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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  October 31, 2019 10:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello. it's thursday. it's 10 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. good morning. it's halloween, and it was supposed to be brexit day. we will leave the european union on october 31st. we are coming out of the eu on october 31st come what may. we are going to fulfil the repeated promises of parliament to the people and come out of the eu on october 31st, no ifs or buts. instead, borisjohnson is visiting a school and a hospital while labour leaderjeremy corbyn in an hour's time will make his pitch to be the next prime minister. and these voters are here to tell these would—be mps how they feel about the fact brexit has been delayed again,
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and whether it's going to affect the way they vote in the general election in december. also today, orkambi, a drug to treat cystic fibrosis, will now be available to patients in england, scotland and northern ireland. but what about wales? this is rebekah bow, mum of eight—year—old sofia. she lives in south wales and, as things stand, won't be able to get the drug. we'll be speaking to them both. and laura huteson was killed with a knife wound to the neck while having sex with a man she'd met in a bar. campaigners are calling for deaths during consensual rough sex to be treated always as murder. what we're really asking for is forjuries to be given the chance to opine on this and for prosecutors not to almost chicken out of prosecuting these as more serious charges. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning.
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we are definitely going to talk later about donald trump because you might have seen that he tweeted this picture last night showing him giving a medal of honour to an incredible military dog called conan, who chased the leader of ios, abu bakr al—baghdadi, before he blew himself up at the weekend. —— the leader of. gorgeous photo that it has been faked. this is the original photograph, him giving the medal to james mclauchlan back in 2017. what do you think other use of this photograph? we want to hear from you, wherever you are in the country, about what the issues you ca re country, about what the issues you care most about our of this forthcoming general election. what is the most important thing to you? let us know this morning. before
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that, the news with annita mcveigh. good morning. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, will launch his party's election campaign today promising a transformation of britain. mr corbyn will kick off his campaign with a pledge to take on what he calls the few who run a corrupt system. the conservatives will blame labour for the failure to leave the eu today as planned. it's emerged that dozens of prisons across england and wales are failing to operate emergency telephone lines to help prevent suicide and self—harm. figures compiled by three campaign groups show a third ofjails have either not installed a line or do not answer calls from relatives worried about the welfare of inmates. the ministry ofjustice says the situation is unacceptable and it's taken immediate action. at least 65 passengers have died in a fire on a train which was travelling from the pakistani city of karachi to rawalpindi. the fire appears to have started when a cooking stove exploded near the city of rahim yar khan. police say it spread to three carriages. army helicopters are being used to
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remove the injured from the scene. the social media site twitter has announced plans to ban all political advertising from its website from next month. the company's ceo said he wanted to prevent potential problems with fake news and unchecked information. facebook‘s founder mark zuckerberg has rejected calls to follow suit saying it wasn't right for private companies to censor politicians or the news. more than 18 million people are affected or at risk from a wildfire which is raging across california. the governor of california has declared a state—wide emergency as strong winds continue to fan the flames. thousands of firefighters are attempting to deal with the crisis. widespread power cuts remain in place in an effort to prevent further outbreaks. lloyds banking group has taken a £1.8 billion hit for payment protection insurance mis—selling compensation, almost wiping out its third quarter profits. it takes the bank's total bill for the ppi scandal to close to £22 billion. the ppi cost meant the bank made
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£50 million worth of profits in the third quarter. a second earthquake has struck the southern philippines on the island of mindanao. the 6.5 magnitude quake hit in the same area as the stong tremor that killed at least eight people on tuesday. the us geological survey says there is no threat of a tsunami. photographs apparently showing elusive street artist banksy at work have been published. the behind—the—scenes images apparently capture banksy in action, creating several famous works of art at various locations, although none of them show his face. they were taken by his former agent and photographer, steve lazarides, who worked with him for more than a decade. the graffiti artist's identity has never been publicly revealed. that's it for the new summary today. back to you, victoria. thank you. good morning. it is 10:05am, the
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sist good morning. it is 10:05am, the 31st of october, halloween and the day the uk was meant to leave the eu. we are coming out of the eu on october the 31st, come what may? we are coming out of the eu on october the slst, come what may? can you make a promise to the british people that you will not ask for an extension in brussels? yes, i can. i would rather be dead in a ditch. extension in brussels? yes, i can. i would rather be dead in a ditchli looked him in the eye. i would rather be dead in a ditch.” looked him in the eye. i have known him 20 years and i said, boris, if you become prime minister, do you give me your word we leave on the sist give me your word we leave on the 315t of october, come hell or high water, and he said look, marker, we have got to leave otherwise the tory party is finished. we are leaving. we are going to fulfil the repeated
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promises of parliament to the people and come out of the eu on october the 31st, no ifs or buts. do you still say we will leave the european union at the end of this month?” think... i think we should leave the european union. saying i think we should is very different to saying we will. we will leave the european union on october the 31st. despite all those promises, the eu have granted britain an extension and we are instead preparing for an election on the 12th of december. the main political parties are haemorrhaging mps with 19 labour mps and 28 conservatives either standing down or going it alone as independent candidates. that also means we'll have a swathe of new faces entering parliament. this morning we'rejoined by three of those newly selected candidates alongside voters to talk about how
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they feel about the fact we still haven't left the eu and what they want to hear from the parties to win their votes. but first here's a look at all the... what? i'm confused. let me introduce you to all our guests right now. i beg your pardon. my mistake. busayo twins, who you may recognise from channel 4's reality show the circle. she says she's politically homeless but will be voting green this time. zak wagman is a conservative party member and student. jake castle has voted both labour and green in the past. this time he'll vote labour because, he says, of the nhs. claire bradwell is a tory memberfrom sheffield. fay rahman from london voted to remain in the referendum but isn't yet sure how she'll vote. liz needham is a member of the lib dems and wants brexit scrapped. and in inverness isjerry lambert who is supporting the snp.
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he says independence for scotland is more important than brexit right 110w. we also have with us three parliamentary candidates who are all standing for parliament for the first time. chloe hutchinson, she's the liberal democrat candidate for swansea east, currently held by labour. faiza shaheen who's standing for labour in chingford and a conservative seat. dr anwara ali who's standing for the conservatives in the seat of harrow west that's currently held by labour. how do you feel about us still being in the eu? i didn't want to leave the eu, so i am happy that we are still in, but in scotland we have got to take our own decisions about the way forward for the future. what
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about you, claire? in the referendum i voted to remain, but now the countryjust feels so stagnant that i would be more than happy for us to leave now. how do you feel about the fa ct we leave now. how do you feel about the fact we will not be leaving at 11 o'clock tonight? yes, i think that hopefully, and there is nothing definite, that hopefully this general election will help to solve theissues general election will help to solve the issues that they have got in parliament of these childish games, back and forth, back and forth. jake, what about you?” back and forth, back and forth. jake, what about you? i am really thankful that it didn't go through and it didn't happen today because in this divorce of leaving the european union, i am happy that we decided to go, actually, let see if we can work this out and work out a better way instead of saying no, ex partner, i will then down the house so partner, i will then down the house so that you don't have it. and what about you ? so that you don't have it. and what about you? it isjust really sad, to be honest. you are sad we are not leaving? i am sad about the state of
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our politics because this was the third brexit day. the politicians, the eu and the supreme court have givena bit the eu and the supreme court have given a bit to the british public who want to leave and we will probably have another delay in january and we are going into our third christmas since we voted for brexit without leaving and it makes a farce of democracy. what about you? iam a farce of democracy. what about you? i am delighted that we are staying. unlike claire, i don't think the general election will sort it out. i don't think we should sort out brexit and a general election because it is not a single issue. general elections are never run on a single issue. we should find out the outcome of any deal first. what about you ? outcome of any deal first. what about you? of course people who voted to leave want to do and i understand that but at the same time but has not changed is the ability for mp5 to talk about brexit honestly and how we're going to leave. people still talk about wanting to leave and they are upset
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that they want to leave. the issue is no longer whether we should leave or remain it is how we should leave and that seems to be the problem. how do you feel about the fact britain is not leaving the eu today despite multiple promises from the prime minister? i don't feel any way. clearly we can't leave because we don't have the brexit deal and the agreement necessary and we shouldn't be too arrogant or to narrow thinking. we can't leave just because we have set a date. you have got to make sure there are processes in place to do so. when i initially voted in the referendum, i voted to remain, andi voted in the referendum, i voted to remain, and i think that the situation has just been elongated so much now. how do you feel about today? happy we are still in? there was a promise to leave today and i didn't expect much from it. we were all kind of expecting it's not to happen of how many times the were
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made. —— the promises were made. now we need to focus on the other things affecting the country.” we need to focus on the other things affecting the country. i want to ask you all in a moment about where the responsibility lies for the fact that the uk is still in the eu. let mejust bring this that the uk is still in the eu. let me just bring this breaking that the uk is still in the eu. let mejust bring this breaking news that the uk is still in the eu. let me just bring this breaking news to oui’ me just bring this breaking news to our audience, which is being reported by afp, the french news agency, that according to the police the body of missing british tourist has been off the cambodia coast. you will know that 21—year—old amelia banbridge from west sussex went missing there last week and her family have been out thatjoining a search of the area. amelia banbridge was last seen at a beach party in the early hours of last thursday. so many people involved in the search for her, relatives accompanied teams ina for her, relatives accompanied teams in a speedboat following an unconfirmed sighting of a body floating in the water. police are saying that a body has been found
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off the cambodia coast. we will bring you more reaction to that when we get it. before we bring an hour would—be mps who are listening to you with interest, who bears responsibility for the fact that we are still in the eu? gerry? it is a difficult one. the westminster system is clearly broken. you could say that has the responsibility for it. you could argue that it goes back to theresa may. if she had not gone to the country in 2017, the tories would have had the majority and they probably would have been able to for some kind of brexit to at that point. you could go back to theresa may on that. or back to voters who voted for that hung parliament back then. absolutely, thatis parliament back then. absolutely, that is true, but it is the hung parliament we have got at the moment thatis parliament we have got at the moment that is responsible for the reason we haven't left right now. what do you say, claire? at the moment it is
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just one to the other to the other. it could be down to us as voters who voted to leave. if we had voted to remain, all of this would have gone the other way. even though boris johnson got a majority for his deal in principle last week, you say it is parliament stopping brexit? yes, and it will do because they will find something else. the supreme court will get involved again. it will continue batting back and forth. they being the mps? yes. what do you think about this? the whole of this resides on the person who wrote the question on the ballot paper three and a half years ago. had it been the options of yes, no, no without a deal, all these other things, we would have solved this at least two years ago, and solve the question of what is it that the country actually wants? two groups are responsible. the first of the european union. if we had got a
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better deal from them at the start of this year, we would have left in march. if they have been more cooperative, we would have left by 110w. cooperative, we would have left by now. secondly the politicians who rejected the deal injanuary, march, who didn't really want to pass the deal last week and rejected every option. it got a majority of 30 last week. it got a majority then they rejected the timetabling option. in reality if the mp5 wanted it to pass on to chile this week, they would have voted for that. so you don't believe that all the people who wanted to scrutinise it were remainers? they were people who want us remainers? they were people who want us to stay for as long as possible, knowing the longer we stay the more chance there is of a stay in.” believe it goes further back beyond that in terms of educating the uk population in what our relationship is likely the eu. that is not to say that if you want to leave you are uneducated, but it was a question brought to us without preparation.
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that is why they can play on our ignorance is an shortcoming is not knowing what is happening. they asked a question we were not equipped to answer and they did not tell us how we were going to leave and that was always the issue. remaining, staying, no one cares. if we are going to remain, how we remain. this is why we have this issue now. we are still in the eu but we are not even trying to improve the eu. wejust but we are not even trying to improve the eu. we just don't know what we are going to do next. the issueis what we are going to do next. the issue is educating the uk population about who our political allies are and how we operate within that.” about who our political allies are and how we operate within that. i am not going to use the word blame. i am thankful to the parliamentarians who take our parliamentary democracy very seriously. they have insisted on being able to scrutinise any deal, any way that we are going to leave, and said this is not appropriate. i am taking away the blame andl appropriate. i am taking away the blame and i say i am grateful to the parliamentarians were doing their job. i am going to bring our audience this breaking news to do with the investigation into the
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death of harry dunn, the 19—year—old killed in a road traffic accident earlier this year. the main suspect in that case is the wife of a us intelligence official called and so clueless. according to the pa agency, detectives have interviewed anne sacoolas and the details of that interview have been passed to the crown prosecution service. let me bring in chris powell, a labour supporter who is going to vote lib dem because they have a better chance of winning where he lives. how do you feel about being in the eu when the uk was meant to be living at 11 o'clock
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last night? —— tonight. was meant to be living at 11 o'clock last night? -- tonight. happy at the moment because every minute counts but i'm doing it. you are thankful to parliamentarians? absolutely, some of them have been doing their job correctly. let's bring in the would—be mps. chloe hutchinson is the liberal democrat candidate for swa nsea the liberal democrat candidate for swansea east, currently held by labour. faiza shaheen who's standing for labour in chingford and a conservative seat. dr anwara ali who's standing for the conservatives in the seat of harrow west that's currently held by labour. thank you for coming on the programme. it will be a hectic six weeks. i want to ask why on earth you want to become an mp when you can see a number of mps, female mps, who are standing down, because of the horrific personal abuse and threats to their safety that they have received. firstly, i have a
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really supportive team and i can't thank them enough. whether that is my local team, friends across the political spectrum. that is not going to insulate you from abuse. political spectrum. that is not going to insulate you from abusem won't but having that support is something that i think all candidates need. so reach out to your friends if they are standing for parliament and offer that kindness. i am standing because brexit is a mess. i have family that live in spain and i strongly believe that our place is better off in the european union. that is what it comes down to at the end of the day. why haven't the abuse and death threats and intimidation put you off standing, dead macro? it has been horrible for politicians and i am already subject to abuse. —— faiza. because i am muslim and there have been issues with islamophobia locally but this is why i'm not
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going to shut up. this is a critical time in history, the critical change that we need to see, on climate, schools, the nhs, brexit. this is when we have got to stand up and speak out. it is hard to take that abuse but i also get a lot of support and i am trying to focus on that. i am support and i am trying to focus on that. lam running in my support and i am trying to focus on that. i am running in my home state, where i grew up and i am not going to run anywhere else. this is personally very important to me. it is an emotional battle. i decided to do this after my mum died, who suffered from the cuts. i know my purpose, i know what we are trying to achieve within our movement. people will abuse us and that is not 0k andl people will abuse us and that is not 0k and i will fight to that but i am not going to give up because of that. and what about you? i am standing because i think parliament should be representative. 50% of the population are women and there should be more women. the nhs is
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bureaucratic and there was institutionalised racism that i faced. coming from a diverse community it is important that our parliament reflects the diverse communities in the country and at the moment it is not representative and our democracy is weakened because of that. it is more important at this time when there is abuse that women stand up to it and we change the legislation and protect women. i have faced abuse on social media but running away from it is not going to solve the problem. we need to face it. people like nicky morgan for example, the culture secretary who is standing down in part because of the abuse, also because she said on local radio this morning that she wants to spend more time with her family, people like heidi allen, former conservative, then changed to the lib dems, she is standing down because of the personal intimidation she is talking about. they are tough campaigner to have been around for a
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few years. you say they need to stand up and they have done that and they have tried that and they have just had enough. it is not worth it. that is an indictment of politics in our country, isn't it? it is an indictment and it is awful to hear that. you saw how much abuse there was towards diane abbott in the last election. it is disgusting and not acceptable. i am election. it is disgusting and not acceptable. iam not election. it is disgusting and not acceptable. i am not saying that i am above that and if i was taking all of that abuse and there are many more public individuals and i am that i wouldn't think again, but at this point in time, where i am standing means i am willing to block that out. and i do get so much support as well and there are so many people behind me and it is critical that we support each other. i think legislation has got to change. there is legislation. we need to change not just the legislation but we need to educate the public about what it does. otherwise we will have a parliament with more men than women and that is not right. it is a culture of abuse that has come out and it is partly
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around the toxic debate on brexit and if we can calm that down then hopefully... let's just talk about that. as noted, are you expecting this to be an aggressive and toxic general election campaign?” this to be an aggressive and toxic general election campaign? i would like to think it is not going to be. are you naive? i am not naive. it would be nice if we could be respectful of each other and run a positive campaign for each of the parties we are involved with and support. but i do think it will become toxic. what is the most important issue for you, chris, in manchester? it is ultimately going to bea manchester? it is ultimately going to be a brexit general election. manchester? it is ultimately going to be a brexit general electionm that the most important issue to you personally? at the moment, yes. if we leave there is no coming back for decades. most general elections are relatively short term. this is a much longer term view that we have got to take on this particular vote.
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the government has decided to try and resolve brexit through a general election and not a second vote. in a way, they have made it the big issue themselves. what about you, jerry? at here it is slightly different. of course brexit is a major issue but it is not quite as toxic because we voted so significa ntly it is not quite as toxic because we voted so significantly to remain. the snp have put independent front and centre in this campaign and they absolutely should do that. this is the election where the scottish people sent a message that we are looking for an independence referendum in 2020. jake, you are a labour supporter traditionally. are you happy that labour are signalling that should they beat the biggest party or dagger even win a majority, they will give scotland a second independence referendum?” they will give scotland a second independence referendum? i think it is needed but it seems like they are just trying to win points to me. and
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maybe they don't mean it. when they say they will do it, they will do it further down the line. but i do think it is a good thing to propose. you mean labour don't mean it? yes. ido you mean labour don't mean it? yes. i do support them but it feels to me that it i do support them but it feels to me thatitis i do support them but it feels to me that it is just going, i know, i do support them but it feels to me that it isjust going, i know, we will get deported if we say this. —— we will get supporters if we say this. do you trust jeremy corbyn, jerry? yes and no. on an independence referendum, every time, but he is talking about yes in principle we have agreed to it but not in the early days of a labour government, and i don't know what early days means. we are looking to move this forward rapidly. the conservative line from boris johnson that if you vote for labour you'll get two more referenda. it is two thing some things we have settled in the last five years. scotland voted to be part of the uk in a once in a
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generation referendum. we take decisions as a country. that is done. we voted to brexit and people said we want to leave the european union and we have not even left yet. we can't have another vote on it before we have even done it. it is an absolute joke. it isjeremy corbyn trying to cop out and win support from everyone and it makes a mockery of democracy. when boris johnson says he is going to get brexit done, obviously he has failed up brexit done, obviously he has failed up until today. he has made a number of statements. actually he had done the opposite and i am choosing my words carefully. do you trust him as a conservative supporter? absolutely. he was 80 as mayor of london and he was excellent. he has been prime ministerfor nearly london and he was excellent. he has been prime minister for nearly six months. it is interesting that you are looking back to 2008 and whatever it was, 2016. he said he
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would never get the eu to renegotiate and they did. they said he could not get rid of the backstop and he did. regardless of what you think of the deal, that is impressive. it passed the second reading and there was a majority in principle. he paused it. he knew it was not going to go through because parliament does not want brexit to happen. or parliamentarians wanted to soften and change it and he just wa nted to soften and change it and he just wanted his deal. you are a floating voter so what will entice you? brexit is not the most important issue to me. we should have left the eu ages ago. they most important issue to me is climate change right now. there are other issues that i find are important as well in terms of looking after minority communities, like women, lgbt, disabled people. climate change is the number one issue for you, a numberof
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the number one issue for you, a number of parties will want your vote. so where are you leaning? lam going i am going to vote based on what issues are important to me. sol will probably vote green party if not labour. what about you, number one issue? my number one issue is education. i work in the sector. crime, youth violence, housing, housing, everything that people care about, but brexit is probably a major issue because we can't move forward on other issues without solving brexit and it will affect what funds we have to apply to these other issues. so we cannot pretend that unless we solve brexit we don't know how much we can do to build youth clubs or whatever it is that we want. number one as you? some of
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my children have got sen needs, so mine is mental health support and support for children. and the transition from children into adult mental health services. you are a conservative member, so the conservatives have been in power since 2010. you will have seen a number of cuts in those areas. and you will have heard in the last few months from boris johnson you will have heard in the last few months from borisjohnson about putting more money into education and into mental health services. do you see that as him trying to fix what the tories broke from 2010 onwards? in the run-up to the leadership campaign i actually met borisjohnson personally leadership campaign i actually met boris johnson personally and leadership campaign i actually met borisjohnson personally and i did ask him questions of where is the money, is it going to get down to grass roots or end up in a middle management framework again? he said it will be grassroots. in sheffield,
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it will be grassroots. in sheffield, it is coming down because of the structure that has been put in place, so we are starting, preparing for the funding coming. the reason i ask is because we saw that clip of conservative mp mark fronswah saying i looked boris johnson conservative mp mark fronswah saying i looked borisjohnson in the eye and said, relieving on october 31, and said, relieving on october 31, and he said yes, we have got to leave, we will be leaving. this trust going to be an issue in the selection? i've been on the doorsteps, people do trust boris. they feel that he is the right man, the one who led the brexit campaign, the one who led the brexit campaign, the right person to take as out of the right person to take as out of the european union. even though he has failed so far, is that going to be an issue? he hasn't failed. i will reiterate what zac said, he brought back arbitral agreement and there was a majority for that. but then the commons the opposition play
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tactical games. he said we would leave today and we are in. his hands we re leave today and we are in. his hands were tied, they wanted to get rid of the backstop and got out of the eu and we could have done it on the 315t but parliamentarians must take responsibility. again and again they have defied the will of the people that this is a parliamentary democracy. 17.4 million people voted. it is not a football game where you lose the game and say can we have another contest? that doesn't happen in football, by the way! i m doesn't happen in football, by the way! i'm going to ask me about the issue of trust, you are a would—be lib dems mp. jo swinson is your leader. she is making a pitch to be prime minister. she was in the conservative government from 2010 for a few years as business minister. she was part of the lib dems party that promised to get rid of tuition fees and we know what happened. is that still an issue for lib dem voters or has it been overta ken lib dem voters or has it been ove rta ke n by lib dem voters or has it been overtaken by other events?”
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wouldn't say that matters is a main issue. trust is always a main issue in politics, and we need to do better on that. going back to the point made earlier about we should be leaving the european union today, no, we wouldn't have been leaving the european union today. this is only the first step in the brexit withdrawal process. so, even a theresa may's deal had passed we would still be negotiating with the european union, so to say that we would be out now and it would all be done by christmas is absolute nonsense. let me ask you about trust. why were jewish nonsense. let me ask you about trust. why werejewish labour voters trust. why werejewish labour voters trustjeremy trust. why werejewish labour voters trust jeremy corbyn? that's a good question. many of us including jeremy corbyn and others have said that we were too slow to act on those cases of anti—semitism that did come up. and a lot more effort has been made now but it is going to
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ta ke has been made now but it is going to take time to rebuild that relationship. that's the conversation i'm having. trust has come up massively likely actually with all politicians but one thing be seen today about borisjohnson, he isa be seen today about borisjohnson, he is a serial liar. he is known for that. even if you just take the last few weeks. we saw the episode in our local hospital at wits cross whereby he lied to parents and there were no cameras when you could literally see the cameras, he said he would not put a border down the irish sea, and... do you worry as a labour candidate, for example we had the jewish labour movement withdrawing campaigning for labour? do you worry about that? i am less worried about the votes in that kind of way and more about the relationship, because for me, that relationship is really important. and so many major women
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mps have left the labour party because of the anti—semitism in the labour party. the electoral commission is investigating the labour party. i know and i have seen it locally, with conservatives, there is a massive programme —— make problem with islamophobia. i think all parties and society have to... just to let you know, that is where jeremy corbyn will be launching his general election campaign at battersea in south london. we will be bringing that to you live at 11 o'clock. public services. jeremy corbyn is going to talk about it today. the nhs, education, and "the corrupt elite". is that something that voters here can relate to? chris, you're obviously a labour voter. is that going to work for him this time around? i think, yeah, it
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does cut to the heart of what a lot of people are thinking. but how do you disentangle that from the other key issues? he is going to try and distance this from brexit. and that's a good thing, you say? i'm not sure. i think it will work for some people but not everyone. and thatis some people but not everyone. and that is the problem with trying to do two things at the same time. for me, it is good but not good enough. cani me, it is good but not good enough. can i ask those who say they will vote conservative this time around, do you want some kind of alliance with the brexit party? they are deciding at the moment whether they will withdraw their candidates from areas that might split the vote and deny borisjohnson a majority at the next election. presumably you would welcome that. the brexit party can stand whatever they want to, the conservative party should never entera conservative party should never enter a pact with any other party. we are the oldest and most
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successful political party in history and we don't stand down on elections. the conservatives should have a democratic duty to stand a candidate in every single seat. if the brexit party don't want to stand back as their decision. the conservative party should stand somebody in every single seat and give voters even if there is only one constituent —— conservative in that constituency the chance to vote conservative. some messages, nick says don't blame royce, it is the other selfish mps that forced his hand, but i will never vote again. —— don't blame boris. turnout will be interesting because of the timing of the election and some people might feel that they were promised that we would be leaving the eu by this time and we haven't. peter says although i voted remain i'm becoming frustrated at the blame landed at borisjohnson for frustrated at the blame landed at boris johnson for failing to frustrated at the blame landed at borisjohnson for failing to leave the eu when it is the failure of parliament to agree the terms upon which the uk leaves. paul says, if we do have a general election, effectively to decide whether to
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either remain or leave, if no deal is taken off the table then an improved remain situation should be pressed more to get better terms if we stay. one more for now, harry says. is like a majority of mps who tells lies, we are just like mushrooms, kept in the dark and fed rubbish. thank you for coming in. jeremy corbyn is launching the labour general election campaign at 11am. you'll be able to watch that on the bbc news channel. boris johnson is out visiting hospitals, schools and a police unit. no doubt the other leaders will have a packed agenda for what feels like day one of the general election campaign despite the fact that parliament has not yet been dissolved. almost exactly time last week, we broke the news on this programme that orkambi, a drug to treat cystic fibrosis, was going to be made available
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on the nhs in england. the annoucement from the dept of health was greeted with joy by parents and children who have been campaigning for months. have a look at this video made by beth finn, from staffordshire — she filmed the moment that her 13—year—old isabelle who has cystic fibrosis , found out she would be getting the drug. guess what's been approved by nhs england. i don't know. what have we been fighting for? wait, the drug what that... has it? 0h! has it?
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when she gave her brother a hug, it was so when she gave her brother a hug, it was so gorgeous. but while the drug will be available in england, scotland and northern ireland — the welsh government is yet to reach a deal with the drug manufacturers vertex phamaceuticals to supply the drug. the welsh government say they have been working closely with nhs england during the negotiations and will be meeting with representatives from the company this week to discuss a potential deal. we are nowjoined by rebecka bow who lives in south wales with her eight—year—old daughter sofia, who has cystic fibrosis.
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welcome to both of you. thank you for talking to us. you still don't have this drug. how much would it mean to you to be able to get it? you saw the reaction from isabel. that is exactly how everybody is feeling. it has been such an emotionaljourney for us. i feeling. it has been such an emotional journey for us. i think that reaction from isabel shows how important these drugs are to the cf community. we are thrilled that the other nations have them but u nfortu nately wales other nations have them but unfortunately wales and the channel islands are still waiting. time is not the friend of us, because once the deterioration starts, it is a long journey, so you need the drug desperately. sofia, can you hear me 0k? desperately. sofia, can you hear me ok? can you hear me? yes. thank you very much for talking to us. i wonder if you can tell us what it is
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you having cystic fibrosis. it means that i have to take loads of medicine every day. and orkambi make things better. of what would it mean to you if you could have this drug, orkambi? rebecca, tell the audience what it is like for you as sofia's mum, helping, looking after and supporting her with her position —— condition. part of our daily routine is to try and drain the long so that fluid doesn't build up in the lungs so sofia will have physiotherapy every day. she takes a cocktail of
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drugs, about 30 drugs, 30 tablets, every day to keep her moving and keep things moving along, to keep her well. in terms of the welsh government having meetings about the cost of this drug and whether they can come to some sort of deal like nhs england did, like they have in scotla nd nhs england did, like they have in scotland and potentially in northern ireland, what would be your message to politicians? we just need this. it is not something that we are able to wait for. the deal has been done. the same deal needs to be done in wales as in the rest of the uk. we need this deal to be done urgently. the manufacturers, vertex, have a drug that will deal with 90% of the cystic fibrosis population. we need to get those offered as well. it is going to be life changing for the
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population. this is another new drug that has just been licensed. is that going to be the next big fight?m isa going to be the next big fight?m is a challenge in itself. it can be a full—timejob is a challenge in itself. it can be a full—time job and they are unwell. it has been such an emotional journey for so many people in the cf community. we need to secure the next pipeline drugs. itjust affects everything for patients, their mental health. and it. so many admissions to hospital. it isjust mental health. and it. so many admissions to hospital. it is just a whole package of issues, notjust everyday living. let's see what happens. we have ourfingers everyday living. let's see what happens. we have our fingers crossed for you. thank you so much for coming on the programme, and sofia,
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enjoy the rest of half term. take care, thank you. at the weekend donald trump announced to the world that the leader of islamic state abu bakr al—baghdadi had been killed in a raid by us troops in northern syria. no us personnel were injured in the raid but he did reveal that a military dog had suffered injuries. nobody was even hurt, our canine, or a cycle that a dog, a beautiful, talented dog, was injured and brought back. when donald trump first tweeted the dog's photo on tuesday, he said the dog's image was "declassified", but its name would remain a secret. last night donald trump tweeted a image of himself awarding a medal of honor to the dog — and revealed its name. conan! only problem is, the photo is doctored.
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it was apparently produced by an american conservative website called the daily wire. this is the original, from an event in 2017 when the president awarded the medal of honour to a retired army medic and vietnam vet, james mccloughlan. tony tweeted this, that trump has photoshopped everything. the dog award is part of the core. gavin says what is wrong with him tweeting this, he didn't muck it up. another says i have been in photo retouching in the advertising industry for decades. how on earth they thought they would get away with this appalling example of retouching and expecting people to believe it is real astounds me. maybe they didn't think they would get away with it. amy says misusing a photo of any
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vetera n amy says misusing a photo of any veteran is unforgivable. if you insist on doing a photoshopped picture take five minutes to pose with a borrowed pet dog and use that photograph. apparently, james mclaughlin thought it was amusing. just to let you know. facebook has said it won't follow twitter by banning all paid political adverts from its site. its founder, mark zuckerberg, says it's not the job of private companies to censor politicians. twitter‘s chief executive, jack dorsey, said the company would be banning ads to try and stop the unchecked spread of false information. let's speak to joey d'urso, reporter for bbc trending, who has been digging into the way parties use political advertising on social media. hello. how important is twitter when it comes to political ads? twitter is important for politics in terms of journalists and politicians is important for politics in terms ofjournalists and politicians using it but in terms of influencing ordinary people twitterjust isn't that big. facebook is much bigger.
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in the last election in 2017 £50,000 was spent on twitter adds. on facebook, about 3 million. by british political parties and campaigners. facebook is a much bigger deal for targeting individual voters. twitter, £50,000, and facebook presumably millions. £3 million. when you see as a user promoted content doesn't that put you off anyway or do political ads work depending on the platform. often it is not especially clear. it may say a small writing that it is sponsored. if you see a pro—labour advert in your feed you will not be able to distinguish between the advert and your friends this system it -- advert and your friends this system it —— your friends sharing a pro—labour post on their account. people will not be able to distinguish what an advert is necessarily so much, these things are signposted but we don't know how to suck distinguish pretty clearly. for most political parties, they wa nt for most political parties, they want the free stuff that just
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happens to go viral, don't they? the conservative spent more than labour on ad spot labour benefited from people sharing pro—labour stuff with their friends people sharing pro—labour stuff with theirfriends and people sharing pro—labour stuff with their friends and it getting shared further on. labour were not directing orfinding further on. labour were not directing or finding that. further on. labour were not directing orfinding that. it further on. labour were not directing or finding that. it was a massive deal that very likely includes lots of people. why isn't facebook following suit? there is obviously a battle between these two bosses. facebook have said it is a freedom of speech issue, that people should be able to do political adverts if they want. one of the criticisms is that it is good for the incumbents, to run political ads but if you are a little party you cannot target people to get into peoples feeds, so you're always going to lose, but facebook right now is in the midst of this huge battle in the us. we have this election in 2020, donald trump spending millions on facebook ads, the democrat money also, there is a huge row about fact checking political adverts, so when someone
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says something that is not true, facebook says it is not going to do that fact checking process. the boss of twitter is saying that it could be fake, your advert but because you pay for it, i'm really going to put it on my platform? that is his argument. but facebook is in at the deep end at the moment. if you just turned it off right now it would have such a massive effect whereas for twitter, it is much easierfor them to do this. anything else? is that it ‘s that's it. thank you very much, joey, really interesting. factor that braking is. two senior cambodian officials say that the body of 21—year—old british tourist amelia bainbridge has been found in the sea. our correspondent is there on the island of —— of koh rong.
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the sea. our correspondent is there on the island of -- of koh rong. the news has been announced by the top navy commander here. he said a body had been recovered 30 miles off the coast and he believed that it was the body of amelia. they have been able to confirm that news. her family had been spending hours scouring the coastline here, as part of the official search, which has got bigger and bigger. they will now be taking to the mainland and we believe amelia's body will be transported to the mainland. she was a 21—year—old. she had spent two yea rs a 21—year—old. she had spent two years working in the uk saving for this trip asia. her family say that she was so looking forward to it. she planned everything meticulously. she planned everything meticulously. she went missing a week ago. she was last seen at a beach partyjust down the road from here. nothing was seen since. but today we have this dreadful news, the confirmation that amelia has died. nick, thank you very much.
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now our next story contains descriptions of sexual violence, — so, you might not want children or young people to watch. laura huteson was 21 when she was killed with a knife wound to the neck while having sex with a man she'd just met in a bar, back in february 2018. he was 23—year—old jason gaskell. the two had been drinking vodka and taking cocaine. gaskell was initially charged with murder, but the crown prosecution service later accepted a guilty plea of manslaughter and he was sentenced to six years in prison. during sentencing, thejudge said gaskell kept the knife to "enhance, in curious ways, sexual gratification". campaigners say this case is one of 58 that highlight why the law needs to change when it comes to women killed by men during rough — but "consensual" — sex. they say the so called "rough sex" was used in these cases and, in almost half of them —
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according to the campaigners, it meant the killing was prosecuted with a lesser charge, or wasn't treated as a crime at all. i've been speaking to fiona mckenzie from the campaign group we can't consent to this and to stephen vullo, a barrister who defended john broadhurst, convicted of killing his girlfriend, natalie connolly. he was cleared of murder but admitted manslaughter after saying the 26—year—old was injured as a result of consensual sexual activity. mr broadhurst is now appealing against his jail sentence. first, fiona mackenzie explains the so—called "rough sex defence". so what we found is that in cases where a man — and it is always a man in the uk — is accused of killing or injuring a woman, he claims at some point in his contact with the criminaljustice system that she consented to that violence. so it was part of rough sex or kinky sex or sadomasochistic sex. so it's very much not that she was consenting to the sex, but that she was consenting to the violence. and why is that significant, do you say? it's significant in lots of ways. these cases are often reported
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as isolated incidents, but what we can see is there's a real pattern and a real recent pattern of these defences being used. what's significant is it's often a way to get out of a more serious charge. it's often a way, in fact, for...in some cases we've seen that police have decided not to investigate these further, have treated them like accidents, only later for the men then to be convicted of murder when, for instance, they've murdered another woman. i mean, that's in some cases they've had to do that before they are convicted of the earlier crime. so it's a really terrifying thing for me and i think other campaigners, that women could be violently assaulted. and the question is not whether or not he did it, because he admits he did it — it's whether or not she consented to it. is there a rough sex defence? no. no, there isn't. the law in this country is quite clear that you can consent to common assault — that's the highest level of assault you can consent to. if you do in fact... can you just explain that? because that will be... people's ears will prick up — that doesn't make sense to most of us. a common assault is where somebody is put
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in fear of violence. it doesn't even involve necessarily a touching. if there is a touching involved, it's an unlawful application of force. it doesn't have to cause injury. it can just be very slight. that's all that you can legally consent to in english law. if, for example, the next level up of assault is actual bodily harm, it can be some harm which is more than trifling or transient, doesn't have to be permanent. if somebody consents and truly does consent for that harm to be done to them, it isn't a defence for somebody to to say, "well, consent was in play," because that consent becomes invalid. why? because that's what the law says. the law has been settled for quite a long time in respect of this. before i put that back to you, i just want to be clear about what you're saying, mr vullo, if i could. so in a consensual relationship, if someone bruises the other person
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during rough sex, is that a crime? it would be if the complaint was made, an allegation of actual bodily harm is made, if the defendant attended court and said, "well, my partner consented," it would not be a legal defence. and so, presumably, you'd say the same, too, in a consensual relationship, someone can't consent to being strangled. that would cause serious harm. the more the harm, consent becomes invalid at the point of actual bodily harm. once you start getting into serious harm, it's invalidated... why don't you accept that — consent becomes invalid at the point of harm? so this is the question of not how the law is written, which i think i fully, fully agree with that summary — i think that's a great summary. it is how the law works in practice and how it works in terms of enthusiasm of prosecutors to go for a murder charge. and that's absolutely what we've seen, is that prosecutors will be fearful that the story — because the defendant can present any defence that they want in court,
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whether it's a sort of legal defence or not — that the story will be believed by a jury. and so they will pull back and offer manslaughter... ..offer the chance to plead guilty to manslaughter to these men. and of course those men will take it because, you know, you get a much lighter sentence. and would it be...? has it been presented to juries with this narrative? "it was rough sex that went wrong." so that has happened. yes, of course. and that is absolutely the foundation of many, many injury cases as well as killings of women... do you accept that, then, that actually the law is there? it is written as it is written, and we can all sign up to it? but actually, in practice, it's not being followed necessarily? well, i can't comment on every case, obviously, but i think there's some muddling of issues here in respect of consent and intent. so if, for example, two people truly consented to have sex with each other in a rough way, so we have to work on the assumption
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proper informed consent was given, and the intention of the person performing the rough act was to do some harm, orjust minor harm, say, a common assault, but nothing above that, and it went wrong and that person died for whatever reason, the question then would be, well, are they guilty of manslaughter or are they guilty of murder? but let's say it's strangulation. let's say. and they're consenting. and the strangulation goes too far and the woman — let's say it's a woman — dies. well, she can't say what the intent was — only he can — and he's going to say, "i didn't mean to kill her." and juries have to deal with issues like that all of the time. i mean, you can't get around that. that's. .. that's the whole thing. you can't prove it. no. and, i mean, there's a couple of clarifications of the law we're asking for, but what we're really asking for is forjuries to be given the chance to opine on this and for prosecutors not to almost chicken out.
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it's coming up to 11 and that's whenjeremy corbyn will kick off the labour party's general election campaign with a speech in south london. norman smith is there. we have blast off. this is it. the first launch of a party campaign with jeremy corbyn setting first launch of a party campaign withjeremy corbyn setting out first launch of a party campaign with jeremy corbyn setting out the big message he wants to get over. his message is, it's time for real change. he believes there's a hunger in the country for radical policies that are going to transform our society in a way he says no party has ever done before. it is also about preparing the ground for the election. he wants to make sure it is not just a election. he wants to make sure it is notjust a brexit election. this is notjust a brexit election. this isjeremy is notjust a brexit election. this is jeremy corbyn's is notjust a brexit election. this isjeremy corbyn's big pitch. time for real change. thank you very much, norman. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. they will be covering jeremy
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corbyn's speech, and what he would do to change the country should he win the next election, which, as you know, is on december the 12th. we will be bringing you full coverage of that speech live with annita. thanks, victoria. you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am. this is the scene in south london, where the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, is due to launch his party's campaign. we will bring you that speech as soon as we will bring you that speech as soon as it begins but first the headlines. party leaders lay out their pitches with six weeks to go until the december general election. on the day the uk was meant to leave the european union, we'll be bringing you the very latest from the campaign trail. police in cambodia say the body of british backpacker amelia bambridge has been found more than a week after she went missing. twitter bans all political adverts, saying they pose
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a risk to democracy — but facebook says it

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