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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 6, 2020 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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two, three areas of low one, two, three areas of low pressure. how they interact will just dictate where the rain really falls through the day. we suspect at the moment that it could well be in the moment that it could well be in the south—west later on, certainly the south—west later on, certainly the western side of scotland and perhaps even england. in the midst of all that could be a dry spell. thursday and friday we are more sure the little bit of high pressure will develop just as we say goodbye to those low pressures, at least for a time. that transition is fleeting. u nless time. that transition is fleeting. unless it offers the prospect of quite a bit of dry weather until late in the day and we bring more cloud and rain back towards northwestern quarter. temperatures after a chilly start, a frosty start perhaps, we end up with single figures for the most part. through the course of the weekend, we have been here before. mild south—westerly than plenty of them. the frontal system ) to the north and west of the british isles and here is the thing, we established that very same pattern on into the
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heart of next week without jetstream firing low pressures at us towards the british isles and there is a lwa ys the british isles and there is always coming from south and south—west. a windy day certainly, but it will feel mild and i suspect much of the rain will be found towards the north—west of the british while, something a little bit drier perhaps towards the south—east. a hello. this is bbc news with rebecca jones.
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we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment — first, the headlines. the most prolific rapist in british criminal history is jailed for life. reynhard sinaga drugged his unsuspecting male victims and then filmed his assaults. we believe there's over 190 victims that have been involved with sinaga, with reynhard sinaga, and 70 of them are still to be identified approximately. huge crowds gather in iran to mourn at the funeral of the iranian military commander killed by a us air strike. the labour mp rebecca longbailey becomes the sixth candidate to join the race to become the next labour leader. the former hollywood producer, harvey weinstein, faces new charges of rape and sexual assault as his trial begins in new york.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the deputy editor of the daily express, michael booker and the chief executive of the new economics foundation and former labour advisor, miatta fahnbulleh. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. the metro leads on the life sentence handed to reynhard sinaga — thought to be the uk's most prolific rapist. the guardian, too, focusses on sinaga saying how the court heard he will never be safe to be released. the daily mail asks — how many more did he rape? sinaga attacked 195 men but police estimate the true number may be higher. the independent‘s front page sees the supreme leader of iran standing over the coffin of the country's most senior general - qasem soleimani — who was assassinated by the us
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in iraq last week. the daily telegraph also looks at us—iran tensions as american troops are pulled out of baghdad at the request of the iraqi government. the financial times focusses on the trial of disgraced hollywood producer harvey weinstein — as actress rose mcgowan speaks outside new york's supreme court. variety of front pages for us to discuss but one story does dominate. let's start with you this hour. the daily mail has a pick of reynhard sinaga. how many more did he rape? this is after the court case today which is found that he assaulted 195 young men and is being called to the world's most prolific sex attacker. it is harrowing and most people will look at this story and feel really
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disturbed. just the scale of it. the fa ct disturbed. just the scale of it. the fact that it was done in a consistent way over a period of time and the really scary part is it could be so much more than 200 men who have been falling victim to him. i think there is something particularly disturbing about, gosh, what's the profile of a prolific serial killer, i don't know. a churchgoing phd student, just a very normal backdrop of someone who is clearly so disturbed and needs an incredible amount of help and i think it's an absolutely horrific story. it's a pertinent headline. 70 men haven't been traced yet. everything they documented in these videos, however there may be other people out there he hasn't videoed and is done exactly the same thing. what is worrying and quite
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horrifying is, people have been watching television news today, seeing his face blushed up there and then maybe thinking that they may have been a victim as well and it's come up from, this is a combination of four trials over 18 months. an 18—year—old student who was actually stayed awake during the attack, fought him off, told the police and it's led to this. he was incredibly brave to do what he did. all the other victims who said they had a knock on the door from police, many of whom had no idea what the police we re of whom had no idea what the police were there for. they thought they had been there. walking up the next day. imposing on him. to have that told you by the police that this is what's happened, you wouldn't be able to comprehend it at all. what the daily mail seems to be going quite high up in their stories about
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how he incapacitated victims with the date rate drug ghp and there is talk about how home secretary patel is talking about controls. this is used recreationally among the gay community. he is clearly got a desire that he is going to carry out and whether or not this drug was class c or class a, he would have done it anyway. look at the controls of it. it'sjust this is a very done it anyway. look at the controls of it. it's just this is a very evil man. you are nodding and obviously agree with me? i think is really disturbed and needs a lot of help. it's hard to see someone who is clearly a risk, serving anything less and the 30— year life sentence that he has and i hope within prison
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he gets a lot of help and rehabilitation. a lot of people will be thinking is victims should be getting more of the help and forget about this guy. i know where you are coming from. we don't care what happens to him. a lot of help. absolutely agree. let's turn to the other story that is dominating. the continuing tensions between iran and the united states. the uk caught between trump and europe, very striking picture of the funeral of the general that of course was assassinated by this drone in iraq on fide. we didn't know it was happening in the first place. we've been playing catch up. we didn't
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hearan been playing catch up. we didn't hear an awful lot. so mark said well, leading some of these cobra meetings over the weekend. —— sedwell. people were saying that borisjohnson should sedwell. people were saying that boris johnson should come sedwell. people were saying that borisjohnson should come back from holiday but i'm sick of politicians coming back when they don't know. there is this idea that we are between europe and trump in what is going on because there isn't really a western alliance anymore. it seems to be trump against eran and that's the worrying thing. it has been this division today. —— iran. where trump was talking about going up all these stoical sites if there is retaliation from the iranian 's is numberten's retaliation from the iranian 's is number ten's spokesman said that was a warcrime. it number ten's spokesman said that was a war crime. it is not where we were a war crime. it is not where we were a few months ago where we were trying to be his best friend. we are
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trying to be his best friend. we are trying to be his best friend. we are trying to strike a trade deal. that is the other problem as well. we don't want to know him too much because he will start tweeting nasty things about us and we know what happens there. there are millions of people who have been energised in iran. it's poor people who didn't necessarily like him. so we are in a very, very precarious position. we just hope no—one does anything more stupid. how bigger challenges this will boris johnson? it's stupid. how bigger challenges this will borisjohnson? it's the biggest challenges faced. it is a test of his leadership. he is untested and quite frankly, his record at foreign secretary was a lot to be desired. this is a proper test for him. what's going to be quite interesting is, he's worked hard to build that
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relationship with donald trump. there is a trade deal he wants to strike with the us. but, on this we re strike with the us. but, on this were trump has gone out on a limb. acting in a way that is potentially illegal but is usually destabilising for the region. i think we are in a really difficult position. what was interesting was, over the weekend, the government was saying we understand, we have empathy with why the us did this, we on same page. i thought that was a bit dangerous because we should be trying to hug donald trump closely on this. he is bubbly acted in a way that is unjustified, in a way that is destabilising and if we want to play the role of trying to bring people around the table to have dialogue, if we seem to be too close, it makes it hard to do that but the risk is we dragged into this. we get dragged in on the european position is interesting because they are trying to caution restraint on all sides.
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the interesting thing on the front of the telegraph, jeremy hunt is interviewed, and during the end of his time as foreign secretary, you can frustration from the americans at the west, ice and europe. there is growing content about our dovish ways, not wanting to rattle sabres of people. the americans are pulling themselves away a little bit. from themselves away a little bit. from the western alliance. it would be good if they had a plan and an end goal. the situation is so complex and precarious, this is like lighting a match. they are right to say time heads de—escalate. on this they are right in the americans are wrong and we are right to try inside with europeans and the question is whetherjohnson can with europeans and the question is whether johnson can use with europeans and the question is whetherjohnson can use his influence, the relationship he claims is built with donald —— donald trump. we shall see. it's
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continue with this story in the guardian. this is slightly bizarre and confusing. the us forced to deny plan to quit iraqi. it seems to be a letter suggesting the americans were moving out of iraqi now the americans are saying it was a draft ofa americans are saying it was a draft of a letter that wasn't supposed to be released. you couldn't make it up, could you? it would be all right if you thought they had a plan that they can't write a letter properly. this came from the dead general william seeley, the head of the american iraqi task force. there is going to be onward movement in the coming days. what he actually meant was, is g0|ng coming days. what he actually meant was, is going to move from the green zone to other areas around the wright rather than pulling everyone out. -- rather than iraqi. that is what they wanted to happen yesterday. this letter, which was supposed to be conciliatory, has ended up inflaming things and making the americans look stupid. we had
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the americans look stupid. we had the defence secretary mark asper coming out and he was confused as to this letter. when they don't know what is particularly going on, it does suggest that it all comes from one guy and it is trump at the top coming up with these ideas, doing whatever he does of the top of his head and then pays the consequences, does the rest of the world. he has advisers. he does, but they don't seem advisers. he does, but they don't seem to be doing very well in advising him. the advisor gave him a list, a menu of things he could do after the attacks on the embassy. he got upset by those, the footage of that, of the protesters outside the embassy so we decided to go the most extreme one which was to blow this guy extreme one which was to blow this quy up~ extreme one which was to blow this guy up. this guy is referred, is a very bad man, responsible for a lot of debts but we don't want it spiralling into something that creates a lot more death and destruction across the world so again, it seems to be donald trump
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and this is what we were scared of with trump. he may be getting a bit overconfident coming into this year, the new election year so hopefully this doesn't go wrong for the rest of us. a lot of people have been sacked from his administration. he might‘ve cautioned more restraint and have been moved out of the picture so there is a question about the council that he is getting and also i think there is something around the domestic context, in the context of impeachment and a general election and being a strong man, there is some of that playing and it's so dangerous because if you're going to pick a fight, this is not a fight to pick and the rest of us you 110w fight to pick and the rest of us you now need to pick up the pieces and you have troops on the ground who wa nt to you have troops on the ground who want to add this is going to happen. they haven't responded and now they just a sort of playing catch up on trying to figure it out as they go along. there will be huge pressure on us forces to be driven out of the
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region and that is where the game will play out and where we will see tactical attacks just trying to put pressure on. in all of this, it will be people in the region were going to suffer. it's not going to be uk citizens or us citizens, is going to be people in the middle east. it will be them victims of roxy was that are going to rage and that is the cost of 1—man active and possibly with poor advice. let's move on to the times. help choose the next labour leader by easter. it is a slightly misleading headline because that is the way the labour leader was chosen in 2016. of course the news broken tonight before it could get on this front page is that rebecca long bailey is
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110w page is that rebecca long bailey is now the sixth think it is good the nec has decided that actually this electorate will not just be existing that actually this electorate will notjust be existing members. for me, it is an interesting field. there are some good candidates there. it is notjust to win the labour ship there. it is notjust to win the labourship —— there. it is notjust to win the labour ship —— membership and appeal to the membership but to have an eye on the country. you cannotjust be trying to tell a story about how you are going to take the party forward, but more importantly what it is you believe that you can do for the country. some races you can focus on the membership of don't think they can do that this time. i think they need to be saying this is what we have to offer and they need to be
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willing voters at they lost now in order to kinda build up momentum over the next four or five years and i think the big thing for me is there is lots that has to be learned about what went wrong in that election and what drove voters that have voted labour all their lives as with dover to the conservatives. in all of that, there was a piece where the labour were arguing the country needs fundamental reform. public services and the climate emergency. i hope the leadership contenders don't lose that and i hope they take that and start thinking about how you construct something that is ambitious and radical that you can convince the country can be delivered. you have both given very long and interesting answers tonight, but it means time is catching up with us. if you don't mind, iwould catching up with us. if you don't mind, i would like to turn to your paper, the daily express. massive spending spree in brexit budget. chancellor spending spree in brexit budget. cha ncellor vows spending spree in brexit budget. chancellor vows launch decade of renewal. is there anything new in
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this story? he is talking about £100 billion being pumped into infrastructure projects. it is to keep the voters, the tory party broke down the redwall in north during the election and the need to keep those voters suite. this is what this is about, parts of the country that have been left behind according to sajid javid. they want to see the infrastructure. whatever the details of the budget and all this money, they have to keep those vote rs this money, they have to keep those voters onside otherwise the gains will be lost in the next election. the people in the north of england, particularly, they need to see real change in their lives. if this government doesn't deliver that, then they won't be voting for them again. there has to be some decent stuff in this budget and the other ones over the next few years as well that actually changes, tangible changes in people posit lives. this
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is why people voted for brexit and then voted for brexit —— the tories. it is the roaring 20s! this is the ci’ux it is the roaring 20s! this is the crux of it. brexit was only ever supposed to be a thing because it was supposed to deliver change. now that we have the withdrawal agreement going to go through on the sist agreement going to go through on the 31st of january, the question that becomes how do you ensure that brexit delivers for the country? that is a much harder proposition andi that is a much harder proposition and i think it is good the government wants to spend more, it is good it wants to target spending on parts of the country that haven't seen on parts of the country that haven't seen it as much, but spending money isn't enough. it has to be coupled with reform. that is what jeremy corbyn wants to do, spend money on everything. you can't spend money on everything. you can't spend money on everything. there was a lot of spending, but to be fair there was also a story of reform, a story of how we get the economy to work in a different way so actually works for communities that have been left behind. no-one thought it was
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believable. it is quite interesting for the conservatives is they will start trying to move into that space and there has to be a reforming agenda that sits alongside spending. if they don't have that, they will fall short. there wasn't much about it in the manifesto or the queen's speech. they have a job now in order to come up with a proper programme government. what if labour elect another clown? that is a problem. i wa nt to another clown? that is a problem. i want to talk about toilet rolls. a robot is going to ensure you always unrolled. a role robot, what is going to do? i don't think how this works? when you run out of lavatory paper, it is smart and it will deliver you a new roll. hopefully it can go upstairs. it is notjust the ground floor toilets as well. also
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worryingly accuses robot vacuum cleaner technology. that is all right for moving along, but it has all of the vacuum cleaners assets, that might be quite painful. are you pressing something on your smart phone to say you have run out of toilet paper? there will be an app involved. it raises many questions. iamafan of involved. it raises many questions. i am a fan of technology, but sometimes you feel that we have information that we don't really need. sometimes the cat wanders in when you are sat there and you don't wa nt when you are sat there and you don't want that... i will leave that hanging as well. we are going to leave it there because that is it for the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — 7 days a week at bbc.co.ukpaper. aand if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later on the bbc iplayer. thank you both again. thank you and goodbye.
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good evening. arsenal are through to the fourth round of the fa cup after beating leeds united 1—0. the championship leaders had enough chances to win it but couldn't take them. the gunners will now face bournemouth in the last 32. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. this is where leeds feel they belong. arsenal hardly, but in general, the big time. it is the path their manager plots so intensely. leads were unmistakably the team even if they wore pale blue rather than white. theyjust overran arsenal in the early stages. danford hit the bar. leads threatened to score with almost every attack. martin has at least showed his skills. he had to. arsenal public
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manager has his own reputation to build and they needed more from the players. he picked a strong team. free kick taper for example. commentator: it was always going to be him. close. a note arsenal were energised and even though this attack featured a big assist from a leeds boot, it was a sign of the way the game had moved. if arsenal supporters wanted commitment, we saw it. var examining the entanglement here. no further action. it. var examining the entanglement here. no furtheraction. have it. var examining the entanglement here. no further action. have a look at this contest by the corner flag. old—fashioned stuff. at this contest by the corner flag. old —fashioned stuff. while at this contest by the corner flag. old—fashioned stuff. while no cards we re old—fashioned stuff. while no cards were shown and arsenal toughed it out. exactly what he needed. joe wilson, bbc news. the fourth round is the last 32, still a few third—round replays but here are a couple of the ties
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that caught our eye: the full draw is on the bbc sport website. it could be a very nervy final day in the second test in cape town. england need eight wickets to win and level the series. south africa need another 312 runs for victory afterfinishing the fourth day on 126/2. andy swiss reports. under the shadow of table mountain, england found their own immovable object in the fast and flashy world of flashy trigger. a throwback to more watchful times. resuming on 85, they set about nudging towards a
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century or so at the other end, ben stokes did what ben stokes does. wow! between them, they reduced south africa to utter frustration. stokes at his blistering best as he bollards the bowling to all corners of cape town. catching practice for the crowd in a spectacular 72. by contrast, sibley was a picture of patients. an eight hour vigil and a first test hundred. his triumph of tenacity putting england firmly in control. south africa's target, a massive 438. impossible surely, but now it was england's turn to toil, removing only dean elgar to the minister of edges and hamza to a rather more obvious one. the hosts 126 42 at close. england are clear favourite, but a gripping final day is the only guarantee. and it was, bbc news.
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—— andy swisse. that's all the sport for now. there's plenty more on the website including news that shooting and archery could be back on the 2022 commonwealth games programme, but staged in india several months before the main event starts in birmingham. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. that is all sport for now. we have multiple areas of low pressure to deal with across the uk this week. the rain is cleared eastwards but waiting in the wings is our next atlantic system and this is our next atlantic system and this is going to bring severe gales across scotland and northern england through tuesday, heavy rain as well. that is only part of the story. also drawing up some very mild air. it is quite mild across the eastern side of scotland. it is the strength of the wind we are most concerned about through tuesday. severe gales through tuesday. severe gales through scotland and northern england. a yellow warning from the met office in place, some disruption is possible. a very wet and windy
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site across scotland, outbreaks of rain clearing in the morning. the rain clearing in the morning. the rain getting into northern england in north wales in south—west england through the afternoon, but quite patchy here. the further south and east you are a dry and rather cloudy day. a windy day across the board. the strongest winds across scotland and northern england where quite widely they will touch 16, —— 60, 70 and 70 five miles an hour from the coast of scotland. quite windy, strong gusts across northern england, 30, a0 miles an hour gusts so england, 30, a0 miles an hour gusts so not so extreme here. a windy day for all of us and tuesday evening about a cloud slides its way south with some patchy rain turning clearer and colder further north with some patchy rain turning clearer and colderfurther north but with wintry showers starting to pile into scotland. you will notice the temperature difference from the north to the south of the country first thing on wednesday, still very mild across the south but turning cold across the north and still very windy across northern scotland on wednesday. elsewhere the wind well
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attendees and for many we will start the day mainly dry, spells of sunshine, cloud for south—east england starting to pull away. wintry showers, down to 200 metres snow, cloud and rain moving into wells and south—west england in the afternoon, holding onto the milder conditions across much of the england and back england figures that further north. thursday, a very messy picture. multiple areas of low pressure putting across the uk. things started to turn dry as its ridge of high pressure builds. when belong with a wet and windy weather returns. for the end of the week, rain, the wind will ease down and briefly dry and cold on friday. goodbye.
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i'm sharanjit leyl in singapore. the headlines: huge crowds gather in iran to mourn the general killed by us forces, as tensions rise in neighbouring iraq. i'm lucy hockings, live in wandandian in new south wales, where firefighters are in a race against time with hot, windy weather forecast for later in the week. i'm kasia madera in london. also in the programme: an indonesian man, declared the worst serial rapist in british criminal history has been jailed for a minimum of 30 years. disgraced movie producer harvey weinstein faces charges

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