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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 7, 2020 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a british teenager, convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus, is due to be sentenced shortly. we'll be live from the island with reaction. we'll have the latest from iran as the country's top military officer is buried after his assasination by a us drone attack. america denies it will start pulling troops out of iraq. was it a happy new year, orjust a christmas hangover? morrisons is the latest big name to update us on how they fared over the festive season — i'll have the details.
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arsenal edge it in the fa cup. they need a half time telling off from boss mikel arteta to spring them into life against leeds united at the emirates. after his success at the golden globes, will sam mendes‘s warfilm 1917 be in with a chance of a bafta? we'll bring you the nominations live. britain's biggest grime artist and this week's number one, stormzy, is joining us on the sofa later. good morning. today is going to be windy wherever you are, particularly so windy wherever you are, particularly so in the northern half of the country, gales or severe gales. i will have more later. it's tuesday the 7th of january. our top story:
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a british teenager, convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus, is due to be sentenced this morning. the 19—year—old could be jailed for a year for causing public nuisance after she retracted her original statement alleging she'd been attacked by 12 men in aiya napa. the teenager could be jailed for a year and find £1500 after a judge rejected her pleas in court that she was gang raped. and only retracted her statement after she was denied access to a lawyer, an interpreter and placed under intense police pressure. local media has reported the cypriot president is planning to pardon her if she receives a prison sentence but if it's a suspended sentence but if it's a suspended sentence or just sentence but if it's a suspended sentence orjust a fine, the 19—year—old could be on a flight home today. the foreign office has expressed serious concern about the separate authorities handling of this case. the foreign secretary three dominic raab urged the country
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to do the right thing. the teenager travelled to the head domestic holiday resort in search of a summer job for university. she had her passport confiscated and was forced to remain on the island for the trial. if the appeal in cyprus is rejected, lawyers say the plan to ta ke rejected, lawyers say the plan to take her case to the european court of human rights. and a whole again, bbc news in aiya napa. john maguire is at the court in paralimni for us this monring — what's the latest, john? are expecting to hear something in the next hour or so? as you can see behind me, journalists gathering behind me, journalists gathering behind me, journalists gathering behind me, one would assume also but it's made worldwide headlines. it's this rather inauspicious building thatis this rather inauspicious building that is shared with other officers.
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it is the famagusta district court. we are expecting sentencing later on this morning. we are expecting a good deal of reaction. the women's rights group is gathering outside and will be issuing state once and as we heard from anna's report, there has been quite a lot of dialogue. interesting to hear the views of the foreign secretary, saying he hopes the separate authorities lean on the side of leniency rather than going the other when its case. it's gained notoriety for want of a better word. as soon as we get any news from cyprus, will be taking a look at the sentence. the iranian general killed in a us
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air strike in iraq will be laid to rest in his hometown of kerman today, following a four day funeral procession. qasem soleimani's death has sparked concerns of wider conflict, amid rising tensions between america and iran. we can get the latest now from our middle east correspondent, lina sinjab, who's in beirut. what is the latest in what is your analysis? basically this is the final day of three days of funeral processions where where qasem soleimani will be buried in his home town, a man held as a hero at home but seen one be in the region as a war criminal, someone responsible for destabilising the region and responsible for the killing of hundreds of civilians. vowing to ta ke hundreds of civilians. vowing to take revenge to the united states and also with further threats of
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targeting iranian sites, even cultural sites. there is a lot of tit—for—tat, heated threats between the two sides but of course the region that has always suffered from turmoil, wars and disturbances is facing further chaos and further concerns of escalation. france britain and germany called for deescalation but for the moment, , it's hard to see if there will be a response by wright, or through their proxy militia who say they are ready to ta ke proxy militia who say they are ready to take revenge. we are watching live pictures therefrom iran. thank you very much. the shadow business secretary, rebecca longbailey, has joined the race to become the next labour leader. the nominations for the 3—month contest formally open today, and the six candidates will take questions from mps in parliament this evening. 0ur political correspondent, helen catt, joins us from westminster. helen, we were expecting this, but does it change anything?
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helen, good morning to you. is this the final six we have? it looks like everybody we thought was going to put themselves forward. rebecca long bailey, long bees and seen as someone who is likely to stand for the leadership. she has been seen as the leadership. she has been seen as the candidate most likely to follow injeremy the candidate most likely to follow in jeremy corbyn's footsteps when it comes to policy in the direction of the labour party. it certainly looks like that is what she intends. she says the election result was devastating but sees it as a failure of strategy, not policy and she talks about going to war, a constitutional revolution and radically ship in power away. where does that leave us in terms of the runners? there are six people who say they want to be leaders of the labour party. emily thornbury, jess
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lips, keir starmer, clive lewis and lisa nandy and rebecca long bailey. each of those candidates will need to be nominated by 10% of labour mps and meps along with local labour party is an affiliate ‘s and as you said, nominations open today. the final result is said to be held on aprilfour final result is said to be held on april four with final result is said to be held on aprilfour with a special conference. we aprilfour with a special conference . we are aprilfour with a special conference. we are expecting jess phillips at about 640. the home secretary has called for an urgent review of the classification of a drug thought to have been used by the uk's most prolific rapist. reynhard sinaga was jailed for a minimum of 30 years yesterday for more than 150 offences. his victims were men, who he's thought to have drugged using a form of class c drug ghb.
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greater manchester police has set up a dedicated number to provide support for anyone affected by this story. it's on your screen now, 0800 056 0154. or if you wish to contact the police and make a report related to this case, the number is 0800 092 01110. greater manchester police has set up a dedicated number to provide later this morning we'll hear from a survivor of male sexual assault about the stigma attached to the crime. in australia, hundreds of volunteer firefighters have attended the funeral of one of their colleagues, who died while battling bushfires. andrew 0'dwyer was killed in new south wales last month when a tree fell in the path of his fire engine. the state has been the worst affected by the ongoing crisis.
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let's speak now to our correspondent, jonathan head, who's there. an upsetting day for firefighters particularly. are very upsetting reminder of the extraordinary effo rts reminder of the extraordinary efforts and sacrifices they have made. andrew 0'dwyer was killed on december 19 by a falling tree, one of the greatest risks in these fires. 0nce of the greatest risks in these fires. once the go through, the trees become weak and that is a great risk for all of us. conditions are cooler at the moment, there is a bit of rain right now but even where iam now, bit of rain right now but even where i am now, you bit of rain right now but even where iam now, you can bit of rain right now but even where i am now, you can smell the smoke. still around 150 fires ongoing, not raging as much as they were when the weather was hotter and windier in the firefighters, there are more than 2000 of them, working on these fires are trying to use this break in the weather to create fire breaks to burn a little bit more in the hope of stopping the fires and spreading. if they restart, in the beginning of the hot season, we expect in dry weather, and getting
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assessment. nearly 2000 homes in total destroyed up to now. although firefighters stress they saved around 20,000 buildings and you get the sense of this battle, they are very grateful for the break they have now. they have a lot more work coming on later this season. do you know what? did you watch the last night? luckily sally is said to tell us what has been going on. last night? luckily sally is said to tell us what has been going onm was one of those games were if you don't get a chance, you get stung. and obviously arteta you are to say
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at halftime. he had to give them a rocketed halftime. it really worked. mikel arteta's really starting to make his presence felt at arsenal, he had to give his side a rocket at half time in their fa cup third round tie against leeds. it worked too. after being completely outplayed by the championship side, arsenal were much better in the second half and won it by a goal to nil at the emirates. tottenham say they've found no evidence to support allegations of racism towards chelsea's antonio rudiger after the defender claimed he heard monkey noises in a game last month. chelsea say they "totally and unequivocally" support rudiger. matches at this month's australian open could be suspended if the air quality is too bad because of the bushfires. reigning men's champion novak djokovic has even suggested that the start of the tournament could be delayed. that is something they are monitoring very closely and djokovic
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has been very vocal about player welfare. and england need to take eight wickets today to win the second test in south africa and level the li—match series. south africa start the final day 126/2 after being set a38 to win. more on the tennis coming up in the papers. let's take a look at today's papers. tuesday's front pages are dominated by the story of the serial sexual predator reynhard sinaga who has been found guilty of 136 counts of rape. the mirror leads with the headline, "britain's worst ever rapist." "how many more did he rape?" asks the daily mail on its front page. the paper says home secretary priti
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patel has ordered a review into whether tougher controls are needed for the date rape class c drug ghb, which sinaga gave to his victims. the guardian looks at the iran crisis and the paper features a striking photograph of dozens of mourners surrounding the coffin of iranian general, qasem soleimani, during his funeral procession in tehran. and the telegraph online features an article about harvey weinstein who's been in court facing allegations of rape and sexual assault. it says his accusers claim the frail figure he presented is all an act. mr weinstein denies any wrong doing. i mentioned the tennis. we have a picture here and interesting quotes. he has had respiratory problems playing in the past, and particularly at the australian open before, because of the extreme heat. what contingency plan is to delay the start of the tournament, but thatis the start of the tournament, but that is the last resort. also the australian open do have other courts
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to choose from. they have courts with roofs. that is something they might use. i like this headline in the sun. loved! i would might use. i like this headline in the sun. loved! iwould rather might use. i like this headline in the sun. loved! i would rather play golf than be united boss. he was asked in a press conference yesterday, would you ever manage united? and he said never. i prefer his other quote that said he would rather be in the maldives. he could not go to the maldives because there is no golf courses. goodness me. i knew you would like that one. priorities. good morning. iwant to bring you up—to—date. we have a date for the budget, sajid javid announcing the budget will take place on march 11. you may remember it was supposed to take place at the end of last year but it was delayed
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for the election. we will hear all the tax and spending plans for the year ahead for the new government. crucially, whether they will tinker with the format. money is invested across the country. at the moment you may know they tend to prioritise investment in places where they are seeing most return on investment, and that in some cases means there is investment in a lot of places, particularly in parts of north of england and the chancellor hoping to rebalance that if he can. nonetheless we expect details on much 11. a story we're looking at this morning about how the retailers fared over the christmas period. we start to get results of this, the are telling us how they got on —— march. hourly sales topped £1 billion for the first time. it says it was lose and meet that held to the record figures. —— aldi. later we will get the figures from morrisons and tomorrow from sainsbury. a busy week for the christmas retailers. thank you. i love this story. i high
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school preparing for the new term with an incredible 27 ex— pupils on the staff. doesn't that say something about that school? it is absolutely wonderful. morgan studied in the 80s before returning to become head teacher. she has taken on other pupils from deputy had to learning support. i think that is a great advert for the school. where is that? good point. i don't know. would you like to read it? no. two other stories for you. a menu a dump... look at this. —— manure. the riddle of 50 foot piles of manure which have been dumped in this village. 50 foot long and six foot high. no—one knows who has been doing this. it has been blocking
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roads and causing issues. they are trying to get to the bottom of the manure bumper, whether that might be. have you ever had your view blocked in the cinema? this is a different story, right? yes! large piles of manure in the cinema! anyone who sits behind me or you, frankly. i tend to slouch like this. 0therwise i tend to slouch like this. otherwise it is impossible... you know... don't step in front of me, don't step in front of me... look at this. i never thought of it from your point of view, but now i see it could be an issue for you as well as everybody behind you. a huge emotional drain at then goes through him. the theatre is worth because there is no room in front of your needs. there is nowhere to go. i saw mama mia and dragged along to the cinema. i must‘ve had about four into allegro so i sat like this. the
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poor person behind me said, you are in my way and i literally couldn't move. i must read this story. i mention this because this lady complained when she went to the cinema and went as a frozen in sheffield and this was her view. she sat behind this rather tall lady who had a whopping great one on the top of her head as well. how short was a lady behind? she may well have dropped the phone down a little bit to take the picture. a mum wants cinema—goers with big hair band after her view of frozen was blocked by a woman by the huge bun! ellie, who is 28, based on a picture online of the back of a really tall woman upon the head as she said she had to sit extremely uncomfortably to watch the film. i was so annoyed that someone would not wear their hair down and not be considerate to other people. tall people and people with buns, maybe have at the back of the
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cinema. it should be a hard thing like at a theme park. if your hair is bigger than this, you can't enter the cinema. she didn't ask her... she didn't ask her? but she did call her a narrowminded idiot with big hair. she can't say that. maybe the lady didn't know and she would have taken her hair down if she had been asked. ididn't her hair down if she had been asked. i didn't know i had massive hair! she might not like it might not have crossed her mind. she hadn't washed it. i'm glad we got to the bottom of that. thank you very much. iam that. thank you very much. i am looking forward to sitting behind you in the cinema! i will be down like this. stay low. no wonder you have back problems. can you see like that all the time? here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. what is going on? good morning. lots going on with the weather today. looking at severe gales, possibly some disruption due to those gales across scotland and also northern
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england. wherever you are today, it is going to be a windy day. you can see why. look at the isobars. the tightest squeeze is across the north of the country. one front is going through and another one coming hot on its heels. the first front coming through is a warm front and it is sucking up all this milder as represented by the ember colours. unusually mild actually for this time of year. we start off in a fairly cloudy note, not too bright brea ks fairly cloudy note, not too bright breaks and showers and the first run to come through bringing all this rain. it will be heavy and persistent. it is the wind that will be the main feature of the weather today, particularly in the north. these black circles indicate the wind gust strength, but across the northern and western isles, the far north of maine and scotland, gusts of 65, 75 and more than 75 miles an hour. for the windy across northern ireland, strong winds and gales across northern england and has become south, you can see the exposure in the west we're at very strong winds as we pushed down
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towards the south—east and it will still be gusting but not as windy as further north. through this evening and overnight we have abandoned cloud moving away, taking the ploughed and catchy rain with it. clear skies behind and we have some showers, some of them wintry on the hills and scotland. here, it is still going to be windy but look at the temperatures. five to 12. the average daytime maximum temperatures at this time of year would be six to 18 degrees. as we had on through wednesday and into thursday, first of all with a nearby to this cold front as it starts down for most of us behind it. still windy as you can tell from the squeeze on the isobars and later the neck system is waiting in the wings to come our way. the cloud associated with the cold front washes away and then cool air follows on behind, a lot of dry weather, fair bit of sunshine through tomorrow as well. we still have some showers and they will still be wintry on the hills. temperatures in the north, seven to
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ten, clinging onto the milder conditions on the far south. by the end of the day our next system is coming in across the southwest and thatis coming in across the southwest and that is going to be heading north. as we go through thursday into friday, there are guys that system heading north into the north sea. another one comes in, the timing and placement of this one still a bit of a question, but by friday, a ridge of high pressure builds and things dry up and quietened down for a time before the next atlantic system comes our way. by the end of the week, the wind will ease and it will become briefly drier and colder on friday but nothing like the chapters we are seeing today. today, somewhere between 16 degrees and the latter area around the murray first. higher temperatures into the mid— teens across north wales, possibly northeast england and northern ireland. a lot going on with the weather this week. there really is, isn't there. thank you very much for the back with you shortly. this morning we've been hearing
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about the case of reynhard sinaga, the man police are describing as the most prolific rapist in british legal history. prosecutors say sinaga attacked as many as 190 men, and yesterday, he was sentenced to a minimum of 30 years injail. graham satchell has been speaking to sam, a survivor of sexual assault, about the stigma associated with the crime. the face of a monster. reynhard sinaga grinning on his social media pages is the most prolific rapist in british legal history. police say there may be as many as 200 limbs. reynhard sinaga prowled the streets of manchester, searching for men before luring them back to his flat. we spoke to one man, not one of his victims, who was raped in 2016.|j broke down to a woman on the phone and told her i wanted to die. i generally meant it. i didn't want to be with here —— like i didn't want to live with it. i didn't want to be
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here. he was assaulted by two men in a hotel room in manchester. he had been out with his girlfriend and at the end of the night he became separated. he began chatting to a group of men and went for one more drink. i think the first thing people hear male rape is they always associated with homosexuality. i think there is a certain stigma attached to it, masculinity, you cannot be a masculine man if you have not fought back and allow this thing to happen and you have not done whatever you can to find the perpetrators or even four b perpetrators. i think what defines us as men or supposedly defines us as men is impacted from the offset. this is st mary ‘s in manchester, a sexual assault referral centre. it is where sam was treated as were many of the men raped by reynhard sinaga. we have seen an increase of around 33% for men coming forward. i am an optimist. so i like to think
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it is not an increase in sexual violence. i think it is an increase in confidence and people being able to come forward. the shame, the stigma associated with sexual assault means it has been a dramatically underreported crime. some studies suggest 90% of male rape is a never reported. sam did go to the police but says it was an experience that made things worse. they asked me about my sexuality, and about whether i had cheated on my girlfriend before, had i ever had a male sexual encounter. it all made me feel at the time that i was not being believe. i didn't understand whether or not i am straight or gay, was any difference? the issue is consent. greater manchester police said they have learned lessons from samples and base and they are now urging anyone who thinks they may have been assaulted by reynhard sinaga to come forward. graeme satchel, bbc news. just to reiterate for you this morning, there are details of
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organisations offering information and support. we have them available online. 0r and support. we have them available online. or you can call the free at any time to hear recorded information. with regard to the reynhard sinaga case, if you have any concerns about that, there are numbers we will put on our social media feeds where you can get in touch with police as well. and thank you for sam to telling the story as well. coming up later, i know a few of our viewers are quite excited about the fact that stormzy will be on the sofa. we are actually one of his lyrics! bbc breakfast. i am pretty pleased about that. we will ask him why. good question. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will have the national headlines for you in we will have the national headlines foryou ina we will have the national headlines for you in a few minutes time.
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good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. 60 firefighters have been at camden's koko club after the roof caught fire last night. the venue is famous for hosting the biggest names in music. greg mckenzie has sent this update. the fire brigade were called up before 9pm last night to reports of the blade believed to have begun on the blade believed to have begun on the roof of the building. koko is currently closed on the refurbishment. the fire brigade say fortu nately refurbishment. the fire brigade say fortunately there are no reports of any injuries. the fire brigade managed to bring the fire under control in the early hours of this morning. a large part of the roof is damaged. greg mckenzie reporting. nadav kander is one of the most influential photographers in the world. in 2009, he won the prix pictet for his photos. we caught up with him in his kentish town studio
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and discussed his jounery in to the industry. i think it was the first thing that empowered me, it was the first thing that i felt came from me that i did well. i wasn't a great achiever at school, i think i was very dyslexic. i don't think it was named in those days, not to me anyway. but i found school really hard and it gave me... it empowered me that i was doing something for once well, and as i said and! something for once well, and as i said and i have always known, i have a lwa ys said and i have always known, i have always wanted to be expert at something. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the trains and tubes this morning. 0n the roads following that fire at koko, crowndale road and eversholt street are both closed from 0akley square, and it also means that five bus routes are on diversion. kidbrooke park road is closed southbound just south of kidbrook park station for water works. in acton, there's a lane closed on the aao westbound at savoy circus
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for cycle works. now, the weather with kate kinsella. it is quite actually start for some, especially if you look at the temperature this time tomorrow morning. things are set to get a little milder. increasing cloud through the day. it will be quite breezy. the cloud thickens up to produce the odd spot of light rain and some drizzle. the wind is south—westerly, could become quite gusty through the afternoon and temperatures today getting up to a mild 13 celsius despite that breeze. 0vernight tonight conditions don't really change at all. again we have quite a bit of cloud, outbreaks of potentially light and patchy rain. 0ne potentially light and patchy rain. one or two breaks. the temperature barely drops at all. central london at all staying around 12 celsius are really mild night. for wednesday, again, quitea really mild night. for wednesday, again, quite a bit of cloud again. we will see some rain as we head
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towards the early evening. temperatures again mild tomorrow. rain overnight and it should clear toa rain overnight and it should clear to a bright afternoon on thursday. temperatures are mild for the next few days. dryer and cooler friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we'll find out this year's nominees for the bafta film awards, as they're announced live in london. also this morning, he's number one in the charts, he's about to set off on a massive 58—date world tour and he's a big fan of bbc breakfast. stormzy will be here.
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and after 9:00, the baby chimpanzees saved from the illegal pet trade in liberia being taught to live in the wild again. a british teenager, convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus, is due to be sentenced this morning. the 19—year—old could be jailed for a year for causing public nuisance after she retracted her original statement alleging she'd been attacked by 12 men in aiya napa. local media has speculated that the cypriot president is planning to pardon her if she receives a prison sentence. john maguire is at the court in paralimni for us this monring — what's the latest john?
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as what's the latestjohn? you can see, a sizeable ant noisy as you can see, a sizeable and very noisy crowd has arrived in the last half hour or so. security staff are trying to control things. this is an office block as well as a court so they are trying to allow access to they are trying to allow access to the office. you can see some of the signs there, and what's really interesting in this case is you don'tjust interesting in this case is you don't just have people interesting in this case is you don'tjust have people hearfrom cyprus and a women's rights advocacy group that has been set up since this case has been in the courts but also from israel as well. the 12 men originally arrested after the rape complaint was made and was subsequently released after the young british woman withdrew her complaint have you can see women here from israel. ijust want complaint have you can see women here from israel. i just want to bring in localjournalists. you can see the cars are trying to get past us as well. we think the sentencing will start in around half—an—hour.
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the samejudge will start in around half—an—hour. the same judge as before. alan to be expected to take? not very long. all we expect is a short speech from the judge sentencing and what we expect to see later on his reaction from the people outside and a presidential pardon is in the cards. it is to be seen. that's the sort of thing that's been talked about. we saw that during the conviction proceedings on december 30. this is really grown momentum. what is the mood been like in cyprus? it didn't start off this strong. there were quite a bit of rumours that spread. incriminating the girl in recent weeks. a surge of solidarity and support for her. we have seen some israeli support. and this is spread
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within cyprus. you are getting a more informed conversation. it was predominantly ruled by rumours and misinformation. is this the sort of thing you would expect a place like cyprus? i would expect it but later is better than never. we do have quite a lead reaction time but it seems in cyprus, people turn up in the end. it will come to show what exactly the result will be from the support mechanisms. it's very obvious to you at home, dan and louise, very vociferous crowd. also what's been significant, a feature of this demonstration is that many of this demonstration is that many of the women as you can see, the
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black fur coat, she has a bandage across the mouth as if to say women have been silenced in this case. we'll have a result from the sentencing definitely within the next hour. then a reaction live on brea kfast. next hour. then a reaction live on breakfast. in northern cyprus at famagusta district court. we'll be back withjohn as soon as we get any more information. the iranian general killed in a us air strike in iraq will be laid to rest in his hometown of kerman today, following a four day funeral procession. huge crowds lined the streets of the iranian capital tehran over the weekend to mourn qasem soleimani, whose death has sparked concerns of wider conflict, amid rising tensions between america and iran. the us has said it won't pull its troops out of iraq. the shadow business secretary, rebecca longbailey, has joined the race to become
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the next labour leader. there are now six candidates in the running — who must win nominations from their fellow mps and gain the support of trade unions before a postal ballot of labour party members. the winner will be announced at a special conference on the 11th of april. sally is with us this morning talking about the final game in the third round of the fa cup. a little bit of ice tennis. —— feisty behaviour. he's not been there very long, but mikel arteta's really making an impact at arsenal. he gave his team the hairdryer treatment at half time last night, after they were totally out—played by leeds in first half of their third round fa cup tie. it worked too, asjoe wilson reports. i tried to give them advice, to tell them exactly what they were going to face and after 32 minutes, we
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started to win and it's impossible, may you look like towards him when we change our attitude, our desire and we change obviously a few things at halftime in organisation, we were completely different. the tottenham say they've found no evidence to support allegations of racism towards chelsea's antonio rudiger. play was stopped when rudiger said that he heard monkey noises during the premier league game at the tottenham hotspur stadium last month. spurs say that both they and the metropolitan police have "exhausted all avenues of investigation". chelsea say that just because there's a lack of evidence, it doesn't mean the incident didn't take place. there's a manchester derby in the semi finals of the league cup tonight. united manager 0le gunner solskjaer‘s been very complimentary of his opposite number in the build up, saying city have ”raised the bar” since pep guardiola has been at the club — giving them something to aim for. guardiola has been less
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complimentary, this what he said when asked if he'd ever consider managing manchester united. it's like i would never train madrid. definitely not. whatever happens in the future. if it was the only offer? i would dream of this if i don't have offers. it's not because not golf courses no—one plays like that. there was another landmark moment for cristiano ronaldo — the man who seemingly gets better with age. he's scored his first hat—trick in the italian league in a 4—0 win forjuventus over cagliari. that's the 56th hat—trick of his career, it also means that he's just the second player to score hat—tricks in england, spain and italy — the other, is alexis sanchez.
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second player. i love statistics. the other one is? it's quite tricky. go on. alexis sanchez. very good. did you look? it's knowledge. i also knew because i looked. never look, you've got to test yourself. matches at this month's australian open could be suspended if the air quality is too bad because of the bush fires. officials are monitoring the air—quality in melbourne, which has been rated as very unhealthy. they say the health of fans, players and staff is their priority at all times. reigning men's champion novak djokovic has suggested that the start of the tournament could be delayed. england will need to take 8 wickets today if they're to win the second test in south africa and level the four match series . dom sibley hit an unbeaten maiden test century as england declared on 391—8 to set the proteas a test record a38 to win. but the tourists could only take 2
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wickets for the rest of yesterday and south africa will begin the final day on 126 for 2. india have submitted a proposal to host the commonwealth shooting and archery events in 2022 even though the games will be hosted by birmingham. shooting and archery have been dropped by the organisers to make way for other events — that's really annoyed india, who threatened to boycott the games completely. they've now said that they want to host those two events, and will pay for the cost of staging them. the commonwelath games federation will consider the proposal in the coming weeks. we've had situations in the past with the commonwealth games has been spread out but that really is moving quite a long way. i take it they got some good competitors. they have a fair chance. the iranian general, qasem soleimani, who was killed in a us air strike last week will be laid to rest today —
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amid rising tensions between the two countries. his death has sparked concerns of a wider conflict, with iran vowing "severe revenge" on the us. donald trump retaliated, promising america would strike "hard and fast" if an attack was carried out. let's discuss this with kamran matin, a senior lecturer in international relations, whojoins us now. good morning to you. let's talk. we have been watching these pictures live this morning. this funeral procession has been going on for several days now. what do you make? well, qasem soleimani was commanding iran's external branch of the revolution regards so he effectively was bleeding and strategising iran was bleeding and strategising iran was make operations across the middle east. because of his position, he was not involved in domestic politics. people are
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unhappy about politics but he had disadvantage of not being seen as one which was reaching some of the basic democratic intervals. so in that sense, i think he is more popular than some other figures in the iranian regime and someone who is seen within iran who fought against isis in iraqi and syria. i should also say there are also people who are not necessarily unhappy about his death. they saw him as one who is spreading sectarian violence in the region so opinion is a bit divided. sectarian violence in the region so opinion is a bit dividedlj sectarian violence in the region so opinion is a bit divided. i suppose the big question for everyone watching this closely, watch what will iran's next big step be? iran is bound to retaliate because of the
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statue of qasem soleimani and every single iranian leader has pledged that. the problem for iran is that the proxy retaliation which gives iran some sort of plausible deniability is not seen as proportionate to what's happened. the new york times, i saw a report that the iranian leader said it has to be done by the regularforces. in that case, donald trump has threatened to bomb 52 sites in iran. that will come to a kind of tit—for—tat, a series of actions which could easily degenerate into war. neither side wants a war. neither side seems to be deliberately seeking the war but the situation is such that it is quite possible to happen so it really all depends on how iran responds. initially it seemed that iran wants to focus, through legal means, the
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iraqi parliament passed the bill. expelling the us from wright. it seems iran is not satisfied with simply that. in the front page of the guardian, the story about the us being forced to deny a plan. it also has a wider impact on the region. the coalition operations in syria is run from iraqi kurdistan. the coalition operations in syria is runfrom iraqi kurdistan. many the coalition operations in syria is run from iraqi kurdistan. many of the main bases for us operations in syria is based in iraqi territory so it would mean leaving syria as well. that involves israeli security and other security issues so i would be very surprised if united states withdraw from iraqi and large—scale anytime soon and they deny that letter was not written. thank you
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indeed. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning to you. this morning it is a bit windy, but it is going to get windier as we go through the day. we are looking at severe gales for scotland and also northern england. in the northern half of the uk, gusting 50 to 60 miles an hour, the north of scotland, devon to five miles an hour or even more than that. if you are ina hour or even more than that. if you are in a high vehicle, a light vehicle or a bike, take note of this. in addition to the strong wind, we have weatherfronts this. in addition to the strong wind, we have weather fronts coming our way and that means they will be some heavy and persistent rain but we are driving up the mild southerly wind so it will be unusually mild for this early injanuary. the average temperatures are six to eight north to south. today, some parts of the north will see 16, a
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good 10 degrees higher than we would expect. we start off with a lot of cloud, one or two brighter breaks. the rain coming from the west continues to push east and south very slowly but it will be heavy and persistent. but it is the wind strength that could lead to disruptions. just in excess of 75 miles an hour across the north—west of scotla nd miles an hour across the north—west of scotland but gales across parts of scotland but gales across parts of england, northern england as well as scotland and gusty with exposure across northern ireland, wales and also the south—west. as we come down towards the south—east, it will still be gusty, does not as windy as it is going to be further north. i mentioned the temperatures. look at these. to eight is the average so pa rt these. to eight is the average so part of northern ireland, north wales, north—east england and around the murray firth area for example are favoured for the highest temperatures, but across—the—boa rd we are looking at double figures. as we are looking at double figures. as we head on through the rest of the afternoon into the evening and overnight the first band of rained
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things south, some spots of rain. the second one comes in with a lot of showers coming our way, some of those will be wintering on the hills in scotland and cooler in the north than in the south where we are still hanging onto the mild air. these are overnight temperatures, not daytime maximums. again, very high for this stage in january. as maximums. again, very high for this stage injanuary. as we move through wednesday, there goes the week cold front sinking off into the near continent. the isobars tell you it will still be windy in the northern half of scotland and we had this neck system coming in later in the day across south—west england and wales. we start off on a largely dry note for most with some sunshine, till the showers packing and across scotla nd till the showers packing and across scotland and still wintering on the hills and also still windy across the far north. later we see the cloud thicken and the arrival of that rain coming in from the north —— south—west england side wales and thatis —— south—west england side wales and that is going to head north. temperatures tomorrow down a touch for some today but still are pretty
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high. as we move through thursday, the first system pushes away and then the timing and placement of the second system, but on friday average of high pressure builds across before this next area from the atla ntic before this next area from the atlantic comes our way, returning us to unsettled conditions. basically as we head towards the end of the week there will be further rain, the winds will not be as strong yesterday and it will be briefly drier and also colder, especially so on friday. thank you very much. very important information for the rest of the week. the race to become the next leader of the labour party officially kicks off today. so far, six mps have said they're running and they'll face their first questions from fellow politicians in parliament this evening. one of the candidates isjess phillips, who is in our london newsroom for us this morning. you have said you want to stand. what you bring to the contest? i think what you bring to the contest? ithinki what you bring to the contest? i think i will bring something different to the contest actually. i
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think that is the main point i would say. after the last election defeat, which was worse than many had feared, but also after the previous three election defeats, that we have had, i think the labour needs to do something different. we have got to stop expecting doing the same thing to resorting the same thing, and what i bring that is different, i think, is an ability to connect with people and make our politics releva nt to people and make our politics relevant to their lives, and whether thatis relevant to their lives, and whether that is policies i feel really releva nt to that is policies i feel really relevant to them or an approach that feels that they can connect with. what labour needs for the country to feel we really ca re what labour needs for the country to feel we really care about them and ca re feel we really care about them and care about improving their lives. feel we really care about them and care about improving their livesm is interesting hearing you speak. is ita is interesting hearing you speak. is it a real break with the past? is that what needs to happen?”
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it a real break with the past? is that what needs to happen? i think if you look at the past, we haven't won a general elections in 2015. my son was born that year. he is now 1a yea rs son was born that year. he is now 1a years old. if we think we don't have to have a break from the past, years old. if we think we don't have to have a breakfrom the past, and we're going to keep repeating it. i think that the labor party falls victim, much more so than other political parties of obsessing over errors in our past rather than, usually we win when the country is calling a big change for the future. i think you might have misspoken. you haven't won since 2005. use a 2015! sorry, 2005. my son was born in 2005. i apologise. 2015! sorry, 2005. my son was born in 2005. iapologise. iam 2015! sorry, 2005. my son was born in 2005. i apologise. i am sure you remember when he was born.|j remember when he was born.|j remember it vividly! as most would. you think it brings something different. let's talk about rebecca long bailey. what is your reaction
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to herjoining in? we were expecting her to join to herjoining in? we were expecting hertojoin in to herjoining in? we were expecting her tojoin in the to herjoining in? we were expecting her to join in the fight, and to herjoining in? we were expecting her tojoin in the fight, and i think that her pitch to the party is very much what we would have expected. rebecca has been in the shadow cabinet, she was very much pa rt shadow cabinet, she was very much part of the drive of the last administration and the last ma nifesto, administration and the last manifesto, so i don't think that what rebecca is saying today is particularly a surprise. let's talk also, i know you have talked about it in some way during the campaign about the northern loyal labour supporters which you lost in droves. how are you going to get them back and persuade them that labour is the one for them? i went to many of these northern heartland seats and i am from the midlands and the midlands and the north seems what the moment is lumped into one of the moment. but i went to many of those seeds and what i found, and actually borisjohnson, very
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seeds and what i found, and actually boris johnson, very few things seeds and what i found, and actually borisjohnson, very few things got right, but he got this right the day after the election, what i found that people were just lending their vote and when i would say, you think you could vote labour again, they would say yes. what i found as they just didn't trust us, they didn't trust us to deliver what we were saying we were going to do, they didn't trust us on issues about leadership, they didn't know where we stood on certain things. and i think that we can win those seeds back. some of them where the majority of 1000 —— win. we have to work to get those back. what worries me is places like mansfield where we only lost it in 2017 and now they have a 16,000 majority. these are big shifts. for everybody, let's talk about where you stand on certain things. with the eu, some people have called you a rejoinder. you would fight campaign to go back in again. this comes out of going and answering a question which maybe
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i... something i am going to commit to. the truth is i was asked a question about a hypothetical. anybody who thinks that they can say exactly what is going to happen in the future, we can't talk about rejoining. we haven't even left yet. what i hope and what everybody should hope, whether i like it or not, is that the very best can come out of the situation that i never wa nted out of the situation that i never wanted to happen. we have to work now to scrutinise what goes on in parliament, what boris johnson now to scrutinise what goes on in parliament, what borisjohnson has promised the country he will deliver over brexit, and we have to make sure he actually delivers that. who knows where we're going be in 2024 or 2025 or even 2030. people were voting for you who might want to vote for you to be the labour, the new labour leader, will want clarity on your view. would you campaign to get back in to europe again?m on your view. would you campaign to get back in to europe again? it is
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based on a premise that i cannot connect. but absolutely, at the moment, we have to accept right now that we lost a general election, and that we lost a general election, and that has consequences for the wii gifted boris johnson that has consequences for the wii gifted borisjohnson a general election. it has consequences. the reality is that who knows, if i was the prime minister in 2030 and awful things were happening to our country andi things were happening to our country and i thought any alliance with any pa rt and i thought any alliance with any part of the world would make us better, why would a prime minister not do that? by no means can we be planning at this stage to be trying to rejoin something we haven't even left when we don't know what is going to happen, and the future is not that simple. i just want to ask you one last question. i think the only candidate not to have held a cabinet or shadow cabinet position, does experience count in this question of what is your view? my view is that in the chamber of the
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house of commons i have managed from the third or fourth house of commons i have managed from the third orfourth bench in that building to both speak in a manner that frightened the opposition, that was listened to by the people in there, and more importantly, actually reached the public. when i speak in parliament there are times when i have spoken when 2 million people have watched it. imagine what i could do from the front that is what i can do from the third. and what i can do from the third. and what are people telling you? have you got the support you need? only the first day of the competition. it is actually the process for electing a new labour leader is now different to how it has ever been done before. it has to be done by mps first, then done by constituency labour parties and an actual members of the labour. and nobody knows what the result is going to be, but what we have to do is work to get that support, and
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what i would ask people to do is ta ke what i would ask people to do is take part in this competition. labour is not going to overcome a historic defeat unless we get people in the countryjoining up with us and helping us to do that. thank you. thank you very much indeed for your time here on bbc breakfast. also coming up late in the programme, talking about the golden globes yesterday and today we are finding out what the bafta nominations are going to be. probably some of the same. much of the similar ones. you are probably right. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. the national headlines coming away at seven o'clock. see you in a minute. good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. 60 firefighters have been at camden's koko club after the roof caught fire last night. the venue, which used to be called camden palace, is famous for hosting the biggest names in music.
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greg mckenzie has sent this update. the fire brigade were called to this iconic venue just before 9pm last night to reports of a blaze, which is believed to have begun on the roof of the building. now, koko is currently closed, under the refurbishment. the fire brigade say fortunately there are no reports of any injuries. the fire brigade managed to bring the fire under control in the early hours of this morning, but a large part of the roof is damaged. greg mckenzie reporting. nadav kander is one of the most influential photographers in the world. in 2009, he won the prix pictet for his photos. we caught up with him in his kentish town studio where he spoke about picking up a camera for the first time. i think it was the first thing that empowered me, it was the first thing that i felt came from me that i did well. i wasn't a great achiever at school, i think i was very dyslexic.
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i don't think it was named in those days, or to me anyway. but i found school really hard and it gave me... yeah, it empowered me that i was doing something for once well, and as i said and as i've always known, i always wanted to be...i always wanted to be expert at something. ok, let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the trains and tubes this morning. but on the roads, following that fire at koko, crowndale road and eversholt street are both closed from 0akley square. and it also means that five bus routes are on diversion. kidbrooke park road is closed southbound just south of kidbrook park station for water works. in acton, there's a lane closed on the a40 westbound at savoy circus for cycle works. now, the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's quite a chilly start for some this morning, especially if you look at the temperature this time tomorrow morning. things are set to get that little bit milder.
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now, we'll see increasing cloud through the day. it's also going to be quite breezy. now, the cloud thick enough at some points to produce the odd spot of light rain and some drizzle. the wind is south—westerly, could become quite gusty through the afternoon and temperatures today getting up to a mild 13 celsius despite that breeze. now, overnight tonight, conditions don't really change at all. again, we've got quite a bit of cloud, some outbreaks of potentially light and patchy rain. one or two breaks. the windfalls light but the temperature barely drops at all. central london at least staying around 12 celsius, so a really mild night. now, for wednesday, again, quite a bit of cloud again. we'll see some rain as we head towards the early evening. temperatures again mild tomorrow. rain overnight into thursday morning. it should clear, though, to a brighter afternoon on thursday. temperatures mild for the next few days. drier and cooler for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning — welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. 0ur headlines today: a british teenager, convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus, is due to be sentenced shortly. we'll be live from the island with reaction. we'll have the latest from iran as the country's top military officer is buried after his assasination by a us drone attack. america denies it will start pulling troops out of iraq. a happy new year, or a christmas hangover? morrisons is the latest big name to update us on how they fared over the festive season —— i'll have the details. arsenal edge it in the fa cup. they need a half—time telling—off from boss mikel arteta to spring them into life against leeds united at the emirates. after his success at the golden globes, will sam mendes's warfilm 1917 be
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in with a chance of a bafta? we'll bring you the nominations live. britain's biggest grime artist stormzy will be here on the sofa talking music and politics. it's going to be a windy day ahead today, already windy in the north and west. the strongest winds in the northern half of the country where we have gusts to gale force. exceptionally mild as well wherever you are. more details on about for ten minutes. ——15 minutes. it's tuesday the 7th of january. our top story. a british teenager, convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus, is due to be sentenced this morning. the 19—year—old could be jailed for a year for causing public nuisance
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after she retracted her original statement alleging she'd been attacked by 12 men in aiya napa. 0ur correspondent, anna holligan, sent this report. the teenager could be jailed for a year and find £1,500 the teenager could be jailed for a year and fined £1,500 after a judge rejected her pleas in court that she was gang—raped and only retracted her statement after she was denied access to a lawyer, an interpreter and placed under intense police pressure. local media has reported the cypriot president, nicos anastasiades, is planning to pardon her if she receives a prison sentence but if it's a suspended sentence orjust a fine, the 19—year—old could be on a flight home today. the foreign office has expressed serious concern about the cypriot authorities' handling of this case. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, urged the country to do the right thing. the teenager travelled to the hedonistic holiday resort in search of a summer job before university. she had her passport
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confiscated and was forced to remain on the island for the trial. if the appeal in cyprus is rejected, lawyers say they plan to take her case to the european court of human rights. anna holligan, bbc news, in aiya napa. john maguire is at the court in paralimni for us this monring — what's the latest, john? when are we expecting to hear what the sentences? we accept the sentencing proceedings will not take long at all. 15 minutes or something like that. it should take place within the next half hour. the family arrived around ten, 15 minutes ago and went into the court. the large crowd you can see in there, well in excess of 150 protesters, not only from cyprus but also from israel. 12 men who were initially arrested but later
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released after the teenager recanted her state, orfrom israel. interesting to see those groups as well. a large demonstration out here. one of the organisations set up here. one of the organisations set up since this case became public, network against violence against women. one of its founders. a very large turnout this morning and a very clear large turnout this morning and a very clear message. large turnout this morning and a very clear message. tell us the strength of feeling in cyprus. what is happening now is amazing for us asa is happening now is amazing for us as a women's movement against violence. the solidarity where we have joined with israeli activist and they are here to shout in favour of the girl because in most of the countries, even in israel, all women are facing the same problems with the system, the sexism of the judiciary system. so we are joining
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our voices and seeking state protection, not only for the case we are facing today but the sentence we are facing today but the sentence we are expecting for the young british lady but for all the women. you are a lawyer, separate government has said it is satisfied the proceedings have been correct. what is your view? all this will be checked in the high court after the appeal case will be filed and if the high court insists that everything was ok, as far as we know from the lawyers of the goal, the case will be gone to the goal, the case will be gone to the european court of human rights where there is plenty of authority, saying the rights of the girls showing the rights of the girls have been violated by the police. what would be a satisfactory sentencing on the court today? i can say it's a
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satisfactory sentence because what is sad for us and totally unacceptable is a conviction. i believe thejudge, because unacceptable is a conviction. i believe the judge, because the pressure he receiving, he may give a sentence of imprisonment but it will be suspended. most of us will be suspended. even if there is a pardon by the president, we strongly disagree because we don't want this conviction to stay. a very clear message, but because of the conviction, all of these protesters talking about the future and perhaps even legal challenges against a conviction. thank you for that update. a strength of feeling outside the court.
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the iranian general killed in a us air strike in iraq is being laid to rest in his hometown of kerman today, following a four day funeral procession. huge numbers of mourners have turned out to pay their final respects to qasem soleimani. his death has sparked concerns of wider conflict, amid rising tensions between america and iran. the shadow business secretary, rebecca longbailey, has joined the race to become the next labour leader. the nominations for the three—month contest formally open today, and the six candidates will take questions from mps in parliament this evening. 0ur political correspondent, helen catt, joins us from westminster. helen, we were expecting this, but does it change anything? 0ne one of those six candidates, should bea one of those six candidates, should be a really interesting day to day, shouldn't it? now heard from all of
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the names in the frame that were going to put themselves forward or not having done so already themselves outside of does look like we've got the sort of final six that are going to go through for this. the latest to declare, rebecca long bailey. she had been to is someone likely to stand unlikely to do that a platform of carrying on thejeremy corbyn levitt —— legacy if you like. it certainly seems that is what she is doing. she didn't want to rush to announce her candidacy because she wa nted announce her candidacy because she wanted to reflect on what she called the devastating result of the election. reflections have led her to believe that was a failure of strategy, not policy. who are this final six? we got emily thornbury, jess phillips, clive lewis, keir starmer, lisa nandy and rebecca long bailey. i have to get the nominations of 10% of labour mps and meps. they got a week to do that and
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nominations open today. in australia, hundreds of volunteer firefighters have attended the funeral of one of their colleagues, who died while battling bushfires. andrew 0'dwyer was killed in new south wales last month when a tree fell in the path of his fire engine. let's speak now to our correspondent, jonathan head, who's there. this is a town called wingello which was other fires over the weekend. the house behind me belonged to a lady called may king who sought for the first time. she was extraordinarily courageous. so many homes like this. we have a number of nearly 2000 houses which have been destroyed in these fires and just at the beginning of the fire season, the beginning of the fire season, the funeral about firemen, a
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reminder that in the incredible effo rts reminder that in the incredible efforts made by the firefighters in the price they paid. they are absolutely exhausted. when they describe trying to battle these absolutely monumental blazes. here in this town, the fire captain described trying to hold it back, thinking they were losing. you realise what efforts people put in to try to deal with this unprecedented disaster so this is one of many towns very badly affected. there is a slight improvement in the weather at the moment. it is a bit cooler. that is giving firefighters the chance to go out. we can smell the smoke everywhere. but because they are not pushing so hard. the firefighters can get out and start to build these fire breaks which they hope. them from spreading. when we get a resumption of much hotter weather expected this week. you mentioned the funeral of one of the
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firefighters today. how dangerous this is for everybody. it is and what killed andrew 0'dwyer, a falling tree, is one of the greatest dangers here. some of the firefighters have been caught up in the most terrifying blazes and in past fires in australia, people have died from the share heat of being burnt to death but once the fires have gone through, particularly with the eucalyptus trees, the gum trees, they become weakened, they are very big and is a very high danger of weakened branches crashing down. it's one of the things we are warned about, a very real risk. the trees you have been scorched as well. we've chosen to do this with you out in the open and away from the trees because of that very risk. you can com pletely because of that very risk. you can completely understand that. i give very much. back to our top story now, and the british teenager convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus
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is due to be sentenced within the next half hour. let's speak to one of her lawyers, michael polak. i know we've spoken to before. let us get your thoughts on what you expect to happen. it's very difficult to predict exactly what the sentence will be. it could really go either way. we're particularly worried about an immediate custodial sentence our psychologists have said this will have a permanent effect on her mental health so it's very important us that she doesn't get an immediate custodial sentence. what have you made of quite a few reports coming out of cyprus that the president there, whatever that sentence will be, is sort of made the decision already to free her anyway and let her go home? i've heard reports
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coming from the greek language media in cyprus to suggest that. i'm not sure exactly where those reports have come from within the separate government. if she is given an immediate custodial sentence and a pardon is given to allow her to return to the united kingdom, that would be fantastic because she needs to be back in the united kingdom, having proper treatment for ptsd. that would not mean she is admitting to the offence at all. we would be appealing to the separate supreme court if you can't getjustice in cyprus. we are watching pictures from outside the famagusta district court. whatever happens, you are assuming you will be appealing the decision. there definitely will be on appeal, she's been subject to a grave injustice. i'm confident we will be successful. maybe not in cyprus but at the european courts because the way the trial was conducted, any objective observer
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could see it wasn't a fair trial for her. you're saying you haven't had confirmation of what the cypriot president has been reported as saying, that he would free your client, whatever happens. do you think that is an indication of the pressure that he and those in the separate government have been under, because of, i suppose, the coverage of this case having had over the last few weeks. the coverage over the last few days has been magnificent. it's been going all around the world. the cypriot people are asking the question, why have we prosecuted this teenager, why has it continued. write to the attorney general of cyprus, we wrote, stopping the prosecution but he decided to prosecute anyway. to ensure the teenager can return home. especially when they hear about psychological evidence that she will
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be damaged if she spends more time in custody and i say more time because she spent 4.5 weeks on remand in the prison in nicosia where i first met her. can you tell how she is today? 0ther where i first met her. can you tell how she is today? other family are doing? i've spoken to her this morning and she is worried about what will happen. she is also very determined and her family what will happen. she is also very determined and herfamily are determined and herfamily are determined and herfamily are determined and a fantastic legal tea m determined and a fantastic legal team made up of english lawyers and the sick. legalteam team made up of english lawyers and the sick. legal team as well. they determined to getjustice for her. always good to talk to you, thank you, i'm sure we will speak to at some point after sentencing as well. he has been one of those barristers working with that 19—year—old who is expecting sentencing at some point this morning. we will be speaking to those protesters supporting her outside of
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court as well. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning. good morning to you as well. if you haven't yet stepped outside, today is going to be windy. the wind is strong for part of the north and the west, could lead to some disruption. to give you an idea of the strength, close the north, we are looking at gusts of 50 to 60 miles an hour, in north—west scotland, gusts of 75 or more. if you are in a high, light or b i cycle, more. if you are in a high, light or bicycle, keep that in mind. it is also rather wet. two wet friends are crossing us, bringing some heavy and persistent rain. you can see if you follow the isobars coming up from the south, that is a mild direction and it will be in amber, not yellow as we would expect at this time of year. damages will be higher and by quite a lot. to start with, fairly cloudy, one or two brighter breaks,
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the rain coming in quite steadily as we go through the course of the day, and heavy and persistent. the wind strength will affect you more than the rain in some parts of the uk. strongest across the north—west of scotland. but still very gusty. bear that in mind if you are travelling. we have the rain pushing across scotland, northern england, northern ireland and into wales. as we pushed down towards the south—east, something brighter but still fairly cloudy and one or two showers. gusty winds not as strong as they will be further north. generally speaking, average temperatures at this stage in january. you average temperatures at this stage injanuary. you can see the hotspots likely to be in the northern ireland, north wales, north—east england north—east scotland. north—east scotland favour as a 16 degrees, possibly even 17. as a head—on through the evening and overnight, you will see how we have a lot of cloud thinking south
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courtesy of the weather front, showers follow—on behind, wintry in the hills of scotland. there will be clear skies in between. something else you will notice is a temperature. coming down behind the cold front as it sinks south, still mild across the south. these would be good daytime temperatures at this time of year, much less nighttime temperatures. as we move through wednesday, the cold front clear the way, the cool air continues to filter further south of the windy across the north of the country and later this in system comes our way. cloud clears from the south, a lot of dry weather and sunshine, flowers —— showers peppering the north, and later we have more rain coming in south—west england and wales and thatis south—west england and wales and that is going to be putting north. wednesday afternoon's temperatures are cooler than today in the north but still mild in the south. thank you very much. we will be watching out for that.
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we all knowjust how crucial the christmas period is for our shops. this week we find out how they fared. ben's with us and he's got news on one of the main supermarkets. this is when it gets really interesting. the shakedown uploaded well over christmas and who didn't. we get quite a lot of results this week. morrison's kicking off this week. morrison's kicking off this week with its figures. they have just told us the sales that covered the crucial christmas period, the 22 weeks are bringing up to the start of january, sales down weeks are bringing up to the start ofjanuary, sales down by 1.7%, so one of the losers of christmas period it is fair to say. we are only in the initial early stages but nonetheless not a great set of figures. morrison's is the fourth largest supermarket in the country facing all of this pressure from discounters now to get people through their doors and to shop there. i have just through their doors and to shop there. i havejust been through their doors and to shop there. i have just been looking at there. i have just been looking at the statement. we have had an update from the chief executive who said it has been an unusually challenging period for sales, which in retail speak means i didn't get as many people through those doors buying as much stuff as they might have wanted
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to. remember, this week we will hear from same breeze, their results tomorrow, marks & spencer, john lewis and tesco, those there on thursday. i really been weak. it is worth putting into context threat from discounters, likes of aldi, because they are eating into the market share. but they are still relatively small. morrison's is the fourth largest and has about 10% of the market. aldi has 8%. they are growing and growing very quickly. by no means are they as widespread across the country as perhaps morrison's, tesco's, sainsbury ‘s. really interesting to hear how they are doing. particularly this year there has been all the uncertainty caused by brexit, a lot of people thinking i will not put my hand in my pocket and have as big a christmas as i might have done before. equally, some saying christmas could be a big hurrah and january, february and march might be difficult for supermarkets and also
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another of different retailers as well. we are starting to get a sense of how they fared. morrison's telling us within the last two minutes their sales were down by nearly 2% over the crucial christmas period. thank you very much. see you later. something you mentioned earlier... the chancellor, sajid javid, has set the 11th of march as the date for his first budget, and what could also be the first post—brexit budget if we do leave the eu at the end of this month. yes, he's promising a decade of renewal with billions of pounds worth of investment. let's discuss this with the treasury secretary, simon clarke, whojoins us now from westminster. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. billions of pounds to be spent. what is your top priority? a decade of renewal. this budget needs to reset the country after such a difficult and turbulent period. we all want to see a levelling agenda which will transform those parts of the country which felt left behind for too long. 0ur the country which felt left behind for too long. our top priority is making that reference so that people feel the infrastructure is improved,
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support for ha rd—working feel the infrastructure is improved, support for hard—working families and we can move on from division and start to heal the country. at a real sense of prosperity back into areas which deserve it. one of the newspapers today, sajid javid a p pa re ntly newspapers today, sajid javid apparently saying part of the treasury could be moved out of whitehall, possibly the economic secretary based on the north. will that happen? as a northern mp, we are very that happen? as a northern mp, we are very keen on making sure we get that presence, that footprint in areas of the country where perhaps central government hasn't been visible for too long. we have to wait and see what we commit to in the budget but we are certainly eager to get out and about across this country, all regions of the uk to spread the message that we are deadly serious about changing the way in which government works and making it work for the people in a way it hasn't done, it hasn't been felt that over far too long. can i ask you about one of the major investments, at the weekend the deputy chair of hs2, the cost of the
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project is out of control. when does not become a value for money? the review is commissioned by the government to give us an independent assessment of this. lord buckley has given his personal view of this, he isa given his personal view of this, he is a member of the panel and clearly had the panel in place for a reason. the government will respond to that, laid before parliament and give our considered review when we get the full review. the cossa out of control? the whole reason the prime minister commission report so we get a proper assessment of whether it offers the right value for money. we love infrastructure and want to make sure we improve our connections across the uk but it does have to be the right set of projects. that is why we have the review. let's talk about improving connections. we talk about improving connections. we talk about this massive investment in hs2 but one of the main problems and you will know this, is the connection between esther, the west, the west indies. at the moment 40% of trains are linking the cities in the north that have been cancelled for the
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rest of the month. you have been in power for many years. why is it so bad? we need to make sure we improve our connections. really northern connectivity is massive. the prime minister committed to delivering the manchester to leeds aspect. we all wa nt to manchester to leeds aspect. we all want to see that improvement. clearly that is why the transport secretary has been thinking about stripping the franchise for northern rail, keeping a close eye on companies in my own patch, so we need to make sure they deliver the quality of service we expect. it is not good enough that productivity in the north fell so far behind what we would expect to see in london. that is what the levelling up agenda is about. we are keeping a close eye on this. we need to make sure we get the infrastructure that we need and it is up to the train companies to keep part of the bargain. simon clark, thank you forjoining us here on breakfast. i have to bring you some breaking news this morning. talking about the sentencing of this 19—year—old british woman which was going to
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ta ke british woman which was going to take place in cyprus. she was convicted of lying about being gang raped. she has been sentenced in the last few moments to four months in jail. that is a suspended sentence for three years. john maguire is outside the district court. john, i know you just receive this news as well. literally the last few moments. a protesters are outside. what is a reaction to that news? as with all of these things, you receive the newsletter that with the same time as i did. as we were hearing from one of the campaigners just half—an—hour ago, something like that, even the conviction should be challenged. they were not challenged —— they were not happy with that. considering what they said to the bbc over the weekend, what we heard from the cypriot authorities, they were considered related done the right thing in the legal process was proportionate. interesting that we had that reaction. it hasn't quite filtered down through the crowd yet, but as
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you can hear, very, noisy here outside the district court. that sentencing really only took about 15 minutes, 20 minutes or so. but we should be able to get some reaction from people here as soon as we get a chance. i would just grab someone. excuse me. have you heard the sentence ? excuse me. have you heard the sentence? no. it is a suspended sentence. four months, suspended for three years. she will be free to go home. if she still convicted? what has been your reaction to the sentencing? i am the head of the association... i am from israel. this sentence in my opinion is horrible. she should not... at the beginning, not been sentenced to anything. is israel, if you come and give a complaint and afterwards, you
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are never blamed because you should understand... the sexual violence. she is not to blame at all. the jurisdiction in the system here is way, way backwards. she is the vic and it happened many times, and under the pressure of the police, she is 19 years old, she is so young. chanting. we think is unbelievable. sexual abuse, sexual violence everywhere should be stopped chanting. thank you very much indeed. interesting to hear that it is a different system in israel. perhaps one of the reasons why the campaigners here, the israeli campaigners here, the israeli campaigners that have arrived, the 12 men initially arrested in connection with this incident are all from israel. interesting to hear the different perspectives. you can see the door of the cop behind me, a
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very large press pack so we are waiting for the young woman and her family to emerge. we are led to believe there will be a statement from the lawyer. we will bring you those details as soon as we have them. john maguire, thank you very much. interesting to hear that. all this happening in the last few moments. there is a four—month jail sentence for that 19—year—old british woman convicted of lying about being gang racked in cyprus. it has been suspended for three years. we will keep you up—to—date with what that means in the next few minutes. we will be back in the court. we are expecting to hear from will be back in the court. we are expecting to hearfrom her lawyer as well. of that coming up shortly after the news, travel and when wherever you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. 60 firefighters have been at camden's koko club after the roof caught fire last night. the venue, which used to be called camden palace, is famous for hosting the biggest names in music. greg mckenzie has sent this update.
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the fire brigade were called to this iconic venue just before 9pm last night to reports of a blaze, which is believed to have begun on the roof of the building. the fire was under controljust before three o'clock this morning. as pa rt of before three o'clock this morning. as part of our role and we can carry out a thorough investigation, we ensure there is no further fire spread. we are using our equipment to continue checks and make sure there is no unexpected fire spread. now, koko is currently closed, under refurbishment. the fire brigade say fortunately there are no reports of any injuries. the fire brigade managed to bring the fire under control in the early hours of this morning, but a large part of the roof is damaged. greg mckenzie reporting there. now, it's one of the biggest events in the cycling calander and has
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raised millions of pounds for charity. the route of the ride london cycle event is in question following criticism for the disruption it causes to residents in surrey. people have until the middle of next month to have their say. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the trains and tubes this morning. 0n the roads following that fire at koko, crowndale road and eversholt street are both closed from 0akley square. and it also means that five bus routes are on diversion. kidbrooke park road is closed southbound just south of kidbrook park station for water works. in acton, there's a lane closed on the a40 westbound at savoy circus for cycle works. now, the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's quite a chilly start for some this morning, especially if you look at the temperature this time tomorrow morning. things are set to get that little bit milder. now, we'll see increasing
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cloud through the day. it's also going to be quite breezy. now, the cloud thick enough at some points to produce the odd spot of light rain and some drizzle. the wind is south—westerly, could become quite gusty through the afternoon and temperatures today getting up to a mild 13 celsius despite that breeze. now, overnight tonight, conditions don't really change at all. again, we've got quite a bit of cloud, some outbreaks of potentially light and patchy rain. one or two breaks. the windfalls light but the temperature barely drops at all. central london at least staying around 12 celsius, so a really mild night. now, for wednesday, again, quite a bit of cloud again. we'll see some rain as we head towards the early evening. temperatures again mild tomorrow. rain overnight into thursday morning. it should clear, though, to a brighter afternoon on thursday. temperatures mild for the next few days. drier and cooler for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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it's hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. in the last few minutes, a british teenager, convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus, is due to be sentenced this —— has been given a 4—month sentence suspended for 3 years. she retracted her original statement alleging she'd been attacked by 12 men in aiya napa. john maguire is at the court in paralimni for us this morning — what's the latest john? they are. as we said, perhaps one of they are. as we said, perhaps one of the more lenient ones but what a lot of people are saying here or shouting indeed is that the conviction shouldn't have happened
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in the first place. even taking things to sentencing was a step too far. we had heard from the foreign secretary persuading, cajoling the authorities to be as lenient as possible. the same judge who oversaw the conviction proceedings back on december 13. at that time, he was very dismissive of the young woman. we've just heard about the sentencing. perhaps lenient compared to what could have happened, she could have been ordered to serve a yearin could have been ordered to serve a year injail. if could have been ordered to serve a year in jail. if that would have happened, the world would have shaken. this is unbelievable. the sentence reflects backward thinking and not understanding the dynamics and not understanding the dynamics and thejudge and not understanding the dynamics and the judge must learn about what happens to a victim of sexual abuse. this is a young lady, 19 years old,
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she will go to university, she will go to have a job and she has a record in her past. she has a criminal offence, it will influence the life and the suspended sentence is bad from the beginning. people coming from abroad. it's absurd. the 12 men initially accused and released for all from israel. that's why i'm here. tells about the reaction. in israel, there is a growing understanding about how bad the big epidemic of sexual violence influences everybody. we as activists and reminisced understand these younger men, they will grow up and understand that even if they we re and understand that even if they
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were not sent to jail, what they did is immoral, it's bad, it's horrible and they injured a soul. they very badly injured a living soul. a lot of them, to think about it, for life. this is gang sex, gang rape. something that should not happen. no woman would want to be with so many people together. afterwards, a sentence. i had that association of rape crisis sentencing in israel. we wa nt to rape crisis sentencing in israel. we want to the police in israel to interrogate them over the filming and sending these films but the police minister said they don't have enough resources. thank you for talking to us here outside the court. you will have noted the law is very different in israel. i think i'm right in saying if someone makes
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false allegations of rape then retracted, and perhaps they are not treated in the same way this young woman has been treated. that is the door of the famagusta district court. being laid siege by journalists from across the world, across israel and cyprus. very much so from the uk. we are expecting some reaction from inside the court. expecting people to come out and talk to everybody. just to reiterate, the 4— month jail sentence. she could have faced a yearin sentence. she could have faced a year injail. the lies sentence. she could have faced a year in jail. the lies asked for that. the feeling was before that sentence came out that if it had been a suspended sentence, should be able to leave and come back to the uk in the next 24 hours so we await to see what her lawyers say on the steps of that courtroom in paralimni
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wherejohn mcguire steps of that courtroom in paralimni where john mcguire has steps of that courtroom in paralimni wherejohn mcguire has been. we will bring that to you soon. the iranian general killed in a us air strike in iraq will be laid to rest in his hometown of kerman today, following a four day funeral procession. huge crowds have lined the streets to mourn qasem soleimani, whose death has sparked concerns of wider conflict, amid rising tensions between america and iran. the us has said it won't pull its troops out of iraq. the shadow business secretary, rebecca longbailey, has joined the race to become the next labour leader. there are now six candidates in the running — who must win nominations from their fellow mps and gain the support of trade unions before a postal ballot of labour party members. the winner will be announced at a special conference on the 4th of april. the home secretary has called for an urgent review of the classification of a drug thought to have been used by the uk's most prolific rapist.
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reynhard sinaga was jailed for a minimum of 30 years yesterday for more than 150 offences. his victims were men, who he's thought to have drugged using a form of class c drug ‘ghb'. greater manchester police has set up a dedicated number to provide support for anyone affected by this story. it's on your screen now, 0800 056 0154. or if you wish to contact the police and make a report related to this case, the number is 0800 092 0410. in australia, hundreds of volunteer firefighters have attended the funeral of one of their colleagues, who died while battling bushfires. andrew 0'dwyer was killed in new south wales last month when a tree fell in the path of his fire engine. his 19—month—old daughter charlotte was presented with her father's medal for bravery at the service.
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elsewhere in australia, a volunteer firefighter has filmed the moment he rescued a baby joey from flames. sam mcglone posted this video on instagram, taken near his hometown of braidwood, an hour east of canberra in new south wales. he immediately got to work extinguishing spot fires and managed to rescue the orphaned joey, which was hiding from encroaching flames under a log. amazing pictures and thankfully lots of animals have died in those fires that that is what has happened there. all those numerous koalas have been brought in. we'll keep following that story. thanks and tha nkfully following that story. thanks and thankfully not —— and thankfully those animals didn't die.
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coming up on the programme. carol will have the weather. we will be talking about the bafta awards. i know you are following this as we go. sorry to interrupt. here they are. and lastly, the nominations for best film. so finally, these are all 39 of the feature films. we can discover more
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about them and the talented people behind them. thank you very much and congratulations to all the nominees. we might miss some of the key moments. the big shock whereas the film with the most nominations is joker, joaquin phoenix, that is the most nominated film at the bafta awards. it had 11 nominations, ten nominations going to the irishman, martin scorsese with robert the niro and al pacino and ten nominations for once upon a time in hollywood, quentin tarantino's version of the charles manson murders in 1969. many said the one that would have the most nominations was 1917, the same end as film which did so well at the
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globin —— the golden globes. —— sam mendes film. joaquin phoenix one of the golden globes, it's not out of the golden globes, it's not out of the blue. just to have done that well in britain. in terms of 1917, it's not on release here until friday. perfect timing for this film to have done so well at the golden globes. i've not got the whole nominations as of yet. you just saw that. five leading actor nominees. leonardo do go, adam driver, from rocket man taron egerton. joker, joaquin phoenix. jonathan pryce. jesse buckley, scarlettjohansson
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saoirse ronan for little women, bombshell, charlize theron and renee zellweger forjudy. bombshell, charlize theron and renee zellwegerforjudy. i'm going to get through. six nominees for outstanding british film. 1917, bait, for sama, sorry we missed you and the to posts —— popes. bait, for sama, sorry we missed you and the to posts -- popes. blue story, the film that made so many headlines has missed out. it was widely tipped. it made all the headlines when it was withdrawn from some cinema chains. yesterday, you had michael ward getting nominated. people really thought that might be nominated. that is up with a record books, joker. most wins ever for one
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year is butch cassidy and the sundance kid. thank you very much. we will let you go and peruse that a bit more when we are not quite so breathless. we will have the sport shortly. right now, let's get the weather. good morning. it is a windy day ahead of us. already gusting around 50 or 60 miles an hour across parts of the north and west of uk. the strongest winds will be in the northern half, north wales, northern england and scotland and northern ireland, gusts of 50 to 60 miles an hour through the course of the day. for the north—west of scotland, gusts of 75 miles an hour plus. these are damaging gusts and some disruption is possible as we go through the course of the day. something to be aware of if you are ina higher something to be aware of if you are in a higher vehicle, something to be aware of if you are in a highervehicle, ora
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something to be aware of if you are in a higher vehicle, or a light vehicle. you can see weather fronts costing us —— crossing us that are bringing rain. they are coming from the south, so temperatures well above average full early january. this morning is a cloudy start across much of england, a few showers in wales, one or two bright spells and we have the rain coming in from the west and pushing southwards and eastwards. the wind strength could lead to disruption, particularly across the far north—west of scotland. we are looking at gusts of 75 miles an hour. even inland across scotland, northern —— northern ireland and gusts of 50 to 60 miles an hour plus the rain. some nasty travelling conditions. down through the midlands and a south—east into the south—west, looking at drier conditions but still a few showers but generally speaking the wins will be dusty further north. i mentioned the temperatures. look at those. at
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this time of year we would normally have six in the north and eight in the south. we are way above that across the board. the highest temperatures today are likely to be in northern ireland, north wales, north—east england and around the murray firth. in north—east scotland, 16, possibly 17 degrees. through this evening and overnight, you can see how the weather front sinks down, a big weatherfeature taking cloud and whether with it. there will be a lot of showers, particularly in the north and west. some of those will be wintry on the hills in scotland. very mild in the south for the stage in january, hills in scotland. very mild in the south for the stage injanuary, 11 to 12. wednesday, we say goodbye to the cold front, but it will start to introduce colder air further south and later on in the day we have this next system coming our way. the isobars tell you it will still be windy across the north of the country. still a lot of showers, a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine around. we say goodbye to the cold front, dragging its cloud
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away and we have this next system coming in across the south—west of england and south wales, and that will be pushing north through the rest of the evening and overnight. temperatures tomorrow, seven in the north but still something a bit milder further south. we will see you in half—an—hour. a lot of breaking news on the programme this morning. we have been live in cyprus where the 19 rob british woman have been given a four—month jail sentence, suspended for three years. we have had a live after nominations which we will go through later on and we have plenty of foot all talk about as well. this is a character that you always think... actually, i am talking about the new arsenal boss. he is having a real impact. he is quite a cool and calm and collected character but he wasn't last night. he gave his team a real hairdryer
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treatment at halftime after they we re treatment at halftime after they were totally outplayed by leeds. they wore pale blue rather than white. healy showed his skills. leeds threatened to score with almost every attack. emiliano martinez was in goalfor arsenal. he at least showed his skills. well, he had to. arsenal's manager has his own reputation to build, and mikel arteta needed more from his players. well, he'd picked a strong team. the free kick taker for example. commentator: it's going to be lacazette. . . it was always going to be lacazette. yep, close. but now, arsenal were energised, and even though this attack featured a big assist from a leeds boot,
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it was a sign of the way the game had moved. reiss nelson's finish. if arsenal supporters wanted commitment, they saw it. var examined lacazette's entanglement here. no further action. have a look at this contest by the corner flag — old —fashioned cup stuff. well, no cards shown and arsenal toughed it out. exactly what he needed. joe wilson, bbc news. arsenal will play bournemouth in the fourth round of the fa cup. all the ties are on the bbc sport website. tottenham say they've found no evidence to support allegations of racism towards chelsea's antonio rudiger. play was stopped when rudiger said that he heard monkey noises during the premier league game at the tottenham hotspur stadium last month. spurs say that both they and the metropolitan police have "exhausted all avenues of investigation." chelsea say that just because there's a lack of evidence, it doesn't mean the incident didn't take place. organisers of this month's australian open say they don't expect any delays to the start of the tournament despite
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the ongoing bush fires. reigning men's champion novak djokovic had suggested that the start could be delayed because of the air quality in melbourne, which has been rated as "very unhealthy". tournament officials say the health of fans, players and staff is their priority at all times, and the weather forecast is good. great britain have a good chance of reaching the quarterfinals of the atp cup. this is a new knockout tournament that's been set up by the men's professional tour to kick off the 2020 season. jamie murray and joe salisbury won their final group game against moldova in sydney and britain will qualify for the quarters if results go their way later. and the final day's play in the second test between england and south africa starts in an hour's time. england need eight wickets to win.
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impossible. it is going to happen, isn't it? did it again? your predictions. he is normally right. jimmy arneson... come on,jimmy. —— is normally right. jimmy arneson... come on, jimmy. —— anderson. thank you very much. wi—fi enabled litter boxes for cats and a rotating tv specifically designed for use by the tiktok generation — the latest social media platform. do you have some of those in your house? 0h, do you have some of those in your house? oh, yes! just some of the new technology on display at the world's biggest consumer tech showcase in las vegas. it's a chance for aspiring start—ups and established brands to show off their latest gadgets. our reporter zoe kleinmann has been to find out what's creating a buzz. it looks like pork and it is supposed to taste like it as well but this is a new meat free alternative. the impossible sausage is by the same company who gave us fa ke is by the same company who gave us fake burgers last year was not pork
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isa fake burgers last year was not pork is a perennial favourite, particularly in china. they attempt to attract a lucrative market of meat eaters. there are a lot of meat eaters in asia and china. we were in shanghai serving 25,000 versions of our locally inspired cuisine and i think you will see us eventually be everywhere, every major market where the meat eater demands great product. there is not an animal insight in the making of this, but does it pass the taste test? this is a challenge i am going to enjoy. here we go. what i would say about it... it is spicy. what i would say about it is it has a very light texture, it is lighter than you would expect from something like a pork sausage a p pa re ntly something like a pork sausage apparently it has half the calories than you can feel that. it is less fatty. does it beat the sausage?
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well, i am fatty. does it beat the sausage? well, iam not fatty. does it beat the sausage? well, i am not sure about that. that is one of the products on display at the world by the largest tech fair in las vegas where 180,000 the world by the largest tech fair in las vegas where180,000 people flocked to see notjust the new tech trends of the year, but of the decade. furniture that moves itself to you, robots to suit your every need. driverless vehicles of all shapes and sizes, and screens everywhere. screens that are paperthin, screens that fold, screen that roll up into the ceiling. they could be yours forjust £45,000. it is always a smorgasbord of the weird, the wonderful and the potentially quite useful. what will catch on and what will disappear without even a digital trace, but ultimately that is up to the consumer. i like that television. i think it is great, but they tend to dominate. they do, absolutely. it will change,
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i expect. it willjust be on your wall. switch it on and it will miraculously appear. you are watching breakfast and bbc news. still to come on the programme, lots, including this... rapping he is number one in the chart and about to set off on a massive 58 day world tour. and we knew it already. he isa world tour. and we knew it already. he is a big fan of bbc breakfast. so much, we are included in one of his lyrics. yeah, stormzy will be with us at 8:30am. lots to talk to him about. he has had a very big christmas. he was reading from the bible a christmas message on christmas day. he is hea christmas message on christmas day. he is he a little bit later. we are talking about, because i have been cooking, about how to feed your family for £20 a week. some of the recipes are pretty impressive, aren't they? have been
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transformed. you read the cookery book and you tested it out as well. we are also speaking to a professor later in the programme who is talking about... i suppose it is quite injune with australia with lots of the animals attempting, people trying to rescue various animals. that is coming up a little later. he is also talking about people who own chimpanzees and what should be done about that. and a reaction in the last 40 minutes, we have heard the sentencing of the 19—year—old british woman convicted of lying about being gang raped in cyprus. we know she has been given a four—month suspended sentence. that sentence has been suspended for three years. we are expecting a statement from the lawyer but it has not happened. when it does, we will bring it to you. and bafta nominations to tie up as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you in a moment.
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good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. 60 firefighters have been at camden's koko club after the roof caught fire last night. the venue, which used to be called camden palace, is famous for hosting the biggest names in music. greg mckenzie has sent this update. the fire brigade were called to this iconic venue just before 9pm last night to reports of a blaze, which is believed to have begun on the roof of the building. the fire was under control just before 3:00 this morning. as part of our role and we can carry out a thorough investigation, we ensure that there is no furtherfire spread. the group will continue to do checks through the evening. we are using our equipment to continue checks and make sure there is no unexpected fire spread. we will look for hotspots. now, koko is currently closed, under refurbishment. the fire brigade say fortunately there are no reports of any injuries. the fire brigade managed to bring the fire under control in the early
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hours of this morning, but a large part of the roof is damaged. greg mckenzie reporting. a large exclusion zone is in place in essex after a chemical leak in the area last night. residents were asked to stay inside and schools are closed in west thurrock after clouds of fumes were reported following a reaction in an industrial cylinder. we willl bring you more on that as we have it. now, it's one of the biggest events in the cycling calander and has —— calendar, and has raised millions of pounds for charity. but the route of ridelondon has always faced opposition from some people in surrey because of disruption and road closures. well, now the county council is consulting on whether the route should continue to run through the area at all. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on all the trains and tubes this morning. but on the roads following that fire at koko, crowndale road and eversholt street are both closed from oakley square.
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and it also means that five bus routes are on diversion. now, the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's quite a chilly start for some this morning, especially if you look at the temperature this time tomorrow morning. things are set to get that little bit milder. now, we'll see increasing cloud through the day. it's also going to be quite breezy. now, the cloud thick enough at some points to produce the odd spot of light rain and some drizzle. the wind is south—westerly, could become quite gusty through the afternoon and temperatures today getting up to a mild 13 celsius despite that breeze. now, overnight tonight, conditions don't really change at all. again, we've got quite a bit of cloud, some outbreaks of potentially light and patchy rain. one or two breaks. the windfalls light but the temperature barely drops at all. central london at least staying around 12 celsius, so a really mild night. now, for wednesday, again, quite a bit of cloud again. we'll see some rain as we head towards the early evening. temperatures again mild tomorrow. rain overnight into thursday morning.
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it should clear, though, to a brighter afternoon on thursday. temperatures mild for the next few days. drier and cooler for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a british teenager convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus has been given a four month suspended sentence. we'll be live from the island with reaction.
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we'll have the latest from iran as the country's top military officer is buried after his assasination by a us drone attack. america denies it will start pulling troops out of iraq. an unusually challenging period for sales. morrisons boss warns of tough trading as it reports christmas sales down nearly 2%. arsenal edge it in the fa cup. they needed a half—time telling off from boss mikel arteta to spring them into life against leeds united at the emirates. after his success at the golden globes, will sam mendes' war film 1917 be in with a chance of a bafta ? we will talk about the nominations shortly. # i'm too bbc breakfast...
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britain's biggest grime artist stormzy will be here on the sofa talking music and politics. a windy day ahead, gusts of 275 mph plus across the north—west of scotland, but for england, wales and northern ireland, more likely to be 50 or 60. add in some rain and there will be nasty travelling conditions. more info minutes. —— michael moore in 15 minutes. it's tuesday the 7th of january. our top story: in the last half hour, a british teenager convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus has been given a four months sentence, suspended for three years. the 19—year—old was found guilty of causing public nuisance after she retracted her original statement alleging she'd been attacked by 12 men in ayia napa. john maguire is at the court in paralimni for us this monring. what's the latest, john? good morning, we are outside the doors of the court and joined by the family's advocates. literally the
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judgment was passed down within the past hour or so. what is your initial reaction to today's suspended sentence? we are delighted, we came to court with trepidation, notjust delighted, we came to court with trepidation, not just because delighted, we came to court with trepidation, notjust because of the damaging effect of the conviction, not knowing whether, in fact, it would be immediate custodial all, in fa ct, would be immediate custodial all, in fact, a suspended sentence, so we are pleased she is going home. tell usa are pleased she is going home. tell us a little bit about her, her mother previously told the bbc she has been diagnosed with post—traumatic stress disorder, how have the last several months been for her and her family? it has been a very traumatic ordeal, effectively she has had to wait six months, she has had several adjournments in terms of the trial of this matter, preliminary legal matters. she was in custody for a bad foreign to half weeks ina in custody for a bad foreign to half weeks in a cell with eight other women ina
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weeks in a cell with eight other women in a prison in nicosia, then she has been unfairly stringent bail conditions. it is a relief she is going home. while we are delighted with the sentence, we will be appealing the conviction, we will be seeking an expedited appeal to the supreme court of cyprus and we also will consider going to the european court of human rights. the case is not finished by any means. has she been aware of the amount of support? there are lots of people, campaigners not just from there are lots of people, campaigners notjust from cyprus but the uk and israel and very vociferous at the sentencing. she has been completely aware of all the international support, she has had well—wishers from around the world, particularly israel, who were concerned about her plight and her treatment and concerned as to whether she was actually getting justice. we feel we have had justice today in terms of the sentence but we do not feel we have had justice in terms of how the trial progressed, the manner in which it
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was conducted, the initial police investigation and the fact that we say she did not receive a child. we had not quite an intervention but some comments from the foreign secretary on the weekend urging leniency, if you like. do you think any of those behind—the—scenes negotiations have made a difference? we know the foreign office has intervened in the last week and we applaud that. we know dominic raab has spoken to his counterparts in the separate government, we know he has found the cypriot president, we know he has made very clear comments. he said at the andrew marr show last week that he made his position crystal to the cypriot government, so position crystal to the cypriot government, so we position crystal to the cypriot government, so we think the pressure that has been brought to by has had some influence, although of course we cannot comment on the political nature of this case. thank you very much indeed for your time and bbc
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brea kfast. much indeed for your time and bbc breakfast. i will take you out to show use above the crowds outside the court. thejudge show use above the crowds outside the court. the judge will follow due process in cyprus, he followed the law as it stands in cyprus, but he will have had the sounds of the campaign is ringing in his ears as he passed sentence on the young woman this morning. —— sounds of the campaigners. as you just heard from the family's legal team, they will be appealing against the initial conviction back in december, clearly the case has a long way to run. very interesting to be hearing from the lawyer, saying she is coming home today and they will appeal to the supreme court in cyprus and possibly to the european court of human rights. this case does not end there for them, as the lawyer said. that is the latest on the breaking story. plenty of other news around. the shadow business secretary, rebecca longbailey, has joined the race to become the next labour leader. the nominations for the three—month contest formally open today, and the six candidates will take
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questions from mps in parliament this evening. our political correspondent helen cattjoins us from westminster. i suppose this is quite a crowded line—up? i suppose this is quite a crowded line-up? it looks like the final six. rebecca longbailey declaring late last night that she would run. as expected she is pitching herself very strongly as someone who would carry on the legacy ofjeremy corbyn, saying she had not rushed in and she was standing for leader because she wanted to reflect on what she said were the devastating results of the election, but she felt that was dealt to strategy, not policy, and not only did she agree with labour policies that help to write them. herron huntsman takes the field to six. they are emily thornberry, jess phillips, sir keir starmer, clive lewis, lisa nandy and rebecca longbailey. bally time to draw breath, they have nowjust a week to get 10% of labour mps and meps, 22, to nominate them to go
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through to the next round of the leadership contest where they will need to get the nominations of local labour parties and trade unions and affiliate to make it onto the final ballot which goes out to members and registered supporters. the process is set to take until april seconds and the new leader of the labour party will be announced at a special conference on april four. thank you, helen. the iranian general killed in a us air strike in iraq will be laid to rest in his hometown of kerman today, following a four day funeral procession. huge crowds have lined the streets to mourn qassem soleimani, whose death has sparked concerns of wider conflict, amid rising tensions between america and iran. the us has said it won't pull its troops out of iraq. iran described all us forces as ‘terrorists' for killing the general. in australia, hundreds of volunteer firefighters have attended the funeral of one of their colleagues, who died while battling bushfires. andrew o'dwyer was killed in new south wales last month when a tree fell in the path of his fire engine.
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let's speak now to our correspondent, jonathan head, who's there. we have been speaking to you throughout the morning, the scene behind you gives us a very clear picture of the damage that has been caused by these fires across australia? yes, this is a town called when jell—o australia? yes, this is a town called whenjell—o which was hit by a massive fire described in the most apocalyptic terms by its residents and firefighters over the weekend. —— this is a town called wingello. the house hide me, the owner was unlucky, the firefighters tried to contain the fire and kept it to only 12 houses in this destroyed —— in this town which were destroyed. the quy this town which were destroyed. the guy who runs the village store said it was like a miracle, the whole sky turns purple, they were consumed by a massive cloud of driving ash, you had to put goggles on to deal with it, a huge red glow and then roaring
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like a freight train as the fire came through and they went hell for leather in their car. the firefighters stayed and fought it and save most of the 50 odd homes here. it is a town of about 400 people. you will see these scenes replicated across new south wales. people shocked by the destruction that hugely relieved it is not worse, full of praise for the incredible efforts of firefighters who have helped each other, come from other towns each time the fires have moved. i think standard has been quite smoky but cleared up a little in the last hour also, there are still fires blazing but they are not leaving because of the lack of wind, which enables the firefighters to stop putting in containment measures, big gaps in the vegetation, in the hope they can stop them spreading if they pick up again once the weather gets hot and windy, and it is likely to do that over the next week or two. thank you for that incredible description of some of the remarkable work being turned by emergency services to save
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other peoples houses in wingello in australia. —— work being done. it is such an incredible thing. this morning we've been hearing about the case of reynhard sinaga, the man police are describing as the most prolific rapist in british legal history. prosecutors say sinaga attacked as many as 190 men, and yesterday he was sentenced to a minimum of 30 years injail. graham satchell has been speaking to sam, a survivor of sexual assault, about the stigma associated with the crime. the face of a monster. reynhard sinaga grinning on his social media pages is the most prolific rapist in british legal history. police say there may be as many as 200 victims. sinaga prowled the streets of manchester, searching for men before luring them back to his flat. we've been speaking to one man, not one of sinaga's victims, who was raped in 2016. when i broke down to my mum on the phone and told her that ijust wanted to die, i genuinely meant it. i didn't want to be...i didn't want to be anywhere. i didn't want to live with it.
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sam was assaulted by two men in a hotel room in manchester. he'd been out with his girlfriend, but at the end of the night, they became separated. sam got chatting to a group of men and went for one more drink. i think the first thing when people hear male rape is they automatically associate it with homosexuality. i think that there's a certain stigma attached to it, masculinity, that we say that you can't be a masculine man if you've not fought back and you've allowed this thing to happen and you've not...yeah, done whatever you can to go and find the perpetrators or even allow, you know, there to be perpetrators. so i think that what defines us as men or supposedly defines us as men is impacted from the offset as soon as something like this happens. this is st mary's in manchester, a sexual assault referral centre. it's where sam was treated, as were many of the men raped by sinaga. we've seen an increase of around the 33% mark for men coming forward.
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—— we've seen an increase of around the 33% mark for men coming forward. i'm an optimist. so, i like to think it's not an increase in sexual violence. i think it's an increase in confidence in people being able to come forward. the shame, the stigma associated with sexual assault means it's been a dramatically underreported crime. some studies suggest 90% of male rapes are never reported. sam did go to the police but says it was an experience that made things worse. they asked me about my sexuality, about whether i'd ever cheated on my girlfriend before, about whether i'd ever had a male sexual encounter. but it all made me feel at the time that i really wasn't being believed here, like, i didn't understand what — whether or not i'm straight or gay, was does that have any difference? obviously, the issue's over consent. greater manchester police told us they've learned lessons from sam's case and they're now urging anyone who thinks they may have been assaulted by sinaga to come forward. graham satchell, bbc news.
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first of all, thanks to sam for talking to us about his experiences. details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 077 077. we have numbers on our media if you wish to contact police specifically about the reynhard sinaga case. if you have just on, about the reynhard sinaga case. if you havejust on, we have got about the reynhard sinaga case. if you have just on, we have got that if you just turned on, we have got stormzy coming on. he actually names bbc breakfast in his later son. louise always has a grin when she hears that sun, the same grin she gets when we hand over to carol kirkwood!
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the weather is a bit stormzy this morning, gales across scotland, northern ireland, northern england the north wales. if you're travelling on a high sided vehicle, a light vehicle or a bike, by that in mind. we had some rain and we are looking at a very mild way. the kind of gusts of wind we had just seen are already creeping up. so he 66 mph, 50 mph at tiree, 44 on the isle of man. we are being governed by low pressure. you can see the isobars across the charge, windy everywhere, the strongest winds in the northern half and we have weather fronts introducing some rain. but the winter is mild, it is coming up from the south. we are looking at a very mild day for this stage injanuary. starting with a bit of cloud, one or two brighter spells, the rain coming in from the west pushes south and east. some of this will be heavy and
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persistent, especially the further north you travel, and further north we have the highest gusts of wind. considered to 75, may be more across the north—west of scotland, and lunch for the rest of scotland, northern ireland, northern england and north wales, gusts of 50 to 60 mph. some tricky travelling conditions when you add the rain. we will see special —— splashes of rain across wales and south—west england but for the midlands into east anglia and the south—east and the channel islands, something drier with fewer showers and although it will be windy, not as wendy. temperatures at this stage in january, generally speaking, the average is six in the north, to eight in the south. way above average for the time of year. the favoured areas for higher temperatures are northern ireland, north wales, north—east england and north—east scotland. in north—east scotla nd north—east scotland. in north—east scotland we could hit 16, possibly 17. this evening and overnight, the bounds of cloud and rain which will
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be weakening all the time will push towards the south, clear skies follow behind, still windy across the north. last windy further south and lots of showers. —— less windy. temperatures of five to six in the north, still double figures in the south, these are overnight temperatures, not maximum daytime temperatures. we lose the cold front through wednesday, still windy in the north, later in the day we have this next system bringing rain to south—west england initially. there goes the cloud and the patchy rain from the south—east, lots of dry weather, showers, windy and the north, boasting 15 or 16 mph, wintry on the hills and here comes the rain across the south—west of england initially, getting into wales are moving northwards for the rest of the day and overnight. temperatures in the south in double figures, but cooler as we push further north. so some unusual temperatures. thank
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you, carol. the award season for 2020 is well and truly under way. we had the golden globes in hollywood on sunday night and also the return of the baftas. the nominees were announced in the last hour. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson can tell us more. i have been periods in them, i have brought my clipboard back. leading the way with 11 is joker, the origin story of batman's nemesis, portrayed by working venus —— betrayed byjoaquin phoenix. he was nominated for best actor, he has been nominated for gladiator and walk the line and ten years ago heath ledger won his posthumous ba fta for heath ledger won his posthumous bafta for playing the joker.
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provides the film divided opinion. some loved it, some hated it, but it was watched and made a lot of money. it won the berlin film festival last year, that is when the dimension really grew. a very violent film and not one to set your four—year—old fan of batman in front of! it is almost a remaking of martin scorsese's taxi driver. martin scorsese's taxi driver. martin scorsese was in talks to direct it at first, he has been outspoken about his dislike of comic book movies. and here is the film up against? martin scorsese for the irishman, with ten nominations. martin scorsese nominated for best director. it is a the true story, and what a cast. —— it is a mop story, a true story. joe penchee is nominated, robert de niro is not, martin scorsese is nominated for
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best director 44 years after he was first nominated for alex goode kvyat any more. joker has 11, the irishman has ten, and another one with ten is once upona has ten, and another one with ten is once upon a time in hollywood, quentin tarantino's love letter to the movies of the late 60s and the actors in hollywood, the reimagining of the sharon tate murders. it is very interesting to see we have a nomination and best supporting actress for this film for margot robbie, there was a lot of talk about how little she speaks in this film, how little dialogue quentin tarantinojudge michael film, how little dialogue quentin tarantino judge michael but she is nominated for best supporting actress, against herself. unlike in the oscars you can be up against yourself. she is also nominated for bombshell, just opening in the uk, the story about newsroom abuse in the story about newsroom abuse in the united states. margot robbie
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versus margot robbie, a decade ago kate wednesday slater was up against herself. provides very disappointing if you do not win if you are up twice. —— a decade ago kate winslet was up against herself. what about the individual awards? one that i think will make headlines as best director, for the seventh year in a row, no women is nominated. i know ba fta would row, no women is nominated. i know bafta would have wanted a woman, a lot of people thought that greta gerwig might get nominated for little women. best actor, you have the likes ofjonathan pryce at the age of 72, the british actor nominated for only the second time in his career, and the welsh actor taron egerton, after his golden globe success, nominated for playing eltonjohn. scarlett globe success, nominated for playing elton john. scarlettjohansson is nominated for marriage story on
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netflix, a divorced movie. her co—star adam driver is nominated for best actor. she won in the past for lost in translation. saoirse ronan is nominated for little women. rene zellweger was nominated forjudy. is nominated for little women. rene zellweger was nominated forjudylj spoke to her about it and saw the film, she is mesmerising. it is not a full biopic, it is the end of her career. a lot of people think her performances better than the film as a whole. it is very much a british film, it will be interesting to see. there are some really great movies about. and often people have not seen them. but because you have films like marriage story and the irishman on netflix, people have seen them so they can be more involved in award season. that is my
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weekend sorted, thank you. love your clipboard. christmas was a crucial time for shops. we will be finding out how retailers did. sales fell at morrisons, audi said it was a good christmas. what has been going on? some people had good times, some people had bad times. —— aldi said it was a good christmas. retailers call this the golden quarter, if they do not have a good christmas they do not have a good christmas they can struggle. yesterday we heard from aldi who said they had their best ever uk christmas, we have heard from morrisons who described it as an unusually challenging period for sales, reporting a fall in sales. let me show you the winners and losers as we know them. the latest grocery share figures have come through and they show how supermarkets are
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giving. they say we spent 29 billion p giving. they say we spent 29 billion pin giving. they say we spent 29 billion p in the 12 weeks to christmas, it sounds like a lot, £50 million more than last year, but it is the slowest growth in sales since 2015. growing by just seem slowest growth in sales since 2015. growing byjust seem a .2% on the year before, clearly lots of issues for the retailers to content with even though we are spending quite a lot of money at the retailers. which retailers had the best christmas, which supermarkets? the moneyjust moves where we are winning to spend it. we have heard from aldi and morrisons, we do not have all the results. canter had tried to predict how the christmases went for the big retailers so we can compare them. looking at the regular supermarkets, lidl did the best, it saw a 10% increase this christmas compared to the one before. this shows how retailers changing, online retailer
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ocado had the best overall christmas growth, sales up 12.5%. aldi said they had their best ever christmas in the uk, racal christmas figures. it is estimated the sales rose by 6%. when we are talking about the likes of aldi and lidl is that they are still pretty small between them, the big four still control a big swathe of the market. aldi and lidl have 13.7% of the market, pretty small. the big four are the ones most others will have shopped in at some point. they still had a much bigger market share than the discounters but they also will that fall. they are being eaten by the discounters. tesco's sales down by 1.596, discounters. tesco's sales down by 1.5%, sainsbury‘s down by 0.7%. we get the official figures this week. morrisons telling us a big job too.
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the supermarket and self gave us an update and they said it has been the most challenging christmas trading period, unusually challenging, they described it. feeling a little bit different this christmas, i think thatis different this christmas, i think that is because there was all the uncertainty before christmas with the election, people probably holding off on purchases. if you look at what people were buying, beer and wine, christmas puddings and by 16%. may be people are making their own. provides seasonal biscuits, i'm assuming that is the ones that go with crackers... i think they will be chocolate biscuits. turkey sales down by 196, sparkling wines and by 8%, so an interesting mix of what we were buying and what we were not. a big week that the retailers, saints become a tesco and asda. what would you say seasonal biscuit is? crackers? i am thinking big
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selection boxes of chocolate biscuits. i have a few of them to work through! coming up, stormzy will be here any few minutes. work through! coming up, stormzy will be here any few minutesm might bea will be here any few minutesm might be a bit later, he has been delayed. 8:45am. news, travel and weather wherever you are now. see you very shortly. good morning. there could well be disruption and damage today because of strong winds, courtesy of this area of low pressure. the hotlines close together, indicative of strong winds, weather systems bringing in rain. wind coming from the south—west today, you can see by the oranges, quite mild across most parts today, temperatures above the average for the time of year. the ring could be particularly heavy across northern england, north wales, further south and east,
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largely dry, the odd spot of rain, lots of cloud. the wind, windy day for all of us but especially in the north west of scotland, south—east scotland, north—east england. wind gusts potentially 70—80 miles an hour, damaging. temperatures 12—15 possibly 16 degrees in the north—east of scotland, north—east wales as well. tonight the rain will ease off in northern areas, temperatures across northern parts will fall, 5—7d. further south and east holding onto the milder conditions, 11—12d by wednesday morning. wednesday, we split the country into two halves, northern areas, chilly. southern areas, this weather system moving on, quite cloudy across the south, we see rain moving into south—west england, wales, the midlands, eastern england by the afternoon but north should be dry, sunny spells, temperatures
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about six or 7 degrees, again across the south and south—east, the temperatures will be staying up. as we go into the end of the week we see heavy rain on thursday, especially moving northwards into scotla nd especially moving northwards into scotland and northern ireland. friday, looking drier, possibly brighter, maximum temperatures as we go to the end of the week roundabout seven — 9 degrees. goodbye.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with samantha simmonds and ben bland. the latest tech innovations are revealed in las vegas, as the world's biggest technology show kicks off. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday the 7th of january. tech fans from around the world have travelled to the consumer electronics show, with everything from foldable laptops to robots on display likely to make the headlines. also in the programme carlos ghosn may be gone but he's certainly not forgotten as japan presses lebanon to return the fugitive ex—nissan boss. and returning to the ces, samsung is turning heads

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