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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 17, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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that we have a profoundly divided parliament and that is why this is still on a knife edge. thank you, norman. let's go live to brussels. i'm nuala mcgovern, in brussels, where the breaking news this hour is — the eu and the uk say they've agreed a new brexit deal. the prime minister says he's got a ‘great new deal that takes back control‘ — and he urges parliament to back it. the president of the european commission, jean claude juncker, hails the deal as a "fair and balanced agreement" but in the last few minutes, northern ireland's democratic unionist party has said it still can't back the deal "as things stand".
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let's bring you some breaking news now —— in the past half hour, borisjohnson has announced that the uk and the eu have struck a brexit agreement. writing on twitter, the prime minister said ‘we've got a great new deal that takes back control , now parliament should get brexit done on saturday so we can move on to other priorities.‘ well, the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, said it was a ‘fair and balanced agreement for the eu and the uk‘. however, the democratic unionists — whose 10 votes the government might need to get the deal approved in the commons — have said in response that they remain opposed to the deal.
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let us been to chris, who is keeping gci’oss let us been to chris, who is keeping across all of the developments here in the european council. we had the following over the past half an hour some of the developments that have been coming in. michelle bernier same as we have a deal, they were talking about whether as a builder isa talking about whether as a builder is a deal. but it does not solve everything for prime minister boris johnson, what you think is going to be his first priority? what we have is clearly a broad political deal between the member states of the european union, including the uk. but we have been here before, do not forget. last year. theresa may announced the same thing and that subsequently rejected three times in the house of commons and the next big question of course is can this deal, and we have not getting a legal text of it with all the detail, can it get through the house of commons? the indications we have had so farfrom of commons? the indications we have had so far from the democratic
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unionist party in northern ireland is that they are sticking with the state m e nts is that they are sticking with the statements they made earlier this morning, which was that as things stand they cannot accept what is on the table. how things change between then and now crash mark we do not know. but certainly in the last three minutes a day you pmp has two bbc northern ireland at their position has not changed up and without the dup the numbers and has a commons of the guide difficult for the payments. i think we need to wait and save it has something else up wait and save it has something else up his sleeve. mps are going to deceive the legal text of an agreement. to see exactly what it says an issue of customs, consent, seeking a democratic approval of the northern ireland assembly and chemical forward northern ireland assembly and chemicalforward from northern ireland assembly and chemical forward from there. on the eu side, i think i will be thinking this is the second time we have come toa this is the second time we have come to a deal, let us hope this one actually sticks. let me meet elizabeth. jean—claude younger says there is a deal, it is fair and balance. i recommend that the
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european council endorsed this deal. so, talk our viewers through, if they do endorse this deal how they get through all that tax that has not been released and have it translated in time to try and ratified over between either today oi’ ratified over between either today or tomorrow? in terms of the complex legal text, you are right, this is detailed treaty text which technocrats and lawyers and 20th capitals will need to go through with a buying to come. so, i think what we were year from political leaders as the broad approval. we heard from angler michael and emmanuel macron yesterday. they have a deal can be done. the technical details still need to be looked at. it is worth remembering, of course, that 90% of this deal is exactly the same as a withdrawal agreement negotiated by theresa may‘s government. an agreement which is
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firstly criticised by among others borisjohnson. but firstly criticised by among others boris johnson. but it firstly criticised by among others borisjohnson. but it is the key thing is the irish backstop which we know have changed. hold that thought, we want to bring our fears... —— are the years... translation: on the does make this as a result of intensive work, and the part of the two negotiating teams and i would like to thank them in person.
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obviously the british team and our own team for their tenacity and professionalism. i would also like to point to the result from a european side on the basis of permanent dialogue and real confidence that has been built of the last three years but the 27 member states, but the european parliament. i can tell you, as you know, we really has built our positions together on our side and this new agreement. this agreement has been agreed between negotiators, with michaelj. this morning with prime ministerjohnson, he concluded this until present this later on at the european council of 27. i would
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also like to offer my personal thanks to him for his confidence of the last three years. i would like to thank present donald tusk. that is who i would like to thank. this text should provide legal certainty in every area. where brexit, like any separation, creates uncertainty. and in particular, and first foremost, or its citizens, for european citizens in the united kingdom and better citizens living in one of our member states. these citizens have always been and will remain our priority. —— european citizens living in one of our member states. uncertainty for the senses since has been going on for two long. thanks to this agreement the right spot at last be guaranteed on
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a sustainable basis. we also have certainty for a full host of project leaders receiving funding from the eu budget on the 27 member states and in the united kingdom. that is because thanks to this agreement, financial commitments already undertaken between 28 will still be respected and honoured between 28. we also have certainty for all individuals and businesses affected by all the other issues involved any separation. the first press co nfe re nce separation. the first press conference i gave three years ago that the social, human, legal, economical and technical consequences would be numerous. so, for all these various individuals and businesses concerned from now on their will be more certainty and thinking about protection of existing intellectual property rights, protection of geographical
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indications, protection of personal data. lastly, this proposal also covers the transition period. which was requested by the british government and which will last until the end of 2020. so, 14 months from fiow. the end of 2020. so, 14 months from now. and that may last one or two years further. subject to joint agreement between the united kingdom and the european union. ladies and gentlemen, the uk government has wanted to withdraw one point. a key point. the question of the protocol on ireland and northern ireland. throughout these negotiations their uk and the eu were fully committed to protect piece, to protect stability on the island of ireland.
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we add to reconcile two objectives. first, include legally operative solution enables droll agreement that would avoid a hard border between ireland and northern ireland. preserve the whole island economy and protect the integrity of the single market. secondly, a point extremely important to prime minister johnson extremely important to prime ministerjohnson and the uk, was that northern ireland remains in the uk's customs territory. discussions over the past days had at times been difficult. but we have delivered. and we have delivered together. the solution that we found rests on four main elements. numberone, northern
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ireland will remain aligned to a limited set of eu rules, notably related to goods. this means that all applicable procedures and goods will take place at the points of entry into northern ireland and not across the island. for this purpose, uk authorities will be in charge of applying the unions customs code in northern ireland. number two, applying the unions customs code in northern ireland. numbertwo, they aren't applicable procedures there is also the questions of customs duties. northern ireland will remain in the uk's customs territory, it will therefore benefit from that uk's future trade policy. but northern ireland will also remain an
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entry point into our single market. so, what have we done to square this circle? uk authorities can apply uk tariffs on products coming from third country, so long as those goods entering northern ireland are not at risk of entering our single market. however, or it goods at risk of entering the single market, uk authorities will apply the eu's tariffs. number three, this authorities will apply the eu's tariffs. numberthree, this night and this morning also, we were working on the issue of the 80. it is an important subject to avoid distortion of competition within the single market for good. —— the issue
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of vat. we have maintained... and finally, number four, prime of vat. we have maintained... and finally, numberfour, prime minister johnson and the taioseach wanted to confirm long—term support for releva nt confirm long—term support for relevant union rules in northern ireland. four years after the entering of forster protocol, the elected representatives of northern ireland will be able to decide by simple majority whether to continue applying relevant union rules and northern ireland or not. this democratic support is a cornerstone of our newly agreed approach. why? because this newly agreed protocol
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is no longer to be replaced by a subsequent agreement between the eu and the uk. so, it makes sense to ensure consent. ladies and gentlemen, obviously when discussing northern ireland we talk about the economy, about technical matters, about goods, but let me state very frankly that for me since day one, since three years, what really matters at the people. the people of northern ireland and ireland. what really matters is peace. translation: beyond the separation a jewel agreement we have also arrived at an
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agreement we have also arrived at an agreement and it is equally important in my eyes to revise the political declaration which should be adopted by the european council and the parliament. this will be quite precise framework for negotiations which will now open to build, rebuild a future ambitious partnership at the united kingdom. a friend, partner, ali, country. on this point, boris johnson‘s government has made a clear choice with respect to the future of economic relationship and that is a choice of a free trade agreement. any reference to other options, particularly the option of creating a single customs territory between us a single customs territory between us has been discarded. what does not
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change, on the other hand, is, if i competitor spec, our geographical proximity. which is for the long—term. this does not change our interdependence at the uk economy, which is very strong. —— i may put it this way. we have agreed on solid guarantees for the level playing failed to facilitate an ambitious free—trade agreement. that is without tariffs and quotas. on this point i would like to testify, having discussed this often when i visited various parts of the european union, to the fact that all member states, the european parliament, national parliament and obviously businesses, members of the business community whom i have met has paid a great deal of attention and will continue to do so in terms of having a comment pillar as it
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will apply at the end of the transition for social rights, environment protection, state aid and taxation matters. in some, the level of ambition of our future free—trade agreement will be very much proportionate to the level and qualities of the economic ground rules that will operate between us at the european union and the united kingdom. i have talked about the agreement that we were right out over these very intensive days and even nights of negotiation, the checks of the agreement is now available. i hope you enjoy reading it. on the basis of the analysis that will set out later on with presidentjean claude—juncker to the european council. which we have arrived at, is that together we have come up with a pair and reasonable
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results, which corresponds to our principles on the european side to stop it is now for the european council to assess the content of that agreement and if it so wishes to approve the agreement and that also applies the european apartment. i would like to thank the european parliament for its confidence and it is the parliament which will have the last word. we will be following through that process as of today, we do not have any dice left on the basis of dialogue and respect for oui’ basis of dialogue and respect for our institutions. by way of conclusion, i would like to say and that was the subject of my work and ambition over the last years, we finally had a pair and reasonable basis for an ordered withdrawal of the united kingdom. it is much better than a disordered patrol and ifi better than a disordered patrol and if i can put it this way, above all we hope that as of the 1st of
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november, as soon as possible, we can november, as soon as possible, we ca n start november, as soon as possible, we can start working on a new partnership at the united kingdom. i would like to thank you for your attention. thank you very much, we had time for about four questions. as has been said, all the information is available online. the irish times, is it possible for a deal agreed at this late stage to be ratified by ratified by european leaders at the summit? but they have to call another summit to look at the legal tax and finally formalises? translation: i think we need to be covered by the time that we use. there will be no ratification in the council, but we have done everything we can, including in the past days and nights to ensure that the council
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today will be able to give a favourable opinion on the recommendation that we together with presidentjean claude—juncker will give them about the state of negotiations and the draft agreement. it is a draft. as i said at the end of my presentation, on oui’ at the end of my presentation, on our side we need to cancel to formally approve the agreement after the ep has ratified it. that is the process which will be followed. and yes, as i said in my presentation, there should be no surprises here. much of the final text can also be found in the agreement that was put forward almost a year ago, so are the priority we give to citizens‘
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rights, certain financial matters amongst others. but there are some new elements. including on ireland and northern ireland, which i imagine interested in most. and in the political declaration, as well. but answering yes to your question. idid, what but answering yes to your question. i did, what i did to ensure member states would be about one. we‘ve had several meetings at 27 of the ambassadors and yesterday i met them again and in previous days i also met the parliament. i said something very important over the past three yea rs, very important over the past three years, but the support of president jean claude—juncker, we have them working in filled transparency. and in co nsta nt working in filled transparency. and in constant dialogue, so we have been building this together. it has
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been building this together. it has been built together with the uk. this agreement. that is why i am confident that it can be supported and ratified in the time between now and ratified in the time between now and the 31st of october. we have been down this road before, three previous agreements failed in the house of commons i wonder, have you had an assurance from the pain and assert that he has the votes to get this 13? translation: it is true we have some experience in this matter. —— to get this through. that is why we use the metaphor of mountaineering. it does not mean that there is no emotion here, but we have to be cautious, as
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well. i have done my work, our team has done their work, president juncker has on his part. afterwards the council and parliament will do their bit and the house of commons will have to take that decision. as it is their responsibility. i was a member of my own national parliament andi member of my own national parliament and i know what that responsibility means. the decision taken by referendum supported by the various governments with whom we have been negotiating means that we have a pairand negotiating means that we have a pair and reasonable agreement to use borisjohnson‘s, we have reached that agreement together infill respect. it has not always been
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easy, negotiations happen complex. what do you want me to say? i and the eu chief negotiator, i never wa nted the eu chief negotiator, i never wanted some might say to give any judgment on reddish political debate. i believe respect those procedures and the debate. —— on british political debate. i never intended for us tojudge british political debate. i never intended for us to judge that, not at all. follow up on the question before, did you get, apparently played a role in the negotiations. whether the british government has a majority for, did you get any indications or even assurances that there will be a majority question mark and the second question if i may, can you explain who exactly is
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going to control the customs duties and if it is the uk, is it possible for the eu to leave it with the uk to do such an important task? thanks. translation: iama translation: i am a political man and i can well imagine that the prime minister who is also of a politician, believes that when he said to president juncker this morning, i was part of this phone call, where we approve the agreement was reached last night. he has faith in his ability to convince the majority needs in the house of commons, that is all i can say to stop he said that based on this agreement and the
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explanations he intends to give, that he has confidence in his ability to win that vote. that is all i can say that. then on ireland and northern ireland, from the get 90, and northern ireland, from the get go, the first day we have been aware that this is a unique situation. we have always said there is clearly to you. and this unique situation must be dealt with using exceptional solutions. and so, all of the questions which are technical, the task force can table. a will be available in the days to come to a nswer available in the days to come to answer your questions. to explain the exceptional procedures which have been established, to come up with a solution for an exceptional situation. obviously, the british
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authorities in northern ireland have been working on this together with us been working on this together with us and wanting to do so. for example, in customs. thank you. thank you very much, bbc news as you say, we have been here before. if this deal does not pass through parliament, as that as far as the eu is prepared to go? is this finally the final deal? translation: why are you asking me to answer questions that do not arise? he can‘t of course ask the question. the question you‘re asking is a hypothesis. that mrjohnson is not looking for and we do not decide either, we are working on an
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agreement which is likely to meet approval and ratification of both sides. we have had a line that we set from the outset. and an attitudes, let me remind you, for those who have come to this part way through this very long period of three years, i have always avoided working or talking on the basis of emotion or passion. even though i note that sometimes that is not being missing, emotion or passion. i have worked on facts, and they got basis, unreality. to come up with objectives, a legally solid operational responses to the cou ntless operational responses to the countless albums thrown up by practice, practically across the board. specifically in ireland and
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northern ireland. —— countless problems. once again, there is a marginfor problems. once again, there is a margin for addition or further detail. i would like for northern ireland... buti detail. i would like for northern ireland... but i think in today‘s agreement, it balances the best possible one after all the various adjustments that we have made. and major changes, particularly for ireland and northern ireland, we for oui’ ireland and northern ireland, we for our part, have accepted that we remove the backstop and we replace it with a new approach. i said this was a cornerstone and this justifies the consent procedure, by the way. for this edition are to be found for ireland and northern ireland to be sustainable, it has to meet with democratic support. i think it is
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legitimate that this democratic support be barely by regular, that is one of the conditions. so, there have been changes, but we have maintained the line in the interest of the united kingdom wishing to leave the european union and the customs union and that of the european union which wishes to remain as it is, a strong single market, which is much more than a free—trade area. i think we have come up with a good, dynamic compromise, if i can describe it, between the united kingdom and ourselves, that‘s all i can say. yes. sorry. some from the financial times. i wa nt to some from the financial times. i want to ask about the customs arrangements. you said that the uk authorities can apply their own system of tariffs compared with eu
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rates as long as there is not a risk of those products entering the single market. how does this text establish what is at risk and not at risk of entering the single market? the second question, looking back over the last week, what would you assessis over the last week, what would you assess is the key turning point where you felt that a deal was actually possible? certainly by the time we reached the weekend, things we re time we reached the weekend, things were looking a little bit dicey, to put it mildly. where do you think the key turning point came with mac which unlocked the deal? thank you. on the question of the risk to the single market, it‘s true, there is a possibility that goods which arrive from great britain and northern ireland orfrom from great britain and northern ireland or from a from great britain and northern ireland orfrom a third from great britain and northern ireland or from a third country by a great britain as part of future
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trade agreements that the uk makes with other countries, that these goods might not stay in the customs territory of the united kingdom and northern ireland, might leave northern ireland, might leave northern ireland, might leave northern ireland to then go across the border, entering the single market. that risk exists and that is why, together with the uk, we have come up with a mechanism to assess these cases where there may be such a risk or not. and the decision on this risk will be based on a number of criteria. i can give you an overview. that will be the work of thejoint committee. overview. that will be the work of the joint committee. firstly, overview. that will be the work of thejoint committee. firstly, what is the final destination of these goods? if they are consumer goods and there is no problem, fine. if
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they are goods which may be industrial goods which may be further processed in northern ireland and would then go elsewhere, perhaps in the republic of ireland 01’ perhaps in the republic of ireland or immediately without protesting entering the single market, that is a question that will apply as a criteria to every consignment of goods. the value of the goods and the risk of infringement of rules in place, these are all decisions that will be taken in great detail by the joint committee, namely by both the eu and the uk, based on the expertise of competent officials. and with cannot totally eliminate the risk that we can try to manage it. you asked about a turning point.
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if we just look at the last 15 days 01’ if we just look at the last 15 days orso, if we just look at the last 15 days or so, together with the british tea m or so, together with the british team led by david frost, the ambassador and by all of the team, whom we thanked, every single member of the team that i have headed up have been exceptional. we have had a great number of meetings. we call them technical meetings but i know there‘s often a lot of politics behind them. all of these meetings we re very behind them. all of these meetings were very useful in helping us to understand what the other side wa nts. understand what the other side wants. the uk team has understood what we mean when we say protection of the single market, consumers and companies. what we mean when we refer to new border on the island of
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ireland. i think the turning point, andi ireland. i think the turning point, and i would like to thank the irish taoiseach for this, and i would remind you that i have also been negotiating over the last three yea rs on negotiating over the last three years on the half of the republic of ireland part of the eu and the single market, the irish taoiseach has a special response ability and he is respected and we listen to him asa he is respected and we listen to him as a member of the eu but on the half of the irish government, a co—guarantor of the good friday agreement together with the uk, we decided to meet in liverpool a few days ago and it was following that meeting that we were able to cover for ireland and northern ireland,
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able to make headway. it was accepted that there would be no customs checks between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, and we were part of trying to find and we were part of trying to find an intelligent solution to the problems there and the uk prime minister and the irish taoiseach came up with the solution to ensure democratic support and support in northern ireland. it is important this new protocol, this new approach must be a sustainable one, must be supported and verified in a democratic way by the northern ireland assembly. i apologise for going on at length but i could see that there was mutual could well in
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wishing to find a solution to the most sensitive issues, ensuring the peace in ireland. thank you. lorenzo. translation: i would like to ask a question about the consent procedure. what happens if at one stage, the northern ireland assembly decides that it no longer wishes to adhere to european rules? there would be no guarantees? lastly, on vat, vat was mentioned as a problem that arose at the last minute but we don‘t know what happened. what is going to happen with vat?
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translation: on vat finally other night we came up with an agreement and he will see that on detail. there was a point concerning the need for consistency between various vat rates for everyday consumables, for ordinary citizens, and for certain categories of these products there will be no difference between there will be no difference between the supply, sometimes they will be zero duty. in the republic of ireland. whereas next door in northern ireland it would have to be the same. we had to come up with a mechanism to allow that consistency between rates. so the european system would apply. on that premise, in northern ireland. we were concerned about the consistency between the systems. obviously, for all businesses, which are paying a lot of attention to that, both in northern ireland and ireland, there
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is consistency with what we describe at the single market for goods, which would apply in northern ireland. i‘ve forgotten your first question, actually. consent! i certainly have no reason to forget that. what was sketched out in the discussion between the irish taoiseach and the british prime minister would be regular verification. this new approach, this new protocol would be supported, therefore, democratically. after the end of the transition period, so that should be the end of 2020, or 2021 or 2022 of the end of 2020, or 2021 or 2022 of the transition period is extended, they were then would be a four—year
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period in which the new approach, the new protocol would be established on the conditions set out therein legal terms in this d raft out therein legal terms in this draft treaty. out therein legal terms in this d raft treaty. at out therein legal terms in this draft treaty. at the end of the four—year period, the members of the northern ireland assembly will have an opportunity to vote on the basis ofa simple an opportunity to vote on the basis of a simple majority for the system to be continued. if there is a cross community vote, as it is described, for the positive votes, this could be an eight—year extension. if we are talking about a simple majority, it would be four years and then four yea rs it would be four years and then four years after that, the same procedure would apply. if a negative vote is cast, they would be a prior notice 01’ cast, they would be a prior notice or cooling off period of two years. before the new protocol is set aside. during that two years we will
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work with recommendations from the joint committee to introduce a measure so that quite simply on our side, we can ensure the single market is detected. it is members of the northern ireland assembly which, every four years, will bear the responsibility of taking the decision and maintaining the system or breaking it off. that will be their responsibility. that is also why this new approach, which has nothing to do with the backstop that has been abandoned, this new approach set up a system in ireland which respects various points which in another language were difficult to reconcile that we have on a
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sustainable basis. this protocol is sustainable basis. this protocol is sustainable and that is why, ladies and gentlemen, this sustainability is linked to democratic and political ownership of this in northern ireland. we know how to place our trust in the system and those who will be managing it so that on the basis of that, democratic verification can be maintained over time in the interests of citizens, businesses in northern ireland, ireland and also in the single market. just one more announcement for you. at 2:15pm, jean—claude juncker and borisjohnson will be meeting here and they will also be with the negotiators of the deal. of course, the chief negotiator will be there as well so there will clearly be a photo opportunity and we will send an advisory as well. thank you very
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much. translation: thank you for your attention, i will see you soon. and there you see michel barnier outlining how he sees the deal and also taking some questions from the press. i am joined also taking some questions from the press. iamjoined by also taking some questions from the press. i am joined by chris morris who has been across all things brexit. great to have you, chris. talk is through a little bit of how you have seen michel barnier, perhaps his tone and his main points. partly relief, i think. he was here a year ago with another agreement which he thought was the done deal. this is the latest one. i guess the big picture, when borisjohnson became prime minister, everyone said, you are not going to be able to draw up a withdrawal agreement, he has, you‘re not going to be able to get rid of a irish backstop, he has. you are not going to get a deal
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by the end of october, he has. however you dress it up, this does set upa however you dress it up, this does set up a de facto border for both customs and cheques, regulatory checks on goods, down the irish sea within the united kingdom between great britain and northern ireland. that is why it appears that the dup, a vote that he needs in a vote in parliament, those votes aren‘t necessarily on—board, particularly because we have the test here of the agreement. though ahead. the text makes clear that any vote in the northern ireland assembly approving new arrangements will be by a simple majority. in other words, arrangements will be by a simple majority. in otherwords, no arrangements will be by a simple majority. in other words, no single community, unionist or nationalist, will have a veto. that will be problematic for the dup. the government will say that article four of the new protocol on northern ireland, northern ireland as part of
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the customs territory of the united kingdom and that is key. it means nothing in this protocol, it says, will prevent the united kingdom from concluding agreements with a third country which grant goods produced in northern ireland preferential access to the market in the same way asa access to the market in the same way as a goods produced in the rest of the uk. in other words, northern ireland will leave the eu customs union and take part in trade deals around the world. but they will be de facto, if not legally, de facto a border down the irish sea for customs and goods, and that will be seen as an impediment to trade with the united kingdom, especially by the united kingdom, especially by the dup. the leader arlene foster said it was a blood red line for her. now to my next guest, president of the brexit party, nigel farage. very curious to hear whether you are
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satisfied with this deal. it is no time for everyone to look at the text. it is just not brexit. we take three and a half years to get to this point and if this was to be agreed, we then enter into years more negotiations for the prize of a free trade agreement, which we already know we will not get unless we surrender our territorial fishing waters and we will not get unless we stay in regulatory alignment with the european union. that means we will not be making our own laws in our own country on employment regulations, environment and many other things. so, frankly, regulations, environment and many otherthings. so, frankly, i regulations, environment and many other things. so, frankly, i think we‘ve probably just other things. so, frankly, i think we‘ve probablyjust on the easy bit for the last three and a half years. the next bit will be even harder and, look, it is a new eu treaty, it binds us into so many other commitments on foreign policy, military policy, a list as long as
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your arm. military policy, a list as long as yourarm. i military policy, a list as long as your arm. ifrankly military policy, a list as long as your arm. i frankly think it should be rejected. i think the best way out of this would be simply to have a clean break and on ireland, well, the backstop... by the backstop... by clea n the backstop... by clean break... sorry for interrupting you but we want our viewers to understand where you are coming from. you would be advocating, instead of people voting for this deal, that they reject it and there is a no—deal brexit and britten leave the eu on the 31st of october? i would very much like us to leave on the 31st of october but i understand the act has been passed which makes it impossible. it is a new european treaty which is frankly very bad for us. would i prefer to have an extension and general election? i will always go for the latter option. i genuinely believe that a clean break, to be able to be competitive is absolutely key to our future economic success. we cannot
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do that with his new treaty and borisjohnson do that with his new treaty and boris johnson can get do that with his new treaty and borisjohnson can get do what he likes but we will never be able to properly break free of the eu if we sign up to this. well, you know, he would have a different take on it also. many financial predictions without a deal could be catastrophic for the uk, also ireland and the netherlands in particular. i don‘t know whether you will do this but if he were to give advice to borisjohnson to try to get the dup on board, what would that be? borisjohnson spoke at their conference last year, saying no conservative prime minister would ever put an internal border between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom and that is exactly what he has done. i think it‘s going to be very difficult to get the dup on board, given that effectively they‘ve been hived off, almost annexed out of the european union. they will be no frictionless trade between the united kingdom and northern ireland.
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but we know, nigel farage, we‘ve had the discussion about the backstop which of course scuppered to may‘s deal going forward and now we have these alternative arrangements, if we wa nt these alternative arrangements, if we want to call it that. if there we re we want to call it that. if there were some other easier solution to avoid a hard border between the republic and northern ireland, surely someone would have come up with it now? they talk about technological solutions or trusted traders that the technology or the plans are simply not there yet, they haven‘t been tested anywhere in the world. what would you recommend? i think the european union put forward a problem to which they thought they would never accept any answer. if we leave on a wto brexit, everyone has had, including the irish taoiseach and michel barnier, that would not be the attachment of a hard border. that would be a lot simpler than
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where we are now. good to have your thoughts. nigel farage talking about an election. he is the leader of the brexit party and obviously would like a harder brexit than appears to be in this deal. it is online, 60 pages, not as long as the first withdrawal agreement. the first was about 600 pages and this is about 60, so you can get it quite quickly but it has to be translated and combed through with a fine tooth comb for all those leaders of the eu. why don‘t we get the business reaction now from that news that they have a deal, depending on who you are, depends how good you think that deal is. i wa nt to how good you think that deal is. i want to hear from the ceo of o2. first your reaction to this deal that we are hearing about? i think the first thing to say as it isa i think the first thing to say as it is a positive thing. the house of commons will have a specific proposal to evaluate, they will conclude whether this is the right thing for the uk but irrespective of
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what they decide, i think what britain needs is brilliant connectivity, mobile connectivity, and that is why we have committed to launch our 5g server today and have 20 by the end of the year and 50 cities connected by the end of 2020. alongside you we wait in anticipation to what the house has decided. i know people might be excited about sg i know people might be excited about 56 but i know people might be excited about 5g but a lot of people might be thinking about, when it comes to brexit, whether roaming charges will be affected? what can you tell your customers if this deal does go ahead? customers if this deal does go ahead ? what does customers if this deal does go ahead? what does it mean when i am, for example, on the eurostar and i hit france? well i get roaming charges? i very much hope not. we have been public in our commitment. we want to maintain free roaming across europe unlike any commitment, we need that to be signed off on our counterparts across europe. the majority of them
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have been waiting for the brexit agreement to go through and they went will then finalise the position. what difference will it make to your business if this deal is rejected? i think business if this deal is rejected? ithink any business if this deal is rejected? i think any business leader struggles with uncertainty. so, you know, we invested £2 million a day into british infrastructure and like any business, what we need are the rules we can operate to. we have been on hiatus for over three years soi been on hiatus for over three years so i ask would be if the house of commons conclude this is not the right step forward for the uk then be crystal clear about what the next steps a re be crystal clear about what the next steps are because i think the general public and industry as a whole do not want to see us continue spending. evaluate the proposition, decide whether it is the right deal for us as the uk and if it‘s not, be
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crystal clear about the what the next steps are because we need to move forward. with this particular deal as it is announced, what are the things you are thinking about for your customers? does it make any difference for the day—to—day running? you are spot on, i‘m thinking about connectivity for my customers, whether that is a 5g service or the proposal we have put to government about improved rural coverage. we wa nt to ta ke about improved rural coverage. we want to take geographical landmass coverage from around 70% to 95%. irrespective of how brexit plays out, our focus is irrespective of how brexit plays out, ourfocus is on irrespective of how brexit plays out, our focus is on customers and brilliant connectivity. thank you so much for speaking to us. we are going to stay tuned for the roaming charges. many people in the roaming charges. many people in the uk curious as to how that will affect them going forwards. thanks to the ceo of o2.
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affect them going forwards. thanks to the ceo of 02. i want to run through some of the lines coming into us during these breaking news hours. they have a deal. british prime minister boris johnson hours. they have a deal. british prime minister borisjohnson has announced. we have been hearing from chief negotiator michel barnier for the eu, going through some of the details. if a minister believes it is the best deal for the uk and mps should get behind it. michel barnier says we need to reconcile two objectives, avoiding a hard border that we have been talking about, and protecting the integrity of the single market. i have the reality check chris morris with me. taking a look forward to saturday, do we think that this deal could get done? i would like to turn to that issue of the integrity of the single market that michel barnier brought up. what is he talking about?
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he is basically talking about not having a leaky hole in the single market where products the eu doesn‘t wa nt market where products the eu doesn‘t want or hasn‘t checked to its standards can somehow leak into the market from outside, especially if the uk decides to diverge in its regulations on, for example, environmental or food safety. to begin with the regulations will be identical but if borisjohnson‘s government or any future government decides to divert than any goods in the british market would need to be checked carefully before going into the european market, and that has concerned other countries. they are talking about the level playing field, making sure the uk doesn‘t intend in the future to undercut their regulations and become rather an aggressive, large economic competitor on their doorstep. you have been taking a look of the d raft you have been taking a look of the draft text on the european council website. we have put it on twitter.
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anything dramatically different as you look at it from previous withdrawal agreements? nothing that we haven‘t been talking about in the last few days. the main difference, obviously, is the irish has gone. it is replaced by this deal customs system whereby the legal vote for customs between northern ireland and ireland and therefore in the future of brexit happens between the uk and the eu will be the land border in ireland. the practical checks will take place within the uk along the irish sea, between great britain and northern ireland. that is one of the reasons why the dup in northern ireland are unhappy with what is going ahead. a lot will depend on the next few days, we are looking toward saturday in parliament, but a lot depends on how this will be sold. we‘ve heard from our political editor in the last few minutes who has been told from a source in downing street that
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borisjohnson would ask leaders at the summit to rule out a further delay. in other words, the summit to rule out a further delay. in otherwords, he the summit to rule out a further delay. in other words, he is expecting them to make clear to mps in westminster in effect it is this new deal or no deal. no further delays are possible. he is going to ask them to pile the pressure on mps to vote in favour of this deal. the dup are still unhappy, there are questions over the hard—core brexiteers in the conservative party and some questions, perhaps less about the rebel mps on the other end of the conservative party, and questions about how many labour mps might decide to cross the aisle and support boris johnson‘s deal might decide to cross the aisle and support borisjohnson‘s deal in the interests of getting brexit over the line? the numbers are extremely close and pretty difficult if he hasn‘t got the dup on board. you know when you say it is this deal or no deal, i hear echoes of his predecessor theresa may because
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how many times did she say that when she tried to get her through parliament, which failed three times. jeremy corbyn says prime ministerjohnson has negotiated an even worse deal than to may‘s which was overwhelmingly rejected. interesting that we had a few moments ago from nigel farage and if this deal goes through and there was to be an election shortly thereafter, borisjohnson will be under political attack from his right flank as well as the left. nigel farage is not going to support this deal. one of the things i think he is going to point to which it won‘t get much attention today is i think he mentioned, the new text we haveis think he mentioned, the new text we have is just over 60 think he mentioned, the new text we have isjust over 60 pages think he mentioned, the new text we have is just over 60 pages long. think he mentioned, the new text we have isjust over 60 pages long. the withdrawal agreement is 600 pages long. so 90% of theresa may‘s deal will remain in place. that includes the slightly less than £39 billion divorce bill that has been agreed to pay to the eu by uk on departure. it
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includes the transition period, which businesses welcome, for businesses after brexit to prepare for dispensation in the future. during that period, the uk will still be paying into the eu budget. for the foreseeable future, the money is still being paid. chris morris, don‘t go anywhere. we will continue speaking to you over the coming hours because of the news that the deal has been reached between the eu and uk. how much further will it go? will it get passed by parliament on saturday? stay with us here on the bbc because we will keep you up—to—date with every twist and turn.
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i‘m nuala mcgovern, in brussels — where the breaking news this afternoon is —the eu and the uk say they‘ve agreed a new brexit deal. as the prime minister heads to brussels — he says he‘s got a ‘great new deal that takes back control‘ — and he urges parliament to back it. the president of the european commission, jean claude juncker, hails the deal as a "fair and balanced agreement" the eu chief negotiatior on brexit, michel barnier, confirms both parties have delivered an acceptable compromise — with no hard border on the island of ireland. discussions over the past days have at times been difficult. but we have
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delivered and we have delivered together. but northern ireland‘s democratic unionist party has said it still can‘t back the deal "as things stand". labour leaderjeremy corbyn dismisses the deal — saying it‘s "even worse" than the one negotiated by theresa may. let‘s bring you some breaking news now, in the past hour, borisjohnson has announced that the uk and the eu have struck a brexit agreement. writing on twitter, the prime minister said ‘we‘ve got a great new deal that takes back control, now parliament should get
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brexit done on saturday so we can move on to other priorities.‘ well, the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, said it was a ‘fair and balanced agreement for the eu and the uk‘. however, the democratic unionist party in northern ireland — whose 10 votes the government might need to get the deal approved in the commons — have said in response that they remain opposed to the deal. but what‘s in the first, to avoid a hard border, northern ireland will remain aligned to a set of rules related to the eu‘s single market. the agreement says negotiators have found a way to avoid a customs border on the island of ireland, while ensuring northern ireland remains a part of the uk customs territory. and members of the northern irish assembly will have a say on the long—term application of eu law in northern ireland. the eu‘s chief negotiator michel barnier has welcomed a new brexit
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deal agreed between the eu and the uk. he said it will protect the peace process, offer northern ireland‘s politicians a say over the new arrangements every four years, and lead to a future free trade agreeement between the uk and the eu. mr barnier said he has faith in borisjohnson to get mps to approve the deal, which he admitted had been hard to achieve. translation: iama translation: i am a political man, i can well imagine that the prime minister, who is also a politician, believes that when he said to presidentjuncker this morning, i was part of this phone call, where we approved the agreement that was reached last night. he has faith in his ability to convince the majority needs in the house of commons, that is all i can say. he said that based on this
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agreement and the explanations he intends to give that he has confidence in his ability to win that vote. michel barnierjust speaking in the minutes go and are building just beside the sun. let us turn to our assistant political editor who has a lot to say on this issue and some gas with him, as well. thank you. they may have a deal in brussels, borisjohnson may think he has a deal, but here is westminster a deal is very far from concluded. because the dps said they are still unhappy and without their ten votes most people here think it is very hard to see how mrjohnson to get his agreement through the commons. jonny may is the lib dems leader. what prospect do you think has mrjohnson of getting a majority on saturday for his package? we do
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not even think there is going to be legal tax to put in front of the house of commons on saturday. because the prime minister has been so laid—back about trying to even do this negotiation. what is coming out of brussels is that he has actually managed to negotiate something that is even worse for our economy the much razor may had put forward. we are talking about an act of economic vandalism which would be worse for the economy that they financial crash was not —— to may. much of that dutyjobs, crash was not —— to may. much of that duty jobs, the crash was not —— to may. much of that dutyjobs, the amount of money people have in their pockets. that is not good for our country. that is by the public need to have a final cycle however borisjohnson try suggested that, liberal democrats are going to be arguing very pass genetically to make sure there are choices given to the public with the chance to remain in the opinion. do you want saturday‘s boat to go ahead? i am very happy for the house
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of commons to set on saturday. we are ina of commons to set on saturday. we are in a moment where there is a huge crisis but the 31st of october deadline and parliament absolutely should be holding the government to account. so, iam should be holding the government to account. so, i am very happy for us to set on saturday. of course, having a detailed discussion on something which is, we still have not in the legal tax for and still may not buy saturday, you know, that is not actually a bill deal. so, yes, we should set, which is hold the government to account under because it is important that parliament is able to put forward what is weezer on this, as well, on behalf of the millions of people in this country who are generally worried about what remains of public services, jobs and their children‘s pictures. we hear that boris johnson is going to say to eu leaders we have got a deal, now i want you to rule out the option of any further extension. i mean, that is him trying to balance the country and force the country into this. we are
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talking about generations to come, this is a hugely important moment in our country‘s history and we need to get this right. and yet, he is trying to rush it through. people need to be able to see the detail, they need to be able to discuss it and decide whether a not that is the right thing. as a liberal democrat, iam right thing. as a liberal democrat, i am absolutely clear the best delegate have is as members of the european union. but there are many mps that will want to look at is critically as many of them who have supported theresa may‘s deal are also worried about the additional hit to the economy that this would bring forward. so, those debates need to be happen in trying to say it is there so you crashed out with no deal, that is frankly balancing the country. he should not be playing that game. we heard this morning at the labour party seem poised to back an amendment if it is table to mrjohnson‘s deal if but on saturday for a so—called confirmatory referendum. that is a lwa ys confirmatory referendum. that is always been lost in previous votes.
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how do you assess the prospect of it succeeding, if it is tabled again?|j think succeeding, if it is tabled again?” think it is certainly possible. as liberal democrats we have tabled an amendment to the queen speech, which suggest that there should be a people‘s vote on any brexit deal and whether that is the theresa may deal with the latest one or whether indeed borisjohnson with the latest one or whether indeed boris johnson manages with the latest one or whether indeed borisjohnson manages to have illegally agreed deal. that should be put to the final say. —— legally agreed deal. so, we have since then see mps say that neighbours be prepared, if necessary, to have a public final say on the deal, so i think it is entirely possible that it could get over the line and it is something the liberal democrats have been arguing for rotary debit years. because we have always said that the decision should rest with the public, not just the decision should rest with the public, notjust the initial decision that was taken in 2016. but then to say now you know what it
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looks like you should be able to choose. just to clarify, what is your assessment of what is on? because we have dup saying they are still not aboard, we have boris johnson saying it is a deal. so, how do you assess what mrjohnson is doing and is there any scope, do think, for him to get dup on board? my think, for him to get dup on board? my best assessment of what is going on is that this is a case of emperors new close. borisjohnson is ina emperors new close. borisjohnson is in a desperate situation and, you know, he has made these rash promises, tries to suggest it would be easy to square the circle and instead he has found, many of the same challenges that theresa may found. he has come back with something that is a bit like theresa may‘s deal, but is a harder brexit, going to be worse for the economy and he is dressing it up and saying it is sparkly and great. it is the same damage the economy, the same old thing that theresa may was
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putting forward largely and he is trying to say that this is an somewhere different. to see whether he can tell they will over the eyes of the dup and people in the country. i do not think people will be filled by this. thanks very much for your time. due to uncertainty here at westminster is how this plays out of the next 48 hours or so. whether mrjohnson can‘t get the dup on board. if he cannot, the risks of having that vote on saturday facing possible defeat and if that vote goes ahead, is that the possibility that mps that had the numbers to force a confirmatory referendum on any deal? a huge amount to play for opening next 48 hours. thank you so much, norman. so undertake to hear the thoughts of the liberal democrat leader with you. we will go back to normal periodic leg, he is westminster first. you are here instead at the
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european council, 27 leaders making their way probably in the next hour so and then having a roundtable meeting at 3:30pm. as you have a hearing, deal has been agreed by both uk and the eu. why do we not picked apart elizabeth? question is me. great to have you met us. he had been taking a look throughout the morning at the 60 pages that has been released that borisjohnson is tweeting very happily about. also be have achieved negotiator michel barnier also saying that this is a great deal. he feels his pakistan. but they work does not end here. no, obviously most of the change —— he feels his work is done. a lot of it is rewriting the protocol on ireland and northern ireland, the better bout northern ireland in the withdrawal agreement which included what became known as the backstop. now, in this new borisjohnson deal, the backstop has gone. what replaces
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it, though, is something which both conservative politicians and the dup in northern ireland have said they we re in northern ireland have said they were never accepted, which is de fa cto. were never accepted, which is de facto. a border in the irish sea between northern ireland and great britain, for both customs checks and regulatory checks on goods. now, obviously the provider to that, this will be key for many conservatives, is that article four of this new push process northern ireland as pa rt push process northern ireland as part of the customs territory of the united kingdom. in other words, part of the customs territory of the united kingdom. in otherwords, even though the legal border will be, sorry the particle board above it down the irish sea, the illegal border but the between northern ireland and ireland. so, northern ireland and ireland. so, northern ireland to leave the eu customs union. —— the legal border. critically, for many tories, means northern ireland will be able to ta ke northern ireland will be able to take part, bill parts, and any breach trade agreement that the government subsequently does that other countries around the other
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issue which is problematic and has been problematic with the dup, who spoke as we know borisjohnson really needs and has a commons, is theissue really needs and has a commons, is the issue of consent. if northern ireland‘s economic relationship at the rest of the uk is to change, how do you a democratic approval for that? the dp wanted essentially to have a veto on that process. what this document lays out is that for yea rs this document lays out is that for years after the end of a transition period, in other words in 2024 it would be in effect, there would be a simple majority vote in the northern ireland assembly four stops, neither community, units or nationalist, would necessarily have a veto over that process. that is something they are that process. that is something they a re clearly that process. that is something they are clearly unhappy about. so, that would be five years down the line that we can subletting at a situation not that different to where we are right now. thank you so
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much for giving us some of that analysis. he is going to stay as well, but right now we‘re gradually our bbc two gears. thank you so much for joining our bbc two gears. thank you so much forjoining us and brexit coverage. —— we‘re going to leave our bbc two yea rs. —— we‘re going to leave our bbc two years. now, let us continue to talk about brexit. we wanted to back from brussels, er here with me in the european council, but let us go back to the palace of westminster and to our assistant political editor. what is happening where you are? i am joanjoined by is happening where you are? i am joan joined by michael gove. is happening where you are? i am joanjoined by michael gove. so, we have a deal, but i dealt the backing of the dup. it is a very good deal, it means we take back control of our money, boards and laws. the whole united kingdom leaves the european union as one country, whole and entire. that means the people of northern ireland can benefit from
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brexit, including the new free trade deals because negotiate. what about the dup? i think that everyone in the dup? i think that everyone in the house of commons as a look at the house of commons as a look at the steel and appreciate in all its dimensions the way in which it strengthens our united kingdom and the way in which it ensures that we all benefit economically, i think people have an opportunity to reflect. we will be talking to colleagues from all parties including the dup and i hope people see this is the best ever. so, you will put disabled on saturday regardless of whether they dup are happy with that? yes, we want to measure everyone has a chance to vote on the steel and we will be putting any hazard, shortly in order to meet on saturday. people across the countryjust to meet on saturday. people across the country just once to meet on saturday. people across the countryjust once brexit done. this provides a certain opportunity to honour the referendum and the best possible way. without the dup's ten votes, you lose. we are not konta betting defeat, we think this isa konta betting defeat, we think this is a good deal. would you be
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prepared to lose mp4, for the deal to be defeated for a first time?” think it's important to consider the merits. what is more important select at what this deal delivers. it ensures that, for example, the european court of justice it ensures that, for example, the european court ofjustice will end its jurisdiction european court ofjustice will end itsjurisdiction in this european court ofjustice will end its jurisdiction in this country. european court ofjustice will end itsjurisdiction in this country. it means we will be able to control who comes into this country, control fishing waters, get new trade deals and at the same time the backstop, which was a particular bone of contention, is gone. it is now the case of the future of northern ireland be decided pay majority of its people. would you be prepared to back to brussels and say you need to look at the issue of consent and how it is obtained instrument to try amid the dup‘s concerns? it is obtained instrument to try amid the dup's concerns? we are explaining how it is the consent at work. i think the conversations we will have over the next territory, i think people realise that in the
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democratically robust way of ensuring that these arrangements can only persist in the future. they ball away. they can only persist if the majority of people in northern ireland want them to. typically about the choice, if the deal is not approved, it is no deal? —— to be clear about. yes. even at the benn act kicks in on saturday? the government is clear. this is make your mind up time for the mps. we all mentally but the deal. this is a great deal and i would not to be an mp in great deal and i would not to be an mpina great deal and i would not to be an mp in a constituency which voted to leave going back to my constituents after this deal has been put forward saying, do know what? i did not back it. the only alternative now are staying in the eu are leaving that it. ijust do not think that would bea it. ijust do not think that would be a credible view as i know lots of colleagues agree with that. clarify for us, you have your deal now. you say we are leaving on october the 1st come what may, but obviously if you don‘t when the vote, the benn
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act kicks in. how do you avoid legally seeking a delay until january the 31st? we will see what happens in the next days. ultimately the choice has always been between three options. we can either stay in the eu,i three options. we can either stay in the eu, i think that designers demand in the referendum. buckley without a deal, of course that honours the mandate but there is economic disruption. 0r honours the mandate but there is economic disruption. or be delivered ago deal, that has to be the best option. michael gove, thank you for your time. there we have it, the boat will go ahead on saturday even if the government do not manage to bring on board the dup. it means, in short, we are heading for a titanic tussle here in westminster on saturdays and stop thank you so much, norman. it‘s here the these are in westminster. you are with me in brussels in the european council. iamjoined by in brussels in the european council.
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i am joined by a reporter at politico. i am i am joined by a reporter at politico. iam by i am joined by a reporter at politico. i am by glad to have you with us, you have been taking the temperature of the reaction of eu members, leaders when it comes to this deal that has been announced. what have you heard? i was just a little miss diplomats and i have heard that ambassadors from the eu 27 state said —— they are meeting right now to assess the deal. they will need to look at a lot of technicalities and look at what it means for their countries. so, technicalities and look at what it means fortheir countries. so, right now the mid seems to be very cautiously optimistic. emphasis on cautious, that is what i am hearing. in addition, we have had some public reactions remember of the european parliament, by example a conservative who said of course, this is a positive step. but they also need to analyse precisely what this deal means. and whether it means the criteria that they have set out in particular defending the integrity of the eu‘s singer market.
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we have also had some reactions from the french leadership, from present emmanuel macron who has said that this is a good deal, but he was also quite cautious, pointing to previous episodes in this brexit saggers. so, i think right now everyone is taking a step back, trying to analyse the text and see what it really means for them. for many of them, it will also have to be translated. it is 60 pages, yes much shorter than the original which was 600. but how do they do that practically, to get through that? they are quite under the gun. they are. i think that's beyond the transition itself which is mostly a formality itself, it is more about x factor each member state. they need to analyse what this means that the economy, trade policies, for their future. this means that the economy, trade policies, for theirfuture. this is not something that your average one diplomat holds on their own, it is
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something whole teams will do for every single country. i think they are working very fast, but also of course they do not want to approve something that later on they will realise something they do not like. either any countries that are more positive about this particular deal than others? i think it is too early to tell, because just as we are, they are reading the text right now, as well. so, i think we will beat and see of next to ours and of course here in brussels we are waiting for leaders to arrive here in this building in a few hours. also, iam in this building in a few hours. also, i am curious whether they are talking about, to you, i‘d date thinking further down the line, like saturday, whether the debit be accepted or rejected by the british parliament? i'm sure they are. at the end of the day, but quite some time it has been quite clear here in brussels at the main hurdle to a deal is not really at the negotiating table, but at parliament
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in london. also, when it comes to borisjohnson, do you have any idea of the relationship or the tone of the discussions? i do not have the exact tone of the current discussions, but from the letter that commission president jean—claude younger said this morning, it sounded like he was being quite positive and optimistic. so, we will have to wait and see exactly what happens next. and cute so much. ijust want exactly what happens next. and cute so much. i just want to exactly what happens next. and cute so much. ijust want to remind you of what we haven‘t hearing so far. borisjohnson has said that the uk and the eu have a great a great new deal on brexit. also, the prime minister is heading to brussels for crunch eu summit, as they happen hearing. we are hearing one line coming into us from brexiteer ian duncan smith. saying that he has concerns. particularly on how consent might work in northern
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ireland. now, that echo something that arlene foster, the leader of the dup, has said. there is really three issues that she was getting into that she felt was not working for them. one was consent, exactly how they decide whether to keep those arrangements were to be able to stop them if it was not working for northern ireland? the other was the customs union and the third one being the 18th. so, with those three issues we are beginning to hear from ian duncan smith who is be a leading voice when it comes to a harder type of brexit, echoing part of what we have with the du p. elizabeth earlier, speaking to somebody else who also was looking for a hardback that, it is the price the party leader as the name goes in the title, nigel farage. he told me why he wants to see this new deal which
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has just been agreed on between the eu and the uk rejected.” has just been agreed on between the eu and the uk rejected. i would very much like a slave on the 31st of october, but i understand that the benn act has been passed and that makes it impossible. was i rather acce pt makes it impossible. was i rather accept a new european treaty that is frankly very bad for us but i prefer to have an extension? and the general election? i would always go for the latter option. i genuinely believe that a clean break and being able to be competitive is the absolute key to our future economic suspects. we cannot do that with this new treaty. borisjohnson conservative likes, but we will never be able to properly break free of the eu if we sign up to this. —— can't say what he likes. many financial predictions without a deal could be started traffic for the uk and also ireland and the netherlands in particular. but if you wear, if
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you are to give advice to boris johnson to try and get the dup on board, what with that because boris johnson spoke at the conference last year, he said no conservative prime minister with ever put an internal border between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom and thatis the rest of the united kingdom and that is exactly what he has done. so, ithink that is exactly what he has done. so, i think it is going to be very difficult to get the dp on board. given that effectively they have been hived off, almost an out of the european union. there will be no frictionless trade between the uk and northern ireland. nigel farage sta rts and northern ireland. nigel farage starts begin to makejust and northern ireland. nigel farage starts begin to make just a little better earlier. so, iamjust wondering how they dup might respond and these coming hours. i want to bring it the response ofjeremy corbyn, he has already said that he and his party will reject the deal.
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saying it is worse in the previous offer that was made by theresa may. this is a day when the prime minister seems to have made a deal with the european union which does not give us the complete freedom of movement between britain and the island of ireland. it creates a custom unions border with the irish sea. secondly, it does nothing to deal with the concerns that we have ratio theresa may‘s premiership a ntes ratio theresa may‘s premiership antes about a waste to the bottom in bytes a nd antes about a waste to the bottom in bytes and protections and we believe the deal he has proposed attending britain in the direction of the deregulated society which will sell off national assets to american corporations. so, as it stands for cannot support that you develop or sit in parliament on saturday. it is also unclear if he has the support of his allies in the dup or many of his allies in his own backbenchers. jeremy corbyn speaking there. let us pick up on some of the points he was making. chris is here from the bbc‘s
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reality check. good to have you with us. so, jeremy corbyn very much saying he will not accept this deal, pushing back immediately really before the tax position published, he says it is a worse deal than theresa may. what do you think the sum of abortions and on saturday and that special setting of parliament? no surprise that labour will vote against him. when he says it is a worse deal than theresa may‘s deal, jeremy corbyn, it is worth remembering that 90% of the deal is basically the same. it is the same payment of financial settlement or divorce bill, the same at citizen‘s right. the same in a transition period after the main change is a protocol in ireland and of course some change in the non—binding political declaration which comes with their withdrawal agreement. i think that is one of the things that mr corbin was referring to. the sense that borisjohnson is looking
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for a much looser relationship in the future. hands with the rest of the future. hands with the rest of the eu. i think if we are to see... that is going to be one of the big themes at that election. if is it actually happens, a post brexit election could essentially be looked at by labour as we are offering you at by labour as we are offering you a soft brexit, i think conservatives are offering a harder brexit, which 21? that is not necessarily a bad place for labour to find that election from. but we have seen nipples at the moment, certainly suggesting that the tories are today well that the ban since boris johnson schemes power. that may be down the road. let us look at saturday for a moment. i know you have been looking at the arithmetic. let us talk about labour members within there, there are strange bedfellows when it comes to back such. he could be looking for a
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labour member to support him, explained who they are. they have has always been a handful, bought five i think, of labour mps who voted with the payments are on previous occasions when theresa may was prime minister. —— with the prime minister. they cite look, we need to get this done and finish. a lot of them from seats where a large number of people vertically. now, the question is how many of them might be prepared to vote for a deal put forward by boris johnson? might be prepared to vote for a deal put forward by borisjohnson? i think that suggestion that the labour front bench is going to push very hard, that this is a deal which could threaten workers‘ rights, makes it harder for labour could threaten workers‘ rights, makes it harderfor labour mps could threaten workers‘ rights, makes it harder for labour mps to vote with the prime minister. but if that eating, maybe have at the mitral but the payments. if you away the dp mps, the ten of them, they numbers are extremely tight without the dup.
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every hour there seems to be a development, so do stay here on the bbc as we continue to talk about brexit, the developments and the deal that has been agreed between the uk and the eu. iam here i am here with you in brussels at the european council building. as you have been hearing, borisjohnson has announced that the uk and eu have struck eight new brexit agreement, a deal. he was writing on twitter, i suppose it is how political announcements come out nowadays. he said: the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, also speaking out, saying it was a fairand also speaking out, saying it was a fair and balanced agreement for the eu and uk, however the dup, the
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democratic unionist party, whose ten votes the government might need to get the deal approved in the commons, has said in response that they remain opposed to the deal. what is in the agreement? first, northern ireland will be aligned to a set of rules that are related to the eu‘s single market. the agreement says that negotiators have found a way to avoid a customs border on the island of ireland while ensuring that northern ireland remains a part of the uk customs territory. and members of the northern irish assembly will have a say on the long—term application of eu law in northern ireland. the eu‘s chief negotiator michel barnier has welcomed the deal, saying it will protect the peace process, offer politicians in northern ireland is a say over arrangements every four yea rs say over arrangements every four years and lead to a future free trade agreement between the uk and
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the eu. michel barnier says he has faith in boris johnson the eu. michel barnier says he has faith in borisjohnson to get mps to approve the deal which he admitted has been hard to achieve. translation: i am a political man andi translation: i am a political man and i can imagine the prime minister, who is also a politician, believes that when he said to jean—claude juncker this morning, andi jean—claude juncker this morning, and i was part of this phone call, we have the agreement that was reached last night, has the ability to convince the majority he needs in the house of commons. that‘s all i can say. he said that based on this agreement and the explanations he intends to give that he has confidence in his ability to win that vote. michel barnier speaking a little bit earlier. it has actually got rather
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busyin earlier. it has actually got rather busy in here as they get ready for the leaders of the 27 member countries to meet, and go through the latest 60 pages that have been released. they have to be translated. they will see how it affects their country. the bbc‘s chris morris has been with us throughout the morning as there have been so many developments. now we have something certain, there is a deal. the devil is perhaps in the detail. a lot of the attention focusing on ten people, ten members of the dup. can you explain to our viewers what their issue is with the deal and why they say it is not a cce pta ble deal and why they say it is not acceptable to them as it stands? well, to get the deal done, boris johnson has had to make a lot of concessions to the eu over the last few days. for example, you know, he has accepted that northern ireland will continue to apply the eu‘s
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customs and tariff rules, and they will be overseen by the european court ofjustice. in effect that means they will be customs checks and checks on regulations between great britain and northern ireland. something both the tories and the dup have said in the past they could not accept. that is what he needed to do to get this deal done. of course, the more concessions you make to the eu, the more difficulty you have keeping both hardline tories on board and the dup on board. and the dup look, i think, at the proposals that have been made on customs and say, this clearly creates a difference economically between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. they are also concerned about the method of democratic approval in the future with the continuance of those arrangements. they wanted, in effect, to maintain what they argue under the good friday agreement would be a veto for their community
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over this change in arrangement. what is in the new protocol on ireland is all you would need four yea rs ireland is all you would need four years after a transition period after brexit would be a simple majority in the northern ireland assembly. that means a simple majority in the unionist, anti—unionist and nationalist community. consent and customs, and we understand the dup are not happy. it is fascinating, these negotiations, what makes the difference. we are hearing that prime minister borisjohnson will be arriving in the next hour. he is going to give a statement i believe at 2:15pm. we are hearing that from the press conference that michel barnier was giving a little bit earlier. we are going to give you that life and we are expecting that in the next hour. we have been flipping between the
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action here in brussels but also in westminster, because now that they have the deal here and the eu leaders need to take a look at the text, but a lot of people looking to see whether the deal could actually be approved in the special setting thatis be approved in the special setting that is taking place next saturday. let‘s turn to norman smith. that is taking place next saturday. let's turn to norman smith. thanks very much indeed. a tough no—nonsense message from michael govein no—nonsense message from michael gove in the past 50 minutes saying they saturday 13 goes ahead with or without the support of the dup. and if the government loses, as they may va ry if the government loses, as they may vary about do if they don‘t get the support of the dup, borisjohnson will take britain out of the eu on october 31. in other words, the choice facing mps, in the view of number ten, is boris johnson‘s choice facing mps, in the view of number ten, is borisjohnson‘s deal or no deal. what are we to make of that? i‘m joined by the leader of the snp at westminster, ian
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blackford. i have to say, that isjust bluff and bluster from the prime minister and bluster from the prime minister and michael gove and quite frankly i'm surprised that is the line they are taking because the simple fact of the matter is parliament has already legislated that on the absence of a deal, we put through the benn act act that indicates to the benn act act that indicates to the prime minister he's got to send a letter to the european union on saturday evening asking for an extension to keep us in the european union post the end of october. that is the law of the land. i have pointed out to the prime minister a numberof times he pointed out to the prime minister a number of times he is not above the law. if he doesn't do so, the government will find itself in court probably on monday morning. the government has got to stop trying to bully people and suggest they have developed for this deal or no deal, because that is not the reality of the situation. borisjohnson could the situation. boris johnson could go the situation. borisjohnson could go to eu leaders and say, look, we‘ve spent three yea rs and say, look, we‘ve spent three years trashing this out, we‘ve got a deal. you‘d now rule out any extension and if the eu say they are
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not prepared to think about an extension, the benn act becomes null and void. it is possible that could be the case but the european union doesn‘t wa nt case but the european union doesn‘t want us to leave on a no deal basis. that is clear. they will give us the time we need to resolve this. i would say to the other opposition parties we have the safe landing place, we have the extension we can get through the benn act, now let‘s bring forward a motion of no confidence, let‘s put this government on notice. let‘s have an election. let‘s see if we can come back with a parliament that can deal with the crisis and i have to say is the leader of the snp in westminster, we have been clear that scotla nd westminster, we have been clear that scotland has no desire to be taken out of the european union. we want to make sure that we fight this election on the basis of staying in the european union. the best deal for all of us throughout the uk and in particular the right of the people of scotland to determine
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their own future and not be taken out of the european union by boris johnson or anyone else. you might call it bluff and bluster but it will certainly place huge pressure on the dup in particular, who will have to face real criticism of the deal goes down. isn‘t it quite possible that borisjohnson could secure a majority by this no—nonsense, ha rd—nosed could secure a majority by this no—nonsense, hard—nosed approach? we will have to wait and see what happens on saturday. all the indication is the dup are not for budging and some of the arg members of the conservative party will not vote for this either so we will have to wait and see what happens on saturday but all the indications are at the moment that the proposition the government has put forward, which is worse than theresa may's deal, is not going to get the support of the house of commons. so, how does this play out if it goes the way you want it? what we want to see is this being defeated because, let's be clear, this so—called deal that boris
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johnson is bringing forward is going to be economically damaging. it is going to put people on the dole and quite frankly it is a price not worth paying. the deal has to be blocked on saturday. i want is to bring forward an election. i want to make sure article 50 process is extended. we are prepared to move on that over the next few days. the government has previously suggested it would accept a vote of no confidence from the scottish national party and i would ask the other opposition to show leadership. we are prepared to end boris johnson's days as prime minister of the united kingdom. ian blackman, thanks very much for your time. stock options opening up here. if it goes to plan for team johnson he will get his deal through parliament and we leave on october the 31st. the other route— the deal goes down, the benn act kicks in, vote of confidence is triggered and borisjohnson is vote of confidence is triggered and boris johnson is facing vote of confidence is triggered and borisjohnson is facing a general election. this is very, very far
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from resolved. thanks very much to norman in westminster. we will be checking in with him through the coming hours. we have been speaking about the prime minister who needs the support of the dup, the democratic unionist party, if he is to win the parliament‘s approval in time for his 31st of october deadline. why have the dup rejected the plans? let‘s ta ke have the dup rejected the plans? let‘s take a look together. they say they cannot accept it what has been suggested on the customs checks being implemented between northern ireland and the mainland of the uk. the dup say they are concerned about the consent that northern ireland would have to that. and they third issueis would have to that. and they third issue is really that they would not be wholly part of the uk vat regime because they would be following the
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customs union. earlier the president of the european council, donald tusk, gave his reaction to this new deal, saying he would prefer not to have to agree to it but it was better than a no deal scenario. let me bring in our guest. i‘ve spoken to you a number of times on the past. lovely to have you back in brussels instead of in london. you have been following closely what the german chancellor has been saying. what do you make of it? angela merkel wants to get rid of this problem because everybody else does. they are sick and tired of the brexit rigmarole. they have been keeping a very neutral background to this. they were very sort of low— key, this. they were very sort of low—key, not trying to stir up any
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problems. they have said yes, we will reach a reasonable agreement that it will reach a reasonable agreement thatitis will reach a reasonable agreement that it is better to go for britain with a deal than without. they have been very statesman—like and statesman woman like. they wanted to keep this on the straight and narrow. she didn‘t waste any time bringing up she didn‘t waste any time bringing up northern ireland, saying she would not allow a return to violence or hatred in northern ireland. that was just after the dup or hatred in northern ireland. that wasjust after the dup had issued a statement saying that they would reject the deal. i‘m wondering how they go forward if in fact boris johnson does not get the numbers to approve this deal in westminster at the weekend. do you think they are thinking about that? of course they know that, they were not born yesterday, particularly not angela merkel, who has been in the job longer than anybody else. she is the most experienced person. of course, she wants to emphasise what
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is at stake here for everybody. for the european union, this is peace in ireland on both sides of the imaginary border. this is of the utmost importance. that is what they want. they are not going to agree to anybody that would... we have been there, back and forth. they will not do anything to jeopardise that, and thatis do anything to jeopardise that, and that is absolutely clear. that is the red line of the eu. this convoluted deal that they have found with borisjohnson, convoluted deal that they have found with boris johnson, which convoluted deal that they have found with borisjohnson, which takes some mental arithmetic and jumping over your own sort of rationality, that is the best that could be done under the circumstances but there is no going back on that. no going back on that. i thought there was interesting during the michel barnier press conference, one of the journalists asked whether this was the final deal. he was slightly irritated. if it is rejected, what do you think would
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happen? the ball is back in borisjohnson‘s cought. he would have to figure out what to do next. then we are in extension country. he would have to say, sorry about this. i tried but i couldn‘t get it through. we remember theresa may, we‘ve been there and done that. then they would have to go into prolongation and it would have to be resolved. he would have to resolve that because the eu has been found that —— has been found that this is britain‘s problem. i think we saw that, michel barnier batting it back out of the council chambers. thank you forjoining us, shedding light on some of the eu leaders the woods when it comes to this deal that we have been following. let us now cross over to a london newsroom. we can now speak to the ceo of eurostar. great to have you with us. i‘m curious, i know this deal has to
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go to the parliament on saturday, does it make any difference to your customers? i think it will be good to get a good deal through in terms of consumer confidence so we hope it would be progressed. conversely, we work hard with governments and control authorities either side of the channel to make sure we are in the channel to make sure we are in the best possible position, given a possible no deal. yes, we are in a position where our safety licenses and operating certification, the free travel of our staff across borders has been put in place. we are prepared for a no deal position but we would clearly prefer for a deal to be put forward in terms of underlying confidence in the economy. i took the eurostar here and, you know, it is a process that you go through security and passports. i was thinking, wow, this could get a rather long queue or a line if in fa ct rather long queue or a line if in fact they were outside of the eu. how do you predict it is going to
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work on both sides if in fact britain has left the european union and we are talking about going into and we are talking about going into a completely different jurisdiction? what is critical in terms of the station experience you had is the use of the electronic gates. there has been a decree passed in france and endorsed by the european commission that allows those electronic gates to be used, regardless of the outcome. for eurostar, that was a critical starting point. we feel comfortable that given that, people should get a similar station experience and should be able to pass reasonably sea mlessly should be able to pass reasonably seamlessly through those passport and border controls that you had this morning. i have an irish passport, probably people can figure out from my accent, but i was wondering as i looked at it because they did move me over one day with a european passport. would it be different queues for those with a british passport? and how many more staff are you going to have two higher if
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you are going to make that a smooth experience? there won‘t be a differentiated experience. we have had confirmation from the european commission that they won‘t be any wet stamping as people pass through the border. it is going to be a pretty similar experience. they could be 48 hours or 72 hours of bedding in, i suspect that would materialise and we would put in contingency plans for that eventuality. we are now reliant on the politicians to finalise this deal. i‘m curious as well, mike, just before you go, if this deal is not approved on saturday, is detrimental for your business? no, it‘s not. as i said earlier, it‘s not good for underlying can consumer sentiment and that can have an impact on any purchase and peoples decision to spend a weekend
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in paris together. it doesn‘t alter the economics of the business and the economics of the business and the operation of the business day today, given the contingency plans we re today, given the contingency plans were put in place, as i explained earlier. thank you so much, mike. ceo of eurostar. i also want to bring in a twitter message from our chief political correspondent, vicky young, who has been over in westminster. let‘s see how that arithmetic looks when it comes to those votes for borisjohnson. there when it comes to those votes for boris johnson. there is when it comes to those votes for borisjohnson. there is a lot of adding and subtracting. it sounds like there could be ten votes subtracted from the potential, he needs 322 have that particular plan approved. as we have been hearing.
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-- 320. approved. as we have been hearing. —— 320. some of the issues that the dup has outlined. one is the state of the customs union, as chris morris as explained to us so eloquently. another part is the issue of consent, when they have a say on the arrangement continuing or stopping and the third one, which really reared its head last night, and that is vat. they are three of the sticking points which are pretty big ones and according to vicky young, and we have been hearing from people she has been speaking to, that in fact they will not go ahead and vote on saturday. bad news for borisjohnson as he begins to make his way to brussels. speaking in brussels within the last hour, there has been the eu‘s chief negotiator who we will bring you in just a moment but let me turn to my colleague back in our london
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newsroom. thank you very much. we have just been hearing in the last few seconds that boris johnson been hearing in the last few seconds that borisjohnson has arrived in brussels. we are expecting to see him in front of the camera is a little later on this afternoon. earlier the chief brexit negotiator michel barnier appeared before reporters to talk through the key for points he said that both sides in this negotiation had to reconcile, that included, for example, they consent issue. he said that there had to be a long—term democratic support of relevant eu rules in northern ireland. vat was another issue. another was an legally operative solution. let‘s listen to what he had to say a short time ago. northern ireland will remain in the uk's northern ireland will remain in the uk‘s customs territory. it will
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therefore benefit from the uk‘s future trade policy. northern ireland will also remain an entry point into a single market. so what have we done to square this circle? uk authorities can apply uk tariffs on products coming from a third country, so long as those goods entering northern ireland are not at risk of entering a single market. for goods at risk of entering the single market, uk authorities will apply the eu‘s tariffs. michel barnier also warned that without gratification there will not bea without gratification there will not be a withdrawal period. translation: formally approve
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without the possibility to ratify. yes, as i said in my presentation, there should be no surprises here. much of the final text can also be found in the agreement that was put forward almost a year ago, so the priority will give to citizens‘ rights, certain financial matters, amongst others. there are some new elements, including on ireland and northern ireland, which i imagine what interest you the most and in the political declaration as well. answering yes to your question, what idid to answering yes to your question, what i did to ensure that member states would be well informed. we have had
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several meetings with 27 of the ambassadors and yesterday i met them again and previous days i met them. isaid again and previous days i met them. i said something very important over the past three years with the support ofjean—claude juncker we have been working with full transparency and in constant dialogue. we have been building this together. it has been built together with uk, this agreement. that is why iam with uk, this agreement. that is why i am confident that it can be supported and ratified in the time between now and the 31st of october. meanwhile jean—claude juncker has given his reaction to the deal. are you happy with the deal?
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we can be happy. i have had the per minister on the phone this morning and said well done. is this going to get through parliament, do you think? iam not parliament, do you think? i am not in charge of the parliament. should the people of northern ireland be content with what is on offer? i think so. earlier donald tusk gave reaction to the deal, saying he would prefer not to have to agree to it but it was a better scenario than ano it but it was a better scenario than a no deal. it is better than no deal but i am not happy. i am here it is better than no deal but i am not happy. lam here because it is better than no deal but i am not happy. i am here because this deal is better than no deal. is this good for the people of northern ireland? yes, i northern ireland? yes, lam northern ireland? yes, i am quite sure that the recommendations of the commission with the positive assessment of the irish taoiseach, this is, for me, for our citizens, the continent but also in ireland, this deal is ok.
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otherwise i would never have accepted it. donald tusk. in a moment the bbc knew that 1pm with christian fraser in brussels and ben brown here in london. first let‘s have a look at the weather forecast. another day for dodging the downpours. some showers, heavy in places. this is high—pressure. this is monday into the start of next week, things turning more settled for a time. maybe not for long, but a brief window of dry weather is on the way. today, although some of us have had some sunshine and clouds have had some sunshine and clouds have been developing and showers breaking out across western parts of the uk, the low pressure stays with us today, tomorrow and through the weekend. plenty of showers on the way. most of them today have been across the western part of the uk. a
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batch across south—east england into east anglia but much of north—east england will be staying dry this afternoon, across the far north of scotla nd afternoon, across the far north of scotland and the northern isles. some showers are heavy and thundery, with a gusty wind through northern ireland and the coast of wales along with western and southern england, stronger winds towards the south coast and channel islands overnight with 50 mph gusts and heavy showers expected. some putting into north—east england overnight, the northern scotland staying mainly dry and temperatures 5—9dc. tomorrow, sun and showers from the word go, quite heavy towards the south—east of england. an area of showers playing close to northern scotland but lighter winds here with gusty winds towards wales, south—west england and along the south coast with a further heavy showers on the way. the big picture going into the weekend, it is still low pressure in charge. it is right across us as
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well so again, they will be some heavy showers around with longer spells of rain putting three parts of scotla nd spells of rain putting three parts of scotland into northern england and scotland particularly turning colder in what will be a northerly wind coming in and around that area of low pressure. beginning to feel colder over the weekend as well. this is how centre is shaping up. low pressure moving out into the north sea with most of the showers bowing up north sea with most of the showers popping up here. more places getting into that northerly breeze as well so temperatures coming down a further few degrees the further south you are. remember that area of high pressure is how we start next week, with dry weather for a time.
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borisjohnson and the european union announce they have reached a deal on brexit. it comes as mrjohnson arrives in brussels for a crucial summit. he says it‘s a "great" deal which takes back control. the eu describe the deal as a "fair and balanced agreement". discussions over the past days, have at times been difficult. but we have delivered and we have delivered together. but can mrjohnson get his deal through parliament on saturday? northern ireland‘s democratic unionists say they still can‘t support it "as things stand". and the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, calls it a sell—out deal — he wants the people

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