across the country, rain clearing away from east of england and moving across scotland, lingering into the afternoon. elsewhere plenty of sunshine following through, this is good, clea n following through, this is good, clean air with 1—2 showers coming into western scotland and northern ireland. 12—16dc, that's normalfor
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this time of year. let's look ahead to thursday and there's more rain, wind is picking up particularly for the western side. further east, where it will be dryer for longer, even there are a few showers, are arriving later on. those temperatures not changing a great deal, 12—16dc again. low pressure early on as we headed towards the end of the week, that is bringing these showers and longer spells of rain. low pressure drifting across the country, bringing winds with heavy rain at times.
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this is bbc news. the headline the queen sets out the governor's legislative agenda in a speech and ceremony steeped in centuries of
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tradition, yet at the heart, brexit. my tradition, yet at the heart, brexit. my government's priority has always been to secure the united kingdom's departure from the european union on the 31st of a towbar. while the labour leader is dismissive, the prime minister says he aims to create a new age of opportunity for the country. the heart of this beach is an ambitious programme to unite our country with energy and optimism, but also with the basic common—sense of one nation conservatism. —— this speech. common—sense of one nation conservatism. -- this speech. he promised this speech would dazzle as, but on closer inspection it is nothing more than full skilled. plea from the parents of 19 old harry dunn, killed in a crash involving a us citizen on a trip to america, they say she must return to the uk and face justice. government forces in syria moved to the border with turkey, raising great fears of
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a dangerous new confrontation. and coming up with the next half—hour, we talked to have the nominated authors who could walk away with this year's booker prize this evening. —— we talk to two of the nominated authors. breaking news, the qualifier game that has been going on this evening, stopped a little earlier, not sure why, a second time. play has now resumed. we are trying to get more information as to what is going on but we know that part of the stadium has been closed because of racist behaviour in the past. that was a sanction, the game stopped twice, play has resumed. we will get more when we have it. westminster mps are continuing to debate the various government policy set out in the queen's speech. what about the reaction beyond parliament? blackpool south, including the famous tower, is a labour hailed
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seat but with a small majority. on 2016 referendum, 60% of people they are voted to leave while 32% voted to remain. it is a target seat for the conservatives as they try to secure a majority at the next general election. our special corresponded editor thomas has spent the day there. it could be a defining week. today, a government's pitch to the nation, as brexit talks reach a critical moment. while people watch, and wait... and wait. why are we having a queen's speech now? it's all really confusing. what are your priorities, living in britain today? my priorities are education, health and policing. what do you want to hear from your politicians? direction, of where we're going to be going. are you confident? no, not really. like elsewhere, political lines in blackpool south are now blurred. take darren — voted labour in the 2017 general election and leave
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in the european referendum. does party loyalty still exist? no. his next vote is up for grabs. are you frustrated at the moment? yes. very frustrated. because we voted out. what are your priorities, though? priorities is earning money, and this brexit is hurting the country. my government remains committed to ensuring that resident european citizens... today's queen's speech was a chance for the government to catch the eye. policies from crime and justice to the environment. and, of course, brexit. what are your priorities? nhs, for me. top priority. but until brexit's sorted, everything else can't be sorted. there might be a general election soon, and this is a critical moment for the country. exactly. i wouldn't know who to vote for. there you go, darling. thank you.
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so, you usually vote labour. yeah. you usually vote conservative. conservative. if there was a general election tomorrow, who would you vote for? i don't know, but not labour. i don't know either. totally lost faith in the big parties. same here. we heard the same word again and again — confusion. people unsure what happens next. unsure where their political loyalties will lie. everybody's confused. so, your votes are up for grabs? yeah, basically. so, what do you want to hear from politicians? well, i think really, we just really want to know. somebody we can trust. aye. that's what we're lacking. and who do you trust right now? nobody. i think everyone's gone round in circles for years. what do you want to happen? i'm just sick of brexit. i'm just sick of it. no guarantees what will happen next, but a sense something soon has to give. ed thomas, bbc news, blackpool. the labour party has branded today's
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queen's speech with expected promise has a pointless propaganda exercise. but with the possibility of a general election around the corner and a brexit deadline only 17 days away, what is labour‘s stance on brexit? sienna rogers editor of labour list, and george eaton assistant editor at the new statesman. as ever, the party is divided on brexit. is it becoming any divided on brexit. is it becoming a ny clearer divided on brexit. is it becoming any clearer what they will actually do if boris johnson any clearer what they will actually do if borisjohnson pulls a rabbit out of a hat and presents parliament with a deal? is a chance they could vote for it? yes, assuming boris johnson does come back to something to offer to the house of commons which is a big assumption. it is very difficult to work out as we have seen for three and a half yea rs. if have seen for three and a half years. if you does have something to offer, we can be clear that the labour party will be equipped to vote against it. jeremy corbyn said today in response to the queen speech that any deal passing
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parliament would have to have a new customs union and workers' rights and environmental protections, at all those things built in. we can assume that borisjohnson's offer will not have those. there are some mps, labourmps, who will not have those. there are some mps, labour mps, who want out. there are some 25 who sided letter asking jeremy corbyn to get this done, a lot of labour mps in leave seeds who wa nt to lot of labour mps in leave seeds who want to secure their futures as well, isn't there a chance that something could likely turn? the numberof labourmps that something could likely turn? the number of labour mps that are prepared to back a brexit deal is probably rising, but you are also seeing a rise of the number who support a second referendum. that is partly because of the surge you have seenin partly because of the surge you have seen in support for the liberal democrats, even in constituencies that voted leave, most of labour vote rs that voted leave, most of labour voters there voted remain, so there isa voters there voted remain, so there is a clear electoral incentive. this plate you are seeing developers whether there will be a second
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referendum before an election, whether an election will be desirable, whether it has bn election is the priority. some shadow cabinet members, tom watson the deputy leader, say that they think a brexit referendum is justified before an election. they are quite clear that they do not think there are the numbers in parliament to back a second referendum are they also don't see how labour could duck the chance of an early general election when obviously it has made much of his desire to ask boris johnson's conservatives. how damaging is another split in the labour party, with them failing to come to any consensus about whether they should bea consensus about whether they should be a referendum before or after the election? it is difficult, but every political party is split on brexit, this does not run along party bloodlines. we do not see jeremy corbyn taking the front foot, he protect —— procrastinates. corbyn taking the front foot, he protect -- procrastinates. he has been very clear on this particular issue. it is a question of, do mps
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wa nt issue. it is a question of, do mps want a referendum before an election at the most of them do want to get brexit resolve. before an election happens, because you can see the appeal of that, they want the next election to be about domestic issues and things that labour can win on and things that labour can win on and not brexit. but it seems like there are two routes that that could be achieved, they are not possible. either you amended that the other borisjohnson comes either you amended that the other boris johnson comes back either you amended that the other borisjohnson comes back with, assuming there is an offer in place, and assumed that amendment could pass, and the bill would not fall if an amendment did pass. so much. also the fact that there is a caretaker government idea, but there is no majority for any leader for that interim government. notjeremy corbyn but also any other mp. it's jeremy corbyn now at risk of being bounced into a position that he does not want to be in? potentially, it is uncomfortable for labour. very
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visible splits in the shadow cabinet. jeremy corbyn has tried to contain more unified position where there was an agreement that labour would back a referendum on any brexit deal. that papered over the cracks for a while but the state you are seeing developers some shadow cabinet members being clear they would vote for remain, others such as an ally ofjeremy corbyn saying that he would campaign for a labour brexit, and corbyn trying to be the man in the middle, holding it together, she has consistently avoided being pinned down to which side he would campaign for. that is partly a product that labour is in an awkward position where most of its voters backed remain most labour hailed constituencies voted leave. it is simultaneously try to represent doncaster and islington, very different views. jeremy
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corbyn's leadership, rumblings behind—the—scenes, who is actually in charge, suggestions john mcdonnell is no leader in all but name. jeremy corbyn refused yesterday to say if he would stay on if labour lost. is he in the dying days of his leadership? that depends on what happens at the next general election. we saw an interview last week, john mcdonnell said he and corbyn would stand down if labour lost the next general election. that isa lost the next general election. that is a defining moment for his leadership. what defines the success of the corbyn project is the identity of his successor. will it be rebecca long—bailey or laura peacock? someone who might continue the left of the labour party being in control of labour? or will it be someone more moderate like emily thornberry? john white donnell says he would like to see a woman in charge but can't get away from these briefings saying he is likely the de fa cto briefings saying he is likely the de facto leader. what do you think the reality is? the reality is that john
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mcdonnell is not looking to oust jeremy corbyn clearly there have been tensions over staff members, the chief of staff who faced a lot of criticism, and us in differences of criticism, and us in differences of emphasis on brexit, sojeremy corbyn was furious when tom watson gave a speech saying that he believed there should be able accept referendum before a general election, one of the reasons there was a failed attempt to oust tom watson. john mcdonnell said in an interview with alistair campbell, not a popular figure, interview with alistair campbell, not a popularfigure, said he had some soup with the with a referendum before an election. anyone who makes say predictions on british politics is very unwise, it all hinges on the election and any trebly volatile time. the days of safe addictions are long gone. thank you for your thoughts. —— safe predictions. in aberdeen, delegates we re predictions. in aberdeen, delegates
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were gathering for the snp party conference. the first minister has told the bbc she will not be willing told the bbc she will not be willing to support a minority labour government unless jeremy to support a minority labour government unlessjeremy corbyn agrees to grant her a second referendum on scottish independence. but nicola sturgeon remains prepared to support the labour leader as a ca reta ker to support the labour leader as a caretaker prime minister for a matter of days if it results in a delay to brexit and a general election. she has been speaking to our scotland editor. the snp have come here with grand ambitions, and not just for leading scotland to independence. their leader even says she thinks it might be possible to stop brexit. i won't give up hope around that until the moment that the uk has left the eu. you have to take the view that there is a prospect, a possibility of stopping ever leaving. do you trustjeremy corbyn? i don't trust him. i don't particularly... i'm not a great fan ofjeremy corbyn. i think his lack of leadership on brexit has been woeful. i can't escape the conclusion that he's actually a secret brexiteer and would rather the uk was out, but...
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yet you're prepared to make him a caretaker prime minister, and you're trying to persuade other opposition parties to join with you in that. let me set out exactly what i'm trying to do. i'm trying to get in a position where we get rid of borisjohnson, and then we have a very, very short—term interim government that has one purpose — to secure the article 50 extension. probably would be in government for a matter of days. i think the best way is a vote of confidence, an extension to article 50 and a general election, but i'm not ruling anything out. the snp will put at the heart of any general election campaign its demand that scotland must be allowed to hold a second referendum on independence. i've got public opinion, increasingly, on my side. support for independence is rising. support for a second referendum is rising. those are exactly the circumstances in which no united kingdom prime minister would dare allow you a referendum, because they'd be terrified that they would be the prime minister who broke up britain and who lost scotland. yeah, but you can't... you can't — even people like boris johnson — you know, you can't end up in a situation, inevitably, where you are denying people their democratic
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aspirations and wishes. that opposition is cracking, so i'm pretty confident that we'll be in a very different position around this very soon. party members have been persuaded they have to wait for a legal referendum, sanctioned by westminster — an argument they think they can win, but it's not a process they can control. sarah smith, bbc news, aberdeen. partially collapsed after a water main burstany partially collapsed after a water main burst any residential street. fire services were called just after 2pm to discover the water main pouring into the road, leaving homes and businesses flooded. south staffordshi re and businesses flooded. south staffordshire water say 20 properties have been damaged by the village. the headlines on bbc news... the queen sets out the governor public legislative agenda ina governor public legislative agenda in a speech. promises on crime, environment and above all else
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brexit. a plea from the parents of 19 world harry dunne who was killed ina carcrash 19 world harry dunne who was killed in a car crash with a us citizen. they do man she returns to the uk and facejustice. they do man she returns to the uk and face justice. —— they demand. syrian forces joined kurdish forces raising great fears of a dangerous new confrontation with the russian backed turkish army. this year's nobel prize for economics has been awarded to three individuals for their work towards alleviating global poverty. professor instead the flow and her husband and also michael kramer won the prize. she will go down in the history books as the second woman to become an economics nobel laureate since its launch in 1969. our reporter is with me now. pillow is more about the significance of this. esther had been widely tipped to win, but it is is her gender that has made this moment stand out.
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early one other woman has won this prize, in 50 years that it has been running. that in its own right is newsworthy. on top of that she is also the youngest to ever win the prize. typically this prize goes to men and older people. two reasons why people are treating this as significant, as she has been speaking to world service radio today about why this moment is so important. this is incredibly humbling. i important. this is incredibly humbling. lam important. this is incredibly humbling. i am very pleased to represent women in this profession, they are not enough women in economics. i think it is because may be many young women feel that they wa nt be many young women feel that they want to make a difference in the world and help people and economics is not the way. it is for finance and men. but forthe nobel is not the way. it is for finance and men. but for the nobel prize to be awarded to a woman for a work that has tried to make a difference in the world i hope we get many
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other young women to think of economics as something worthwhile to do with your time. is that aspect of their work making a difference that won them this prize. tell is more. they were awarded for their work in developed economics, particularly their work in tackling global poverty. poverty is an issue that seems daunting in many ways to tackle. how do we go about it? they have tried to break it down into smaller questions, making it easier to tackle. looking at child health or education in isolation. they have pioneered this work to trials in the real world to see what kind of thing works and what doesn't work. they started by rolling it out in places like india, kenya, and now it is used much more widely. the academy that awarded it referred to this work today, talking about around 5 million indian schoolchildren now benefiting from the tutoring programmes that have come out as a
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result of their work. a huge achievement, it has caught the imagination of people on social media. yes, social media has gone a bus with this. people congratulating the trio, but also particularly looking at esther duflo and her, her name is trending on twitter, 60,000 tweets of her name. fellow academics, we had a tweet from catherine milkmen, she tweeted that all three academics have helped to reduce global poverty. sophie walker welcomed the news and said, he was to the talent of all young women they recognised. people congratulating the trio about using it as an opportunity to talk about the need to promote greater diversity in economics. six authors from around the world are competing in this year's booker prize for fiction. margaret atwood and salman rushdie are among the nominees
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hoping to take home the £50,000 prize. rebecca joe's is at london's guildhall by the winner will be announced. getting lively here, the 500 guests enjoyed a champagne reception to be followed by three course dinner, and among them the six writers shortlisted for the prize this year. let's remind ourselves who is on my shortlist. six of the best books of the year are competing for the booker prize. margaret atwood's the test and it is the sequel to the handmaids tale. set 15 years later, it follows three women in the totalitarian state of gilead. and orchestra of minorities is to goes it would be's second book, young nigerian farmers also love but then becomes the victim of a scam. the story is told by his guardian spirit from ego culture. bernadine ever bestow‘s girl woman
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other, featuring women mostly black and british, with interconnected stories. it is told in free verse. in ten minutes 38 seconds in the strange world, relief fact chronicles the life and death of a woman who becomes a six worker in istanbul. dead in a dustbin while her brain remains active, we learn her brain remains active, we learn her story. lucy ellman has written ducks, newburyport, which takes us inside the koteka mind of a housewife from ohio trying to deal with modern life. salman rushdie's key short, is a retelling of cerva ntes's key short, is a retelling of cervantes‘s donkey ot. it is but a travelling salesman pursuing an unobtainable woman across america. i am delighted to say we are joined by two of those authors now, salman
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rushdie and lhr fight. your book is about modern america and yet it is davey imagining of a 17th—century novel. how did that inspire your book? ulysses was inspired by a big written thousands of years earlier, itjust seemed written thousands of years earlier, it just seemed to written thousands of years earlier, itjust seemed to me that written thousands of years earlier, it just seemed to me that those characters are modern versions of those famous characters, great three, would be very good point to a few characters through which to see a kind of panorama of current american. it would also allow me to write about something else more privately, a father—son relationship. the book has those two dimensions, the private story about family set against a much more sprawling story about the craziness of society. we have to explain the title of your book, because ten
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minutes 28 second, is the mud of time you break keep working was the heart has stopped beating. for you is that a matter of medicine or a matter of magic? i think in my work i like to combine written culture and oral culture, politics and imagination, so i see it as related. everything is connected. as you said i became very interested in this series of studies that show after the heart has stopped beating the mind can remain active for another few minutes. that was very intriguing, like a puzzle, what exactly happens inside the human mind and that limited amount of time? right away in this book we know that the main character is dead but as she keeps remembering her past, minute by minute mark we travel into her story i'd also the story of a country, always told
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through the eyes of outcasts. you both have experienced opposition to your work, you had to go into hiding after the fatwa when you wrote the satanic verses. give us a sense of what impact that has had. of course it had an impact on my life, but as faras my it had an impact on my life, but as far as my writing is concerned, if you didn't know anything about me except for my books ijust had the shelf of books, i don't think you would say that something awful happened to the author 1989. the books are on their own journey. i happened to the author 1989. the books are on their ownjourney. i am proud of that, ijust wanted to go on being the writer idols set out to be, don't buy have managed to do that. you are currently being investigated in turkey for obscenity. it is that for this book? it is more than one book. i am not the only author who is investigated in this way, but perhaps it is important to understand it is difficult to write about local
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issues, people understand that, but perhaps many people do not realise that sometimes it is equally challenging to write about sexuality, sexual harassment, questioning gender taboo is, gender roles. in countries like turkey, it can become a challenge for fiction writers and you can easily end up offending the authorities. we must leave it there, but thank you both, congratulations for being shortlisted and we will bring you the announcement of the winner live here ina the announcement of the winner live here in a special programme on the bbc news channel at 9:30pm. don't go away. once again reign developing over many parts of the uk today, and here in wiltshire river level certainly been rising from that earlier spell of heavy rain. more recently our attention has been focusing to was east anglia and the south—east where
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we have seen very wet weather and some thunderstorms pushing in from india continent. this amp thunderstorm warning from the met office for the evening, that expiring before midnight as those storms are the way northwards and into the north sea. wet weather for a while, more rain to push its way northwards away from the midlands, up northwards away from the midlands, up into northern england and towards the borders. further west the rain we saw earlier will peter out, as we hit was the end of the night it turns dry. misty as well, lowest temperatures in scotland six or seven celsius. more dry weather around widely tomorrow. many places dry, much—needed dry weather. it bit of sunshine as well for early ray clearing away, picking up one or two showers in northern ireland, wales and the south of england. elsewhere dry, misty start. areas of low cloud then brightening, sunshine coming through, to which is not bad,
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14-16dc. a band through, to which is not bad, 14—16dc. a band of rain waiting in the wings, coming courtesy of the weather front, anchored by the wings, coming courtesy of the weatherfront, anchored by the the wings, coming courtesy of the weather front, anchored by the low pressure which will come into play later. tuesday night, wet and blustery, rain clearing away from eastern england in the morning, moving northwards across scotland, lincoln again scotland. elsewhere plenty of sunshine, good clean—air, one or two showers coming into western scotland and northern ireland. 12— about normal for this time of year. thursday, more rain, but a gleefully western side, heavy bursts of rain, further east drier for longer. eight few showers arriving later in the day. tempt us not changing a great deal, 12—16dc. low pressure bringing showers or longer spells of rain, drifting down
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across the country, blustery winds, rain could be heavy at times.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. turkey says it won't "back down" over its syria offensive. but syrian government forces are moving towards the turkish border, as they align with kurdish fighters. borisjohnson's government lays out its legislative vision for britain, with brexit at its centre. my government's priority has always been to secure the united kingdom's departure from the european union on 31 october. but the government has no majority — so it's far from clear what it can get done. we'll have the lastest from westminster. we'll report from barcelona, too. thousands take to the streets after spain's supreme court jails

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