Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 7, 2020 10:00am-11:00am GMT

10:00 am
hello, it's tuesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire and we're live from new broadcasting house. hello, it's tuesday, it's ten o'clock, we wa nt we want justice, we wantjustice, we don't want favours! the british teenagerfound guilty of lying about being gang raped in cyprus by a group of israeli men can return to the uk after she was given a four—month suspended jail sentence this morning. the judge told her he was giving her a second chance. the sentence reflects backwards thinking and not understanding the dynamics of rape, and the church here must learn about this, what happens to a victim of sexual abuse. —— and the judge —— and thejudge here. could what happeend to her happen to you? or to your daughter? would you boycott cyprus as a result of this case? we'll talk live to the 19—year—old woman's lawyers
10:01 am
this man is an ethical vegan. he avoids sitting on leather seats or doesn't take the bus when there are lots of insects around. a judge has now found his beliefs should be protected in law — do you agree? let me know. nearly 2000 homes have now been destroyed by the australian bushfires, including this one, belonging to 75—year—old noreen railston—burchill. she's lost all of her possessions. we'll be talking to her live. the bafta film nominations are in and thejoker leads with 11 nominations — including joaquin phoenix, who's nominated for best actor for his portayal of the role. you don't listen, do you? you just ask the same questions every week. "how's yourjob? are you having any negative thoughts? " all i have are negative thoughts.
10:02 am
hi. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. are you an ethical vegan? is that how you would describe your beliefs? and if so... your beliefs are now protected in law, like major religions and smaller ones too — scientology and paganism and rastafarianism. but do you back that? we will talk to the man whose actions have led to this landmark case ruling in the next ten minutes. and thanks for your comments about the cyprus rape case. juliet on twitter, "i100% believe her. something rotten going on there. will be discouraging my daughters from travelling to cyprus in the future." any says i sincerely hope that british people boycott cyprus.
10:03 am
another person says it is a disgrace and they should be ashamed. phillip on twitter: "funny how the threat of a tourist boycott and a potential international investigation into the corruption of the cypriotjudicial system has a very positive effect." jonny on twitter: "probably the right outcome overall. lying about being raped is a serious crime and can have a devastating effect on the male victims. that said, we do not want a world which discourages rape being reported. the ambiguity in this case suggests it's hard to find who is guilty." more comments very welcome, details are on screen. annita mcveigh has the news. thank you, victoria. that is our top story. a british teenager who was convicted of lying about being raped by a group of israeli men in cyprus has been given a four—month jail sentence, suspended for three years. the 19 year old insists she was coerced into retracting her
10:04 am
original allegation under pressure from police. victoria will be speaking to her lawyer lewis power a little later in the programme. at least 35 people have been killed ina stampede at least 35 people have been killed in a stampede at the funeral of the iranian general qasem suleimani. local reports say more than a0 were injured. huge crowds lined the streets of cities around the country over the weekend to mourn the iranian general killed in a us air strike in iraq. he is being laid to rest in his hometown of kerman today, following a four day funeral procession. soleimani's death has sparked concerns of wider conflict, amid rising tensions between america and iran. the us has said it won't pull its troops out of iraq. mps are expected to discuss the situation in the middle east when the commons resumes sitting this afternoon following the christmas break. this morning boris johnson is holding a cabinet meeting in number 10 downing street and the national security council is expected to meet after that to discuss the government's response to developments in iraq.
10:05 am
the shadow business secretary, rebecca longbailey, has become the sixth candidate in the race to become the next labour leader. she said the party needed a proud socialist to succeed jeremy corbyn and stay true to his radical vision. she joins sir keir starmer, emily thornberry, clive lewis, lisa nandy and jess phillips in the contest. nominations for the three—month contest formally open today and the result will be announced on ath april. a convicted murderer serving a life sentence has revealed how he helped restrain the london bridge terrorist attacker, usman khan. steve gallant — pictured here with one of the victims of the attack, jack merritt, whom he worked with on training courses and described as a friend — has spoken publically for the first time about tackling khan, after his knife attack on prisoner rehabilitation conference last november. steve gallant was out on licence to attend the event and is serving a minimum of 17 years for killing ex—firefighter barrie jackson
10:06 am
in hull 15 years ago. the chancellor, sajid javid, is to deliver a budget on 11th march — the first after britain leaves the european union at the end of this month. on a visit to greater manchester, mrjavid says billions of pounds will be invested across the country. the treasury will prioritise the environment, he said and reiterated a plan to make use of low borrowing rates to spend on public services. the nominations for the bafta film awards have been announced this morning. leading the way with the most nominations is joker — the origin story of batman's nemesis — with eleven nominations, including the best actor nomination forjoaquin phoenix. the irishman and once upon a time in hollywood have both been nominated for ten awards, while the first world war epic 1917 has nine nominations
10:07 am
that is a summary of the main stories. back to you, victoria. the british teenager convicted of lying about being gang—raped in cyprus can now return to the uk, after being handed a suspended prision sentence this morning. the judge told the 19 year old that he was giving her a "second chance". her case sparked outrage amongst human rights and feminist groups after the teenager alleged she was raped by up to 12 israeli tourists in a hotel room in ayia napa injuly, but police later charged her for making up the claims. she maintains she was raped and was forced to change her account under pressure from cypriot police. the 19 year old's mum gave her first interview to this programme before christmas, and talked about the extreme post traumatic stress her daughter was suffering. we can talk now to lewis power qc, the barrister representing the 19—year—old. he was with her in court for sentencing this morning. and also michael polak from the campaign group justice abroad, who has been helping the teenager's family. we have spoken to him and number of
10:08 am
times on this show. lewis power, first of all, you were in court, as was the 19—year—old. what was the reaction when thejudge was the 19—year—old. what was the reaction when the judge gave a suspended jail sentence to her?|j think suspended jail sentence to her?” think the first reaction was of tyranny. i met with her last night and there was a great degree of trepidation as to what the judge would do, there had been various press reports about a potential pardon, and the young girl was petrified that she would be sent back to nicosia prison if thejudge had given a custodial sentence, so it was relief that she was given a suspended sentence, she can go home. she and her parents are ecstatic, but the fight will go on in terms of overturning the conviction, that battle still has to be fought and we are in the process, we will launch an appeal this week against the conviction, with the supreme court of cyprus, and we are considering
10:09 am
taking the matter to the european court of human rights as well. when thejudge said i am giving you a second chance, what did the 19—year—old take that to mean? second chance, what did the 19—year—old take that to mean7m second chance, what did the 19-year-old take that to mean? it is fairly unremarkable because, of course, he delivered hisjudgment in greek. i had a translator beside me. when she realised and she looked at the faces of the rest of those people in court that effectively the sentence was being suspended, she broke down in tears, she was so relieved. because of the relief that after six months there, she can finally come home? notjust what she imprisoned forfour finally come home? notjust what she imprisoned for four and a half weeks, she was in a cell with eight other women, she had to endure pretty stringent bail conditions. the trial process happened over about five months, it was fairly
10:10 am
arduous, we asked for bail conditions to be relaxed so she could get the psychological treatment that she so richly deserved back home, but that application fell on deaf ears. what should have happened today? first of all, we applaud the sentence that she has been given her liberty, but we feel very strongly that she should never have been placed in such a circumstance. we feel the trial process was deeply flawed, we feel that this started from the investigation itself, the manner in which it was conducted, the preservation of evidence and the crime scene and the manner in which the retraction statement was taken, which was in the early others of the morning with a male police officer, no solicitor, no interpreter, no custody records recording what had happened, and at that specific time,
10:11 am
and there was also evidence in court, she was making some temper rainy messages and texts to her mother and friends saying she was being placed under pressure. we are staggered and flabbergasted that the judge, on a very fair analysis of the evidence, can come to the decision that there was no reasonable doubt and that he found her evidence was not credible. that, coupled with the expert evidence that we called in terms of linguistics, medical evidence and the testimony from a young girl who had no axe to grind, who told the court the same officer who took the retraction statement had asked her to change her statement as well, we are appalled by the standard of justice in this specific case that we are heartened by the support she
10:12 am
has had. there was some outcry outside court, many political groups, pressure groups, and we believe over 100 women came over from israel, they have been very supportive, to champion her cause as well. we hope this will be a ca ta lyst well. we hope this will be a catalyst for potential reforms in the law of cyprus and a protection of the safeguards that should be afforded to these young women in such circumstances. do you think this could happen to any young woman going on holiday in ayia napa?” really do. i have to daughters aged 21 and 16 and i would be extremely cautious allowing them to come here on holiday, bearing in mind the treatment of this young girl, who in a cruel twist of irony turned from victim to the accused almost overnight. the story is quite sensational. but we hope there is a
10:13 am
real lesson to be learned, notjust in cyprus but across the globe, as to how these trials should be conducted, how the investigation should be properly carried out. one more question, lewis power, if i may, before i bring it michael polak. there was one more report yesterday that the president was going to pardon your client. have you had any contact from their office, from the authorities, any confirmation or otherwise? we know that dominic raab spoke to his cou nterpa rts that dominic raab spoke to his counterparts in the cypriots government and i think he also said on the andrew marr show on sunday that he had contact with the cypriot president, but that was all hearsay and hyperbole. we had no news of the pardon, that even if she hadn't been pardoned today, that would have been of little circle, because the conviction would have stood, and why —— wants the conviction stance it
10:14 am
had severe repercussions in terms of her application the future for various positions of employment and also potential restrictions on her travel. michael polak, why would police officers put pressure on a 19—year—old woman who said she had been gang raped in a holiday resort to change, to withdraw those claims? it isa to change, to withdraw those claims? it is a very interesting question, victoria. since this case has come into the public eye, we have had a numberof women into the public eye, we have had a number of women come to us, justice abroad, and giving their accounts are very similar circumstances and pressure being placed upon them to attract similar claims. it could have been an aim to protect the tourism industry council budget could have been just tourism industry council budget could have beenjust a simple misunderstanding —— educator have been an aim to protect the tourism industry, but it could have been a misunderstanding as to what the
10:15 am
young woman was trying to say on that night on the 17th ofjuly. the base do you think it could happen to other women? i think there are many reforms needed in the cypriot justice system so that foreigners who go there on holiday or to do business know there will be a fair and impartial court system they can turn to if they get into trouble. if i was the cypriot justice turn to if they get into trouble. if i was the cypriotjustice minister i would be looking about, saying how cani would be looking about, saying how can i assure people we have a system, how can i change things so people have fake earrings? you will know some of the support and social media includes a hashtag, boycott cyprus. do you think people should boycott cyprus because of this case and what has happened to this young woman? why people go on holiday and send their children is a question for them. but it is quite clear that lots of work needs to be john by the cypriot authorities in regards to how they deal with people from overseas and how they make sure
10:16 am
something like this does not happen again in future. the base banking. 0ne again in future. the base banking. one final thought from you, lewis power, when are your client and her mum coming home? we think they will come home at sometime this afternoon, we have urged and to come home as soon as possible. they are obviously worried about the present media coverage, of course one can't stop the trolling in the media and vile comments expressed, but this young girl is very feisty and forthright and she wants to get on with her life, she wants to start university and start a new chapter in her life and we will be behind her, supporting her all the way. thank you for your time, gentlemen, lewis power qc, the barrister representing the 19—year—old and in court with her for sentencing this morning, and michael polakfrom justice abroad, the legal age group who have helped the teenager's family since the beginning. a lot of
10:17 am
support, one view on twitter says a hideous oh deal, we need to stop funding countries who oppress women and treat them like seven because citizens, why anybody would holiday in these places is beyond me, there are plenty of decent places to go without supporting misogynistic regimes. david says i am not sure it is fairfor all the local regimes. david says i am not sure it is fair for all the local businesses and ayia napa to suffer as a result of the country's poorjudicial system, especially when the vast majority probably think it is a poor speeding. full says no to a boycott, it isa speeding. full says no to a boycott, it is a wonderful country with polite and decent people. tracy says i will not visit, i would not feel safe. do get in touch with your own views. coming up later in the programme: this is all that remains of the home of a 75—year—old woman after it was burned to the ground in the australia bushfires. we'll talk to her shortly. and the swedish furniture giant ikea has agreed to pay £35m to the parents of a child who was killed when a chest
10:18 am
of drawers fell on him. more details later in the programme. it's illegal in this country to discriminate against someone because of their race, sex or disability. as of last week, ethical veganism is now classified as a philosophical belief and, as such, it is now also protected in law. the landmark case was brought by vegan jordi casamitjana, who claims he was sacked by the league against cruel sports because of his ethical veganism. vegans don't eat food that comes from animals, including eggs and dairy, and don't use animal products such as leather. mr casamitjana's former employer says he was actually dismissed for gross misconduct. that part of the case is yet to be ruled on by the employment tribunal. the judge ruled that ethical vegans should be entitled to similar legal
10:19 am
protections in british workplaces as those who hold religious beliefss. do you support this? jordi casamitjana is the man who brought about this landmark case, and rachel carrie describes herself as an "ethical meat eater," who supports hunting and shooting. welcome, both, thank you very much for coming on the programme. halogens ethical veganism govern your day—to—day life? halogens ethical veganism govern your day-to-day life? from the moment i wake up to the moment i go to bed, everything i do, every choice i had, i had to think which is the choice that minimises my impact into the animals microlight. i wake impact into the animals microlight. iwake up impact into the animals microlight. i wake up and i will use... i go to the toilet and have a shower shower with a vegan friendly shower project, they have not been tested on animals. then i dress, none of my
10:20 am
put up any animal product whatsoever. if i go summer and there isa whatsoever. if i go summer and there is a leather sofa, for instance, and an alternative, i would use the alternative. every time there was a choice for me, i will think, is very better choice? everybody is familiar with the concept of the carbon footprint, i would use the large footprint, i would use the large footprint, how you contribute to animal suffering, can you reduce that even further. —— i would use the term blood footprint. you will only catch buses at certain times of the year because there is less chance of insects being squashed against the windows, effectively?“ i have a choice of transport, sometimes you don't have a choice, but if you do, is there is one that ican minimise but if you do, is there is one that i can minimise my chances to be than accidentally contribute to the death ofan animal. accidentally contribute to the death of an animal. in a very busy springtime with lots of insects around, itake springtime with lots of insects around, i take the underground or
10:21 am
ion. if i around, i take the underground or i0n. if i can't do that, i will have to use transport. it is all within practicality, it is notjust a simple rule, it is trying to minimise it. if a taxi turned up with leather seats, you would use another one, that kind of thing question at exactly. what do you need protecting from as an ethical vegan? from discrimination. any group of people that it won point becomes noticeable by the population, people will always have ignorance about who they are, that might lead to prejudice, discrimination, hate. we already see with the growth of veganism, there was a reaction against vegan sometimes, people laugh at you, discriminate against you, you might lose yourjob, you might not be fed or have the right clothes, so when you start seeing this phenomenon, is that when the state should intervene? but it is more than people making fun of your beliefs on mocking you? in my case i was fired.
10:22 am
it does not need to be that far, you may just had to it does not need to be that far, you mayjust had to work at home, or at the office everybody has a meal and you do not, your employer does not provided. about your former employer, the league against cruel sports, sazy were fired for gross misconduct and the employment tribunal has yet to rule on whether you win that or you do. good morning, rachel. tell us about being an ethical mediator, what does that mean? basically i decided that i would hunt. iwanted mean? basically i decided that i would hunt. i wanted to be a mediator, that is my choice, but i decided to hunt my own meat so i am aware of where it comes from, so i see the environment that the animal i'm going to eat lives on, i can see it lived a happy life. i suppose my impact on the environment is less
10:23 am
because i am hunting on land around my home, so the carbon emissions are less, there are less food miles involved. there is no plastic packaging on my food, it is in the natural or feather. it is basically my natural happy medium. i tried vegetarianism based on animal welfare grounds when i was smaller because i don't agree with factory farming andl because i don't agree with factory farming and i suppose i found a happy medium because that did not work out for me personally due to health reasons, basically.” work out for me personally due to health reasons, basically. i know you have received a lot of abuse because of your views, do you think you should be protected in law as an ethical meat intake? this is one of the things i find extremely ironic about what mr as saying, over the
10:24 am
la st two about what mr as saying, over the last two days i have received the most discrimination, hate, abuse of my entire life —— about whatjordi casamitjana saying. finally enough, it has all come from vegans, based on nothing more than food choice. 0ne on nothing more than food choice. one thing on nothing more than food choice. 0ne thingl on nothing more than food choice. one thing i would say is i don't think anybody should ever be discriminated against on the grounds of their dietary preference or their ethical choices. i and discriminated ethical choices. land discriminated against grossly. if ethical choices. land discriminated against grossly. lfjordi casamitjana's beliefs are protected, then, yeah, i think hunter more than anyone let do you agree? not every belief deserves to be protected and the system will not really recognise that, that is why i had to go to court to convince the judge that my belief qualified, because the series of criteria is already created. they
10:25 am
are of criteria is already created. they a re really of criteria is already created. they are really interesting. they restrict criteria to prove a belief or it should be protected in law, it must be genuinely held, a belief and not an opinion or dew point —— viewpoint, to a weightier substantial aspect of human life and behaviour, it must have cogency, seriousness and importance and be worthy of respect and democratic society. rachel could argue she fits those. everyone can argue that, a judge has to decide. mine is not the first philosophical belief protected. there have been other attem pts protected. there have been other attempts which have failed. successful attempts have been pacifism, or environmentalism or man—made global warming. 0thers pacifism, or environmentalism or man—made global warming. others have failed, homophobia has failed, islamophobia has failed, neo—nazis and has failed. what would you say to rachel? it is a matter for the judge to say her belief is
10:26 am
protected. if fibre is the church i would say it does not qualify, you are affecting other lives, other lights are suffering. that is not one of the criteria. one of the criteria is whether it interferes with the lives of others, for me that includes animals. it does not say that in the criteria. rachel, what would you say to jordi? a say that in the criteria. rachel, what would you say tojordi? a bloke hunting and the results for use of animals and managing wildlife is mentioned in the bible several times, so it is directly linked to religion, so even more so i believe that. and due to the disconnect between humans is becoming so industrialised and everything has become more convenient, hunters have probably become a minority group because people have just become so much more disconnected from the natural world and the role we play and it. let jordi respond. whether
10:27 am
it isa and it. let jordi respond. whether it is a majority or minority does not play a role, a belief can be protected if only one person has it. but it is all about whether the belief is positive to the world.” am sorry, it doesn't say that. it is implied. all talk at once you implied. all talk at 0nce you mention environmentalism, controlling or managing gear, particularly in the uk with no natural predators, it's absolutely essential for the environment, to protect biodiversity. —— controlling and managing deer. both talk at once it is a scientific fa ct. it is essential to manage deer. if you look on the british deer society website, you can get all the facts and figures of how detrimental it is to deer themselves if human do not
10:28 am
manage them. both talk at once you can do that without having to kill them. what would you do without —— with them if you did not manage deer by killing them? you could control the population by controlling reproduction. both talk at once rachel reproduction. both talk at 0nce rachel made the point that vegans were harassing her ina way point that vegans were harassing her in a way that she has never been harassed in her life before in the last few days, what do you think of that? i would say people were harassing her, there are good people and bad people in all the groups, including the guns and ethical vegans, of course. there are aggressive people. —— including vegans and ethical vegans, because. vegans and has grown so much to reflect society, i would be completely against anyone harassing anyone and would never do it myself, but vegans are harassed as well by non—vegans, it is part of humanity. kelly on facebook says i
10:29 am
don't believe they should have the same protection as people with disabilities. disability is not a choice and i think visibility of the rights that disabled people have aa. the equalities act clearly says, and the churches have already set out, you can make one protection better than the other. anything is protected. disability is protected, so its marital status, which is a choice, so not everything you are born is protected, but once you are protected you cannot make something more protected than another, that is how the system works. karen says isolate this man even though he appears a little extreme, if we all lived as he does the climate crisis would be completely averted and we would be completely averted and we would probably all be happier too, how can you criticise someone against animal exploitation and cruelty? he deserves and needs protection. thank you very much, rachel. thank you very much, jordi.
10:30 am
so many more comments which i will try to read before the end of the programme, but i appreciate your time. nearly 2,000 homes have now been destroyed in australia's month—long bushfire crisis. and officials say fire crews are frantically preparing for worsening conditions. temperatures are likely to soar again on friday. it's prompted fears that two big fires could form a new "mega blaze". at least 25 people and millions of animals have died from the fires since september. let's talk to noreen ralston—birchall who is 75 — her house in bateman's bay in new south wales was burnt to the ground on new years eve, she has been relocated to a residential complex. thank you for talking to us and you have so much love your from british people who have so many connections with people in australia. i'm sure that's not much consolation to you right now but could you tell us what happened to your home? my home
10:31 am
burned to the ground. nothing left. all my worldly goods in it. at 7a, you can imagine all my life, all my home, pulling and keeping a roof over the heads of my children, working hard, i am over the heads of my children, working hard, iam in my 75th over the heads of my children, working hard, i am in my 75th year. i think working hard, i am in my 75th year. ithinki working hard, i am in my 75th year. i think i deserve some peace and quiet and calm. but this has happened to me. and it's very devastating. you have given us permission to show pictures to our british audience, showing what remains of your home, actually. we can see there, your walking frame,
10:32 am
it is unimaginable for people in this country. it's unimaginable for me. i was at the centre, we were kept there for safety. i was hearing stories from other people, giving them cuddles and telling them how sorry i was without realising my home was gone as well, you know? it was just a home was gone as well, you know? it wasjust a weird home was gone as well, you know? it was just a weird feeling. to know that it's just gone, it's gone. that's it. it's just, that it's just gone, it's gone. that's it. it'sjust, yourself left, i have three animals and i got them
10:33 am
out to where we had to stay. they we re out to where we had to stay. they were evacuated to. and i got them out, i had a rabbit, a cat and dog, small dog. and they were so good. i mean, isat small dog. and they were so good. i mean, i sat in the centre with lots of other people. all around. and the cat stayed in her basket, the rabbit sat in his basket up against the wall. and they did not move, ijust covered them over with a towel and they did not move and my little dog sat on my lap! and it was as if they knew something terrible was happening, they were so quiet. for
10:34 am
over 2a hours. happening, they were so quiet. for over 24 hours. noreen, i'm glad at least you managed to get your animals out. so many animals have perished, as you know. and again, i'm gratefulfor you perished, as you know. and again, i'm grateful for you letting perished, as you know. and again, i'm gratefulfor you letting us show your pictures to our audience, pictures which you don't want to look at because it's too traumatising. i wonder how you, maybe this process will never begin, but how you rationalise what has happened and the devastation that you have to face now? i think it's just an in—built protection that hit me. ican just an in—built protection that hit me. i can talk about it but i don't wa nt to me. i can talk about it but i don't want to see my home in that state. the home was only seven years old. and i'd bought it new. and moved out of another home that was getting too
10:35 am
much for me. because i'm 75. and i found that i couldn't manage the steps and i've got a back problem so yeah, i bought this little house. it's in gold rush mining area, they had the gold mine rushes on, they had the gold mine rushes on, they had about 20 odd tabs there, they are drunk, the gold mine, the digging, that's where i lived because that's where i wanted to live, to have that feeling of the brush and you know, history around me. noreen, i am going to pause you there and thank you so much for
10:36 am
talking to us and to our audience. all we can do is send you lots of love, i know it's not much but it's something, i hope. thank you very much. thank you very much. goodbye. noreen, who has been located to a residential home after her home burned to the ground on new year's eve, evacuated to a safe area, able to show you pictures of the devastation her home, that is com pletely devastation her home, that is completely gone, which she doesn't wa nt to completely gone, which she doesn't want to look at herself because obviously, it's much too traumatising to do that. this morning we got the nominations for the baftas, with the dark thrillerjoker leading the way with 11 nominations — including best film and best actor forjoaquim phoenix. my my mother always tells me to smile and put on a happy face. she told me i had and put on a happy face. she told me ihada and put on a happy face. she told me
10:37 am
i had a purpose. to bring laughter and joy to the world. stop them! but there have been a few raised eyebrows about the lack of diversity amongst the nominations and the fact that no women were nominated in the best director category. critic scott bryan is here with us to take a look at some of the nominations. 0ctober october through the big categories. check out leading the pack with 11 nominations, joaquin phoenix nominated for best actor, up for best film and he won at the golden globes on sunday night. i would say if we are looking ahead to the 0scars, this is the film that has a really big shoeing but of course, there were some others in there that arejust behind, the irishman has ten, 1917 done by sam mendes is, the british film, that did really well at the golden globes. and i would have expected that you have done better in the nominations, it's a british film. do we know what the
10:38 am
correct, definitive pronunciation forjoaquin phoenix as name is? women directors, no women directors in the best director category. i mean, there is a really good woman director out there who did little women who could easily have been nominated. a really big talking point online, look at the best film category, in the past ten years there's only been one woman director nominated for that award. it's been a real talking point in the last few yea rs. after, a real talking point in the last few years. after, in 2016, they tried to improve the diversity in terms of the nominees of the people behind who actually make up the voting membership. so you would have thought that would have had more of a consideration, considering they've not necessarily had a good track record and it's notjust women directors under the spotlight. all of the acting categories, there are
10:39 am
all not of people of colour, not a single person is a person of colour, there's been so many films praised that have had people of colour in those rules, it's a bit weird not to see that reflected in the main categories. jonathan pryce, the best actor category. this points to netflix and its future, doesn't it? it does, they've got 23 nominations under it netflix films. we've seen that in the golden globes as well, more than 20 there as well but what was really interesting with the golden globes, when it came to winning they barely walked away with any. it will be interesting to see, there's been a bit of contention in there's been a bit of contention in the film industry about whether netflix is a friend or foe and of course we saw on sunday, sam mendes is talking about how the enjoyment of going to a film in the cinema, rather than seeing it on the small screen and it will be interesting to see whether that reflects it's all about the films at the end of
10:40 am
the day, not about the businesses and the power supply but they must have an influence in the decision—making process at the sides and overall winner so it'll be interesting to see how many they come away with. the baftas, how much do they matter? i think they matter, that's why they are so well ordered in terms of being directly before the oscars, it's one of the last pit stops people go through before they go and find out who will be at the oscars and the way that it works is that from this point onwards, all of the voting membership can start to vote according to the buzz that there's already been and we've seen it with the golden globes, i think that has a factor into the baftas which will have a factory into the oscars. that's why it's the sole, big pr machine that's falling into motion and it will do so during the next few weeks. the ceremony is very the second, i think, graham next few weeks. the ceremony is very the second, ithink, graham norton hosting. the weird thing is it won't be live, it will be on bbc one, 9pm but it will be two hours earlier, stay away from social media, it's a real frustration of mine. thank you
10:41 am
very much, nice to see you. it's chilling to consider that some men might have seen the story of reynhard sinaga, who is now thought to be britain's most prolific rapist, when it was finally reported yesterday, and wondered if they might have been one of his victims. the home secretary, priti patel, has called for an urgent review into date rape drugs such as ghb in the light of sinaga's conviction for more than 150 sexual offences, including 136 rapes. sinaga, who is a 36—year—old mature student originally from indonesia, is believed to have lured dozens of men to his flat in manchester, given then the date rape drug ghb, and then raping or sexual assaulting while they were unconscious. he was named for the first time yesterday but was already serving a life sentence for offences he was convicted of in two earlier trials in summer 2018 and last spring. all but one of the men were identified after police found video footage of the assaults. police then had to tell the survivors they had been a victim
10:42 am
of a sexual assault. they say they are still unable to identify 70 victims and are now appealing for anyone who believes they may been abused by sinaga to come forward. we can talk to duncan craig, the chief executive of survivors manchester. patrick strudwick lgbt editor for buzzfeed news who led ghb. sarah crew national police chiefs' lead for adult sex offences and deputy chief constable, avon and somerset police. thank you all for coming in the programme “— thank you all for coming in the programme —— coming on the programme. duncan, starting with you, you've been involved in the case you, you've been involved in the case from the first day, two and a half years ago, can you give us the insight into the emotions they have been going through?” insight into the emotions they have been going through? i think now it's out there and everyone knows about it, what many of these men will be
10:43 am
experiencing is just part relief and pa rt experiencing is just part relief and part shock, just that everything becomes much more of a reality in not particularly survivors will often talk about the fact when a case often talk about the fact when a case has concluded, there is this momentary kind of euphoria of, thank goodness, that's it, it's over and then the sudden realisation now the work starts, now i have to start building my life back up. in the last 12, 18 hours since this case was first reported and the picture of reynhard sinaga was out there for the first time, have you had any contact from men who think they might have been a victim of his? very much so, i know we are speaking to some of my colleagues at the police incident room and that room has had both contact to the police and also to the support workers that are there. do you know how many calls ? are there. do you know how many calls? i think last time i spoke to them there was round about 30 calls yesterday. and the police said there will be men out there who they
10:44 am
haven't been able to contact, they haven't been able to contact, they haven't been able to contact, they haven't been able to identify? yeah, but it's not just haven't been able to identify? yeah, but it's notjust those men that we can't identify, its also, this story, this is a story of the biggest rape case in british legal history. the fact that i am sat here in studios in manchester talking to you and everybody else and all the other press we have been doing over the past couple of days, generates a conversation within the country. we saw this when we worked on the coronation street storyline, it generates the ability to talk about the subject, something we don't do enough of stop i know back in the office, my office, there's people ringing up who are not directly affected by this particular case. but are people who have been sexually assaulted, maybe even in childhood, that are now feeling like the time is right to step forward and talk. understood. those 30 calls are not necessarily men who think
10:45 am
they may have been assaulted by reynhard sinaga but some could be. let me bring in patrick. can you imagine seeing this man ‘s face and thinking my god, i went to his flat, i woke thinking my god, i went to his flat, iwoke up thinking my god, i went to his flat, i woke up there one morning, did he do the same to me? what would you do. first of all, i think it's very important to say to anyone who is concerned about that, they are not alone. and there is help available for them. organisations such as survivors manchester, uk, organisations like gallup and of course the police are all there to help, there is help. perhaps not enough. but it's really important that if someone thinks they've been in that situation, that they speak to someone that they trust, whether that's someone in their personal life or a professional, because they do need help. and what we also know and it's important to say, yes,
10:46 am
reynhard sinaga is the most prolific rapist this country has seen and he is not the only one that uses ghb and gbl, which is very similar to ghb asa and gbl, which is very similar to ghb as a weapon, and uses it to facilitate sexual assault and rape. there are other people out there. so i hope if nothing else, this case provokes a conversation, provokes people into seeking help and provokes the government into acting. as you know, the home secretary has announced a review of gbl but why do you describe this gbl as you have in the past as a perfect weapon, what do you mean? there are two drugs that are very similar, ghb ..” do you mean? there are two drugs that are very similar, ghb i beg your pardon it used to be an anaesthetic. gbl which are still used as an industrial cleaner, it's
10:47 am
a solvent. they have almost identical effects. the trouble is they can be slipped into drinks. and you may not detect that, particularly if the drink has a strong flavour like coca—cola or lucozade. so, you can be drugged, spiked with it very easily. and very often it can lead to unconsciousness. or often it can lead to unconsciousness. 0r semi consciousness. so that you are either completely incapacitated or semi incapacitated. does it leave your system pretty quickly? that depends on the dose. the reason why it's particularly dangerous is because of what's called the very steep dose response curve, which meansjust a steep dose response curve, which means just a fraction increase steep dose response curve, which meansjust a fraction increase in dose can have a huge effect on the body and the brain. so you know, one
10:48 am
or two mg more can be the difference between life and death and it can be the difference between being awake and ina the difference between being awake and in a coma. and i'm just going to bring in the deputy chief constable ina bring in the deputy chief constable in a moment but you say ghb, gbl is being used alongside lubricant before victims are being raped. there are cases that have been reported both in the courts and to the justice system and to me as a journalist in the work that i've donein journalist in the work that i've done in reporting and investigating this drug, where people have spoken about gbl, particularly, being mixed with lubricant and being applied a nally with lubricant and being applied anally so the person, the victim doesn't even know they've taken the drug or how. let alone commit sexual violence taking place and l drug or how. let alone commit sexual violence taking place and i should point out that in the investigation that i point out that in the investigation that l undertook last year, which
10:49 am
included the largest ever survey of gay and bisexual men who take ghb and gbl, more than a quarter, 28%, say they have been sexually assaulted or raped while under the influence of this drug. urgent action is necessary. sara, deputy chief constable of avon and somerset police national police chiefs lead for adult sex offences, obviously you weren't involved in this case but i want to ask you to comment on the sheer scale of this man ‘s crimes. absolutely. the number of victims that are suspected are huge. but i think it's important to echo the words of duncan and patrick. what it is enabling us to do is talk about this issue, to be able to say to people, this is happening, people are not alone, there are some fantastic services that are
10:50 am
available to help you cope and recover. but more importantly, the police are here, as in this case, to bring perpetrators who use these type of techniques to commit these crimes, tojustice. why type of techniques to commit these crimes, to justice. why do you think sexual assaults of men often go unreported? i think there are a range of different myths and stereotypes that make it particularly difficult for men to feel comfortable in coming forward. like what? men, there is a common view that men are strong, they should be able to protect themselves. men may be concerned about why people may think of them if they come forward. they may think that people may think they are gay if they are not. there are many stereotypes that perpetrators are a lwa ys stereotypes that perpetrators are always gay, victims are always gay, but that is not the case. rape happens, irrespective of gender or any other characteristic and its
10:51 am
impacts and effects are devastating, there is no place for myths or stereotypes. because that's what perpetrators hide behind. and from a policing perspective, working with partners like duncan and patrick and others, we want to bust those myths and stereotypes, we want to encourage people to come forward. very, very quick final word, patrick, regarding this review of the home secretary of ghb, currently a class c drug, should that category change, would that make a difference or not? it needs to be reviewed, it doesn't make sense that it such a low categorisation. if it's a high categorisation it could lead to higher sentences for perpetrators which could mean the probation service have more time to help people but i must end with a plea to the police and the home secretary. it is not enough to say to people you must come forward, but the police and the home secretary have to do is to tell victims if they
10:52 am
have been raped on ghb and they come forward , have been raped on ghb and they come forward, they will not be investigated for drugs offences. that is the reason that some people do not come forward and it has to change, it has let me ask sarah, would you support that?” change, it has let me ask sarah, would you support that? i absolutely encourage people to come forward, if they'd been the victim of a rape or sexual ... but they'd been the victim of a rape or sexual but the point of gbl, the specific point. this is what the police say, our focus, they refused to say because the home secretary has never given them license to say this, we refused to say we will not investigate you for drugs offences and they wonder why people don't come forward. this has to change. ok, thank you all for coming on the programme. thank you. and our actionline website is (gfx) bbc.co.uk/actionline — if you need help there are loads of organisations listed there who you can contact. rebecca longbailey has joined the race to become labour leader, saying the party needs "a leader that can be trusted with our socialist agenda"
10:53 am
to succeed jeremy corbyn. she's the candidate who has the backing of key figures in mr corbyn's inner circle. in an article for the left—leaning magazine tribune, ms longbailey says "we need a proud socialist to lead the labour party, driven by their principles and an unwavering determination to see democratic socialism in our lifetime." and she defends the policies the party contested the election with. "i don'tjust agree with the policies, i've spent the last four years writing them," she says. we can chat about this now with our assistant political editor, norman smith. norman, good morning. she says we need a proud socialist to win the election, they had a proud socialist leading the party, voters rejected that. her you as there was nothing wrong with policies, the difficulty was the way they were presented, there wasn't a coherent story to a whole range of different policies and they did it with more of a narrative, then that would make it easier to sell them because she
10:54 am
basically buys thejeremy corbyn vision and what she's proposing is to carry on with the carbon project, she's always been very loyal to jeremy corbyn in the shadow cabinet, in the national executive committee, and again, today, being incredibly loyal tojeremy and again, today, being incredibly loyal to jeremy corbyn. any leader who leads us into a general election defeat needs to take ultimate responsibility. but he also set out a radical platform for policy development that involve the grass roots under trade unions and developed some of the most exciting and innovative policies that we've seenin and innovative policies that we've seen ina and innovative policies that we've seen in a generation. now, in this article she says she wrote some of the policies that were rejected. so she is partly to blame for the labourfailure? she is partly to blame for the labour failure? she acknowledges that she wrote many of those policies so she would have to take some of the blame but she doesn't buy that argument, she thinks the policies were popular, that there we re policies were popular, that there were difficulties in if you like convincing voters they could actually deliver on them but there
10:55 am
is no suggestion there is going to be any turning away from the direction of travel underjeremy corbyn. that may be enough to get the topjob corbyn. that may be enough to get the top job because the labour party, it seems, and its membership, still overwhelmingly supportive of jeremy corbyn, she will probably get the support of many of the big unions, so where we art she is perhaps, the most likely person to ta ke perhaps, the most likely person to take over from jeremy corbyn. that would mean the party going into the next election with presumably pretty much the same set of policies but may be presenting them in a different way. the other thing that would be different is she is a different character, frankie, to jeremy corbyn. let's be honest, he isa jeremy corbyn. let's be honest, he is a bit austere, down in the mouth, she is more of an upbeat, smiling sort of person so a different presentation to the policies, but basically, the same policies. norman, thank you. obviously we will hopefully talk to all the candidates who want to be the next labour party leader in the programme in the next few weeks, culminating in a debate
10:56 am
with all of them in front of an audience of people like you. the swedish furniture giant ikea has agreed to pay £35 million to the parents of a child who was killed when a chest of drawers fell on him. two—year old jozef dudek suffocated in may 2017 when the company's malm drawers toppled over at the family's california home. the item had been recalled a year earlier in the us over safety concerns after three other children were killed in the same way. our reporterjim reed is here. why has the company come to this decision? it happened in california in may 2017, this specific type of dresser toppled over onto the two—year—old, the drawers had been recalled back in the united states a year before. over safety concerns after three other children died but the family were not aware of that at the family were not aware of that at the time. important to say they were recalled in the united states, had not been recalled in this country so
10:57 am
we think there are probably millions of them in this country at the moment. ikea has agreed to pay £35 million to the family to settle this lawsuit. lawyers for the family say they think that is the largest child wrongful death settlement in american history. right, do we know how the accident happened, what happened? the family say we never thought, in a statement, we never thought, in a statement, we never thought a two—year—old could cause a dresser just 30 inches, thought a two—year—old could cause a dresserjust 30 inches, 76 centimetres high, to topple over and suffocate him. it was only later we learned it was unstable by design, they say we are telling our story because we don't want this to happen to anyone else and they've also donated $1 million of the payment to groups working to protect children from dangerous products. we had this problem before, toddlers want to climb on furniture and of the drawers are unstable it can't fall down on them. that seems to have been the situation here. ikea, what didi been the situation here. ikea, what did i say? recalled in 2016 in the
10:58 am
united states, not recalled here in the uk because there are different product loss so we still think there are millions of these things in use in the united kingdom. the trick here is apparently to make sure, if you've got one of these, it's fixed to the wall, you get these brackets when you get this kind of flatpack furniture, often you discover the thing that attaches it to the walls, the triggers if you've got one, attach it to the company say they remain committed to working to address this very important safety issue. jim, thank you. thanks for your company today. newsroom live is next, we are back tomorrow. have a good day. hello, good morning. some fairly strong once so far today across northern parts of the uk. the winds are strengthening as we go through the afternoon. girls, severe gales expected around the north west of scotland, south—east scotland, the
10:59 am
north—east of england, already causing disruption and further disruption, possibly damage throughout the afternoon. rain across scotland, northern england, into north wales. patchy rain to the south—east. this is an idea of wind gusts, quite windy for all of us, moving in by the evening. further north, drier and brighter with some showers. goodbye for now.
11:00 am
you re watching bbc newsroom live. it's11.00am, and these are the main stories this morning. a british teenager is given a four—month suspended sentence after being found guilty of lying about gang—rape in cyprus. her lawyer says she'll appeal the conviction. an 18—year—old man admits killing pc andrew harper, who was dragged along the road by a van in berkshire last year, but denies murder. dozens of people are killed in a stampede in the huge crowd attending the funeral of iranian military commander qasem soleimani. the shadow business secretary, rebecca longbailey, and joker leads the pack with 11 bafta film nominations.

48 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on